×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

171 comments

Obvious solution (0, Troll)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#33057752)

All we need is to get Superman to fly around the earth in reverse, sending him back in time, when he can cockpunch Tony Hayward before any of this happens.

Re:Obvious solution (2, Funny)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058038)

While the thought of Superman cockpunching Tony Hayward is certainly satisfying, would that really have stopped the leak? Perhaps if Superman lined up the punch he could will have (is that the correct time travel tense?) performed a 'junk shot' using Tony Hayward's actual junk.

Re:Obvious solution (1)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058068)

And maybe also we could start skimming up oil on day one? Something that everyone (other than the unions and EPA) wanted to do?

U.S. Cleanup Solution: Step 2 (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33057832)

Seize BP's U.S. assets. Of course, as this is written, the transfer to offshore accounts continues.

Yours In Astrakhan,
Kilgore Trout, C.I.O.

Re:U.S. Cleanup Solution: Step 2 (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 3 years ago | (#33057864)

Yeah, to seize all that oil would definitely help. The problem is how to do it. :-)

Re:U.S. Cleanup Solution: Step 2 (1)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058058)

We could do it like we did in Iraq, where eight billion dollars (out of nine billion total) in oil revenue has simply disappeared.

Re:U.S. Cleanup Solution: Step 2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33058146)

[citation needed]

Here you go (4, Informative)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058290)

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-iraq-funds-20100727,0,3856364.story [latimes.com]

You see, when all us crazy liberals were saying we were going to Iraq to steal their oil, we were right. That's what we did.

Re:Here you go (3, Insightful)

nospam007 (722110) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058854)

It's just a bit overpriced.

http://costofwar.com/ [costofwar.com]

Re:Here you go (4, Insightful)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059034)

Did anyone actually think that when we said "we're going to Iraq to steal their oil" what we meant was "So we can have cheap oil?" That's ridiculous. It was so the rich could have cheap oil to sell at a high cost.

Re:Here you go (2, Informative)

jbeach (852844) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059246)

Bingo. Would mod up if I could.

Another argument I've heard is that "Why would the US invade Iraq for profit? Look how much it's cost!" Which ignores the fact that the cost is paid by taxpayers, while the profit goes to private businesses. Why should they care that the peasants have to pay?

Re:Here you go (2, Insightful)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059390)

It's almost as if major portions of the US population have developed Stockholm Syndrome and empathize with their oppressors. They think they are in the same class of people as their oppressors. They think of the United States as 'us.' I guarantee that the rich do not think that way.

Re:U.S. Cleanup Solution: Step 2 (2, Informative)

sycodon (149926) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058678)

Especially when they can't find it [go.com]

Re:U.S. Cleanup Solution: Step 2 (1)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058774)

Well, if we can't find it, it must not be a problem, right? Whew. Glad that's over. I was actually worried for a while.

Re:U.S. Cleanup Solution: Step 2 (1)

sycodon (149926) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058864)

Read the link before you spout off.

Re:U.S. Cleanup Solution: Step 2 (1)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058988)

I did read the link. What was I supposed to be looking for? The story says what I just said? You don't say. I just thought it was important to preempt the idiots by pointing out the important fact that 'we can't find it' does not mean 'it is gone.'

Re:U.S. Cleanup Solution: Step 2 (1)

sycodon (149926) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059436)

"experts say an astonishing amount has disappeared, reabsorbed into the environment. "

While not all of it is gone, apparently a good portion of it is.

Re:U.S. Cleanup Solution: Step 2 (1)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059578)

"experts say an astonishing amount has disappeared, reabsorbed into the environment. "

While not all of it is gone, apparently a good portion of it is.

Reabsorbed into the environment. Like ducks, and seaweed, and marsh grass. Fantastic. Why didn't we think of that before? Just let the environment soak it up. That will sure keep the oil out of the... oh wait.

BOOM! Headshot.

Re:U.S. Cleanup Solution: Step 2 (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33057900)

Oh boo hoo! BP screwed up so I'm going to jump on the hate bandwagon and pretend that everyone involved needs to be brutally skinned, murdered, and have their genitals flown to all parts of the world...

Because you blame yourself.

Re:U.S. Cleanup Solution: Step 2 (4, Insightful)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058098)

Oh boo hoo! BP screwed up so I'm going to jump on the hate bandwagon and pretend that everyone involved needs to be brutally skinned, murdered, and have their genitals flown to all parts of the world...

Because you blame yourself.

How dare we demand accountability, right? I mean, BP is a big corporation, with lots of power, and might makes right, so BP must be right. It is quite unnatural for the weak to attack the strong. The meek will inherit the Earth? Like that's going to happen. The meek will sit down, shut up, and not bother their betters, like they always have.

Re:U.S. Cleanup Solution: Step 2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33058174)

Now if only people like you would get this worked up about Obama breaking virtually every campaign pledge and allowing Goldman Sachs to continue pillaging this country.

Re:U.S. Cleanup Solution: Step 2 (1, Insightful)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058234)

I am this worked up over that conservative in liberal's clothing. Of course, he has passed the reform bill, which nearly all conservatives opposed. Obama is a corporate conservative, but even that isn't enough for Republicans. Obama could be a Bush clone and they would still hate him.

Re:U.S. Cleanup Solution: Step 2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33058322)

Funny that Goldman Sachs' stock actually went UP after the the financial reform bill passed, no? That bill is widely viewed as a gift to GS wrapped in consumerist rhetoric.

Re:U.S. Cleanup Solution: Step 2 (1)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058426)

Funny that Goldman Sachs' stock actually went UP after the the financial reform bill passed, no? That bill is widely viewed as a gift to GS wrapped in consumerist rhetoric.

Widely and falsely touted by conservatives who actually want even less regulation. It's not as though they were advocating for more oversight. The stock went up because the uncertainty was gone. The reform bill isn't perfect, but it is a step in the right direction.

Obviously, you must agree that we need more regulation of the financial industry. You wouldn't be lying about wanting more as a ruse to convince people to do away with the reform because you actually want less regulation. Nope. No one would be that underhanded.

Re:U.S. Cleanup Solution: Step 2 (1)

aliquis (678370) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058958)

The meek will sit down, shut up, and not bother their betters, like they always have.

Yeah, because never ever has the opposite happened!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Revolution [wikipedia.org]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_Revolution_(1917) [wikipedia.org]

I assume the US signing off from the British empire wasn't as graphic but well, at least they left.

Re:U.S. Cleanup Solution: Step 2 (1)

neophytepwner (992971) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059660)

That's why we need fearless environmental engineers who are not afraid to do a little social engineering to correct the situation. Those with lots of money and power should fear their collapse. Those with nothing have nothing to lose, true willpower.

Prevention is better than cure (2, Interesting)

FriendlyLurker (50431) | more than 3 years ago | (#33057858)

Can't see how we can repair untold environmental damage, merely cover up some of the more obvious scars - but we sure can prevent it from happening again. Prosecute AND JAIL top executives... then keep going right up into the political appointee's whose job it is to police them. Then maybe we might have a chance of not seeing them happen again in 50 years or so.

Re:Prevention is better than cure (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33057954)

You only prosecute and jail if something illegal was done, not to prove a point. I'm not saying they didn't do anything illegal, they very well might have. If they didn't though, it's purely a civil matter and should not end in jail time.

Re:Prevention is better than cure (5, Insightful)

wizardforce (1005805) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058116)

Their company knowingly violated over 700 safety regulations and they knowingly ignored their own engineers in order to rush the project, Why shouldn't they be held accountable? The 11 deaths that resulted from the explosion alone are a good enough reason to lock these guys in prison let alone the billions of dollars in jobs and the ecosystem they destroyed through negligence.

Re:Prevention is better than cure (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33058414)

It still doesn't mean that Tony Hayward would go to jail. It would be a few VP's that are thrown under the bus for violating the regulations and jailed.

Re:Prevention is better than cure (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33058802)

source ?

Re:Prevention is better than cure (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058942)

I'm all for tossing people in jail who didn't do their job, leading up to this debacle. Problem is, only 1/2 the people are going to go to jail who need to.

All those porn watching government official charged with over seeing the whole thing should be as well.

If CEO of BP goes to jail, so should all the idiots between him and the oil rig should as well. Same with those in the MMS that didn't do their jobs right.

UNTIL everyone accountable is charge with crimes, and fired for dereliction of duties I'm gonna be pissed.

All the regulations in the world are worthless with poor enforcement. WE don't need MORE regulation, we need the established regulations enforced.

There is plenty of blame to go around. I only wish people were as outraged at the Government charged with oversight as they are at BP.

Re:Prevention is better than cure (0, Troll)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059314)

Bush appointed people who would hire non-appointed government bureaucrats who would entrench themselves in the regulatory agencies and continue to obstruct attempts at regulation long after Bush left office. Those porn watching government officials were not lazy, they were doing what Republicans hired them to do: destroy good government.

Re:Prevention is better than cure (0, Flamebait)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059538)

ahhh yes, (R) bad (D) good .. sock puppet. You're almost as annoying as the Bushbots.

The truth is sometimes annoying (2, Insightful)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059724)

ahhh yes, (R) bad (D) good .. sock puppet. You're almost as annoying as the Bushbots.

Am I wrong though? You see, you were claiming the government is bad, because they did not regulate. I'm saying, we have one party that is rabidly anti regulation, and has proven it will work underhandedly against regulation. So why blame 'government' in general, when in fact it is the people who hate government and stand in its way that have caused the problem in this particular case.

I would like to make it clear: one party is at least nominally pro regulation, the other is rabidly against it. The party that is against it is to blame for the lack of regulation leading up to this disaster.

I welcome any attempts on your part to argue against this position, no matter how pathetic they may be. But ad hominems will get you nowhere, you know that right? Around these parts, ad hominems are taken as a sure sign of defeat. Rather than attacking me, you may as well just admit I've won for all the good your ad hominems do.

Re:Prevention is better than cure (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059000)

Their company knowingly violated over 700 safety regulations and they knowingly ignored their own engineers in order to rush the project

They should be charges with negligent homicide. That's what you're charged with if you break the regulation against driving drunk and someone dies; twelve workers died when it exploded.

But in the US, a rich and powerfull man only goes to prison if a richer and more powerful man wants him there. Prisons are mostly for poor people.

Re:Prevention is better than cure (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33059234)

Indeed. No prison time for the BP disaster, yet someone who films a cop in Maryland and posts it to Youtube is being sentenced to 16 years in jail. Where's the justice?

proving where the knowledge stopped (1)

Shivetya (243324) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059028)

is going to be hard.

Or do we just arbitrarily punish people based on job title? Maybe we can just zing the ones with high salaries!

Get them where it hurts, the pocketbook. Nice large fines to be used to better the safety of the industry as a whole. Set it equal to the costs to clean up the mess plus at least a quarter's or more profit. Stock holders won't take kindly to a board that allows this to go on long.

Jailing executives over decisions underlings performed would be great, but damn why not start with our government first. Would we even have any President or Cabinet official living free?

Re:Prevention is better than cure (1)

neophytepwner (992971) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059738)

You make a good point, the resulting lawsuits and settlements from the 11 death comes to a billion alone. By the end of this there will not be a BP, I hope we will have a better appreciation for sustainable development.

Insightful? (1)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058362)

You only prosecute and jail if something illegal was done, not to prove a point. I'm not saying they didn't do anything illegal, they very well might have. If they didn't though, it's purely a civil matter and should not end in jail time.

You aren't making any sense. We prosecute to prove the point that someone needs to go to jail. If it looks as though someone, say, willfully violated safety regulations over 760 times in a three year period where the next most egregious offender had all of nine willful violations, I'd say that is enough evidence to warrant a thorough, crawl up their ass with a microscope sort of criminal investigation.

Re:Prevention is better than cure (1)

cgenman (325138) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058720)

If I knowingly let my car rot to the point where a wheel falls off on the freeway and kills a bystander, I'm liable for manslaughter. If there are 700 violations of safety regulations that someone approved of, which let an oil platform rot to the point where it exploded killing 10, why are they not liable for manslaughter?

Re:Prevention is better than cure (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33058054)

Remember this post when your car spring a leak and you don't call the EPA and clean it up right away with the kitty litter you keep in your trunk at all times in case it happens. You do keep kitty litter in your trunk, right? I mean, how irresponsible can you be to not be prepared for a disaster!!! You should be forced to spend every remaining cent in your savings to clean up any accidents you have. You should also be lambasted on the evening news so everyone will be aware of how horrible you are.

I can't be the only one sick of the stupid comments people are making? Basically asking for the heads of people.

Re:Prevention is better than cure (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33058386)

Silly AC. Why did you make a reasonable post? You should know that's flamebait. Now if you'd demanded that the CEO of BP be roasted alive and his children forced to eat him, you'd get Insightful for sure...

Re:Prevention is better than cure (4, Insightful)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058614)

Remember this post when your car spring a leak and you don't call the EPA and clean it up right away with the kitty litter you keep in your trunk at all times in case it happens. You do keep kitty litter in your trunk, right? I mean, how irresponsible can you be to not be prepared for a disaster!!! You should be forced to spend every remaining cent in your savings to clean up any accidents you have. You should also be lambasted on the evening news so everyone will be aware of how horrible you are.

I can't be the only one sick of the stupid comments people are making? Basically asking for the heads of people.

Because accidentally elbowing someone in the nose is the same as mowing down thousands with machine gun fire to make a few extra dollars.

Re:Prevention is better than cure (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058638)

The majority of the environmental damage will be gone in a year or two.

The rest of it will pretty much be gone inside a decade.

It is still idiotic that such a thing happened.

The spill was huge.

The gulf is more huger.

Re:Prevention is better than cure (1)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058704)

Is that what history teaches us about oil spills that get into sensitive wetlands? Funny, I've heard a different story from actual scientists who have studied the problem.

Re:Prevention is better than cure (2, Interesting)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058844)

Yes Executives Must Pay with Jail TIme. Because they Micromanage Everything to such a detail level that they know about Everything that is going on at all times. Usually at the Executive Level for Large Corporations they are just looking at the final set of numbers... Unit Produced Revenue earned... The Real people responsible are the Middle Managers who are trying to fight their way up to the top cut safety just to get the impressive numbers to make the CEO happy. That isn't to say the CEO isn't responsible at all... He should have demanded safety as a measurable priority, but these accidents will happen again and again because there will be some weasel in middle management who knows how to manipulate the numbers to make him look good.

Secondly there is a fact that Mistakes do happen. Looking back you may have prevented it, but I don't know anyone who can predict all possible outcomes, to prevent disasters. If that was the case everyone will be paralyzed in fear. Having solutions to fix such disasters and clean up the mess is just as important as prevention. As it is easier to predict the final outcome of a disaster then the cause to prevent for each disaster.

Third the guy who really messed up is probably the best guy to make sure it doesn't happen again. Firing the person who made the mistake is often the stupidest thing you can do, as they are often the one who now has the most experience in dealing with it. Otherwise you will replace him with a person who never experience the pain and may become lax to the rules as there is no emotional memory of the mistake.

Re:Prevention is better than cure (1)

Surt (22457) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059118)

If they aren't taking responsibility for having safety-first policies that put profits second, then yes, they are indeed responsible for a failure of management that should land them in jail. Setting a direction is their job. Choosing to go for short term profits at the expense of safety is a direction that they determine. Send them to jail for life. The next guy in the job will be much more likely not to take those chances.

Re:Prevention is better than cure (1)

locallyunscene (1000523) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059252)

I don't buy it.

Mistakes happen, sure, but disregarding 700 safety regulations is a "mistake"? If not outright bribing, encouraging widespread ethics violations by throwing parties with gov't regulators is a mistake? This was policy and corporations don't make policy, people do, specifically those at the top.

The result of those policies is 11 people dead and billions of dollars in damage to people living on the Gulf Coast. That's nice that you think intent is more important than results here. But I want to fucking press charges.

Re:Prevention is better than cure (2, Insightful)

russ1337 (938915) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059398)

I learned that lesson during my Officer training. It was my final 'lead' assessment, and we were on a patrol against hostile forces. My team had been briefed twice that day on the Rules of Engagement (ROE) by me, and my 2IC was briefed by me a third time as well as he had to give the brief to another group. I'd then checked understanding of the ROE with the group after he'd done so. We went on patrol and encountered enemy. We had one of the enemy guys cornered and he 'surrendered' walking toward my squad with his hands in the air. My 2IC saw the enemy guy, and recognized him as one of his best mates. In about one second he raised his rifle - and with a grin on his face - fired (blanks) at the guy. By the time he had his weapon at his shoulder I was yelling at him to stand-down, but he continued and 'shot' the prisoner. I was hauled over the coals by the instructors, and my final mark was going to be the difference between a distinguished graduation and merit graduation. I said "OK, what could I have done differently to get a higher mark?" The answer: "Nothing. You did everything right, you've just learned a hard lesson in leadership. You are responsible for the actions of your team. If this were real you'd be up on war crimes." The lesson: You are responsible for the actions of your team.

Re:Prevention is better than cure (1)

erroneus (253617) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059308)

Part of prevention is having a cure. Personally, I think all such activities should be halted until such time that a working and tested plan is in place for every similar disaster such as this. People have already been screaming that it would do this and that to the economy and literally ban offshore drilling forever. But this is pretty normal for lots of other industries. You can't even have a building to work in without loads of fire prevention and contingency devices. We still have buildings. We have a coal mining industry that is heavily regulated too... okay, bad example... they are TOLD what to do... now if they would only do it.

I have yet to hear of an industry regulated out of business. The profits might not be as high, but the motivation to stay in business usually results in unsurprising ways... the businesses stay open and the communities are the better for it.

Re:Prevention is better than cure (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33059342)

Do you even know what jail is used for? Its main purpose is NOT punishment that is just a side effect. The main goal of a jail is to remove someone from the population who poses a high a risk to our safety.

The executives should be held accountable and have to pay. They should have all their property seized and not be allowed to flee anywhere until this matter is resolved. In the end I hope they are all pennyless. Putting them in jail is just ridiculous. Save jail for thugs, murderers and rapist.

Oil companies should be funding this contest (1)

NemesisEnforcer (654033) | more than 3 years ago | (#33057884)

Considering the amount of liability that BP has potentially accrued, I'd say it is in their best interests to get this race going as quickly as possible. This other oil spill today only highlights our need for this technology ASAP.

Tough problem (2, Insightful)

GrumblyStuff (870046) | more than 3 years ago | (#33057948)

Oil on the surface is just a sheen. Oil below is mixed with water and dispersants. Oil on the beaches is mixed into marshes and sand.

That's a lot of stuff to churn and in doing so, greatly affects everything living in it.

Perhaps we could keep in mind that "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure."

Re:Tough problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33058186)

horse gone, stable demolished, door for sale on ebay. tad to late for prevention, perhaps that should have been a condition of the licence

Re:Tough problem (1)

GrumblyStuff (870046) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059274)

Ayup. Either that horse is making its way past Jupiter or jumped into an alternate equine dimension and became the ruler of that hooved place, but it is gone.

That said, there's other wells. I try to imagine that operators and owners of said wells have a renewed interest in at least not having a $20 billion disaster bill and maybe a shred of conscience and understand of what their actions can reap. I keep waiting for some news on the fucking dipshits at MMS who were literally fucking those who they were suppose to keep an eye on. No, attending their coke, meth, and sex parties [motherjones.com] is not the way to do it. I think these people should get jail time.

Given the sheer volume of matter that needs to be cleaned, I don't think there will be any effective solution. I mean, effective and doesn't completely sterilize the water or sand the oil is in. I doubt either the water or sand would be habitable afterwards. Sand gets hauled away to hazardous-waste [motherjones.com] and rapid degradation of oil in water will suck all the oxygen out [go.com] . Likewise, I don't have high hopes for the survival of marshes that soaked up tidefuls of oil.

So... yeah, pretty grim outlook but it's the same deal for anything covered in oil [discovery.com] . Ideally, the American public will learn that, no, businesses will not regulate themselves and that you actually need to put people who aren't ideologically opposed to regulation into positions to *gasp* regulate. That might be a bit much to ask though.

Anyway, we fucked up on the regulating of oil companies part and the environment will be pretty fucked over for decades (ie, if it ever recovers). We could at least not fuck up the cleanup effort and make sure those workers don't suffer health effects from cleaning up BP's mess. Whoops, too late.... [cbsnews.com] Oh, and fucking up the cleaning effort by trying to bury it with sand [huffingtonpost.com] .

Re:Tough problem (1)

neophytepwner (992971) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059790)

True, but I would correct it to read:

Perhaps we could keep in mind that "An ounce of prevention is worth a ton of cure."

SpongeZilla (5, Funny)

Major Downtime (1840554) | more than 3 years ago | (#33057976)

SpongeBob and Godzilla should have children, so we can dip an enormous SpongeBob into the spill.

Re:SpongeZilla (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058128)

No, we must endeavor to build a MechaSpongeBob.

Re:SpongeZilla (1)

Major Downtime (1840554) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058860)

Agreed, that would be the safer route, but i was kind of hoping to see SpongeBob get raped by Godzilla.or vice versa. Purely for the sake of saving humanity, ofcourse.

Not even sure if these two can have kids and if they'd end up having the right size and soaking power. And even if their offspring had the right attributes for the job, not even sure if we could force SpongeZilla to dip into a spill if it didn't want to. Damn, so many variables. Now i understand why there is such a big reward.

Mopping gnomes (3, Funny)

Cloud K (125581) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058002)

When I first glanced at "mapping genomes" I thought it said "mopping gnomes" and had this RPG inspired vision of gnomes on boats (clockwork/steampunk) using these special oil-soaking mops.

You have become better at Oil Mopping! (28)

This is BP et al's responsibility (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33058018)

BP and company should be paying every last dime of the cleanup effort. Anything less just encourages this sort of behavior.

Re:This is BP et al's responsibility (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33058528)

Cry more. I think I'll hit up my nearest BP station and buy people tanks of gas just to give them more cash to piss off all the BP haters.

Umm, you guys are a little late to the party (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33058028)

http://abcnews.go.com/WN/bp-oil-spill-crude-mother-nature-breaks-slick/story?id=11254252 [go.com]

Sorry to preempt your Two Minutes of Hate like that...

my solution... (0, Flamebait)

peteinok (1825618) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058036)

shave the heads of all the protesting hippies and use it to soak up the oil. Problem solved. what else ya got?

Re:my solution... (2, Insightful)

spun (1352) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058742)

Hehe, I read this as "I can't stand it when the hippies are right, and I have no argument against them, so as usual, I shall punch the hippies." You meant it as a joke, but it comes out as a statement of defeat.

OIl is dissapating on its own (1)

syntap (242090) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058048)

according to some reports. If by chance it does dissipate to a degree that a gulf oil cleanup solution beyond what is already being done isn't necessary, I hereby claim that idea as mine and will await X Prize's communications requesting a destination US bank account.

Re:OIl is dissapating on its own (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33058540)

FROM: THE DESK OF THE MANAGING DIRECTOR
INTERNATIONAL PROMOTIONS/PRICE AWARD DEPARTMENT.
REF Number: EGS/2251256003/02
BATCH Number:14/0017/1PD
WINNER NO 3RD.

Dear Lucky Winner,

AWARD NOTIFICATION

The X-Prize Foundation wishes to inform you the results of the gulf oil spill cleanup slashdot post solution international program and Your slashdot account have been picked as the winner N0 3RD attached to the Cash Prize of the Sum of $1,650,000.00 ( On Million Six Hundred and Fifty Thousand US Dollars.)

This results is now officially released to you Today. Your slashdot account was attached in the A Category With REF Number EGS/2251256003/02 and BATCH Number:14/0017/1PD consequently won in the Fifth X-Prize category.

The online draws was conducted by a random selection of slashdot posts from an exclusive list of 429,031 accounts of individuals and corporate bodies picked by an advanced automated random computer search from the internet.

HOW TO TO CLAIM YOUR PRIZE MONEY

Simply post the required information below on the thread Withing 48hours of receiving this message. In order to avoid unnecessary delays and complications

Full name:
Address:
Age:
Sex:
Country
Country of residence:
Mobile phone :
Occupation:

Once again, I on behalf of the entire staff of the The X-Prize Foundation hereby Congratulate you for being part of slashdot users program.

Really long sheets... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33058050)

I have no idea what they're doing now to clean it up, so chances are my idea sucks (ha!), but here it is:

Get a lot of that hydrocarbon-attracting fabric or whatever it is... maybe a few yards wide, but really really long (and loop it back to itself so it's like a belt)... have rollers send the stuff down into the water (how deep, I don't know... this would probably only work on somewhat shallow levels)... it'll bring up oil with it, which you squeeze off with rollers... I'm sure it'd also get some water, but it'll be somewhat filtered before it even gets onto the boat...

Solved! (1)

NetNed (955141) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058078)

Bounty, It's the quicker picker-upper!

When can I expect my check?

Re:Solved! (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059556)

When can I expect my check?

It would have been funnier if you'd left that part out. After all, they're offering a bounty for the cleanup.

Jones Act? (1, Troll)

The AtomicPunk (450829) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058090)

How about just dropping the Jones act and let foreign ships in to help, rather than this administration protecting its union cronies?

disclaimer: I loathed the last administration too.

Re:Jones Act? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33058224)

http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2010/06/30/96831/gops-false-talking-point-jones.html

Better lies, please.

But I hated Bush too! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33058530)

That was supposed to stop you from asking questions, asshole.

Re:Jones Act? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33058244)

I have a plan, but it involves sacrificing some of the BP staff and shareholders to appease the kelpies and selkies. It won't happen though, they prefer a better image over a clean-up.

It would be a lot easier, but EPA says NO! (4, Informative)

Just_Say_Duhhh (1318603) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058206)

This is not the first oil spill in the world. There are companies who do ocean oil cleanup all the time, but can't do it in the U.S. because of EPA regulations. You see, according to the EPA, any water dumped INTO the gulf can't have > 15ppm of oil. A skimmer will suck up oil and water, separate them, then discharge the water. If they can get 90% of the oil out, that's good, right? In the rest of the world, yes. In the world controlled by the EPA, no - they'd rather leave 100% of the oil in the water, rather than allow a skimmer to get most of it.

If you suck dirty water out of the gulf, and put back not-so-dirty water, isn't that better than leaving ALL the dirty water there? Hello, EPA? How long did it take them to waive this STUPID regulation?

Re:It would be a lot easier, but EPA says NO! (4, Informative)

sweatyboatman (457800) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059386)

it's called a waiver. the EPA gives them out all the time.

in fact, remember the "whale" boat, the oil tanker that was going to be the gulf's salvation, but was being held up by all that red tape? They got their waiver (took about a day) and, well, it doesn't work [nola.com] .

But, if it makes you feel better, go ahead and keep railing against the EPA.

I have an idea... (1)

adamjcoon (1583361) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058250)

Instead of offering prize money, how about the person with the 'great idea' is given prestige and recognition, while the $1,000,000 is given to help the communities directly affected by this mess...

Nuke it from orbit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33058278)

It's the only way to be sure.

WHY? (3, Insightful)

retech (1228598) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058406)

Why is someone OTHER than BP paying for this? This is just like asking for volunteers to help clean the waterfowl etc. To clean this up the BP board should be hauled in (with a gun to their head if needed) and forced to clean it up with their own fucking money and their own hands. WHY tax payers and any other private source is putting one cent into this is beyond me.

They wanted the profit, they can accept the consequences.

The Dutch (2, Interesting)

Thelasko (1196535) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058436)

Apparently, the Dutch have developed the technology to clean up the oil spill long ago. [publicradio.org] Unfortunately, for various [wikipedia.org] reasons, [wikipedia.org] they aren't allowed to use it.

Re:The Dutch (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058714)

Skimming is only a mitigation strategy, it will never collect all of the oil. Partly because not all of it is on the surface, and partly because you can only cover so much surface area in a given amount of time.

Re:The Dutch (1)

Thelasko (1196535) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059082)

Forgive me for the bad link above. My browser had issues and I couldn't check it before I submitted. One of those links should be to the Merchant Marine Act of 1920. [wikipedia.org]

Re:The Dutch (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33059378)

The Jones Act doesn't seem to have been an issue, though the EPA certainly was, as was general government incompetence. There's really no single act you can point to, but a blistering array of agencies all stepping over each other, and each with veto power due to obscure regulations.

The reality of this incident was that, no matter the administration, there was nothing the government could really do to actually fix the problem. That goes counter to Obama's core message, and it's what has them so upset. All they could actually do was get out of BP's way, which Obama explicitly didn't do because he was more interested in using it as an opportunity for demagoguery.

Re:The Dutch (1)

sweatyboatman (457800) | more than 3 years ago | (#33059574)

the article mentions two private companies with some suggestions for how they can make money off the oil spill.

first guy says "buy my sweeper arms" and "don't use dispersant". Even the article admits that they are using his sweeper arms now. the EPA must have given them a waiver! who would have thought they could do that? the utility of dispersants a mile below sea level is a huge question mark. it might turn out to be the best thing BP did. it might turn out to be a huge environmental disaster.

the second guy says "build huge berms". the berms that don't work to stop the oil? the berms that are severely disruptive to the ecosystem? yeah, those. except, you know, larger. I am sure no one in America has thought of making the berms bigger. or maybe scientists examined their proposal and found that the risks far outweighed any benefits.

We've solved these addiction issues before... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33058442)

with cigarettes. A $5/gallon gas tax is the obvious solution. There's no magic bullet - you need lots of people with lots of rags - not only would the tax pay for it, it would go a long way towards breaking the addiction.

A better way to spend the money (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33058470)

Just pile the 20 billion in $1 bills on top of the busted well. The paper money will absorb the oil with the resulting mountain of cash with form an island that can be used as a tourist destination. A similar technique could be used on the terrorist. Just launch bails of money at them then later collect the terrorist as they sun themselves on beaches in Dubai. This technique would save billions and thousands of lives.

my solution (1)

hypergreatthing (254983) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058538)

Involves taking chickens... ok, i see i got your attention there, putting them in the gulf. Then selling their remains to kfc. Not only is this totally green but profitable but extremely tasty.

About time (1)

hesaigo999ca (786966) | more than 3 years ago | (#33058600)

About time, someone tried to invest in recycling, or cleaning of our planet, good for you XPrize, just wish many more companies were like you to help fund development of things this planet really needs.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...