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Lightspark 0.4.2 Open Source Flash Player Released

CmdrTaco posted about 4 years ago | from the gotta-start-somewhere dept.

Open Source 172

suraj.sun writes "The Lightspark project has released version 0.4.2 of its free, open source Flash player. According to Lightspark developer Alessandro Pignotti, the alternative Flash Player implementation is 'designed from the ground up to be efficient on current and (hopefully) future hardware.' The latest release of Lightspark features better compatibility with YouTube videos, sound synchronization support and the ability to use fontconfig for font selection. Other changes include plug-in support for Google's Chrome/Chromium web browser and support for Firefox's out of process plug-in (OOPP) mode, which was added in version 3.6.4 of the browser."

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172 comments

Project page (5, Informative)

nacturation (646836) | about 4 years ago | (#32978632)

At least link to the project page rather than a rehashed "news" story: http://sourceforge.net/apps/trac/lightspark [sourceforge.net]

Re:Project page (0, Flamebait)

tenco (773732) | about 4 years ago | (#32978910)

You must be new here.

Re:Project page (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32979364)

Yeah, you must be new here. Or you must be thinking with clarity, precision and pragmatism. Either way, get with the program will you.

Damn Republicans.

Incoming fucktard sopssa aka SquarePixel trolling (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32978656)

sopssa = SquarePixel = fucktard troll. Remember it moderators.

Peace out!

Lifting the Lid on the Guilty Yid (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32978682)

The liberals got it exactly right. For years now they’ve been telling us how “vibrant” mass immigration has made stale, pale White societies. Well, London was certainly vibrating on 7th July and that got me thinking: What else have the liberals got right? Mass immigration “enriches” us too, they’ve always said. Is that “enrich” as in “enriched uranium”, an excellent way of making atom bombs? Because that’s what comes next: a weapon of real mass destruction that won’t kill people in piffling dozens but in hundreds of thousands or millions. Bye-bye London, bye-bye Washington, bye-bye Tel Aviv.

I’m not too sure I’d shed a tear if the last-named went up in a shower of radioactive cinders, but Tel Aviv is actually the least likely of the three to be hit. What’s good for you ain’t good for Jews, and though Jews have striven mightily, and mighty successfully, to turn White nations into multi-racial fever-swamps, mass immigration has passed the Muzzerland safely by. And mass immigration is the key to what happened in London. You don’t need a sophisticated socio-political analysis taking in Iraq, Afghanistan, Bosnia, Jewish control of Anglo-American foreign policy, British colonialism, and fifteen centuries of Christian-Muslim conflict. You can explain the London bombs in five simple words:

Pakis do not belong here.

And you can sum up how to prevent further London bombs – and worse – in three simple words:

PAKI GO HOME.

At any time before the 1950s, brown-skinned Muslim terrorists would have found it nearly impossible to plan and commit atrocities on British soil, because they would have stood out like sore thumbs in Britain’s overwhelmingly White cities. Today, thanks to decades of mass immigration, it’s often Whites who stand out like sore thumbs. Our cities swarm with non-whites full of anti-White grievances and hatreds created by Judeo-liberal propaganda. And let’s forget the hot air about how potential terrorists and terrorist sympathizers are a “tiny minority” of Britain’s vibrant, peace-loving Muslim “community”.

Even if that’s true, a tiny minority of 1.6 million (2001 estimate) is a hell of a lot of people, and there’s very good reason to believe it isn’t true. Tony Blair has tried to buy off Britain’s corrupt and greedy “moderate” Muslims with knighthoods and public flattery, but his rhetoric about the “religion of peace” wore thin long ago. After the bombings he vowed, with his trademark bad actor’s pauses, that we will... not rest until... the guilty men are identified... and as far... as is humanly possible... brought to justice for this... this murderous carnage... of the innocent.

His slimy lawyer’s get-out clause – “as far as is humanly possible” – was soon needed. Unlike Blair and his pal Dubya in Iraq and Afghanistan, the bombers were prepared not only to kill the innocent but to die themselves as they did so. And to laugh at the prospect: they were captured on CCTV sharing a joke about the limbs and heads that would shortly be flying. Even someone as dim as Blair must know you’ve got a big problem on your hands when there are over 1.6 million people in your country following a religion like that.

If he doesn’t know, there are plenty of Jewish journalists who will point it out for him. There’s the neo-conservative Melanie Phillips in Britain, for example, who never met an indignant adverb she didn’t like, and the neo-conservative Mark Steyn in Canada, who never met an indignant Arab he didn’t kick. Reading their hard-hitting columns on Muslim psychosis, I was reminded of a famous scene in Charles Dickens’ notoriously anti-Semitic novel Oliver Twist (1839). The hero watches the training of the villainous old Jew Fagin put into action by the Artful Dodger:

What was Oliver’s horror and alarm to see the Dodger plunge his hand into the old gentleman’s pocket, and draw from thence a handkerchief! To see him hand the same to Charley Bates; and finally to behold them both running away round the corner at full speed! He stood for a moment tingling from terror; then, confused and frightened, he took to his heels and made off as fast as he could lay his feet to the ground.
In the very instant when Oliver began to run, the old gentleman, putting his hand to his pocket, and missing his handkerchief, turned sharp round. Seeing the boy scudding away, he very naturally concluded him to be the depredator; and shouting “Stop thief!” with all his might, made off after him. But the old gentleman was not the only person who raised the hue-and-cry. The Dodger and Master Bates, unwilling to attract public attention by running down the open street, had merely retired into the very first doorway round the corner. They no sooner heard the cry, and saw Oliver running, than, guessing exactly how the matter stood, they issued forth with great promptitude; and, shouting “Stop thief!” too, joined in the pursuit like good citizens.

“Wicked Muslims!” our two Jewish Artful Dodgers are shouting. “Can’t you see how they hate the West and want to destroy us?” Well, yes, we can, but some of us can also see who the original West-haters are. Mark Steyn claims not to be Jewish, but his ancestry shines through time after time in his writing. Above all, there’s his dishonesty. One week he’s mocking anti-Semites for claiming that the tiny nation of Israel could have such a powerful influence for bad on the world’s affairs. The following week he’s praising the British Empire for having had such a powerful influence for good. You know, the world-bestriding British Empire – as created by a tiny nation called Britain.

If the Brits could do it openly and honestly, Mr Steyn, why can’t the yids do it by fraud and deception? And the yids have done it, of course. They’ve run immigration policy and “race relations” in Europe and America since the 1960s, and Steyn is very fond of pointing out what’s in store for Europe as our Jew-invited non-white guests grow in number and really start to show their appreciation of our hospitality.

Funnily enough, I’ve never seen him point out that the same is in store for North America, which has its own rapidly growing non-white swarms. And when Steyn launches one of his regular attacks on the lunacies of multi-culturalism and anti-racism, a central fact always somehow seems to escape his notice. He recently once again bemoaned the psychotic “Western self-loathing” that has such a “grip on the academy, the media, the Congregational and Episcopal Churches, the ‘arts’ and Hollywood”. Exhibit one: the multi-culti, hug-the-world, “Let’s all be nice to the Muslims” memorial for 9/11. This was his list of those responsible for it:

Tom Bernstein... Michael Posner... Eric Foner... George Soros...
Well, that’s a Jew, a Jew, a Jew, and a Jew – sounds like a lampshade collector showing off his Auschwitz shelf. But fearless “Tell It Like It Is” Steyn, ever-ready to mock the “racial sensitivity” of deluded liberals, is himself very sensitive about race when it comes to the Chosen Ones. He’ll kick dark-skinned Muslims and their liberal appeasers till the sacred cows come home and he can start kicking them too, but just like Melanie Phillips he never whispers a word about the Jews who created liberal appeasement or about the enormous power Jews wield in “the academy, the media, the 'arts', and Hollywood”.

The same is true of all other Jewish “conservatives”. They’re shouting “Stop thief!” at the top of their voices and hoping that no-one will notice that they all belong to the biggest race of thieves who ever existed. Those bombs went off in London because Jews have stolen large parts of Britain from their rightful White inhabitants and handed them over to the non-white followers of a psychotic alien religion. When non-whites commit more and worse atrocities in future, you won’t need to ask who’s really responsible: it’s liberal Jews like Tom Bernstein and George Soros, who organize mass immigration and the anti-racism industry, and “conservative” Jews like Mark Steyn and Melanie Phillips, who distract White attention from the racial motives of Jews like Soros and Bernstein. Heads they win, tails we lose – liberal, “conservative”, they’re all of them Jews.

Re:Lifting the Lid on the Guilty Yid (-1, Offtopic)

Surt (22457) | about 4 years ago | (#32978868)

This just doesn't feel authentic without a lot of misspellings and grammatical faux pas to make it feel like the author is an illiterate nincompoop. You need to work on your fakery a bit.

The best feature they could add... (1)

Picass0 (147474) | about 4 years ago | (#32978706)

...would be blacklisting for sites that serve ads and popups. I'd settle for restricting flash to site domain only.

Re:The best feature they could add... (0, Troll)

Surt (22457) | about 4 years ago | (#32978802)

Since it's OS, maybe that's the best feature YOU could add.

Re:The best feature they could add... (1)

Abstrackt (609015) | about 4 years ago | (#32978914)

Since it's OS, maybe that's the best feature YOU could add.

That sounds good in theory but not everyone's a (capable) programmer. Perhaps the best feature they could add is bounties, meaning people can offer cash for someone with the necessary skillset to implement the feature they want.

Re:The best feature they could add... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32978994)

Offer -cash-?

Cash?!

Re:The best feature they could add... (2, Funny)

Abstrackt (609015) | about 4 years ago | (#32979180)

Offer -cash-?

Cash?!

s/cash/money

(Note to self, no more colloquialisms on Slashdot.)

Re:The best feature they could add... (0)

Surt (22457) | about 4 years ago | (#32980494)

I figured on slashdot odds favored the programmer.

Re:The best feature they could add... (1)

Phisbut (761268) | about 4 years ago | (#32981950)

I figured on slashdot odds favored the programmer.

And that's why you never make assumptions... because you make an ass out of you and... mumptions...

Re:The best feature they could add... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32978948)

Maybe, maybe not.

But that condescending reply in response to an informal feature request is terrible.
You give open source a bad name.

Re:The best feature they could add... (1, Interesting)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 4 years ago | (#32979232)

That sort of reply is now mandatory for any open source related story. It is now formally referred to as "Anonymous Coward's Law".

Re:The best feature they could add... (1, Funny)

Surt (22457) | about 4 years ago | (#32980460)

It wasn't intended to be condescending. It was intended to be encouraging.

Re:The best feature they could add... (1, Insightful)

westlake (615356) | about 4 years ago | (#32979598)

Since it's OS, maybe that's the best feature YOU could add.

If - and only if - he is a programmer.

Something to remember before the mod-up to "Insightful."

     

Re:The best feature they could add... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32981076)

Since it's OS, maybe that's the best feature YOU could add.

If - and only if - he is a programmer.

Something to remember before the mod-up to "Insightful."

Is anybody else going to bitch about Surt's reply or is this enough yet? After the first one, you're all redundant and should be modded as such. I don't share your offense at the suggestion that someone pitch in and help a free project but even if I did, once statement of such is enough.

Re:The best feature they could add... (2, Informative)

farlukar (225243) | about 4 years ago | (#32978936)

I'd settle for restricting flash to site domain only.

What a novel concept! [mozilla.org]

Re:The best feature they could add... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32979196)

That's something that's better handled at a higher level than the browser plugin. With what you suggest, the plugin needs to be loaded first in order to decide whether it should display the element or not. If you end up on a page with nothing but blocked ads, the plugin is loaded only to be find out that it has nothing to display, which ends up just being a waste of resources.

Re:The best feature they could add... (2, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 4 years ago | (#32979722)

On a feature level, for the entire browser+addons stack, I agree that that is an extremely useful feature. Sturgeon's law applies, hard, to flash and most of it deserves to be blocked.

Architecturally, though, isn't the flash renderer plugin a silly place for blacklisting/whitelisting/domain control features? The browser is responsible for issuing the HTTP requests, rendering what it can, calling plugins for what it can't, and so forth. Why should the browser download the flash blob, load the renderer, and then have the renderer check a blacklist and allow or refuse rendering of the object?

Wouldn't it make much more sense for that to be handled at the browser level, with the renderer invoked only if you want the flash rendered?

embrace and extend (2, Insightful)

goombah99 (560566) | about 4 years ago | (#32978728)

Now that open source has embraces the flash standard, no doubt Adobe will add proprietary additions so sow incompatibility.

The protentially nice thing about this howerve is that if
1) it's efficient
2) not buggy
3) supports DRM

then it answers apple's complaints about flash and Youtube's complaints about H264. The problme for apple was that it would be insane to make your player beholden to a closed 3rd party app, espeically one from a company that hsitorically dragged it's heels in incorproating your platforms new features. Apple thrives on offering distinguishing features and adobe smothers them if they don't incorporate them.

But if the source is open apple is free to make sure it keeps up. So long as it is not as buggy as flash was.

Likewise youtube complained they could not monetize Video under H264 as well as under flash. the ability to have linking and overlays and such was required for the cash register.

Again this is now possible if this supports DRM.

One nice thing is that since apple already has a sandboxing system in both OSX and iOS, having it open source may allow them to get a tighter sandbox. No need to count on Adobe's sandbox working.

Re:embrace and extend (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32978786)

Now that open source has embraces the flash standard, no doubt Adobe will add proprietary additions so sow incompatibility.

The protentially nice thing about this howerve is that if
1) it's efficient
2) not buggy
3) supports DRM

4)has the potential to run on 64 bit and ARM platforms.

Re:embrace and extend (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32978940)

Now that open source has embraces the flash standard, no doubt Adobe will add proprietary additions so sow incompatibility.

The protentially nice thing about this howerve is that if
1) it's efficient
2) not buggy
3) supports DRM

4)has the potential to run on 64 bit and ARM platforms.

5) there is a windows version planned (i loathe having to have any adobe product installed).

Re:embrace and extend (1)

Nursie (632944) | about 4 years ago | (#32979968)

Flash on 64 it linux has been ok for a while, though it's borked again at the moment whilst adobe re-architect. As for ARM....

Works fine on my N900!

Re:embrace and extend (5, Insightful)

natehoy (1608657) | about 4 years ago | (#32978844)

It won't, however, answer Apple's biggest reason for not wanting to support Flash.

Flash is, simply, a proprietary format that they don't have any patent control over. They want h264, which is a proprietary format controlled by a consortium they are a major member of.

Apple wants Flash dead. They don't want it open, they don't want it closed, they don't want it with cherries and whipped cream on top. They want it dead. It's something they cannot control, and therefore it must die.

Re:embrace and extend (2, Interesting)

sortius_nod (1080919) | about 4 years ago | (#32978966)

If you had used flash on a mac you'd probably change your tune. Adobe have almost abandoned apple when most of their apps started on mac os. I can understand apple saying "fuck off" to adobe after the bullshit they've pulled over recent years.

Re:embrace and extend (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32979494)

Indeed, try running an Adobe product using a networked home directory for example...

Re:embrace and extend (4, Informative)

unix1 (1667411) | about 4 years ago | (#32979636)

They want h264, which is a proprietary format controlled by a consortium they are a major member of.

I'm not sure what you mean by "major" but Apple only has 1 patent in the h264 patent pool that looks like nothing but a placeholder patent to satisfy the membership requirement.

Re:embrace and extend (2, Insightful)

samkass (174571) | about 4 years ago | (#32979660)

Flash is, simply, a proprietary format that they don't have any patent control over. They want h264, which is a proprietary format controlled by a consortium they are a major member of.

h.264 and Flash aren't incompatible. And Apple's a minor member of that consortium with almost no patents in the game. Apple just wants the best products and doesn't want to have to depend on others to get them, and Flash is the opposite of both of those things.

Considering how much Apple has contributed to open source over the past few years, they obviously value it highly. Heck, their biggest competitor in their fastest-growing market is basing their entire web experience on Apple's browser engine, so it doesn't seem like Apple is too worried about competition there.

Re:embrace and extend (0, Flamebait)

Draek (916851) | about 4 years ago | (#32979766)

Apple just wants the best products and doesn't want to have to depend on others to get them, and Flash is the opposite of both of those things.

And proof of it is their excellent support for Ogg and FLAC on their products. Oh, wait.

Heck, their biggest competitor in their fastest-growing market is basing their entire web experience on Apple's browser engine

Apple's? me thinks you were a bit too generous with the kool-aid this morning.

Re:embrace and extend (0, Troll)

abigor (540274) | about 4 years ago | (#32981030)

And proof of it is their excellent support for Ogg

Ogg is not an "excellent product", by any means. Also, no one cares about it.

And WebKit, while derived from KHTML way back when, really is Apple's. Sorry.

Re:embrace and extend (1)

moonbender (547943) | about 4 years ago | (#32981292)

How much of the current WebKit is Apple and how much is from other contributors? Does anybody actually know? I'm sure much of KHTML is gone, but the KDE (now Nokia, I guess?) people still work on it, and so does Google among others.

Re:embrace and extend (4, Informative)

molnarcs (675885) | about 4 years ago | (#32980308)

Apple's browser engine? How many times does this myth have to be corrected? KHTML was a pretty complete rendering engine before Apple adopted it under the name WebKit. It was the only major free software contender to gecko, and Apple was not the first to notice it. NOKIA used it to replace gecko in their handhelds (and they sent a nice thank you letter to the khtml mailing list). Yes, Apple did contribute a lot of code, but they did not write it. And as of now, they are not the only contributors either. So webkit is a bad example for Apple's contributions - they basically forked KHTML (and the first few releases of Safari were pretty much KHTML + a few patches) and they had no choice but to maintain it as free software because KHTML was GPL.

Re:embrace and extend (1)

StayFrosty (1521445) | about 4 years ago | (#32981072)

From wikipedia: WebKit was originally derived by Apple Inc. from the Konqueror browser’s KHTML software library for use as the engine of Mac OS X’s Safari web browser and has now been further developed by individuals from the KDE project, Apple Inc., Nokia, Google, Bitstream, Torch Mobile and others.

Heck, their biggest competitor in their fastest-growing market is basing their entire web experience on Apple's browser engine, so it doesn't seem like Apple is too worried about competition there.

A couple of problems with this statement:

  1. It's not Apple's browser engine, it's the community's. Just because Apple is a major member of that community does not mean they own the project. If anything, it's KDE's browser engine since they wrote KHTML in the first place.
  2. KHTML is LGPL licensed. Because of this, any fork has to be compatible with the LGPL. This resulted in Webcore and the javascript portions of Webkit being LGPL licensed and the rest BSD licensed.
  3. Whether they want to or not, Apple has no say in whether Google or anyone else can use KHTML/Webkit in a competing product. It wasn't a conscious decision to allow Android to use Webkit.

Re:embrace and extend (0)

glwtta (532858) | about 4 years ago | (#32979836)

Apple wants Flash dead.

Huh, for once Apple and I agree on something.

Re:embrace and extend (2, Funny)

eldavojohn (898314) | about 4 years ago | (#32979964)

They don't want it open, they don't want it closed, they don't want it with cherries and whipped cream on top.

Adobe's Flash
- a poem by eldavojohn

I bash Jobs, Jobs I blash

That Jobs-I-bash, That Jobs-I-bash!
I do not like, that Jobs-I-bash

Do you like Adobe's flash?

I do not like it, Jobs-I-bash.
I do not like Adobe's flash.

Would you like it on your iPad?

I would not like it on my iPad.
I would not like it if it's a fad.
I do not like Adobe's flash.
I do not like it, Jobs-I-bash

Would you like it open or closed?
Would you like it
virtually imposed?

I do not like it open or closed.
I do not like it virtually imposed.
I do not like it on my iPad.
I do not like them if it's a fad.
I do not like Adobe's Flash.
I do not like it, Jobs-I-bash.

Would you install it on your box?
Would you install it in Firefox?

Not on my box.
Not with Firefox.
Not open or closed.
Not virtually imposed.
I would not install it open or closed.
I would not install it virtually imposed.
I would not install Adobe's Flash.
I do not like it, Jobs-I-bash!

Re:embrace and extend (1)

natehoy (1608657) | about 4 years ago | (#32980348)

I almost went Dr. Seuss.

I'm glad I didn't. It would have looked pathetic compared to your effort.

Bravo, sir.

Re:embrace and extend (2, Insightful)

h3 (27424) | about 4 years ago | (#32980172)

>Flash is, simply, a proprietary format that they don't have any patent control over. They want h264, which is a proprietary format controlled by a consortium they are a major member of.

I think you got the Apple v. Flash "war" mixed up with the HTML5 v Flash war...

I'm pretty sure Apple's objection to Flash on their iOS devices has more with it being an alternate development platform that they can't control and little to do with the specialized use case of video delivery. In other words, they want to make sure HotSellingGame is written using *their* dev tools, not against Flash.

Not that the HTML5 v. Flash war makes that much more sense.

Re:embrace and extend (1)

dannys42 (61725) | about 4 years ago | (#32980196)

The open source version solves the technical problems Apple may have with Flash.

But actually I think they're right in wanting Flash dead. It's true that it's a closed propriety format, and it will lead to a closed web. Perhaps they're doing it for their own selfish reasons. But in this case, I think those reasons coincide with what people want in the long term.

I'm just surprised Google hasn't realized the danger that flash poses. It'll completely demolish their search capabilities.

Re:embrace and extend (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32980768)

Actually Apple wants flash dead because if people start writing mobile games for a flash target that runs on iphone, android, windows mobile, etc, then the iphone becomes a generic phone with less lock in.

We are all used to thinking of flash as a closed platform, but to apple, it is way too open.

Re:embrace and extend (1, Insightful)

Yvanhoe (564877) | about 4 years ago | (#32979190)

Open source software is technically incompatible with DRMs.

Re:embrace and extend (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 4 years ago | (#32979834)

Unfortunately, that depends... For classic "Hey, let's try to obfuscate on top of a standard OS running on general purpose hardware and hope nobody with a clue attaches a debugger" style DRM, OSS is indeed technically incompatible. Obtain code, recompile version with locks removed, go home happy. Game over.

However, if the code is under one of the OSS licenses that allows Tivoization(GPL2, among others), and if embedded hardware controlled by the vendor comes into play, you have a very different story. The code is OSS, you bought a product containing the binary. Sure, you are entitled to the source, here you go. Well, yeah, the device bootloader will only load images signed with our private key. Have a nice day. You are welcome to recompile the code for some other device, knock yourself out; but don't expect your device to be able to pass the challenge/response from our server that is handled by the TPM in our device...

If you control the hardware from a fairly low level, you can always enforce DRM that way. Worse, unless you screw up, any attack will actually require a silicon level crack, not just some software chops and patience.

Re:embrace and extend (1)

goombah99 (560566) | about 4 years ago | (#32981824)

Open source software is technically incompatible with DRMs.

Uh no.

What about license? (3, Interesting)

DMiax (915735) | about 4 years ago | (#32978796)

I seem to remember that the real problem Flash clones is that documentation is not completely free and if you read it you have to be under strong NDA for the rest of your life. This should also be why Gnash always lags behind. How did he overcome this issue? Or are we waiting for a lawsuit to strike as soon as the plugin becomes usable?

Re:What about license? (1)

kevinmenzel (1403457) | about 4 years ago | (#32978982)

I seem to remember that the documentation that wasn't free was for video codec implementation? (Admittedly an issue, but one that could be piped to the system codecs, or integration with ffmpeg or something?)

Re:What about license? (4, Informative)

sreekotay (955693) | about 4 years ago | (#32979070)

That was historically true, but is no longer the case (I believe they changed the license coincident with the Open Screen Project release). See here [adobe.com] . There are still the H.264 and On2 (as well as Nellymoser and other specific media codec) issues, but not any with open implementations of Flash itself.

Re:What about license? (1, Funny)

larry bagina (561269) | about 4 years ago | (#32979600)

GNASH lags behind for the same reason HURD lags behind.

Solution (5, Funny)

neoshroom (324937) | about 4 years ago | (#32979634)

I seem to remember that the real problem Flash clones is that documentation is not completely free and if you read it you have to be under strong NDA for the rest of your life. This should also be why Gnash always lags behind. How did he overcome this issue? Or are we waiting for a lawsuit to strike as soon as the plugin becomes usable?

The creator of the project trained a chimpansee to understand code, a literal code-monkey if you will or rather a code-ape to be more accurate. This code-ape then reads the Flash documentation and explains it with sign language to the project creator. Since the code-ape cannot be properly held to an NDA the project continues unencumbered by draconian laws or demonic contracts.

Gnash? (1)

jabuzz (182671) | about 4 years ago | (#32978890)

How does this compare to the FSF sponsered Gnash then?

Re:Gnash? (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32978960)

Gnash does not support version two of the Actionscript Virtual Machine. (Most new Flash content uses that AVM version.) Lightspark is intended to support exactly that. There are many other differences, but that's the main one.

Re:Gnash? (2, Interesting)

ink (4325) | about 4 years ago | (#32978988)

Gnash doesn't support ActionScript 3. Lightspark does. There has been talk [gnu.org] on the Gnash list for a hybrid solution.

Gnash (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32978902)

How is this different from the gnu flash player (gnash) ?

As long as it's nothing like... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32979394)

As long as it produces effects that are nothing like those of AllSpark (tm)...

call me when there is a firefox addon (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32978912)

not something i have to dl/compile..... https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/ [mozilla.org]

Re:call me when there is a firefox addon (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32979088)

-1 flamebait plz

Re:call me when there is a firefox addon (3, Informative)

jedidiah (1196) | about 4 years ago | (#32979308)

...the guy kind of has a point.

When this can be a drop in replacement for the vendor's version that doesn't support video acceleration on most platforms, then it will be something.

For now, it is something that just looks very promising for now.

Re:call me when there is a firefox addon (1)

unix1 (1667411) | about 4 years ago | (#32979916)

After it's compiled, you'll end up with a standalone client and a Firefox add-on. It shouldn't be hard to provide an add-on download. As far as I can see, it's Linux only, however.

Re:call me when there is a firefox addon (1)

dotancohen (1015143) | about 4 years ago | (#32981656)

For now, it is something that just looks very promising for now.

You work in the Department of Redundancy Department, no?

which one (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32978924)

By my count there are atleast 4 opensource flash project. Most of them seem to exist just for the developer's own benefit. Is there any analysis or review and comparison of the several open source flash clones?

Efficient, yes. But... (2, Insightful)

tenco (773732) | about 4 years ago | (#32978942)

...is it secure?

No, that's-a fish! (3, Funny)

RevWaldo (1186281) | about 4 years ago | (#32978972)

Chico and Harpo on the problems with Flash substitutes

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5Ovh18nYwc [youtube.com]

"Alright never mind c'mon we work without it.."

.

Re:No, that's-a fish! (1)

rufus t firefly (35399) | about 4 years ago | (#32979560)

"Tie on the bed, throw the rope out the window." Classic.

Hardware Acceleration and Benchmarks (1)

Flammon (4726) | about 4 years ago | (#32979030)

Has anyone done any benchmarking? Is it hardware accelerated (video, vector etc) on Linux?

Re:Hardware Acceleration and Benchmarks (1)

bioglaze (767105) | about 4 years ago | (#32979814)

I haven't done any benchmarking, but it is hardware accelerated. It also uses OpenGL Shading Language.

Hulu (3, Insightful)

TechwoIf (1004763) | about 4 years ago | (#32979032)

Will it work with www.hulu.com?

Re:Hulu (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32980118)

Just compiled and installed on debian squeeze. Works with youtube, and thats about it. Hulu, pandora, grooveshark all crash firefox.

That's just as wrong as mono (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32979142)

Stop helping these companies push their proprietary crap on us.

Re:That's just as wrong as mono (4, Informative)

betelgeuse68 (230611) | about 4 years ago | (#32979436)

The irony is that if open source people didn't have a target to emulate, there's tons of things that would have never been written since a baseline and mindshare in the overall tech market wouldn't have existed:

lex = flex
yacc = bison
sh = bash
UNIX = LINUX
vi = vim

To name just a few.

So your complaint about "proprietary" falls on deaf ears. If nothing else, what you call proprietary seeds things.

Re:That's just as wrong as mono (4, Insightful)

mandelbr0t (1015855) | about 4 years ago | (#32979768)

i386 protected mode OS
ext2/3
emacs
Perl, Python and others
decss
bayesian spam filtering
eclipse

To name a few more. Proprietary is not necessarily first, just the first to try and make profit from the project.

Re:That's just as wrong as mono (1)

dannys42 (61725) | about 4 years ago | (#32980262)

Don't forget rpm/deb and the entire package management and distribution infrastructure.

It still surprises me that this came from the open source community AND that to this day no commercial OS has anything close.

Even cygwin doesn't use it in it's distribution, though I understand they have their reasons. But then what reason does projects like macports have to not use real package management?

Re:That's just as wrong as mono (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | about 4 years ago | (#32980814)

Don't forget rpm/deb and the entire package management and distribution infrastructure.

It still surprises me that this came from the open source community AND that to this day no commercial OS has anything close.

It's simple: proprietary software places want to have control over everything. They don't want to be just another program on your desktop, they want to take it over with buttons everywhere on your desktop and start menu, their corporation name on your start menu (instead of just putting their program in a submenu called "Graphics programs"), etc. This is why proprietary software companies like Windows so much; it doesn't have any problems with them taking over a user's computer with their bloatware.

Package management systems take away control from software makers, and give it to users. Software makers don't like that.

Re:That's just as wrong as mono (2, Insightful)

drsmithy (35869) | about 4 years ago | (#32981176)

It still surprises me that this came from the open source community AND that to this day no commercial OS has anything close.

That's because packaging systems exist primarily to address problems that - by and large - don't exist on "commercial OSes": cascading webs of slightly incompatible software versions (ie: "dependency hell") and ease of installation.

Re:That's just as wrong as mono (1)

lisaparratt (752068) | about 4 years ago | (#32980290)

You appear to have made a pretty much random list of technologies/programs - why?

Re:That's just as wrong as mono (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32981196)

All of those things listed are innovations and new inventions that were free software innovations. They are not works derived from proprietary sources.

Re:That's just as wrong as mono (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32981816)

Oh come off it! Almost all of them have proprietary predecessors that implemented the same functionality.
  • i386 protected mode OS: prior art in Unix, mainframe OS's, VMS... any 32-bit OS that used an MMU. If we must be specific to the 386 (why?) then I think even then Xenix did this first.
  • ext2/3: dozens of earlier (proprietary) filesystems had the same capabilities first, whether we are talking about basic filesystem capabilities or journalling.
  • emacs: hardly the first text editor, emacs' only innovation was stealing Vi's crown by making text editing even more difficult.
  • Perl, Python and others: whether these count as programming languages, virtual machines or scripting environments, there is a tonne of proprietary prior art, from C/Fortran to KSH and JCL.
  • decss: just a reverse-engineered reimplementation of CSS surely?
  • bayesian spam filtering: ok, you win this time... but if email wasn't the classic example of a badly thought out open standard that we're now stuck with, this wouldn't be needed.
  • eclipse: pick your proprietary IDE; most likely it predates Eclipse.

While all of these things are valuable (except Perl and Emacs), they are hardly new inventions. Bit of intellectual honesty please!

Re:That's just as wrong as mono (2, Funny)

moonbender (547943) | about 4 years ago | (#32981408)

You appear to have made a pretty much random list of technologies/programs - why?

  • Because he felt like it
  • Out of spite
  • For reasons unknown
  • Oh I'm sorry I didn't see you there
  • Google it yourself
  • Because it's Wednesday
  • The dog ate it

A few bugs in that list! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32981764)

emacs - based on TECO, yes proprietary to MIT, but modified by damned near everyone
perl - borrows strongly from C, AWK, sh, grep, and RPG - all proprietary at one time or other
decss - reverse engineering of a proprietary algorithm
eclipse - began life as a proprietary IBM product Visual Age

need I continue?

Re:That's just as wrong as mono (2, Informative)

Grishnakh (216268) | about 4 years ago | (#32980736)

My understanding is that Flash has an open specification, just like PDF. So it's not the format that's proprietary, only most of the software that uses the format. This was a problem with PDF too for a long time, but now there's tons of both Free and non-Free tools for both creating and viewing PDF files.

As long as the spec is open, there's no problem; anyone can create compatible software. The problem is usually that it takes a lot longer for other people (especially F/OSS writers) to do it than the company that created the spec and has a vested interest in making it popular.

Waste of time (0)

betelgeuse68 (230611) | about 4 years ago | (#32979330)

Some projects are worthwhile, this smells of things like "ReactOS", i.e. something I would never use. I would suggest to the people on this project to go contribute to open source projects that would get people to even have an inclination of using a LINUX desktop.

Re:Waste of time (1)

Narishma (822073) | about 4 years ago | (#32979676)

What makes you think those developers are interested in getting people to use Linux?

Re:Waste of time (1)

Draek (916851) | about 4 years ago | (#32979806)

Some projects are worthwhile, this smells of things like "ReactOS", i.e. something I would never use.

But fortunately, the Open Source community comprises a lot more people than just you.

I would suggest to the people on this project to go contribute to open source projects that would get people to even have an inclination of using a LINUX desktop.

And I would suggest *you* to go contribute to those projects if you want to see them succeed.

Re:Waste of time (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32979952)

I would suggest to the people on this project to go contribute to open source projects that would get people to even have an inclination of using a LINUX desktop.

Why?

You believe there is only open source when there is Linux? This kind of thinking doesn't help the open source community.

Re:Waste of time (1)

Abcd1234 (188840) | about 4 years ago | (#32979992)

Some projects are worthwhile, this smells of things like "ReactOS", i.e. something I would never use.

Ah, I see, so unless *you* would use it, it's a "waste of time".

Uhuh.

Re:Waste of time (1)

drsmithy (35869) | about 4 years ago | (#32981250)

Ah, I see, so unless *you* would use it, it's a "waste of time".

ReactOS is a "waste of time" because it will never, ever be a genuinely viable alternative to running Windows.

Re:Waste of time (0, Troll)

Abcd1234 (188840) | about 4 years ago | (#32981670)

I never said anything about ReactOS. Why are you changing the subject?

Re:Waste of time (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | about 4 years ago | (#32980898)

One of the big problems in Linux is Flash support. For better or worse, Flash is needed to view a lot of websites, most notably Youtube. An open-source flash player promotes Linux on the desktop, by making it so that users can do all the same things in Linux that they currently do in Windows.

You're not going to get people to switch to Linux by making it impossible to do all the things they do in Windows. However, if you can make it even easier to do things in Linux that they currently do in Windows, or allow them to do the same things but also add capabilities that are locked out in Windows, they might just switch. For instance, a browser/flash player that lets them right-click and save a copy of a video (even though the website doesn't want to allow that), is something that many users would like. Or a browser that lets them block certain flash content (ads) while allowing others (videos); this is something you usually don't find from proprietary vendors like MS, because they're more interested in other corporations' interests than in users' interests.

Mixed bag (5, Funny)

noidentity (188756) | about 4 years ago | (#32979372)

The good news: it's an open-source Flash player

The bad news: for better compatibility with web browsers, it's written in Flash

And the critical question.. Does it support FV? (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | about 4 years ago | (#32979402)

Mafia Wars, etc?

Re:And the critical question.. Does it support FV? (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 4 years ago | (#32979764)

I feel dirty for asking this particular question, but did they make some change to mafia wars that requires flash? It's been some time since I played it (and I have no intention of starting up again regardless of your answer, I just want to know how well-informed you are in this case)

Re:And the critical question.. Does it support FV? (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | about 4 years ago | (#32980400)

I "play" farmville to maintain connection with a couple friends. I've blocked mafia wars and had the medieval games. I'm not sure if they use flash.

FV has gotten very annoying lately. You click on "send gifts" and it inserts other pages in the flow to force you to participate in the tuscan wedding.

I am down to about 1 day out of 4 now. The recipes and bushels and other activities are starting to sound like EQ trade skilling and don't match my '20 minutes a day' metric.

Re:And the critical question.. Does it support FV? (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 4 years ago | (#32981484)

The interstitial stupidity is a part of the reason I stopped playing those retarded games. the fact that they're lame had something to do with it too. Now I'm playing another lame game without any added stupidity called dragon's call [gamedp.com] .

PulseAudio (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32979460)

I'm trying to build it now and in case anybody wants to bitch about audio systems, it appears to use PulseAudio.
Of course I have ALSA.

Shit is going to ensue.

Re:PulseAudio (1)

Jorl17 (1716772) | about 4 years ago | (#32979972)

Code your own ALSA backend or find somebody who can! For some reason it is an open-source project!

Well, I did manage to compile it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32979668)

After installing a few packages, it compiled easily on Arch Linux, but it mostly failed the test SWF they asked me to use:
http://www.adobe.com/devnet/flash/samples/drawing_1/1_coordinates.swf

The background is white instead of blue, and I can't drag the little widget around.

I ran one more test before giving up:
-- Homestar Runner SWF "DNA Evidence" - Lightspark doesn't even open a window to try and play it. :/

Good try, but I think Gnash can at least play the Homestar cartoons, although with some small graphical artifacts.

No Windows? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32980132)

I would gladly run this instead of adobe flash if it ran on windows. Flash is the kind of thing I use lightly enough that I wouldn't mind reporting bugs and trying to help out that way.

mod jup (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#32980154)

x86 biased project (1)

pinkishpunk (1461107) | about 4 years ago | (#32981688)

Lightspark is using a Jit(just in time) compiler framework that as it stands right now is x86 only, there will go a long time before this project can help those that adobe doesnt support with their flash player. Those using Powerpc, arm are still without any working flash implementation, can only hope it will support those at a later stage, but I am rather pesemistic.

Fuck Off (1)

seanonymous (964897) | about 4 years ago | (#32982174)

The best thing about Flash, from a programming perspective, is that you don't have to write in a bunch of special cases for different platforms like you do when writing HTML/CSS/JS for IE/Mozilla/WebKit.

If this project catches on, it better be perfect or I'll be one of many writing a sniffer to block my apps from running on it.

Also, the 'Flash is buggy' stuff needs to stop. It makes you sound ignorant. Flash is a runtime. People can write wonderfully stable, efficient code in ActionScript or they can take down the whole process, just like they can in Java, C++, Objective C, or whatever. If flash wan't around, advertisers would hire the same half-wits to write banner ads in Java or JavaScript and your CPU fan would spin just as fast. (This is why you need adblock.)
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