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India's New Rupee Symbol Won't Show On Computers

kdawson posted more than 4 years ago | from the currency-formerly-known-as-rupee dept.

Government 252

itwbennett writes "It will take at least 18 months for encoding in Unicode the symbol for the Indian rupee that was approved by the Indian cabinet on Thursday. But it may be over two years before the rupee symbol starts showing on computers and mobile phones, analysts said. Many vendors are also undecided whether they will offer the new symbol on keyboards and keypads, or as additions in software to the character set supported by their devices. Nokia, for example, welcomed the move by the Indian government to have a symbol for the rupee. But a company spokeswoman said it's too early to comment on how the symbol will be implemented, whether on the phone keypad or on the character list."

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Back in the good ol days (2, Funny)

FredFredrickson (1177871) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926284)

Back in the good old days, we had ascii 004- which gave us a nice little diamond symbol. What happened to that?

If I had my way, real life symbols would resemble the symbols in games- like gem shapes.

Re:Back in the good ol days (1)

CDigglesworth (1814266) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926322)

Thats what Zelda uses!

Re:Back in the good ol days (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926398)

What, what? Rupee? You mean those guys at convenience stores drug the female customers to rape them?

Re:Back in the good ol days (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926504)

No no no, that's reefer.

Re:Back in the good ol days (1)

nschubach (922175) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926938)

I think you mean ruffie?

Re:Back in the good ol days (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926556)

What, what? Rupee? You mean those guys at convenience stores drug the female customers to rape them?

Thank you, cum again!

Re:Back in the good ol days (1)

level_headed_midwest (888889) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927060)

No, that's a Roofie aka Rohypnol, or for the medically inclined, fluunitrazepam.

Re:Back in the good ol days (4, Informative)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927228)

There is a generic currency sign [wikipedia.org] in Unicode (and it was also there "back in the good old days", in Latin-1).

Euro (4, Interesting)

tsa (15680) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926340)

How long did it take the Euro sign to get easily usable by computers? I think much longer than they predict for the rupee sign. These things take time, but a short time in comparison with the lifetime of the symbols in European and Indian society, so don't worry about it too much.

Re:Euro (1)

clickclickdrone (964164) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926472)

Exactly. Even now, most keyboards I use are missing the symbol, I just happen to know where it's supposed to be and press accordingly. That or just type EUR.

Re:Euro (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926816)

I STILL can't find the Euro on my computer, and you'll be lucky if you can convince me to look at an ASCII table.

Re:Euro (2, Interesting)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926984)

you'll be lucky if you can convince me to look at an ASCII table.

Extremely lucky, as the euro symbol isn't part of the ASCII set. Now, looking in a UTF-8 table, that could work.

Mine is conveniently located below the E, and it's used pressing ISO_Level3_Shift (bound to Alt Gr) and E.

Re:Euro (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32927010)

Obviously, you will not find it on an ASCII table. If you look at the correct tables, you might find it on ISO-8859-15 on 0xA4 or on Unicode at U+20AC. If your OS supports a copose key, you can use compose = C. If you have a standard US keyboard and no compose key, you are out of luck (i.e. you have to use that funny ALT+ 0128 combination). I guess the US does not like to do business in foreign currencies?

Re:Euro (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32927070)

I STILL can't find the Euro on my computer, and you'll be lucky if you can convince me to look at an ASCII table.

You wouldn't be so lucky though. It's not in ASCII. I won't spell out the U word: from what you said I doubt you can handle it.

Re:Euro (1)

clone53421 (1310749) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927202)

€
Alt+0128
AltGr+E if your keyboard layout is European

Re:Euro (2, Informative)

elFarto the 2nd (709099) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927232)

My British keyboard has it at AltGr+4.

Re:Euro (4, Funny)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926910)

I don’t believe you, as I can’t remember any time span between the Euro being introduced and it being typable. I remember a quick patch pushed trough Windows update, and another patch for Linux, and it was done.
I specifically remember that I never faced the problem of being unable to enter it.

Except on Slashdot of course. But it’s a surprise that Slashdot doesn’t still use Baudot or Murray encoding. I bet internally, it still runs on a special ternary hacked variant of the morse code. ;)

Re:Euro (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927112)

Dumb question - What was wrong with the old Rupee symbol?

Also what does it mean? The Euro Sign is a stylized E, to represent Europe's currency. And the Dollar Sign is a slashed S to represent Spain's currency (where the symbol originated).

Re:Euro (1)

bar-agent (698856) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927266)

Also what does it mean? The Euro Sign is a stylized E, to represent Europe's currency.

Take another look at the rupee symbol; it is a stylized R, slashed similarly to the euro.

India is the 5th country... (1)

themoneyish (971138) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926352)

... to get a symbol for its currency. Congratulations!

Re:India is the 5th country... (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926426)

Well, now every country will want their own currency symbol . . . it's a status symbol now.

"MY country has a symbol for our currency . . . where's YOURS?"

Re:India is the 5th country... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926532)

"MY country has a symbol for our currency . . . where's YOURS?"

We don't have a graphics designer yet...

Re:India is the 5th country... (1)

Mister Whirly (964219) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926624)

Maybe they can outsource that job to the US for a change.

Re:India is the 5th country... (1)

FredFredrickson (1177871) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926578)

You can't claim us, we live here! 500 million of us!

Do you have a flag?

Re:India is the 5th country... (1)

radicalpi (1407259) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926610)

No currency symbol, no country...that's the rule I just made up...

Re:India is the 5th country... (1)

vecctor (935163) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926714)

+1 Obscure reference bonus (is it obscure? I think so...)

Re:India is the 5th country... (1)

radicalpi (1407259) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926974)

In my circles it's not obscure, but from a greater perspective, probably.

Re:India is the 5th country... (1)

daguru (106899) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927182)

Wish I had some mod points... classic!

Re:India is the 5th country... (4, Funny)

cmiller173 (641510) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926590)

"You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline - it helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least you need a beer." -Frank Zappa

Re:India is the 5th country... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32927072)

India has both :P Ironically ...

Re:India is the 5th country... (2, Funny)

operagost (62405) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927174)

This would eliminate most of the Middle East. Zappa was a genius!

Re:India is the 5th country... (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926982)

Yeah! Where's our Canadian dollar symbol, eh?

Re:India is the 5th country... (3, Informative)

ral (93840) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926554)

India is the 5th country...to get a symbol for its currency.

Ummm... The Unicode Code Charts [unicode.org] show many more than 5 country's currency symbols. And the currency code section has room for 23 more currency symbols.

Re:India is the 5th country... (4, Informative)

Moridineas (213502) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926582)

1-Pound
2-US Dollars (and cents)
3-Euros
4-Israeli Shekel
5-Japanese Yen/Chinese Renminbi

Off the top of my head. Checking wikipedia, it looks like there are a bunch more

Korean Won -
Thai Baht -
Nigerian Naira -

(great, slashdot strips out the currency characters)

And dozens more...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Currency_sign [wikipedia.org]

Re:India is the 5th country... (3, Insightful)

Tim C (15259) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926762)

Slashdot strips out (pretty-much) all non-ASCII characters. For a tech site, it's unforgivable.

Re:India is the 5th country... (4, Informative)

idontgno (624372) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927218)

A few currency marks work if you're posting in (Slashdot's brain-damaged idea of) HTML, and you use the standard HTML character entity encoding for them:

Pound: £
Euro: €
Yen: ¥

Of course, HTML 4.01's entity list [intuitive.com] only has a few currency marks available to begin with, including WTF ever a "general currency mark" is, but Slashcode can't be troubled with those other than the few listed up above.

Re:India is the 5th country... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926584)

There appears to be more than 5

http://www.jhall.demon.co.uk/currency/by_symbol.html

Re:India is the 5th country... (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927020)

There appears to be more than 5

And they have a plan.

Re:India is the 5th country... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926654)

More than 5...
http://www.xe.com/symbols.php

Re:India is the 5th country... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926940)

I don't think "country" is the right word here. There are more than 5 countries using the euro, and there are several countries whose currencies are called "dollars", most of which use the same symbol. So over all, there are definitely more than 5 countries that already have a symbol for their currency.

Re:India is the 5th country... (1)

PseudonymousBraveguy (1857734) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927250)

Erm, the 22 countries using the euro beg to disagree. Congratulations non the less.

Why use symbols? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926372)

What's wrong with letters?

1500 rupees - 1500R.

It works fine for Swiss Francs - Ch. F.

The euro symbol was a stupid idea.

Re:Why use symbols? (1)

Timmmm (636430) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926508)

I disagree. Stating an amount of money is an important and common enough thing that it deserves its own symbol. It also prevents confusion in some cases, e.g. what if you're buying a 15R resistor?

And € is great.

Re:Why use symbols? (2, Insightful)

cwebster (100824) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926588)

Is the symbol for "Ohm" R in India? I think you are the confused one. And so is the guy selling resistors in units of "R".

Re:Why use symbols? (1)

Timmmm (636430) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926848)

I'm not confused. In addition to denoting a resistance by Ohms, they are often labelled like this:

1R2 = 1.2 Ohm
1k2 = 1.2 kOhm
1M2 = 1.2 MOhm

(i.e. the letter replaces the decimal point and also indicates the SI prefix.)

And so on, so 1500R would be 1500 Ohm (although you'd probably use 1k5).

Re:Why use symbols? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926608)

>> e.g. what if you're buying a 15R resistor?

The old notation for Rupee was Rs not R.

Re:Why use symbols? (1)

Sudheer_BV (1049540) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926628)

Many countries have same symbol for their currencies - $. It is more confusing to me.

Re:Why use symbols? (3, Funny)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927080)

1.00$USD
1.00$CAN
1.00$AU

Alternate ways of writing the above:
1.00 freedom dollar
1.00 dollar, eh?
You call that a dollar? THAT's a dollar.

Re:Why use symbols? (1)

cgenman (325138) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926896)

If you're in that country, rupee usage should be common enough to be assumed.

If you're far away from that country, chances are you don't have any idea what the hell that symbol is. And being a symbol, it's almost impossible to look up.

Really, this will help people on the borders of the country, or who interact with India all of the time. It's a nice shorthand for 15 R Indian.

To everyone else, it's one more confusing Kanji they will never be able to look up.

Re:Why use symbols? (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927114)

And being a symbol, it's almost impossible to look up

Oh? Just copy & paste to Google search.

If you want to see confusing - guess the currency / country which I'm using here: $.

Re:Why use symbols? (1)

leenks (906881) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927122)

And being a symbol, it's almost impossible to look up.

To everyone else, it's one more confusing Kanji they will never be able to look up.

Do we assume they do not have access to Google, and the ability to type the character? Eg query google for "what is "...

Re:Why use symbols? (2, Insightful)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927076)

How the hell did you make that symbol work on Slashdot?

Unicode does take its time... (4, Informative)

mfarah (231411) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926380)

... and it's for a good reason. That said, this kind of thing should have been coordinated *beforehand*, to avoid exactly this situation. The long lag between introducing the new symbol and actually being able to use it might kill it.

OTOH, the Unicode consortium approved several years ago the symbol for the Argentinian austral (""), a currency that ended up dying an inglorious (yet entirely deserved) death a few months afterwards.

Re:Unicode does take its time... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926452)

OTOH, the Unicode consortium approved several years ago the symbol for the Argentinian austral (""), a currency that ended up dying an inglorious (yet entirely deserved) death a few months afterwards.

Slashdot disapproved.

Re:Unicode does take its time... (2, Insightful)

IANAAC (692242) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926626)

this kind of thing should have been coordinated *beforehand*

How so? This was a competition to come up with a new symbol. There were 5 designs that were on the final list and this symbol was the one that was just chosen.

I don't know how you can plan ahead for something like that.

Re:Unicode does take its time... (4, Insightful)

dkf (304284) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926736)

How so? This was a competition to come up with a new symbol. There were 5 designs that were on the final list and this symbol was the one that was just chosen.

I don't know how you can plan ahead for something like that.

The competition was for the design of the glyph, not for the logical concept of the symbol. Getting the concept into Unicode is what could have been done beforehand, which would have made supporting the symbol fully just a matter of updating everyone's fonts...

Re:Unicode does take its time... (1)

IANAAC (692242) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927118)

Maybe I'm misunderstanding...

Unicode should already support it: http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/20a8/index.htm [fileformat.info]

The delay seems to me to be in getting everybody to update their fonts. That's what I was referring to when I said I didn't know how you could plan for it.

Re:Unicode does take its time... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926778)

I don't know how you can plan ahead for something like that.

Add all symbols to Unicode beforehand, duh.

Re:Unicode does take its time... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32927166)

Or the Unicode consortium could allow direct vector representation of characters as binary blobs. That way any character can be used immediately, and the effect of the approval process is only to shrink the size of the character from ~300 bytes to 2-4 bytes.

Re:Unicode does take its time... (1)

mfarah (231411) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926824)

How so? This was a competition to come up with a new symbol. There were 5 designs that were on the final list and this symbol was the one that was just chosen.

I don't know how you can plan ahead for something like that.

There can be a delay between the announcement and the actual introduction of the symbol. The Unicode consortium could have been contacted to work on a draft proposal, to minimize the time required to work on it.

Re:Unicode does take its time... (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927014)

I don't know how you can plan ahead for something like that.

"We are starting the competition to come up with a new symbol; initiate your process to make accomodations for it, we will provide the ready glyph in 2 years."

Re:Unicode does take its time... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926726)

I don't understand what you mean. That they should have filed for a Unicode symbol before the symbol got approved? That people weren't really conscious in 2008 so putting the 2-year wait between 2008 and 2010 wouldn't have mattered?

Re:Unicode does take its time... (1)

leenks (906881) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927142)

They could file for the Unicode concept in advance, then when the glyph design was ready the Unicode spec could be updated and fonts patched. As it is, they've got to wait for all of that to happen now.

Its nice to see (3, Informative)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926394)

Its nice to see that they have used a devanagari character (0930 ) as the basis for this.

Re:Its nice to see (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926512)

it's nice to see indians using their own language to come up with a symbol for their currency? so you thought they would use arabic or chinese or russian instead?!

Re:Its nice to see (1)

happysingh (1319643) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926664)

http://www.unicode.org/charts/PDF/U0900.pdf [unicode.org] 0930 would do for the time being!

Re:Its nice to see (2, Insightful)

leenks (906881) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927156)

No, it wouldn't. That code point already has a well defined semantic meaning. If people start using that in the interim it will just make things harder for everyone.

Re:Its nice to see (3, Informative)

SpaceToast (974230) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926764)

Specifically, it's a Devanagari R with a horizontal line through the top, similar to the €, £ and ¥ signs. Usefully for most European language readers, in most fonts (and when not part of a conjunct character) it does look similar to a Latin R missing it's vertical stroke. Pronunciation is a soft R, similar to French.

What? Hindi is a fun language to learn.

Re:Its nice to see (1)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927058)

Specifically, it's a Devanagari R with a horizontal line through the top

Those letters look all Chinese n'junk.

Pronunciation is a soft R, similar to French.

And Boston.

My loony bun (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926402)

Is fine Benny Lava! Minor bun engine made Benny Lava! Anybody need this symbol Benny Lava?

counterfeiters (5, Funny)

rfelsburg (1237090) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926422)

Just give the job to the counterfeiters, they'll have it out in a couple of months.

Why So long? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926448)

Why is it taking so long to adopt - it can't be that difficult to adapt to new symbols?

After all, Slashdot managed to adopt Unicode after only - oh, wait.....

Hmmm....

Use $ instead (1)

hicks107 (1286642) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926488)

They could just use the $ until then. We will know the difference.

Isnt there already a Rupee sign? (3, Interesting)

jonwil (467024) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926490)

If there isn't, why is character 20A8 called "Rupee Sign" then?

Re:Isnt there already a Rupee sign? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926876)

Yes, which makes the whole discussion totally absurd. It's not unusual at all for one codepoint to encode different glyphs, as long as they're equivalent. U+20A8 has variants already: it looks like "Rs" in some fonts and like "Rp" in others, with or without a bar through the R. It wouldn't hurt anybody except some legislators' pride to reuse that codepoint for the new rupee symbol, as the meaning is identical. This would be the right way to do it: just use the existing codepoint, so fontmakers can take their time to replace the glyph without breaking anything.

Re:Isnt there already a Rupee sign? (2, Informative)

rjiy (1739274) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927178)

Other countries use the same sign for their currencies (also called rupees or some variant). One of the reasons for the new symbol was India wanted a different one.

They should have just used the Euro Symbol (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926492)

Buy the time computers are ready to use the new Rupee symbol, the Euro will have ceased to exist.

Symbols in the digital age (3, Interesting)

wandazulu (265281) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926506)

I admit that the first time I saw the Rupee symbol on the iPhone I thought I was looking at the symbol for the Yen. I wonder if the designers take into consideration that the symbols, when scaled way down, start to all look the same. Maybe that's the point?

Not specifically thinking about the Rupee, I would imagine that, in this day and age, a designer would know that the symbol/icon/logo/whatever needs to be recognizable at a potentially very small size.

Of course (1)

CosaNostra Pizza Inc (1299163) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926530)

"Nokia, for example, welcomed the move by the Indian government to have a symbol for the rupee.". Not surprising since a huge portion of Nokia's hardware and software development is now done in Hyderabad, India.

Re:Of course (1)

Sudheer_BV (1049540) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926652)

Also they get huge business from India. BRIC, FWIW.

How about the Ruble? (1)

skrimp (790524) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926570)

Don't go changing it yet. The Russians may want something too similar to it like a capitol R with two lines through the top. But, since the Russians and the Indians are close allies the Russians may let them have it.

Re:How about the Ruble? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926992)

The Cyrillic alphabet doesn't even have the letter "R", so I don't think that will be a problem.

Just ask Shigeru Miyamoto for help (2, Funny)

Drakkenmensch (1255800) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926606)

Legend of Zelda games have had the same rupee symbol for years!

Cool Symbol (3, Interesting)

hellop2 (1271166) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926616)

If you utilize the left-hand side of an imaginary rectangle enclosing the symbol, the symbol contains all of the letters in the word RUPEE.

Re:Cool Symbol (1)

hellop2 (1271166) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926632)

Well, at least: R u P and e.

Re:Cool Symbol (2, Funny)

happysingh (1319643) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926818)

Only if your "U" looks like a bath tub!

Two options (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926650)

* Use U+20A8 RUPEE SIGN [fileformat.info] . It looks different, but means exactly the same: Indian rupees. Just replace the glyph in new fonts.
* Fake it. Use U+0930 DEVANAGARI LETTER RA, from which the rupee symbol is derived, plus a combining bar, e.g. U+0304, U+0334, U+0335 -- whatever looks best.

Unicode and not the 5th (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926706)

The proposal for the Rupee symbol has already been written and submitted to the document register for the Unicode Technical Committee. The next Unicode meeting will be at Microsoft next month, and the Rupee symbol will be approved there. The WG2 - the ISO 10646 body - is in October in Pusan, South Korea, again with astronomical approval prospects. I think it is likely that Unicode will publish a minor edition (6.0.5) right after Pusan - like they did with the Euro - in order to include the new Rupee as soon as possible. Realistically, this is as little as three months from being in Unicode. And the problems with the Euro were in 8859, not Unicode. In fact, there are still brain-dead auto-detect algorithms where texts in 8859-15 (with Euro) are interpreted as 8859-1 (without Euro).

This is not the 5th currency symbol encoded. Unicode 6.0 includes dollar, cent, pound, yen, florin/guilder, afghani; bengali, gujarati, tamil, and Rs Rupee signs; Thai Bhat, khmer riel, rial, ECU, Colon, Cruzeiro, French Franc, Lira, mill, Nigerian Naira, peseta, won, new shequel, Vietnamese Dong, Euro, Kip (Laos), Mongolian Tugrik, Drachma, Pfenning, Philipine Peso, Guarani, old Argentinian Austral, Ukrainian Hryvnia, Ghanain Cedi, old French Livre Tournois, Esperantist Spesmilo, and the Kazakh Tenge. That's a good couple dozen countries with a currency symbol already encoded, along with a few historic and partial currency symbols.

happens all the time (3, Interesting)

jimbomarq (1857698) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926728)

Governments do things all of the time that make systems hard to implement. Adding a new currency doesn't seem terribly cumbersome in comparison to other government requirements.

For example, apparently Thailand just passed a Thai Computer Crimes Act that requires IT providers to track who has viewed people blogs just in case some blogger has said something critical of the Thai government. So, if your company has people in Thailand (we do), and they can potentially post information on a blog, you've got some work to do.

Re:happens all the time (1)

Kepesk (1093871) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926844)

When they came out with the Euro symbol, it didn't take that long for it to be added using software patches and the like. I don't see much of a problem.

Proud to be Indian (1)

casiowatchchick (1857704) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926734)

I'm so proud to be Indian today!!

Because my currency will show up on computers and mobile devices in 2 years. :)

Holy symbols, Batman! (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32926776)

Robin: The Riddler has escaped of Gotham! He left a note!

Note: 'Riddle me this, Batman - solve this equation: "?==$"'

Batman: Hmmm... It looks like he's gotten into the Indian money market.

Robin: However did you guess that, Batman?

Batman: You just have to overlap the ... what am I explaining this to you for? When we get to India, I am totally replacing you with a cheaper Indian model.

Robin: Holy takemyjarb, Batman!

Microsoft? (1)

GNUALMAFUERTE (697061) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926832)

Once a new version of the standard, which has the code point for the rupee symbol, is released by the Unicode Consortium, Microsoft will start work to include it in the Windows operating system and other products, Parappil said. He did not specify the time it would take to include the changes. Users will not have to buy new software, but will likely receive downloadable updates to their existing software, he added.

Wow. Because, of course, all computers depend on microsoft software. And there are no devices outside ms or nokia ones. What a stupid article.

Also, why implement more symbols for this? It is absolutely stupid. The first currency sign ever was the Pesos sign ($). Yes, I know you guys know it as the 'dollar sign' but that is just plain wrong. The symbol was created originally in the 18th century to refer to the Spanish Peso.

The peso sign is recognized all around the world, and everyone knows it means money. We also have ISO 4217. Why create new symbols? Use $ generically when everybody reading your doc will now what currency you are talking about, and ISO 4217 anywhere else. It's just three letters. In some cases, you can combine them. For example, here in Argentina we use ARS + $, that is, AR$. We refer to the us dollar as USD or U$D.

Adding new codes for each currency is fairly stupid.

Two years is nothing (3, Funny)

PPH (736903) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926866)

I'm still waiting for the Unicode symbol for TAFKAP [wikipedia.org] .

I'm just happy to get ANY money. (1)

thomasdz (178114) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926870)

When I get money, I always use the ":-)" set of characters. Why can't we use emoticons for currency symbols?

No worries (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 4 years ago | (#32926994)

Rupees? Can't Princess Zelda just make a royal decree and get the symbol added right away?

The currency formerly known as... (1)

keytohwy (975131) | more than 4 years ago | (#32927106)

Did they just jack Prince's sumbol?
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