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Man Wants to Donate His Heart Before He Dies

samzenpus posted more than 4 years ago | from the cart-before-the-horse dept.

Medicine 456

Gary Phebus wants to donate his heart, lungs, and liver. The problem is he wants to donate them before he dies. Gary was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, better known as Lou Gehrig's disease, in 2008. Phebus says he'd like to be able to donate his organs before they deteriorate, and doesn't consider his request suicide because he's "dead anyway."

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we all are dead.. (1)

stanlyb (1839382) | more than 4 years ago | (#33069808)

But who is not dead???

Re:we all are dead.. (4, Funny)

the_one_wesp (1785252) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070416)

I'm not dead yet! I feel happy! I want to go for a walk!

I fail to see what is newsworthy (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33069840)

If you are an organ donor, they take your organs before you die. If you die, your organs are useless. This is why I am *not* an organ donor.

Re:I fail to see what is newsworthy (2, Insightful)

Sir_Lewk (967686) | more than 4 years ago | (#33069940)

And yet you would no doubt take a donated organ if you needed one.

You are the worst sort of person.

Re:I fail to see what is newsworthy (2)

yoblin (692322) | more than 4 years ago | (#33069942)

I think you're confusing organ donor with victim of organ harvesting

Re:I fail to see what is newsworthy (1)

nelsonal (549144) | more than 4 years ago | (#33069982)

You have to be brain dead, but on life support machines before the organs are taken. Most transplant centers will only take a few minutes of CPR before they reject a potentail organ.

Re:I fail to see what is newsworthy (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33069994)

That's ok they'll just wait until you're brain dead to do it.
Hell no point waiting I'll just send them around now!

Re:I fail to see what is newsworthy (3, Informative)

MoeDumb (1108389) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070076)

Not true. In NY for example it is illegal to remove a patient's organs before he has been pronounced dead by a physician using certain clinical criteria. Depending on the organs in question the pathologist has window of one to 24 hours for the tissue to be viable. A special case is when a patient is on a ventilator. He can be declared "brain dead" which is legally irreversible, clinical death, but all his organs can be kept 'alive' and healthy for days.

Re:I fail to see what is newsworthy (4, Interesting)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070118)

NY is considering making organ donation the default status in the state unless you opt out of it. I actually think that's a bridge too far -- the state ought not to assume that I want to give away my body parts without confirmation of this wish.

Re:I fail to see what is newsworthy (1)

Mr. Bad Example (31092) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070226)

> the state ought not to assume that I want to give away my body parts without confirmation of this wish.

Why? What exactly are you planning to do with them after you die?

Re:I fail to see what is newsworthy (5, Insightful)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070294)

That's between me and whatever Gods I believe in.

The free exercise of religion is sufficient reason on it's own for organ donation to be an opt-in affair.

Re:I fail to see what is newsworthy (4, Insightful)

Animaether (411575) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070526)

The problem with it being opt-in is that it also makes it lazy.

Most people don't put any thought into whether they want to be a donor or not, and whatever religious or superstitial concerns may arise, because the question of being a donor or not never affects them in an opt-in scenario.
After all, if you're not a donor, you don't have to think about parts of your body being used to help others. It's easy and lazy.

If you make it opt-out, people will be forced to think about this and make a decision to either remain a donor, or opt out of it.

If it weren't likely to elicit "ZOMG Teh Constutition!" responses, I'd say this should actually really be handled in high school or college. Have people decide actively to either be a donor, or -not- be a donor; no 'default' status being presumed (with younger children falling under the wisdom (with any luck) of their parents/guardians).

If opt-in is the norm.. very well. But I do think that those who choose not to be a donor should in fact be treated differently when it comes to receiving a donor. I wouldn't go as far as saying that they shouldn't get the donor organ (or skin graft or whatever).. but perhaps a donor recipient should automatically be made a donor themselves. After all, it's not 100% their own body they'd be deciding about anymore, and at least somebody whose organ(s) you received -did- choose to be a donor.

Re:I fail to see what is newsworthy (4, Funny)

Captain Splendid (673276) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070296)

Let his family sell them on the black market, of course. What are you, some kind of communist?

Re:I fail to see what is newsworthy (5, Insightful)

digitig (1056110) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070462)

There have been suggestions of medical attention switching, whilst the patient is still alive, from preservation of life to preservation of organs, though. That's worrying.

Kinda (5, Insightful)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 4 years ago | (#33069852)

While I don't really care to stop him in his request - let him do what he wants - I still consider the "dead anyway" argument flawed. ALL OF US are "dead anyway". Life is a condition with a 100% fatality rate. It's just a matter of when. Just because his when is likely sooner than most (not definitely though - I'm currently healthy but could easily be hit by a car this afternoon, and him still outlive me), doesn't make his death any less significant.

In short, it's still suicide. The only question is, whether suicide should be legal or not. Were I in his shoes it's not a choice I would make (might as well eek out as much time as I can), but I wouldn't deny him the right to make the choice.

Re:Kinda (4, Insightful)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 4 years ago | (#33069866)

If you don't own your body, then you are slave.

Therefore it you are not slave, you should be free to do whatever you want with your body or its organs, including termination.

Re:Kinda (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33069910)

If you own your body, then you are able to sell it into slavery...wait.

Re:Kinda (4, Funny)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070000)

If you own your body, then you are able to sell it into slavery...wait.

It's called being a Walmart employee....

and they used to have key man on all workers (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070298)

and they used to have key man insurance on all workers

Re:Kinda (1)

XxtraLarGe (551297) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070064)

If you own your body, then you are able to sell it into slavery...wait.

Sorry for similar post AC, you're below my viewing threshold, so I didn't see yours when I posted mine.

Re:Kinda (1)

socz (1057222) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070270)

Kernal Panic! Press space bar to reboot...

Re:Kinda (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33070278)

If you own your body, then you are able to sell it into slavery...

You can, by joining the military.

Kinda like the BSD license (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33070596)

If you own the code contributed under the BSD licence, then you can sell out and let someone else privatise it.

That's why you need the GPL to guarantee all other freedoms - except the freedom to privatise the code.

Sorry, not directly connected with heart transplants but I thought the parent post's comment about slavery had a more general significance.

Re:Kinda (1)

XxtraLarGe (551297) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070004)

If you own your body, can you sell it into slavery?

Re:Kinda (2, Insightful)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070006)

If you don't own your body, then you are slave.

Then I guess we are all slaves because someone tried to put some THC into his body the other day and got arrested for doing so......

Re:Kinda (1)

decoy256 (1335427) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070074)

Sad, isn't it?

Re:Kinda (1)

xonar (1069832) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070336)

Fucking criminal, isn't it?

FTFY

Re:Kinda (2, Funny)

HungryHobo (1314109) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070108)

your *self* and your *body* can be considered distinct.

It could also be considered that *nobody* owns you or can own you, not even yourself.(not my actual view but it's valid)

I would have thought if he's intent on it he could just walk into a hospital specializing in transplants and off himself in some way that wouldn't damage his organs.

Or just ride around on a motorcycle.

Re:Kinda (2, Interesting)

Zerth (26112) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070556)

Go in wearing a non-resusc bracelet with a living will taped to your chest and just open a vein.

Out of consideration for the janitorial staff, I suggest bringing a bucket.

Re:Kinda (1)

rufty_tufty (888596) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070056)

You raise an interesting point. If I own my body I can surely mutilate it.
I can get a tattoo
I can pierce my ear
I can cut off a finger
I can cut off an arm
I can cut off a leg
Or can I?
But what if I get one of the attempts wrong and bleed to death? When does it stop being artistic and become attempted suicide?

Re:Kinda (2, Insightful)

ooshna (1654125) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070350)

Don't forget about drugs its your body you can pump whatever chemicals you want into it... oops n/m.

Re:Kinda (1)

xonar (1069832) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070396)

When does it stop being artistic and become attempted suicide?

In a perfect world, we wouldn't need to make that distinction. Granted it's caused by one's own self, as opposed to forcing it on someone else; obviously.

Re:Kinda (2, Informative)

Animaether (411575) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070600)

But what if I get one of the attempts wrong and bleed to death? When does it stop being artistic and become attempted suicide?

It becomes attempted suicide when your -goal- was your death.

If you chop off your leg because you think you'd be happier with that leg gone.. go for it. If you then can't stop the arterial bleeding and bleed to death.. well, whoops. But your goal was only to remove your leg, not to kill yourself. Therefore, not suicide.

Re:Kinda (5, Interesting)

MozeeToby (1163751) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070062)

His death isn't even that imminent, consider that Stephen Hawking was diagnosed with ALS 47 years ago. An extreme case certainly (the longest survivor of any ALS patient), and I doubt that many people would have adapted to and overcome the psychological problems of the disease as well as Hawking has. But to say that ALS is 100% death sentence is obviously wrong.

Re:Kinda (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33070078)

speak for yourself thanks to the power of denial i am, immortal.

Re:Kinda (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33070168)

All death is suicide. We chose to be born, and as birth always results in death, we chose that too. A law against suicide makes as much sense as outlawing a naturally-occurring plant.
Not that that stops them, of course....

Re:Kinda (4, Funny)

digitig (1056110) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070540)

All death is suicide. We chose to be born

Speak for yourself. I wanted to stay in there.

Re:Kinda (1)

RivenAleem (1590553) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070248)

You could easily be hit by a car this afternoon, but the likelihood is not great. Gary's death in the short-term is guaranteed. There is the difference. If you KNEW, with 100% certainty, that you would get hit by a car this afternoon, and that it would destroy some vital organs, then the decision to pre-empt this and check into a hospital to harvest them before they took this damage is equivalent to the decision he is making now.

Does this open a can of worms for assisted suicide for people who are not terminally ill? Not likely. Will it allow those who are terminally ill to give the gift of life to someone who has a chance to use it to the fullest? Yes, it does.

Re:Kinda (1)

Smekarn (1623831) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070302)

You nailed it, my friend!

However, I think suicide should be prevented by all reasonable means possible. Euthanasia on the other hand is not for anyone but the terminally ill patient to decide, regardless of what relatives and professionals believe the chances of survival to be. People rarely argue that preventing euthanasia is in fact a wildly selfish act.

Re:Kinda (1)

epp_b (944299) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070390)

While I don't really care to stop him in his request - let him do what he wants - I still consider the "dead anyway" argument flawed. ALL OF US are "dead anyway". Life is a condition with a 100% fatality rate. It's just a matter of when. Just because his when is likely sooner than most (not definitely though - I'm currently healthy but could easily be hit by a car this afternoon, and him still outlive me), doesn't make his death any less significant.

I'm going to make a judgement on whether or not he should be allowed to do this, but the difference here is he knows he's going to die within a determined, much shorter time than you are likely to and he knows the path to his death will be painful.

Re:Kinda (1)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070582)

Life is a condition with a 100% fatality rate. It's just a matter of when.

That's not what Holt Fasner thought...

a psych eval..... (2, Insightful)

metalmaster (1005171) | more than 4 years ago | (#33069858)

Give the guy an evaluation and if he isnt deemed crazy or suicidal grant him his wish. His decision is rational enough

Re:a psych eval..... (5, Insightful)

nospam007 (722110) | more than 4 years ago | (#33069902)

"Give the guy an evaluation and if he isnt deemed crazy or suicidal grant him his wish."

Wanting to die is usually always suicidal, no?

Re:a psych eval..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33069980)

"Give the guy an evaluation and if he isnt deemed crazy or suicidal grant him his wish."

Wanting to die is usually always suicidal, no?

Yes, "usually always"...

Re:a psych eval..... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33070032)

Except..it's not necessarily a case of wanting to die, it's a case of being willing to die, but wanting to do something in the process.

Re:a psych eval..... (1)

xonar (1069832) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070434)

Except..it's not necessarily a case of wanting to die, it's a case of being willing to die, but wanting to do something in the process.

^ This

Re:a psych eval..... (5, Insightful)

cyber0ne (640846) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070186)

Accepting the inevitability of death isn't exactly the same as being suicidal. We all know we're going to die, most of us just ignore that fact in our daily lives. But when someone is directly facing that reality they may choose to want to make it "mean something" as in this guy's case.

"Suicidal" means wanting to die. I doubt this guy wants to die, but he does want his inevitable death to mean something to someone.

Re:a psych eval..... (1)

Animaether (411575) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070236)

Wanting to die is usually always suicidal, no?

Wanting to kill yourself is being suicidal.

But what if you want to die, but not kill yourself?

If you are in incredible agony with no hope for survival, you may wish to die because death would be better than the agony.
( up for discussion, usually from religious views, but let's say that the person in question believes so )
That wouldn't qualify as being suicidal on its own. You may not want to kill yourself.

In the case of this story.. this guy obviously doesn't particularly want to kill himself. He just knows that he's dying relatively soon and that when that time comes, his organs will be of no use to anybody. He wants to donate those organs before it's too late. The fact that he'll die sooner in the process is a consequence, but not - presumably - his goal.

If killing himself was the goal, there'd be much easier and direct methods.

Re:a psych eval..... (5, Insightful)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070518)

Wanting to die is usually always suicidal, no?

There's a difference between "wanting" and "not caring". My wife died several years ago from a brain tumor. Now I don't really care how long I live... Even have my Will, Living Will, DNR and body donation (to science, like she did) forms filed - and I'm only 47. Not only that, I'm not afraid because she's there - wherever that may be - even if only in the abstract.

No different... (5, Insightful)

the_one_wesp (1785252) | more than 4 years ago | (#33069864)

Than someone jumping in front of a bullet to avoid it hitting someone else. Both are willingly inviting death to save another's life.

Re:No different... (1)

ShadowRangerRIT (1301549) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070072)

Well, inviting death is somewhat different than guaranteeing it. I don't disagree with your unstated conclusion, but the rationale is somewhat different. My opinion is that if someone's experience of life is already painful, and guaranteed to get worse with no hope of recovery, they should be allowed to end it. And if they want to help others in the process, that's gravy.

Re:No different... (1)

Xemu (50595) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070592)

My opinion is that if someone's experience of life is already painful, and guaranteed to get worse with no hope of recovery, they should be allowed to end it. And if they want to help others in the process, that's gravy.

There's a possibility that the doctor says to a patient "your life is over in 3 years, but if you kill yourself, you'd save another", but 2 years later after the patient killed herself, a cure for the disease is discovered.

You would also run a the risk of a doctor lying to a patient there is no hope of recovery, in order to obtain that patient's organs for another patient. A patient in need of organs could pay off or threaten a doctor to lie to another patient.

There's plenty of big problems with assisted suicide and they get worse when other's can win their life from the suicides.

Re:No different... (1)

RivenAleem (1590553) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070136)

Not just jumping in front of a bullet. There are many people who put themselves in harms way to save another's life. The difference with, say, a fireman is that they are not guaranteed to die.

Re:No different... (4, Interesting)

cyber0ne (640846) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070304)

I wouldn't say "willingly inviting death" but I see the point you're making.

I'm reminded of an episode of M*A*S*H where a soldier was brain-dead due to too much shrapnel turning his head to swiss cheese. The doctors were waiting for his body to fully die (all other functions were still going, but slowly fading) because they needed to harvest some tissue to save someone else. The soldier's friend, recovering from his own injuries, was upset that they were just waiting like vultures to butcher his friend.

The priest asked him if his friend was the kind of guy who would jump on a grenade to save his buddies. The soldier responded that, yes, his dying friend would have done that without a second thought. "Well," the priest said, "that's what he's doing right now." He died back on the battlefield, the rest of his body just hasn't figured it out yet.

This guy is facing a similar decision, he just wants to make it himself while he can before someone else has to make it for him.

Re:No different... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33070316)

You've seen too many movies...

Bad Move (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33069874)

George Steinbrenner [theonion.com] tried that, with disastrous results.

altruism incarnate (2, Insightful)

smoothnorman (1670542) | more than 4 years ago | (#33069894)

Sadly, the standard array of (AMA approved) bioethicists isn't ready for this yet. A very brave fellow who's picture should be in the dictionary in the definition of altruism.

Re:altruism incarnate (3, Insightful)

XxtraLarGe (551297) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070140)

I'm not saying his heart isn't in the right place (no pun intended), but if he considers himself a dead man anyway, is it really altruistic? It's kind of like the old millionaire who leaves his estate to a charity. Was it really charitable of him if he didn't give it away while he was still living?

Re:altruism incarnate (1)

cyber0ne (640846) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070370)

The net result is the same. The recipient of the heart, and their loved ones, will be forever grateful. The guy's true motives are between him and any god he believes in.

Re:altruism incarnate (1)

AGMW (594303) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070452)

I'm not saying his heart isn't in the right place (no pun intended), but if he considers himself a dead man anyway, is it really altruistic? It's kind of like the old millionaire who leaves his estate to a charity. Was it really charitable of him if he didn't give it away while he was still living?

I'd say, by definition, this guy is offering to give away his heart and lungs while he's still living. That's the whole point of the story!
If we was just saying "Hey, you know, when I die and shit, why not harvest my organs and stuff, and, you know, like give it to other people" then it wouldn't really be much of a story!

Man carries donor card! Film at Eleven!

Re:altruism incarnate (1)

MozeeToby (1163751) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070180)

Unless he's actually just suicidal and is looking for a way to do it that his family and friends will be able to accept. Not saying this is the case, just saying that he needs to be thoroughly evaluated before you can even say if he's the ultimate altruist or just wants off the ride.

Re:altruism incarnate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33070230)

Dont be silly.

Encyclopedias have pictures, not dictionaries.

Re:altruism incarnate (1)

spads (1095039) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070262)

Yeah, to the AMA a lingering death is money in their pockets.

Assisted suicide (3, Insightful)

Sarten-X (1102295) | more than 4 years ago | (#33069918)

It's the same physician-assisted suicide argument that cropped up so many years ago. The only difference is that this guy's going for a "noble hero" approach instead of a "suffering patient".

Re:Assisted suicide (1)

Zeek40 (1017978) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070058)

This one has a much better chance of succeeding though. Social conservatives who want to run other people's lives and Pharmaceutical Corporations interested in making a buck are the only ones who are against physician-assisted suicide, and now that they have the opportunity to profit from organ harvesting instead of profiting from end-of-life care, at least the Pharmaceutical Corporations may change their minds.

Re:Assisted suicide (1)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070084)

Why doesn't he just shoot himself and render the whole debate moot? ALS doesn't cripple you so fast as to take away your ability to end your life. Is there some prohibition against harvesting organs from suicide victims that I'm not aware of?

Re:Assisted suicide (1)

Zeek40 (1017978) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070286)

I cant remember where I read it, but I remember reading that "Live Donor" transplants have a higher success rate than "dead donor" harvested organs. If he planned it out ahead of time, for the highest chance of a successful transplant, he would have to notify the physicians performing the transplant operation of his suicide plans so that they would be ready to quickly perform the procedure, which I believe would cause those physicians legal trouble aw well as potentially cost them their medical licenses for not trying to prevent his suicide.

Re:Assisted suicide (1)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070342)

So walk into the hospital, put your organ donation card down on the counter and blow your brains out. Seems simple enough to me.

I realize I'm being somewhat callus about this but the point is that he has control over his own body. If he's really determined that life is no longer worth living then there isn't a damn thing anybody can do to stop him from ending it.

Re:Assisted suicide (1)

Zeek40 (1017978) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070534)

Yeah, but it's still going to be hours or days before the physicians can match him with a recipient, call in the right surgeons, prep for the procedure, etc. etc. and during that time his organs will be slowly dieing, even in the care of transplant professionals. Plus it's kind of fucked up to the hospital staff and patients to put them through the experience of watching some random guy blow his brains out on in the waiting room. I agree with you that he still has control over his own body, but there's really no legal way for him to truly maximize the probability of a successful transplant. If he wasn't worried about a successful transplant, then yeah, he could just blow his brains out and be done with it.

Re:Assisted suicide (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070308)

Not that I know of; but the logistics could be tricky.

If you want the organs to be viable, the EMTs need to show up fast. Those guys don't have advanced life support gear(more advanced than the panicked bystanders, sure, less advanced than the hospital) so your organs will be deteriorating the whole time from gunshot to OR. They'll probably be deteriorating extra quickly because a decent gunshot wound(ie. the one you want in a suicide attempt), will cause massive blood loss, really fast. This is good for you, as it reduces the amount of time spent conscious of having a massive gunshot wound to a minimum, and reduces the odds that the EMTs will show up a little too early, and successfully patch you up. Having ALS and a horrible gunshot deformity would be a real downer, and you might score a psych stay as well...

Probably not impossible, with the right proximity and prep; but riskier and a lot messier than just getting the ethicists to heed your expressed wishes, have the doctors anesthetize you, remove the organs, and then deepen the anesthesia until you shut down.

Are organ donations from diseased people good? (1)

Junior J. Junior III (192702) | more than 4 years ago | (#33069938)

I'm not sure I'd want organs from someone who has ALS. Wouldn't that become a problem for me in time?

Re:Are organ donations from diseased people good? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33070036)

RTFA, the organs he wants to donate are not affected by ALS. Do you really think it would have gone this far without first determining that? And if you don't want them, feel free not to take them, but I think you might feel different if your heart was ready to give out any day now.

Re:Are organ donations from diseased people good? (1)

spamking (967666) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070046)

Exactly what I was thinking . . .

I'm not sure he'd qualify as a "good" donor.

Re:Are organ donations from diseased people good? (1)

MozeeToby (1163751) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070358)

ALS is a brain disease, the neurons that control muscle movement degrade over time, causing paralysis and eventually death by respiratory failure. The organs are unaffected because even the heart is not controlled by motor neurons in the brain. After he passed he'd be the perfect donor, one with too much brain damage to live but otherwise healthy organs. The stated concern is the year or more spent lying in bed after the paralysis hits could damage or degrade the organs (I suspect the real concern is that he just doesn't want to go through that but knows that assisted suicide is a no go these days).

Re:Are organ donations from diseased people good? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33070126)

Sure. When a car 'dies' of transmission blow up, the tailgate lights are probably fine.

Re:Are organ donations from diseased people good? (2, Informative)

hipp5 (1635263) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070162)

I'm not sure I'd want organs from someone who has ALS. Wouldn't that become a problem for me in time?

ALS is a disease of the central nervous system. His organs are likely fine, his central nervous system that controsl them is not.

Re:Are organ donations from diseased people good? (1)

ShadowRangerRIT (1301549) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070366)

ALS is a genetic disease that affects the nerve cells involved in voluntary muscle movements only. It's not transmissible, and it doesn't affect internal organs that aren't under voluntary control (and for the record, your lungs aren't under voluntary control, they expand and contract based on the movement of your diaphragm). A heart, lung or liver from an ALS patient would be no worse for you than any other organ transplant (and heck, it might be better since most other organ donations come from accident victims, where trauma is a concern, and you don't have time to test the organs for viability and safety as thoroughly).

Grant him his wish (4, Insightful)

StuartHankins (1020819) | more than 4 years ago | (#33069992)

And perhaps take some time to reflect on what the world would be like without people willing to sacrifice everything for someone else, even a stranger.

Sometimes being in the limbo between life and death, waiting for it to arrive, is too much to bear. Give him peace in a dignified and respectful way.

Perhaps it says something about us, that we require a psych eval before allowing someone to give so freely of themselves?

Re:Grant him his wish (1)

drukawski (1083675) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070588)

There is an easy enough end run to get around this, someone buy the guy a motorcycle and let nature take its course. A subscription to some Youtube channel with idiots riding on one wheel would likely speed up the process.

Why is this idle? (0, Troll)

beefnog (718146) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070012)

I could understand this being posted as "idle" if the person was misinformed about the consequences of losing his organs, but this guy seems to have his ducks in a row.

What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33070014)

Everyone is dead already, it is just a matter of time.
If he really wants to donate that stuff, just sign up for it, then hold your breath.

But, correct me if i'm wrong, wouldn't the disease transfer over?

Bad idea to authorize this (4, Interesting)

frednofr (854428) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070022)

While this may seem like a good idea at first glance, the implications of accepting such requests could be terrifying:

One could imagine threats such as "If you don't give your heart to patient, we will murder your family one by one".

Desperate people with questionable morals will go to great length to save someone they care about.

Re:Bad idea to authorize this (1)

the_one_wesp (1785252) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070200)

Those same morally questionable people would still find other ways of being morally questionable, there's no way to stop it. Quite honestly, liberty dictates that this man should be allowed to do what he wants.

Re:Bad idea to authorize this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33070260)

My god, I hope nobody thinks of doing that to demand money!

"To argue against any breach of liberty from the ill use that may be made of it, is to argue against liberty itself, since all is capable of being abused." – Lord George Lyttleton

Jebus, Gary Phebus! (0, Troll)

tacktick (1866274) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070026)

I propose "Jebus, Gary Phebus!" as the new expression of shock and surprise.There certainly aren't many people like him.

Cool. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33070066)

Cool.

1. Find a surgical team who's morals weigh heavier than their career goals
2. Put the patient on liver dialysis and cardiopulmonary bypass
3. If he dies from complications of being on the machines, that doesn't count as suicide in my book.

Re:Cool. (1)

matthiasvegh (1800634) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070580)

Wait, not ALL surgical teams morals weight more than their career goals? WTF?

He would have sold them already... (1)

brian0918 (638904) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070086)

Were it legal to sell one's own organs (which it should be), he would likely have already sold them, and given the profits to his loved ones - a win-win situation for all involved. Instead, we are stuck with waiting lists and high prices (due to lack of supply, due to ban on selling for profit).

Re:He would have sold them already... (1)

bws111 (1216812) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070292)

Sell your organs to who? Highest bidder? Plus, there is way to much opportunity for coercion.

Re:He would have sold them already... (1)

Mongoose Disciple (722373) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070620)

Sell your organs to who? Highest bidder?

Well, sure. How else could the free market sort this problem out? :)

Seven Pounds (1)

Nexus7 (2919) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070088)

A fiver says he watched the movie "Seven Pounds."

Safe to transplant? (1)

cmdr_klarg (629569) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070094)

I'm not so sure I'd want the organs of someone suffering from ALS.

There is still a 10-20% chance of long life (4, Insightful)

jeffmeden (135043) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070100)

He may not want to accept being wheelchair bound but he could have a fulfilling life with ALS, even though the chances are relatively slim. He should take up physics, after all Stephen Hawkig isn't going to live *forever*. If he really wants to be an organ donor, he should do what every one else does: file the appropriate paperwork at the DMV and buy a motorcycle*.

*As a motorcycle owner, I am comfortable with this joke.

Too many movies (0, Redundant)

silverglade00 (1751552) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070110)

I think this guy finally snapped after watching Seven Pounds...

I'ts been done before. (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070208)

I saw it on Monty Python's Meaning of Life. (Part V - Live Organ Transplants)

Anti-Kevorkians (1)

cosm (1072588) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070284)

How long until the Anti-Kevorkians [wikipedia.org] create a media 'outrage'? You should be allowed to do what you want, when you want with your own manifestation and its components. If they allow people to have 'DNR' clauses attached to them in case of traumatic circumstances, or allow people to preemptively opt out of life support (having the plug pulled before they are 'dead'), then this mans behavior should be allowed.

If you havn't seen 7 Pounds [imdb.com] , it is a good watch and hits this issue in a different but powerful light.

Euthanasia (1)

mim (535591) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070306)

I firmly believe that euthanasia should be a legal option for people with such conditions and that if they have the presence of mind to make such a gracious decision, that could potentially benefit so many others, prior to their death that this should be allowed.

transplant list. (1)

Svartalfar (867908) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070340)

Even if they were going to cause problems for the person receiving them(and they shouldn't) most people who are on a transplant list are desperate. Willing to accept anything that will give them that next breath. The next day with their family. If the man chooses to end his life in a way that saves others, more power to him.

Even if the laws were changed (1)

stomv (80392) | more than 4 years ago | (#33070372)

no surgeon would do it, lest he lose his license, due to those pesky ethics rules by which doctors must abide.

Can we please stop linking to fox news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33070546)

Please?

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