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World of Warcraft Can Boost Your Career

samzenpus posted more than 4 years ago | from the tanking-the-boss dept.

Businesses 272

Hugh Pickens writes "Forbes reports that although videogames have long been thought of as distractions to work and education rather than aids, there is a growing school of thought that says game-playing in moderation, and in your free time, can make you more successful in your career. 'We're finding that the younger people coming into the teams who have had experience playing online games are the highest-level performers because they are constantly motivated to seek out the next challenge and grab on to performance metrics,' says John Hagel III, co-chairman of a tech-oriented strategy center for Deloitte. Elliot Noss, chief executive of domain name provider Tucows, spends six to seven hours a week playing online games and believes World of Warcraft trains him to become a better leader."

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It stands to reason (3, Insightful)

5pp000 (873881) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986776)

It stands to reason that you're learning something when playing a game. It's only a question of how useful that something is in the rest of your life.

Re:It stands to reason (1)

Netshroud (1856624) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986822)

You can learn something from everything.

Re:It stands to reason (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32987088)

Exactly.

In other news... New Study Finds Some Can Balance Work And Hobbies!

And how does that saying go? Ah yes, I remember now:
"All work and no play makes Jack a dull noob."

Re:It stands to reason (5, Funny)

Lord_of_the_nerf (895604) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986870)

If you ever come into a situation where you have to train 10 or 25 people not to stand in fire, you call me.

Re:It stands to reason (2, Funny)

Redlazer (786403) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986914)

BoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

"JESUS CHRIST! JOHNSON! GET OUT OF THE FIRE!"

Headlines: Area man saved by the Mimiron fight.

Re:It stands to reason (3, Funny)

MrNaz (730548) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987504)

Meeting chairman: Let's give these negotiations a break, for a while.
[Executives leave the room]
Sales team leader: Look guys, we haven't convinced them that we're the best guys for their production line. I think they recognize that our services are best of breed, but we still need to get it in the bag. They're in there, deliberating right now, about whether to go with us or the competition. Does anyone have any ideas how we can close the deal?
Sales team member 1: Well, I think we could highlight that we have a longer track record than the compet...
Sales team member (Running back into meeting room): LEEEEEROOOOOY JEEEEEENKIIIIINS!!!!!!

Re:It stands to reason (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32987658)

I recently joined the army you wouldn't think that skill would required but.....

Re:It stands to reason (1)

playbbg (1694996) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987016)

There are many websites covering such like mmorpg and http://www.mmogamesite.com/ [mmogamesite.com]

Re:It stands to reason (4, Funny)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987084)

The hours passed in Slashdot are also very productive. /. removed my upper bound on the douchebaggery and reasoning logic purity I'm capable of displaying.

If extending the discussion enough to win it by attrition doesn't work, I can switch to "that argument is falacious and I'll explain you why, in excruciatingly verbose detail" mode.

Now I just need to spend some time in 4chan and I'll be able to discuss on level even with a partially retarded frog.

Re:It stands to reason (1)

wisty (1335733) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987438)

OK, so you are gradually working up to taking on the Pointy-Haired-Boss?

Frog, you say? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32987692)

I'll find my frog

Who took my frog /goingtohell

Re:It stands to reason (1)

JabrTheHut (640719) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987162)

What is this "rest of your life" that everyone keeps talking about? is it another MMORPG?

Re:It stands to reason (3, Funny)

wisty (1335733) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987524)

"The Rest Of Your Life" is like a MMORPG but it's really boring and repetitive, leveling up takes way too long, people steal the really good drops, you can never get enough gold, and there are too many n00bs.

If you like WoW, you'll LOVE TRoYL

Re:It stands to reason (4, Funny)

silentcoder (1241496) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987858)

TroYL won't get a subscription from me till they fix the respawn bug. Seriously, it seems once you die in TRoYL you just get stuck in the graveyard, no spirit healers or anything - I know some people who have been waiting to respawn their chars for years now and the developers simply don't seem to care about fixing this glaringly obvious bug that really hampers gameplay. Nobody is prepared to take even the slightest risks in bossfights because of it.

Having said that, one thing I do miss about TRoYL - it had the best implementation of /fucking I have EVER played.

Re:It stands to reason (1)

William Robinson (875390) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987556)

My boss didn't believe that playing solitaire improves my ability

Now all I have to do is show him this discussion.

Trains him to become a better leader? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32986814)

Elliot Noss, chief executive of domain name provider Tucows, spends six to seven hours a week playing online games and believes World of Warcraft trains him to become a better leader."

Six to seven hours a week? There's a term for someone who plays such an excessive amount of online games. Let me see if I can think what it is... Oh yeah. I remember now.

That term is "NOOB".

Re:Trains him to become a better leader? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32986854)

Looks most CEO's they are good bullshitters, sounds like he has found an excuse for justifying his gaming habit whilst at work ;)

Re:Trains him to become a better leader? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32986866)

Actually, the term for playing an excessive amount of online games is "no-lifer". Noob is for people that are new or bad at the game. Casual is the term for people that play a few hours a week. On that note, 6-7 hours is nothing considering some guilds in WoW raid at least 4 hours a day, up to 7 days a week.

Re:Trains him to become a better leader? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32986906)

Actually, the term for playing an excessive amount of online games is "no-lifer". Noob is for people that are new or bad at the game. Casual is the term for people that play a few hours a week. On that note, 6-7 hours is nothing considering some guilds in WoW raid at least 4 hours a day, up to 7 days a week.

*WHOOSH*

Re:Trains him to become a better leader? (1)

IndustrialComplex (975015) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987276)

woosh

Re:Trains him to become a better leader? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32987738)

nub

Re:Trains him to become a better leader? (1)

Lord_of_the_nerf (895604) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986894)

Training? Cue the longest, most boring training montage of all time:

Click. Repeat.

Re:Trains him to become a better leader? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32986942)

I wouldn't touch Elliot Noss!

Re:Trains him to become a better leader? (1)

mjwalshe (1680392) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987240)

only 6 or 7 lightweight :-)

Re:Trains him to become a better leader? (1)

codeonezero (540302) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987322)

You obviously never played World of Warcraft 6-7 hours a week is what is called "casual" play. Excessive amount of online game time in a game like WoW is 30-40+ hours a week. Serious raiding starts at 10 hours per week with a highly organized group (which is rare), 20+ with a poorly to mid organized one. And that's not even counting off-raiding time which Blizzard makes sure you put in unless you are really good at playing the Auction House or pay gold farmers for gold.

Re:Trains him to become a better leader? (0)

dnaumov (453672) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987416)

Six to seven hours a week? There's a term for someone who plays such an excessive amount of online games. Let me see if I can think what it is... Oh yeah. I remember now.

That term is "NOOB".

WOW, epic double-fail.

1) 6-7 hours a week not considered excessive for an MMO at all
2) The people who DO play excessively have nothing to do with "noobs" (although arguably even excessive players CAN be noobs).

Re:Trains him to become a better leader? (4, Insightful)

TheLink (130905) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987472)

Quest failed: you did not pick up "Sarcasm" and "Hyperbole".

Please start the quest again.

Totally helps (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32986820)

If you don't have a gearscore over 5.5k you won't get an interview!

Re:Totally helps (1)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986980)

You're using the add-on, aren't you?

Running a guild for a couple years (5, Insightful)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986826)

makes running a mere business department almost child's play.

politics.
prima donnas.
80% of people are users.
sexual harrassment.
achieving short and long term goals.
managing the sheer logistics of a well balanced guild.
learning to delegate to staff.
etc.

Re:Running a guild for a couple years (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986932)

Eve Online has that covered, with an included market place too. You can even delegate hanger rights to members of your corporation.

Re:Running a guild for a couple years (1)

mwvdlee (775178) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987006)

Everything except faily sharing the profits of a raid.

Re:Running a guild for a couple years (2, Insightful)

Aranykai (1053846) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987188)

When was the last time you worked for a business that fairly shared the profits of a sale with you?

Re:Running a guild for a couple years (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32987370)

all of them. I work, and they pay me for my labor, and if I want, I can voluntarily buy stock in the company just like everyone else. That's fair.

Re:Running a guild for a couple years (2, Insightful)

Zelgadiss (213127) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987098)

And even if you are not the leader, you learn a bit about working in groups to get stuff done.

A pity that if you have an addictive personality, the cost of playing outweighs the benefits.

Incredibly useful human group dynamics experience (5, Insightful)

Gavin Scott (15916) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986832)

Running (or trying to run) a significant guild in WoW can teach you more about human group dynamics and people management than you could ever want to know :)

This time I spent playing WoW was *incredibly* valuable to me in this regard, and I don't consider that time wasted at all.

G.

Re:Incredibly useful human group dynamics experien (2, Informative)

vivian (156520) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986890)

I would absolutely agree.
I tend to be the follower type, happy to do as I am told rather than the leader type coming up with the big plan, so to get some experience in a leadership role, I started a guild in another game (not WoW, but one that tends to attract more players in the 30+ age group) specifically for this purpose. It was an interesting experience, and I was surprised at how willing people are to take direction from a leader and have the burden of decision making taken off their shoulders. I also learnt a lot about resolving group conflicts and expectation management.

Overall the experience greatly increased confidence in my ability to lead a group. Another thing I learnt was that often it doesn't matter what decision you make - right or wrong - as long as you make one and accept the consequences, rather than dithering and doing nothing.

Re:Incredibly useful human group dynamics experien (5, Interesting)

snowgirl (978879) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987052)

I definitely agree. I learned a lot about social dynamics and the power of leadership through the various guilds and whatnot I have been involved with leading.

And World of Warcraft also now promotes working with essentially random groups of people. Recognize the weakest link, and ducking out before you've wasted too much time in a losing proposition.

However, that part about them being heavily concerned about gaming performance gauges concerns me... when people are gaming the measurements, you're not getting a true representation of the criteria that you really care about...

Perhaps though, this also means that people will be better able to recognize when someone is clearly overrated... Sure, your gearscore may be epic, but you're playing like a noob.

Re:Incredibly useful human group dynamics experien (4, Insightful)

Darinbob (1142669) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987120)

But please, do not put this on your resume as one of your skills, or as leadership experience. Some people do this, and it generally just gets them laughed at.

Re:Incredibly useful human group dynamics experien (1)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987608)

Not any more.

Re:Incredibly useful human group dynamics experien (1)

Aceticon (140883) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987264)

On a smaller level, running raids is training in team leadership.

You have to know the weaknesses and strenghts of (potential) members while assembling the group and during the fight, you need to "know your enemy", do some tactical planning and serve as a guide before the encounters and you (often) need to give in-encounter commands.

There's also a low level of personality management (especially in Pick-UP Groups) involved and sometimes you have to take hard decisions (like kicking a very underperforming member for a new one).

It must be nice... (1)

ceraphis (1611217) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986836)

...to justify playing an MMO as a leadership opportunity. I wonder if he's getting paid those 6-7 hours as on the job training?

It makes sense. First heard this in December 1995 (5, Informative)

FlorianMueller (801981) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986846)

There's definitely some truth in that. One thing that especially strategy games can teach is to deal with resource constraints and to strike a balance between the different objectives that must be pursued, especially a balance between short-term defensive action and the pursuit of mid-term to long-term strategic goals.

I first heard a manager say this in December 1995. He was one of my business contacts and around that time became VP Sales & Marketing of Germany's largest publisher of dictionaries and language-learning materials. I had done some work on the German version of Warcraft II - Tides of Darkness (PR, marketing, sales, and translation; got listed twice in the game's credits [mobygames.com] ) and I gave copies to business partners like the person I just mentioned. He became addicted to it and told me that when his wife criticized him for spending so much time on the thing, he explained to her that this was basically like management training :-)

At the time computer games weren't online, so except for those who went to "LAN parties" with other gamers, gameplay was a solo mission. Now one can actually practice leadership and diplomacy. But even just the virtual resource management challenge of a game like Warcraft II has value in itself.

When I was running the NoSoftwarePatents campaign years ago, it also felt like real-time strategy in many respects :-) And lots of Orcs to fight against.

Re:It makes sense. First heard this in December 19 (1)

snowgirl (978879) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987060)

VP Sales & Marketing of Germany's largest publisher of dictionaries and language-learning materials

This is clearly either Duden, or Berlitz. Because of the language-learning side, I'm leaning towards Berlitz, but it's not the first one that came to mind.

Re:It makes sense. First heard this in December 19 (1)

FlorianMueller (801981) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987252)

This is clearly either Duden, or Berlitz. Because of the language-learning side, I'm leaning towards Berlitz, but it's not the first one that came to mind.

Duden belongs to the publishing group I meant (Langenscheidt).

Re:It makes sense. First heard this in December 19 (1)

ejsnow (121810) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987598)

err Trolls.....

Re:It makes sense. First heard this in December 19 (1)

silentcoder (1241496) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987888)

>When I was running the NoSoftwarePatents campaign years ago, it also felt like real-time strategy in many respects :-) And lots of Orcs to fight against.

Not to mention all the trolls...

Useless hype... (-1, Flamebait)

blahplusplus (757119) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986850)

... the only thing WoW teaches anybody is to learn how to waste money on a game that's less of a game then single player RPG's of years past.

Re:Useless hype... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32986902)

... the only thing WoW teaches anybody is to learn how to waste money on a game that's less of a game then single player RPG's of years past.

I don't think it matters quite what you're doing (WoW or otherwise). As long as it's a people- and team-oriented, competitive experience, you're going to get something valuable from it.

Don't forget that the infamous intarwebs anonymity occasionally has benefits: like allowing people to try out a leadership role (yeah, with other actual human beings following them!) that they might never get in real life.

Re:Useless hype... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32987026)

Well it certainly didn't teach you to differentiate between "then" and "than".

Useless hype ... it's not that trite. (2, Insightful)

Hidyman (225308) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987230)

I think you are missing the whole "Interacting with humans" dynamic.
You can have a brilliantly scripted game, but it will always be just that, a scripted game.
Humans add an element of unpredictability that will keep you on your toes.
After you master the "game", you start to learn what really makes the game tick, the variability of human interaction.
I think that human interaction is what the original article is referring to, and what elevates an MMORPG above a standard RPG.
This is obviously debatable, but I assure you that leadership of a robot (NPC) squad bears very little resemblance leading 4 or 5 humans into the fray.

Out of balance at times. (4, Insightful)

GeorgeTech (1861614) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986860)

Moderation is the key here. Most WoW players that I know do not play in moderation. The time spent playing this game and other Online RPGS is very out of balance with other things that are much more important in life. Such as your marriage, your kids, your job and many other necessary things. If you are single this may not be the case, but you know the point I am trying to make. Please do not get me wrong here, there are those who can play with moderation and more power to you. I myself have done my fair share of online grinding to hit my toons level cap, but I also know that there is a very fine line between healthy online playing and being severely out of balance.

Re:Out of balance at times. (2, Interesting)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987024)

This has already been parodied beautifully -- look up "date my avatar" on YouTube, and the running comedy of "The Guild".

I play WoW for a number of reasons, one subtle one being that I'm uh, "chronologically privileged". I get puffed taking out the rubbish, but my Hunter can run all day and kick serious butt.

Anyone thinking there's no value to the organisation training provided by WoW has never tried to take down any of the Ice Crown Cathedral bosses in a 10-man raid. These things are intense, people, and if you screw up even a tiny bit you can wipe the raid. You'll hear about it from your guildies if you do.

if that's true... (1, Troll)

jamesh (87723) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986868)

If that's true, then why is everybody I know of who plays WoW or other similar games an overweight unemployed loser?

Re:if that's true... (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986886)

Clique?

Re:if that's true... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32986966)

It's only natural to spend time with people who are like yourself.

Re:if that's true... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32987216)

You must be an American, unemployed overweight losers seem to be in excess in your country right now.

Re:if that's true... (1)

maliamnon (1848524) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987332)

Most people who play WoW don't participate in the activities that provide leadership and group interaction experience. For an average progression guild there are 1-6 people who could possibly have the opportunity to gain valuable leadership experience, and 19-35 (benchies) who are being led. And then for every person in a progression guild there are hundreds (if not thousands) of people playing the game that aren't even being led by the leaders. For most people, all the people they know who play WoW will fall into the non-leader majority, which fits your experiences perfectly. This, imo, is what gives MMOs and other online games a bad rap.

Re:if that's true... (4, Insightful)

Aceticon (140883) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987344)

If that's true, then why is everybody I know of who plays WoW or other similar games an overweight unemployed loser?

Having played something like 5 different MMORPGs over the years, with the exception of the teenagers I have yet to come across any unemployed team member in any of the guilds I've been with. For those that have pictures, none is fat. (I myself make about 5x the average income in where I live and am not fat)

I can only think of a couple explanations for the disconnect between what you are saying and what I see:
- You are lying, probably for shock reasons - i.e. you're trolling.
- I'm in the EU zone and you are in another area and the demographics of players is different.
- You yourself are unemployed and usually play at core work hours when anybody with a job will not be online, so everybody you cross paths with is either unemployed or an below work age.
- Personal self-selection: maybe the type of person you get well enough and for long enough with to be told what they do is the kind of people that tend to be fat and unemployed.

I currently live in the UK and I'm sure that if I frequented the local pubs during work days at the core working hours, I pretty much would only come across (fat) unemployed people.

Re:if that's true... (1)

maliamnon (1848524) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987374)

Most people who play WoW don't participate in the activities that provide leadership and group interaction experience. For an average progression guild there are 1-6 people who could possibly have the opportunity to gain valuable leadership experience, and 19-35 (benchies) who are being led. And then for every person in a progression guild there are hundreds (if not thousands) of people playing the game that aren't even being led by the leaders. For most people, all the people they know who play WoW will fall into the non-leader majority, which fits your experiences perfectly. This, imo, is what gives MMOs and other online games a bad rap.

Re:if that's true... (1)

Canazza (1428553) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987414)

I have a job, you insensitive clod!

Re:if that's true... (1)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987646)

More than likely it's because people who play those games find your condescension repulsive and avoid you like they would a dog with rabies. It's the same reason none of the people I know go to the gym six times a week and drink protein milkshakes; I don't like those people, and choose not to associate with them. I find them vapid and narcissistic.

If you're having trouble with that concept, just put it down to "safety in numbers" and forget all about it. They're not missing out on much.

Re:if that's true... (2, Insightful)

DMorritt (923396) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987754)

I think this is maybe more telling about the people you know, than the people that play WoW. Most of the people I have met have jobs or are students.

Re:if that's true... (1)

the way (22503) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987832)

If that's true, then why is everybody I know of who plays WoW or other similar games an overweight unemployed loser?

Success at WoW depends partly on having plenty of time (which unemployed people will have), and requires lots of time sitting in front of a PC (which may mean less time exercising, leading to weight gain).

So it seems quite possible that being overweight and unemployed is correlated with playing WoW - but if so, I would expect the causation is in the opposite direction to what you imply, and does not disprove the assertion that managing a guild can help your people management skills.

Re:if that's true... (1)

silentcoder (1241496) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987916)

I'm guessing because "the people you know" is not a sufficiently large sample size to give statistical validity ?

Or else, based on your tone... perhaps it's because everybody you know is an overweight, unemployed loser anyway regardless of wheter or not they also play WoW. Birds of a feather and all that...

Yea, ask any Blizzard employee. (4, Interesting)

BitZtream (692029) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986918)

I'm pretty sure they've all had better careers because of WoW, and of course the majority of the WoW team HAS a career because of it, so its certainly made their careers better.

I would like to point out however, the rest of us have know that 'games boost your career' for years.

Why do you think people play golf? Its not about liking golf, its a awesome way to get someone drunk and talk about business while in a relaxed setting. You get far more accomplished in this setting than you do in a conference room or office. People let their guard down and feel they can trust someone more in that environment, makes deals far more likely to happen.

Real business happens on the golf course. WoW is just another golf course.

Re:Yea, ask any Blizzard employee. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32987810)

While I enjoy playing WoW myself, I do not see the game as playing any significant role in my success in reality, other than it helps keep the mind sharp by making me think. It definitely beats watching the TV, which is loaded with mindless content. Either way, I take articles like this at "face value". This article is merely a couple interesting opinions, much like our comments. One thing for sure is I will take World of Warcraft any day over a boring game of golf.

Re:Yea, ask any Blizzard employee. (1)

blanck (1458239) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987880)

In fact, some got their start at Blizzard after making a name for themselves with what would be considered excessive EverQuest play: Furor [wowwiki.com] & Tigole [wowwiki.com]

If putting lots of hours into an MMO makes you happy, why not keep playing? Maybe you'll become a game designer some day.

How much leadership ability is required... (3, Insightful)

superdude72 (322167) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986920)

...to run a domain name provider? Let's face it, they're not exactly curing cancer. People who spend half their lives playing WoW are probably well suited to sitting at computers for hour after hour, pushing buttons that are wired to produce reward or punishment at just the right intervals to keep people pushing buttons. Not that different from a lot of dead-end IT jobs, actually. But I wouldn't equate that with WoW being excellent training for anything else.

Congrats Bob, you've made Shitkicker leve (1)

ghmh (73679) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986944)

Huge suprise. People motivated by in-game rewards of questionable value as a result of grinding, are also motivated by cheap to worthless company 'rewards'. The fact you're grinding together in a group may make it less of a drag than grinding alone, but it's still grinding.

Leroy Jenkins is the new Warren Buffet (1)

zeil (1690682) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986950)

"Elliot Noss, chief executive of domain name provider Tucows, spends six to seven hours a week playing online games and believes World of Warcraft trains him to become a better leader." Love it!!!!

Causation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32986968)

Correlation does not mean causation?

I wonder if this is true for nethack? (4, Insightful)

kainosnous (1753770) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986974)

I've probably spent most of my gaming time playing nethack. I wonder if that counts for anything. I've learned not to steal from shopkeepers, you should always know where the stairs are, and that eating cats is a bad idea. Sadly, writing "Elbereth" on your desk won't keep you from getting fired. It does seem to keep the giant ants away, though.

Re:I wonder if this is true for nethack? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32987044)

I've learned not to steal from shopkeepers

Unless you've trained your pet to lift stuff over the threshold for you, or you brought a shovel to tunnel your way out, of course.

Ah Tucows, (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32986976)

I haven't been on there since the turn of the century.

Correction! (4, Informative)

Cyberllama (113628) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986988)

It can help your career skills! If anyone actaully finds out that you play, it can seriously harm your career. Regardless of what real-life benefits it might confer, it still comes with a huge stigma. This is the main reason why Blizzard recent efforts with RealID were uniformly rejected by the community. Many gamers, especially MMO-gamers, are still in the "closet" to their friends and co-workers.

Re:Correction! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32987094)

And Blizzard is connecting Starcraft II to Facebook! WTF? If we spend more time on Starcraft than we do working at work, we really don't want people to know about that.

Is this slashdot? (2, Informative)

krou (1027572) | more than 4 years ago | (#32986994)

Whatever happened to "correlation is not causation"? The article is a little short of scientific evidence to back up its claims except for a few anecdotal stories. Maybe it could be that the types of people who excel at WoW, or are drawn to playing particular games, already have these particular traits. The game may help them realise this, but to say gaming can boost your career is just a silly headline to grab attention. Just because the article is talking about a positive effect of games doesn't mean we shouldn't think about this critically.

Re:Is this slashdot? (4, Funny)

tnok85 (1434319) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987050)

Honestly, I think the correlation of correlation not being causation is simply that - a correlation. Since correlation is not causation, we can not be certain that correlation not being causation is not simply a correlation, rather than a causation.

Re:Is this slashdot? (3, Interesting)

Jack9 (11421) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987156)

Using the words "playing", "boost" and "career", what data would you suggest? It's a subjective view about subjective things. Saying "Using brighter colors can make art prettier." requires as much empirical evidence.

I happened to have gotten an awesome job because most of my interview consisted of me talking about my leadership role in a WoW guild (and I think the part where I said I didn't play anymore gave me some points). I thought it was strange at the time.

I now believe that it's very difficult to quantify a person's experience in social group management. The number of people who have participated in leadership of a virtual (mixed age) group greatly outnumbers those who have participated in leadership of real life adults.

YMMV

Re:Is this slashdot? (1)

deniable (76198) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987174)

I'm sure it came up the last time this was posted. In other news "Slashdot reading helps pattern matching and dupe detection skills."

As a former WoW player... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32987004)

[rant]
I was very motivated when I started my current job. New skillset to learn, techniques to master, more acronyms and experience to add to the resume. Plus, they were very up front about their policy of "promoting from within." I was overqualified for the job and figured that I would be able to move up quickly to a more suitable position. To me, the job was similar to WoW in a lot of regards; it was a tedious grind, but practice and effort would be rewarded, right?

[gripe]
Not so much. I found out that the company (despite being a major player in the bioscience world) was run with a mindset similar to that of a fast food joint. We are paid to show up, not for the results we produce. Promotions are based solely around the amount of time that you've been in your position, not around your skills or expertise. For example, a coworker of mine with an online bachelors degree in an unrelated field and no job experience outside of her work at this location just got promoted, while I, with an MS in biotech and years of experience before starting here was passed over because she started working there a couple months before I did. To them, the date on the calendar is the only metric of our performance that matters. They won't even give me a better reference for the extra work; corporate policy is that references are to confirm only the dates of employment and the position held; nothing more. And so the grind became pointless, and rather than honing my skills or going the extra mile, I'm now content with simple mediocrity. There's no motivation to excel, and even less motivation to improve things;(those that reinforce the status quo are much more likely to meet with frustration than those who rock the boat).
[/gripe]

Contrast that to WoW, where the skill level of individual players is more readily apparent, and recognition is given based more on skill than on time spent logged in (This of course assumes something more organized than a PUG - a measure that any decent business should easily surpass). So in my experience, the corporate world could stand to be a little more like WoW than they currently are.
[/rant]

Helped get me a job (1)

Smoke2Joints (915787) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987018)

Part of the reason I got my current job was because I was a gamer. It was something they were looking for, but only because they all were as well :)

Just ask Leeroy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32987056)

If it doesn't help you get a job, at least you'll have chicken.

There's a simpler explanation (2, Insightful)

Goalie_Ca (584234) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987086)

People who play world of warcraft have no lives. This is exactly what certain companies (especially high tech) are looking for. Young employees who will sit down in front of a computer for a million hours without any family or friends to draw them away.

For everyone else NOT making 6-7 figures (1)

Chas (5144) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987104)

It's something for your bosses to worry about as something that takes attention away from your job.
It's something that, if they know about it, can cause prospective employers to be biased against you and accept another applicant in your place, even with lesser credentials than you have.

And the employment experience funny?

Harnessing The Boundless Source (2, Insightful)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987118)

If you can harness the boundless source of energy that is the Gold Farmer to do mundane corporate tasks, you can rule the world.

Thought So (1)

wzzzzrd (886091) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987122)

When I played WoW, I led a medium sized guild. And yes, it definitely improved my "soft skills", aka people management, leadership, etc. Organizing raids, reducing guild drama, keep em entertained, recruiting new players without making it feel like a job and thousand other things.

Oh, and cram all that into 4h a day at evening max.

farmvile (1)

bakamorgan (1854434) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987180)

So that means when I see all these women playing farmville I can say they are in training? Ya know, training for repetitive and boring jobs, like house work, cooking, sectary jobs, and other low paying jobs. hahaha

Correlation, not causation... (1)

srothroc (733160) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987272)

Wouldn't it be equally as likely that, say, people who are driven to achieve do better in WoW /and/ real life? Actually, I find that MORE likely than the idea that WoW makes lazy people goal-oriented and gives them a personal drive...

"and grab on to performance metrics" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32987300)

Gamers know how to game the system, big surprise. Performing well in performance metrics does not imply you perform well on the job (although "managers" might disagree). It means you know how the reward system works, and can maximise the return on the amount of effort you put in.

Just another excuse..... (0, Troll)

Berkyjay (1225604) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987342)

...to justify a gamer wasting his life away by accomplishing tasks completely useless to the planet and society.

Re:Just another excuse..... (1)

DMorritt (923396) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987712)

As opposed to watching tv, reading a book, going to the movies, sorting your stamp collection (do people still have those?), or whatever you do to pass your free time? People see gaming as "wasted time", however it's no worse than most other leisure time. After all isn't *all* leisure time wasted? How does posting comments on /. in your free time benefit the planet and society?

producer > consumer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32987392)

If you build, you understand. Build something. People skills are soft. Building a guild is a social structure, not a capital good. Building things will become progressively easier. You can start a business around what you produce. Don't just be a player in an existing structure. Build!

It is as useful as army training (3, Insightful)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987410)

Management skills and combat skills have both the same difficulty, hard to train without doing it for real and the risk are often just to big for it to be done for real.

How do you gain leadership experience when no business in their right mind is going to give a kid a chance? Oh we got this project that the future of the company depends on, lets give it to the new guy. See if he got what it takes.

That is why things like taking part in school activities, running the school newspaper COUNT during a job interview. Shows you did more then just sit on your arse, that you can do something. Lead, take charge.

MMO raid leaders and guild leaders are just the new coach of the highschool soccer team.

If you never played these games, or suck at it, it might not be clear, so allow me to illustrate with Lord of the Rings Online, my own waste of time.

Situation: Minstrels are the primary healing class and you can't find any. What do you do?

Answer 1: I sit there for hour after hour spamming the chat channels asking, demanding no screaming for a minstrel.

Answer 2: I look at the classes I have got and adjust the strategy to handle the situation, for instance by relying on captains for healing and asking the DPS classes to trade some DPS for survivability.

Who would you hire? NO, the point is NOT that knowing that captains can very effective healers or that good champions (dps class that dies a lot) can adjust their style to be less squishy makes you a good manager. The trick is that the second answer showed you can be flexible. Work around a problem rather then beat yourself to death against it.

Situation: Level 65, the discussion on whether the game should be more solo friendly.

Person A: Yes, I am a champ and never can find anyone for the very hard stuff I can't just DPS my way through and I am not a member of a kin because they all suck and expect constant hand holding.

Person B: No, I am a captain and finding a fellowship is easy enough, I start by asking in chat channel if someone else needs it, and if I need to I ask for help from my kin and friend list, since I am a captain, I can always summon someone to my side, a really useful skill. And a captain is always welcome since we give nice boosts to everyone else.

Who do you hire for your team? The DPS who can only DPS because everyone is working their ass of the keep him alive? The prima dona? Or the team player, the guy who knows he is best when he works with others to offset his own shortcoming and augment other peoples strong points?

It makes no real difference if it is a MMO, a knitting club or the rugby team. You can tell what kind of person they are by their role in their team. And if you find a person who doesn't play a team sport, doesn't play group games... well smile a lot and get the interview over as quickly as possible because you got yourself a psycho.

Being a successful raid leader means you can make over a dozen people work together who all have their own agenda and who can't be fired. Compared to that, running a multi-national is a piece of cake. Not because leading a raid is the same as leading a business team but because the essential skills have a lot in common. It is what the obstacle course is to real combat. Not the same at all, but the best you can get without actually going to war to train your soldiers. How else is a 16 year old going to get leadership experience? I am perfectly willing to raid with a young kid in charge even if they never done it before. That is how you learn, but have the same kid lead a project at work? No thanks.

Re:It is as useful as army training (1)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987838)

Dang. I was with you until you decided to dump the loner. You're making a mistake that you yourself are saying you don't make: Forgetting to be flexible.

For some jobs, loners are the best workers. And some loners have skills that you just won't find in a team player. You can't judge a person just on one facet of their personality.

Bonus points (1)

RivenAleem (1590553) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987732)

Bonus points for anyone who can guess the name of his Tauren Char

TUCOWS (1)

the way (22503) | more than 4 years ago | (#32987818)

chief executive of domain name provider Tucows

How things change. When I see "Tucows", I still think of "The Ultimate Collection of Winsock Software". But then they started listing software that didn't use winsock... and then people stopped using the term "winsock" at all... and then they created the OpenSRS domain registration service... and now they are known as "domain name provider Tucows".

maybe when it first came out... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#32987830)

wow has been so simplified for the masses at this point, that is not the case anymore. they have unfortunatly made the game to easy to please everyone.

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