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Apple Launches New Magical Trackpad, 12 Core Macs

CmdrTaco posted more than 4 years ago | from the oh-oh-oh-its-magic dept.

Input Devices 432

theappwhisperer writes "The Magic Trackpad is basically a larger version of the MacBook Pro touchpad, with 80% more surface area for all your swiping and pinching. The entire surface acts as a button, so it's also a possible mouse replacement. And all of the expected gestures are here: two-finger scrolling, pinch to zoom, fingertip rotation, and three- and four-finger swipes. You can enable and disable gestures at your discretion from System Preferences." They also launched 12-core Mac Pros coming in August.

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I'm selling my neighbors kids to get one of these (4, Funny)

alta (1263) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045142)

works out great for me, I get a new computer and get one of those damn kids out of my hair.

Any takers? SHould I put them on craigslist or ebay?

Re:I'm selling my neighbors kids to get one of the (2, Funny)

bannable (1605677) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045216)

Put two in craigslist's personals and the rest on eBay. That ought to do it!

Re:I'm selling my neighbors kids to get one of the (4, Funny)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045582)

I didn't know Apple did Trade-ins for non Apple products.

Re:I'm selling my neighbors kids to get one of the (0)

Microlith (54737) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045790)

They're called "future cultists." It's the easiest way to generate more followers and customers get a great deal on new hardware.

More magic? (2, Insightful)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045148)

Honestly, I find this "magic" marketing strategy to be a complete turnoff.

Re:More magic? (3, Insightful)

ari_j (90255) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045214)

More of a turn-off than i-everything? Honestly, if you're going to pick an Apple product naming issue to complain about, 'magic' is always going to be striving for the silver medal.

Re:More magic? (1)

Fishchip (1203964) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045246)

Should this device be filed under iMagic Trackpad or Magic iTrackpad?

Re:More magic? (0, Flamebait)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045858)

They call it the iProselytize.

fuckin' trackpads, HOW DO THEY WORK?!! (0)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045998)

strange, I don't really see *pple pursuing the Juggaloo demographic, what's up with that?

Re: Apple product naming (2, Interesting)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045656)

It's brilliant, really. We're just complaining about "unified branding". People are forgetting that the prior marketing disaster was "My". My documents, Myspace, yecch.

"e" was taken and done to death. e-mail, e-zines, etc.

Any sufficiently advanced technology... (1)

ThrowAwaySociety (1351793) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045234)

Honestly, I find this "magic" marketing strategy to be a complete turnoff.

The fact that you're on Slashdot makes you Not The Target Market.

To most people, virtually any computer thingie is sufficiently advanced.

Re:Any sufficiently advanced technology... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33045308)

You seem to be under the mistaken impression that the majority of people on Slashdot actually understand technology.

Re:Any sufficiently advanced technology... (1)

insertwackynamehere (891357) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045808)

I made a website in HTML once. Can I talk about things that 4chan told me to hate with the big boys, now?

Re:Any sufficiently advanced technology... (1)

jgagnon (1663075) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045974)

If you didn't hand type it with ALT-#### codes then it doesn't count. :p

Re:Any sufficiently advanced technology... (5, Insightful)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045612)

Well, what about the 12-core Mac? I mean, the only people who are really going to be able to make use of that kind of power are the same type of people who look at Mac OS X as a friendly Unix that can run Matlab AND Photoshop, probably heavy on the Matlab. Maybe 3D animators, but I've known a few of those, and they were pretty on the ball in general. I mean, I see a 12-core Mac Pro and think back to the Mac Pro we had mixed in with the HP and Sun workstations in the FEL control room when I did an internship back in 2002, I don't think "web designer" or "philosophy major." Just saying.

Re:Any sufficiently advanced technology... (1, Troll)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045728)

Apple isn't about making cool technology any more - it's about marketing to the masses.

Sure, I can use a 12-core device - but then again, I can write multi-threaded code in c, so I'm not dependent on a higher-level abstraction to hopefully "manage" my threading for me (while sucking so much resources that 12 cores becomes the new dual core). The average user simply can't even make proper use of 4 cores - and if you gave them a really pimped-out liquid-cooled overclocked single-core 32-bit machine (gobs or ram, a really good motherboard, multiple hard drives with the os and data spread amongst them so almost every drive access hits the drive cache), a slimmed-down OS that doesn't need to run bloatware like virus scanners, and stuck a 12-core label on it, they would be enthusiastic. AND most of their software would run faster.

Re:Any sufficiently advanced technology... (1)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045878)

likewise the average program, even plenty of games, can't even make proper use of 4 cores. Wasn't there an article about this on slashdot recently?

Re:More magic? (5, Insightful)

mini me (132455) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045488)

You don't have to make love to the product. If the product is useful to you, buy it. If not, do not buy it. Who cares what marketing has to say?

Re:More magic? (5, Funny)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045604)

You don't have to make love to the product.

You would if my app wasn't rejected.

Re:More magic? (2, Funny)

ground.zero.612 (1563557) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045492)

Honestly, I find this "magic" marketing strategy to be a complete turnoff.

Well, I guess Steve Jobs learned his lesson with "really cool engineering". What else is left besides "magic"?

"Combining the really cool engineering of the iPhone 4, and the magic of the new iMac; I am pleased to announce to the world the iAlchemist. Yes that's right folks, as long as you don't hold it the wrong way, your iAlchemist can use the power of alchemy to turn lead into gold!"

Re:More magic? (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045698)

your iAlchemist can use the power of alchemy to turn lead into gold!

Uh, we're lead free solder here, thank you.

Re:More magic? (2, Funny)

ground.zero.612 (1563557) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045874)

your iAlchemist can use the power of alchemy to turn lead into gold!

Uh, we're lead free solder here, thank you.

I'd be happy to redirect a barge full of toys en route from China to one of your local ports; for a nominal fee of course. :)

Re:More magic? (4, Funny)

Sturm (914) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045828)

At least they didn't call it,

iMagic.

So... (2, Interesting)

skyride (1436439) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045156)

What exactly is the benefit of this over a conventional mouse?

Re:So... (1, Insightful)

Nerdfest (867930) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045238)

No desk space required ... but it will probably retain most of the disadvantages of other trackpads while adding a bit more usability.

Re:So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33045434)

Ah, so just like a trackball, then?

Re:So... (3, Interesting)

arivanov (12034) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045452)

And enhance the biggest disadvantage of trackpads - RSI.

I really do not want to think on how my hand will feel after 8-10h a day of pinching, zooming and rotating your finger on a touch surface. It is OK on a notebook or a phone once in a while. It will be an absolute ligament killer on a desktop when used in a work environment.

Re:So... (1)

asukasoryu (1804858) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045646)

I really do not want to think on how my hand will feel after 8-10h a day of pinching, zooming and rotating your finger on a touch surface. It is OK on a notebook or a phone once in a while. It will be an absolute ligament killer on a desktop when used in a work environment.

The life of a porn star is tough.

Re:So... (1)

linhares (1241614) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045982)

i respectfully disagree

Re:So... (1)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045454)

No desk space required ... but it will probably retain most of the disadvantages of other trackpads while adding a bit more usability.

My mouse only takes up as much room as my mouse pad. From what I have seen on TFA, my mouse pad is comparable in size to this device. Plus I use a wired mouse, so no batteries needed either. About the only benefit I can see is in multi-touch. But my normal operating paradigm doesn't need multi-touch.

Re:So... (4, Interesting)

ari_j (90255) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045242)

Huge multitouch surface. Two-finger scrolling on my Powerbook's trackpad makes it a useful machine for browsing the web without an external mouse attached. That said, my desktop is most likely always going to have an external mouse attached, so I don't know how much usability gain you get from it.

Re:So... (4, Interesting)

Altus (1034) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045758)

Here at work I am using one of these Apple touch surface mice. Its the nicest mouse I have used in a very long time. I love the 2D touch scrolling on it.

I guess multi touch would be nice but I cant see this being better than what I have here for the work I do. Maybe for graphics and video work it would come in more handy.

On the other hand this thing would be perfect as an input device for controlling my media sever from my coffee table.

Re:So... (2, Informative)

somersault (912633) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045314)

Scrolling should be a lot nicer. The only couple of things I miss from my MBP are the multitouch scrolling (drag two fingers around to scroll), and the way you could hold down two fingers and click the button to simulate a right click. I've been back using a normal PC touchpad for over a year now but I still like that better than having two trackpad buttons.

A lot of games would still be better with a mouse though IMO, I guess because you use your wrist to control movement while your fingers are free for button control.

Re:So... (1)

mini me (132455) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045524)

Trackpads are more enjoyable to use under most circumstances.

Cores do not equal power (3, Insightful)

Robotron23 (832528) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045192)

As others have noted here in the past, the number of processing cores do not a powerful computer make. A lot of the time with both laptops and PCs the cores are entirely unused. You could get a finely made quad-core which is standard fare nowadays, and have it work much faster than a six or dozen core system like these Mac pros.

Since processing is largely a duopoly of AMD and Intel, both have been guilty of marketing their hardware by highlighting the core numbers. Yet it's the architecture, pressure under strain, among other things that actually equate to performance.

Re:Cores do not equal power (3, Informative)

Alakaboo (171129) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045332)

All but the highest-end iMac are dual-core. The lowest-end Mac Pro is quad-core. If someone is going to drop $5K+ on a Mac Pro with 12 cores, they either have money to throw around or they know what they're doing.

Re:Cores do not equal power (3, Interesting)

grub (11606) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045474)


I don't think money is much of an issue for the target market. 12 core machines are aimed at the professional market who will use these devices to make money through rendering and other things lots-o-cores excel at.

That's why they're using Xeons, I think these one are around $900-$1K per.

Re:Cores do not equal power (1)

Alakaboo (171129) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045732)

Right, that would be the "or they know what they're doing" part of my original comment.

These Xeons are currently over $1K each, at least on Newegg.

Re:Cores do not equal power (5, Interesting)

0100010001010011 (652467) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045848)

Exactly. Say a very good artist makes $50/hour. Cost to his company (Health insurance, his desk, power to his desk, 401k, taxes) is roughly double that: $100/hour.

If one of these new duodeccore processor computers is $12k. As soon as it saves the user from 120 hours of rendering, it's paid for itself. I can easily see someone hitting that in a year. Between opening a 20MP RAW to saving, to applying filters, etc.

Now these machines aren't going to be used for just a single year. Figure 3 year life span, at which point it's resold for $2,000 and the user is upgraded to the viginticore.

The 'machine' cost $10,000. They can subtract depreciation from taxes. Saved countless hours (one second at a time) of their artists.

/ These numbers are made up to be round. I have no clue what graphic artists make, so don't get on my case about that. Adjust numbers accordingly. //I also don't know Latin. I just copied wiki.

Exactly (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33045900)

I'll be buying a 12 core Mac, because it will help me get my job done in a little less time, and will pay for itself in half a day's work tops. With 12 cores, it will be about a quarter of a day. Then I can spend the rest of the week doing whatever the fuck I want.

Agreed. That +50% comes out of nowhere. (1)

e065c8515d206cb0e190 (1785896) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045334)

Sure, you have +50% cores (12 instead of 8). Now in terms of productivity, how much are you likely to gain? Not much, unless you run number crunching software that can scale to multiple cores. It's been several years since we've seen the introduction of multi-core machines. Yet I'm not sure software is being developed with that in mind. On the good side, putting SSDs in that machine will make the processor(s) less likely to wait for I/O on demanding tasks. The article fails to mention... is flash supported?

Re:Agreed. That +50% comes out of nowhere. (5, Interesting)

ground.zero.612 (1563557) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045756)

Sure, you have +50% cores (12 instead of 8). Now in terms of productivity, how much are you likely to gain?

I recently tried to spec out a render node for a graphics artist friend of mine. I was trying to convince him that a single CPU mid-range Nehalem based Xeon system might be more cost effective in the long run. His plan was to build a single CPU Extreme Edition Core-i7 system. This was based on Netrender's benchmark utility placing this single CPU system ahead of the dual C2Q systems by a large margin, and even way ahead of dual Nehalem systems.

My logic failed to win the argument. I simply can't spec a dual quad-core Nehalem that can beat a single i7-EE. Even cost over time, it looks more cost effective to build two i7-EE systems instead of a single dual CPU system.

So, to answer the question directly, I would guess my friend is looking at gaining perhaps ~1hr a day in rendering time. That might be huge.

Re:Cores do not equal power (4, Insightful)

DavidpFitz (136265) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045338)

As others have noted here in the past, the number of processing cores do not a powerful computer make.

For sure; but this is aimed at people who are would be rendering video on their desktop or other CPU heavy creative tasks (e.g. Photoshop on massively high resolution images).

This isn't aimed at your average Mac user, or even your 'power-user' - it's aimed at people who need huge amounts of CPU every now and then.

Re:Cores do not equal power (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33045502)

Another example would be audio recording/editing where there could be any number of effects prosescors running in software over a couple dozen tracks, all expected to respond in real time.

There's a reason logic pro has the capability of running in a cluster.

Re:Cores do not equal power (1)

Robotron23 (832528) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045754)

That's true and the OP never denied that.

But the fact is that in 3 or 4 years 12 core technology could well be in place on standard home PCs, where the most strain possible is a newly released videogame.

The niche market of video renderers and other early adopters are only the first stage of buyers for this hardware - other customers will buy into it as the tech proliferates. History has shown we've seen widely marketed multi-cores aimed at everybody; and that's really what my beef is with AMD/Intel and others - they sell their stuff with the implied pretence that a big speed increase will result from more cores: It doesn't.

That is why I felt the need to point that out above. Many will buy a 12-core CPU in ~2014, just as people who don't do CPU-heavy tasking are buying 6-core Thubans now with the anticipation of a processing power gain far greater than really happens.

Re:Cores do not equal power (5, Insightful)

ironring2006 (968941) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045398)

If you think you can get by just fine on just a quad-core, then you're not the target market. Simple as that. I get by just fine on my entry level MacMini. There won't be a huge volume of sales of the 12 core systems, but there exists a market (however relatively small) that needs every bit of computing power they can get. They're also the ones willing to invest in the software architechture to get the most out of the hardware.

Re:Cores do not equal power (3, Informative)

yumyum (168683) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045428)

A lot of the time with both laptops and PCs the cores are entirely unused.

So? That is more a problem of application programmers than hardware designers.

Since processing is largely a duopoly of AMD and Intel, both have been guilty of marketing their hardware by highlighting the core numbers.

This does not even make sense. Why shouldn't a company tout the fact that they have more cores on a chip than before? And this is Apple's advertising anyway, not AMD/Intel. The price alone would keep most people from buying the high-end, as it always has. However, for my work in radar signal processing using heavily-threaded applications, this machine would be a great addition to my desktop since I would no longer have to run my signal processing streams distributed over several hosts; one host could do the job just fine.

Re:Cores do not equal power (5, Insightful)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045510)

It depends on how you define "power." If it's in terms of the number of calculations per second the computer is capable of doing, then of course more cores equals more power. The question is whether you're going to be running software that uses that power. The sterotypical "I just want to surf the web and read e-mail" low-end user isn't going to, but then, that guy isn't in the target market for this machine.

In bioinformatics, many of the problem we work on are "embarrassingly parallel," and I can guarantee you that I'd have no problem keeping all 12 cores on this machine busy. But scientists are a tiny niche market, of course. Presumably the new Mac Pro is mainly being pitched, as previous machines in the lines have been, to graphics and video pros. Can Photoshop and Illustrator and Final Cut use an arbitrarily large number of cores efficiently?

Re:Cores do not equal power (4, Informative)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045642)

Can Photoshop and Illustrator and Final Cut use an arbitrarily large number of cores efficiently?

Arbitrarily large numbers of cores? No, not a chance, certainly not on a shared memory architecture like the system in question. 12 cores is probably going to be OK, but when you pass 16 cores you'll start to notice the memory bottleneck; once you are at 64 cores you are basically at the limit of usefulness for shared memory architectures, and you have to be careful about memory access patterns or your software will be slower. Even "embarrassingly parallel" can suffer if the memory access patterns are bad.

There is a reason that almost all of the supercomputers in use today use some sort of NUMA or distributed memory architecture.

Re:Cores do not equal power (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33045532)

Especially under OSX, with its terrible threading model [anandtech.com] .

Yeah, I know mac fanboys - "just avoid using it that way", right?

Re:Cores do not equal power (1)

insertwackynamehere (891357) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045950)

That article is from 2005 (5 years ago). It discusses OS X servers before x86 architecture was even implemented and PPC was ditched.

Re:Cores do not equal power (5, Interesting)

aclarke (307017) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045558)

I have an 8-core Mac Pro. It's currently running a 4 core Windows 2008 server VM with 6GB of RAM, a dual core Windows 7 VM with 1.2GB of RAM, a couple app servers natively in Mac OS X, an a host of other applications. This machine has replaced my need for separate development and test servers, and gives me power to spare for the rest of my tasks. Yes it cost probably $4-5k once you count in the 13.5TB of drives, etc., but I use it to get work done. I rarely see my CPUs pegged at 100% for a long time, but it does happen.

I had a very nicely specced quad core that I built before I bought my Mac Pro, and the Mac Pro absolutely blows that computer out of the water. When you have real work to do, of the type that the Mac Pro is built for, it's an awesome machine and worth every penny. If you don't need the power, then of course it's more than you need.

Re:Cores do not equal power (4, Insightful)

AdmiralXyz (1378985) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045570)

Three points:

1. More cores means lower clock speed, by necessity, because it means more power consumption, so you have to turn down the frequency to keep the TDP the same. This doesn't mean you have to get cheated out of clock speed though. You will note that Apple is not forcing you to get the 12-core version: 8- and 6- core versions are available at higher speeds.

2. What you need out of the architecture depends on what you're doing. Many Mac Pro customers are doing embarrassingly parallel workloads like 3-D rendering, where increasing your cores increases your performance almost linearly. That's a way better tradeoff then a couple percent of performance from a higher clock rate. Or, if that's not what you're doing, you can get the faster chips, see above.

3. Yeah, architecture matters, but... the architecture's all the same? No matter which core count/frequency you get, they're all Xeon chips, they're all Nehalem. It's not like you have another choice. And for my money, Nehalem is a damn good architecture for workstation/server machines (laptops, less so, but it's still an improvement over Core 2).

Re:Cores do not equal power (2, Informative)

Tom9729 (1134127) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045888)

TFA suggests the 12-core Mac Pro is actually a dual 6-core running at 3.33ghz. My last (albeit, budget) machine was a dual-core @ 3.15ghz. You're right that fewer cores = lower clock speed, but I don't think anything over 3ghz is really that bad (especially when you have 6-12 of them).

Re:Cores do not equal power (1)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045636)

As others have noted here in the past, the number of processing cores do not a powerful computer make.

That is certainly true for the average to power user.

However, if you use software specifically written to take advantages of all the cores then you are the intended audience of the Mac Pro. We use the 8-core version and have slashed computing times down from over 5 minutes per data file to less than a minute. I can see an application for the 12-core version and the completely guessed $6000 price tag makes it competitive to the hardware we usually purchase to perform these tasks.

Re:Cores do not equal power (2, Informative)

DJRumpy (1345787) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045750)

Any OS X app that leverages GCD could benefit from those cores.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Central_Dispatch [wikipedia.org]

Although any existing app could also be written to utilize multiple cores effectively, GDC makes it much easier and requires far less raw code to accomplish.

Expected gestures (5, Funny)

jeffmeden (135043) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045196)

And all of the expected gestures are here: two-finger scrolling, pinch to zoom, fingertip rotation, and three- and four-finger swipes.

Ah, nope. You missed one.

Re:Expected gestures (1)

KDEnut (1673932) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045538)

The single fingered salute?

Re:Expected gestures (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33045580)

And can this be mounted on the chair for the Mac user's customary input appendage?

Re:Expected gestures (2, Funny)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045640)

Ah yes, the most communicative of the fingers. I wonder why it isn't used to close apps when you're finished - seems like that would be a great stress reliever.

Re:Expected gestures (4, Funny)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045664)

I think that gesture is handled by iSight.

Surface as button. (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33045346)

Does anyone else hate trackpads acting as buttons? I always end up selecting or launching all sorts of stuff I don't intend to when using laptops with that feature turned on.

MOD PARENT UP (0, Offtopic)

e065c8515d206cb0e190 (1785896) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045406)

I actually loved* IBM Thinkpads and their TrackPoint for that!

*: it's all gone to hell since the purchase by Lenovo. Who do we turn to for high quality laptops now?

Re:Surface as button. (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33045484)

These have an actual physical click, and tap to click is always off by default on a Mac.

whats the point? (0)

Superken7 (893292) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045348)

"And Magic Trackpad sits at the same height and angle as the Apple Wireless Keyboard, so you can go from trackpad to keyboard in one seamless motion."

Thanks, but I think I'll stick with my clit^H^H^H^H trackpoint where I dont even have to move my hands when switching from keyboard to mouse and viceversa.

Also, why use a touchpad when you got a mouse? The magic mouse sure is very uncomfortable but regular mouses are much more pleasant to use than touchpads or trackpoints or whatever. And its not like they can't do gestures.

Re:whats the point? (1)

getNewNickName (980625) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045528)

Maybe not useful for many, but finally I can have handwritten input via the Magic Trackpad. I was reluctant to buy a Macbook just to make use of this feature.

Re:whats the point? (1)

MBCook (132727) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045676)

The gestures would be a serious plus. Being able to scroll with the two fingers, zoom in, out, trigger expose, etc would all be quite nice. Also, if you had wrist problems, not having to move the mouse around would probably help.

The gestures become second nature on a MacBook(Pro).

I could see it. I'm not sure for me. For my work desktop it might be nice. But at home, if I still had a desktop, a big part of it's reason for being would be gaming, and you need a real mouse for shooters and many other games.

Re:whats the point? (1)

alvinrod (889928) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045724)

There are probably a few *nix admins that wonder why you would use a mouse when you have a perfectly good keyboard. I think that this device might have a place, but I don't think it's something that will be hugely successful.

I haven't used the device so I can't comment how well it works, but Apple's notebook trackpads are usually regarded as pretty good. Personally I always prefer to use a mouse, but I can see how a person might be able to be more productive if the device were really precise, the person was very familiar with it, and the software could take advantage of all of the gestures. Would probably be great for something like Photoshop or video editing.

Some of us are just too used to a mouse to change our ways. After watching new computer users struggle with using a mouse, it makes me think that if I spend enough time learning to become proficient with one of these devices, I might be able to improve my productivity in some cases. It would be interesting to find someone who's really good and compare their ability to use it precise with someone who has exceptional mouse control.

Re:whats the point? (1)

Superken7 (893292) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045884)

Sure.

Maybe I should have used another title for my post.
Regular mouses can't do such intuitive gestures such as pinch and zoom.

I am sure there are people who will love this new touchpad.
But others might want to just get a tablet for extended functionality such as handwritten input, design, etc...

And I have not tried it out, but if its anything like the macbook's touchpad, moving around with the mouse and clicking with it is IMHO a much comfortable experience with a regular mouse.

I can see how others might benefit from the gestures though.

Editing images (1)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045370)

The TFA suggests that this trackpad would be good for editing images. Not having seen the device I can't say for sure, but isn't a finger a little too big and inaccurate to use as a precision targeting tool? If it wasn't then all the high end track pads currently used for editing would be using fingers rather than a stylus.

Re:Editing images (2, Funny)

alvinrod (889928) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045766)

Just use the pinch to zoom to make the target area larger.

As an added bonus you can yell "Enhance!" every time you zoom-in.

Re:Editing images (2, Insightful)

dzfoo (772245) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045854)

Just to be sure, the technology required to track fingers is much different than the one required to track a stylus, in power, complexity and components. For one thing, the stylus requires pressure or conductive contact, while the finger requires capacitive contact.

Think about this, if it is all the same, how come phones are now including touch-screens instead of the old, tried-and-true stylus like the PDAs of yore? Perhaps it's because the technology has improved enough, and its cost lowered enough as to be practical.

To say that a finger-trackpack would not be good for editing images just because older tools did not do it, is as short-sighted as saying touch-sensitive screens on phones are useless because they didn't used occur in smartphones before.

        -dZ.

Re:Editing images (1)

0100010001010011 (652467) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045906)

If only someone could invent a device that would simulate the human finger, but had a finer point.

It'd be even better if it was in the shape of a pen, because that's what most people are used to holding.

You could call it... iMagicBicPenPointer.

I guess here's cross post to this one... (4, Interesting)

Kalidor (94097) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045382)

So .. since all their touch technology derives from FingerWorks [ http://fingerworks.com/ [fingerworks.com] ]. They revived the iGesturePad from 1999 and added a raiser.

Question 1) Do we get to see any of the 60 or so gestures they used to use a decade ago that Apple declined to reuse?

Question 2) Is there a chance that it means the TouchStream LP is coming back in a form I could potentially get for my windows9x+/*nix9x computer again ... without having to pay several hundred on eBay + driver hunts... just several hundred to Apple?

-------------
My hope is that they are answered as followed:

1) Yes

2) Yes, more than a chance, and soon.

Re:I guess here's cross post to this one... (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045568)

just several hundred to Apple?

The trackpad is only going to cost $70 according to TFA, so while it isn't as cheap as a bottom-barrel USB mouse you can buy at best buy, its certainly not a couple hundred dollars.

Re:I guess here's cross post to this one... (1)

Kalidor (94097) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045718)

The iGesturePad was a similiar price point. The Touchstream LP(on the website link) was significantly more ... functional ... and cost a lot more.

Question 2 was more in hopes that the latter product will be delivered as well as the smaller cousin.

Re:I guess here's cross post to this one... (1)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045824)

Bottom barrel mice are not found at best buy.

I get my "bottom barrel mice" out of the bottom of my barrel (technically it is a large plastic tub) that contains a random assortment of computer components left over from the last 20 years of hoarding parts.

The $20 USB optical mice from best buy are over priced, but hardly bottom of the barrel.

If i hear "magical" one more time... (-1, Troll)

theghost (156240) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045410)

If i hear them describe their tech as "magical" one more time i think i'm gonna blow a gasket. It may be sleek and cool, but it is not sufficiently advanced to be considered magical.

Fuck you, Apple, you condescending wankers.

Re:If i hear "magical" one more time... (1)

cowscows (103644) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045608)

It must be miserable life you live where some marketing guys in california that you've never met have so much power to make you angry. Or you're actually indifferent but have decided to complain because it's easy to do so and it makes you feel better about yourself.

Re:If i hear "magical" one more time... (0, Flamebait)

theghost (156240) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045682)

It must be a miserable life you live, devoid of the ability to recognize exaggeration with humorous intent. Or you actually just enjoy acting superior to others because it's easy to do and makes you feel better about yourself.

Re:If i hear "magical" one more time... (1)

cowscows (103644) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045830)

sorry, but that original comment did not even begin to approach humorous. I trust you can see why I was confused.

Re:If i hear "magical" one more time... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33045990)

I am indifferent, but yea magical? um yea, la de shit apple welcome to a decade ago, its not magic its a already failed product your re branding (again)

Re:If i hear "magical" one more time... (1)

rxan (1424721) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045768)

If I hear them describe their tech a magical one more time I'm gonna...

... roast their ass with a level 5 firebolt.

What a hose job.... (1, Insightful)

rimcrazy (146022) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045412)

Hey, I'm a Apple Fanboy but this is just a screw job. No SATA III, No USB 3.0 ????

I need a good platform for my 3D work and was hoping that there might be something making the new MacPro's worth waiting for but not this.

Just priced a nice Win 7 system from Newegg and me thinks for work I'm switching back. This is just absurd.

Re:What a hose job.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33045610)

Me thinks Linux on x64 is what thou needst.

Re:What a hose job.... (1)

rimcrazy (146022) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045972)

Yea, but I need Adobe in my workflow. No way around it. Dual booting sucks. Win 7 is not near as sucky as previous versions of Windows and my video workflow in HD would scream with the new Premium Pro and an NVidia card. I will wait to see what the new FCP looks like but if it is the rumored iMovie on roids that will be the final nail in the Apple coffin for me as far as professional workstations.

Magic Trackpad (0, Flamebait)

Duradin (1261418) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045432)

It's the Magic Trackpad, not the "Magical" Trackpad.

It'd set a better example if Taco would stop trolling every Apple article.

Re:Magic Trackpad (1)

IANAAC (692242) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045588)

It's the Magic Trackpad, not the "Magical" Trackpad.

It'd set a better example if Taco would stop trolling every Apple article.

Or, you know, you could just laugh at it because it was so overused in other iProduct discussions.

It's not a troll. It's a pun.

About Time! (1)

SeriouslyNoClue (1842116) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045442)

While other companies like Asus and Dell are offering customers weak underperforming netbooks and media centers, Apple knows what the averager person wants. Just like getting a Hemi in your new Dodge, this is going to be the killer laptop and desktop at a premium price. Sure, the few CEOs and executives out there are going to get even more expensive servers for their personal needs but the poor McDonalds employee is going to save up their money to get these kinds of machines. And when it comes to sales that spells volume for Apple and an equation for guaranteed success.

Dell and Asus are going down.

You call that thing magic? (2, Funny)

ITBurnout (1845712) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045518)

I won't be impressed until I can make a flaming pigeon come out of it.

$2500 for quad, 3GB ram and only 5770? (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045522)

$2500 for quad, 3GB ram and only 5770?

You can get quad cores for $800-$1500 with 4gb and 5830 or better.

at least the 5770 is much better then the past for base cards. But will apple make you pay for the 5870 $300 making it cost $150-$200 (5770 cost apple price likey higher) + $300

Very Nice (1)

helix2301 (1105613) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045526)

The Mac Pro is so nice buy the price is way to high the track pad is a nice touch.

100% bogus article, er... slashvertisement! (1)

unrtst (777550) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045634)

From the touchpad article, "I can’t wait to get hold of one", and later, "It’s made with smooth, wear-resistant glass that feels great to the touch."

and it ships in 24hours... so it's not like a real review should be very difficult!

Would be better of just to post the apple store page directly. Horrible.

Apple and Gesturing (1)

mschaffer (97223) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045666)

While the new "magical" trackpad gives you more space for gesturing, I do always wonder what gestures iPhone users will be giving Apple?

Feels great to the touch? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33045696)

So, when this site says that it "feels great to the touch" -- does that mean that they've actually tried one already? How else could they really know?

Problem with the trackpad (0, Flamebait)

drsmack1 (698392) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045764)

Anyone know when Steve Jobs will tell us how to hold it? I want to make sure I'm doing it right.

Not a twelve core computer (1)

voss (52565) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045898)

Its a system with dual six-core cpus. Its like saying a computer with two one-core cpus is a "dual core" system. It may be literally true but very misleading and not what a customer expects.

Re:Not a twelve core computer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33045984)

I really doubt that the customer cares.

all of the expected gestures (1, Funny)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 4 years ago | (#33045926)

Including extended middle finger?
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