Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Alternatives To Paypal's Virtual Credit Card Service?

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the other-than-giant-stone-discs dept.

Privacy 242

An anonymous reader writes "Paypal has quietly killed the Paypal plugin and the related virtual-card service. The service generated on-the-fly, one-time-use credit card numbers. When I called in and inquired about the service, I was told that the service has been discontinued, but may be relaunching something similar depending on interest. They are treating inquiries as a sort of petition, taking down names and contact info. The forums seem to be a lost cause, as no Paypal reps have replied to the numerous posts regarding virtual cards being discontinued. Does anyone know of a good alternative source of one-time-use credit card numbers?"

cancel ×

242 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Look for an option from your credit card company (5, Informative)

mysidia (191772) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099656)

Citibank, Citicard virtual account numbers [citibank.com] .

Bank of America ShopSafe [bankofamerica.com]

Re:Look for an option from your credit card compan (5, Interesting)

dicobalt (1536225) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099668)

I can vouch for the Citibank virtual numbers, I have been using it for years. It even works with recurring charges for up to 1 year. You specify the max amount to be drawn over the year. Amazon.com sometimes chokes up when using it but I have never had problems anywhere else.

Re:Look for an option from your credit card compan (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099678)

Interesting... recurring charges longer than a year break?

I never had a problem opening up an 'active virtual account number', and extending the expiration date to 12 more months....

Re:Look for an option from your credit card compan (4, Funny)

ls671 (1122017) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099710)

I opened an 'active virtual account number' valid for an unlimited time and unlimited amount and also valid with an unlimited number of merchants and it is the only one I use all the time ;-)

Re:Look for an option from your credit card compan (1)

bev_tech_rob (313485) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100270)

Ummm....that sounds like just a regular credit card account...big whoop.... not the same thing we are talking about...

Re:Look for an option from your credit card compan (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33100438)

That was a whoosh, son. I say, a whoosh. Of course, in Texas we have whooshes five times as big as that.

Re:Look for an option from your credit card compan (5, Interesting)

MoeDumb (1108389) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099688)

And I can vouch for Bank of America's ShopSafe. Have used it for years without a hiccup. Discover Card's equivalent seems a bit harder to navigate for some reason.

Re:Look for an option from your credit card compan (1)

Kelbear (870538) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099754)

I love this service as well.

I wish they could offer the same thing for in-person or over-the-phone purchases. I really don't like having to hand over my credit card to strangers. Perhaps one day security technology will catch up. Anybody could easily come up with a half-dozen ways to improve security in the process. Sure there are obstacles for implementation, but they're far from insurmountable. It seems like the risks and occurrences have to get worse before they get better.

Re:Look for an option from your credit card compan (5, Funny)

adolf (21054) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099780)

I wish they could offer the same thing for in-person [...]. I really don't like having to hand over my credit card to strangers. Perhaps one day security technology will catch up. Anybody could easily come up with a half-dozen ways to improve security in the process. Sure there are obstacles for implementation, but they're far from insurmountable. It seems like the risks and occurrences have to get worse before they get better.

Cash.

Re:Look for an option from your credit card compan (1)

ChipMonk (711367) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099902)

You can't push coins or bills down an IP connection, no matter how fat or thin.

Re:Look for an option from your credit card compan (1)

amRadioHed (463061) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099988)

You'll note that the OP was talking about better security for in-person transactions. For IP connections, the one-time use card numbers this thread is all about work nicely.

Re:Look for an option from your credit card compan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33100110)

Even virtual coins and bills?

Re:Look for an option from your credit card compan (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100180)

I wish they could offer the same thing for in-person or over-the-phone purchases.

Nothing stopping you from using the disposable credit card numbers over the phone.

In person - well you could try picking up a mag-stripe writer and using it to write a disposable number to a regular credit card. Just make sure you only swipe that card once before you re-write the mag-stripe with a new number...

[USA only] (2, Interesting)

krischik (781389) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099820)

Well, this looks like USA only products. Paypal services are world wide.

Re:[USA only] (2, Informative)

mysidia (191772) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099872)

Paypal is worldwide, but as far as I know, when this particular service operated, the option to use this particular service, virtual debit card was only shown on PayPal's US website to US customers...

Re:[USA only] (5, Informative)

laederkeps (976361) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099880)

Swedbank [swedbank.se] (Sweden) offers customers an unlimited number of virtual Visa cards with a given maximum amount and expiration date. They are debit cards tied to the same account as your real plastic card.

Re:[USA only] (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33100224)

One time auto generated card numbers have been available here in Sweden for quite some time. So its definitively not an us only product.

Re:Look for an option from your credit card compan (3, Informative)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100058)

Shopsafe works great, I use it any time I am buying from a small merchant (Newegg and the like I order enough they get to have the real number). It creates the numbers in real time so you just log in to the bank as you are going to check out and make a new number, or add money to a number.

Discover has the same kind of thing, though I've not used it. Looks like the same idea though.

Seems to be getting to be fairly common with banks.

Re:Look for an option from your credit card compan (1)

yyxx (1812612) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100226)

Is ShopSafe actually back? It had stopped working for a while, and support knew nothing about it. I eventually just canceled my accounts with them.

Discover card (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33099662)

Discover Card still offers Secure Online Account Numbers using either a web or desktop app. http://www.discovercard.com/customer-service/security/create-soan.html [discovercard.com]

Re:Discover card (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33100108)

DISCLAIMER: I work for Discover in IT and know the guys that implement and support this functionality.

The Discover system is pretty straight-forward. You just log into the site and request a temporary number. I personally use it on a lot of my online transactions...it's simple and easy to use. Why use your real number?

Try CitiVAN (4, Informative)

bauzeau (128909) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099686)

Citibank offers a "Virtual Account Number" service for their credit cards (Mastercard). It works fairly well. You can do one-shot purchases, or recurring purchases with the same merchant only, or even cap the total you're willing to spend via a virtual number over a number of months.

They have a web interface, but you can also download a Java applet that can generate numbers and fill in purchase forms for you.

A regular bank account? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33099690)

I dont know about you but my bank account can create VCC's without me even having a credit card. All I need is the debit card and enough cash to actually create the VCC, and of course internet banking enabled. The VCC gets destroyed in a couple of days like normal and the balance amount goes back into your account. Considering that youngsters are advised against taking credit cards, and I haven't this is almost my only option for online shopping.

Re:A regular bank account? (5, Insightful)

mysidia (191772) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099720)

The advise to youngsters against taking credit cards is flawwed. Because of how the current financial industry and credit reporting works.

If you never get a credit card or loan of any type, you will not have a credit history. This will be very bad later, when you need to apply for credit or a loan, you will be denied, or require a cosigner, and pay a much higher interest rate..

Unless the youngster is going to be independently wealthy, and never need to borrow money for the rest of their lives (Going to buy your house outright with cash, going to buy all your cars outright with cash, no mortgages, no loans), the sooner you start a credit history, and the higher quality the history you establish, the better (more financially beneficial) terms you will be able to negotiate in the future, when you need a loan.

I would suggest any youngster get at least one credit card, but be very careful and judicious in the management of it.

Even if that means you get a debit card, and leave the credit card locked away in a safe, and only use it once a month.

For the most part, it's beneficial for just about anyone to have at least one CC.

Re:A regular bank account? (5, Informative)

tapanitarvainen (1155821) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099782)

The advise to youngsters against taking credit cards is flawwed. Because of how the current financial industry and credit reporting works.

If you never get a credit card or loan of any type, you will not have a credit history. This will be very bad later, when you need to apply for credit or a loan, you will be denied, or require a cosigner, and pay a much higher interest rate..

As far as I know that is pretty much a US-only phenomenon. At least in most of Europe, the notion of "positive credit history" is all but unknown, when applying for a loan it doesn't matter if you've ever had a credit card unless you've failed to pay up. In many European countries many people don't have credit cards at all.

Re:A regular bank account? (2, Informative)

networkBoy (774728) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099822)

A cell phone contract will establish history in the US as well.
Any contractual obligation over time whether pre or post paid (I.e. phone Vs. Car loan) will show up on your credit history. So does renting an apartment, paying facilities (gas, electric, cable, phone, etc.)

Re:A regular bank account? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33099854)

No, it doesn't. A cell phone contract may require a credit check, but it will only be reported to the credit bureaus if you do not pay. If you get a cell phone and pay it on time, it'll never show up after the initial credit check, which itself will disappear after two years. Student loans, credit cards, store cards, mortgages, etc, all show up. Get a credit card early, use it once every 1-3 months, pay it off when you do use it, and you'll be building a steady history.

Another tip: if you get an American Express card, all future cards you get with them will be backdated to your original account start date. This can be super helpful if you need to boost your average credit age.

Re:A regular bank account? (1, Interesting)

PiSkyHi (1049584) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100016)

I was refused an AMEX card a fee years ago because 7 years prior to that I lost a mobile phone on a contract. At the time I had a very small income and the loss of the phone forced the network to demand payment of the entire remaining 14 months contract period in 1 month. I could not pay. What's funny is this didn't stop me gaining credit with other banks. At the time of rejection I had around 27,000 AUD in credit from different banks and an excellent payment histroy with no debt.

Actually, I think that's why they rejected me, because I was using the initial no interest for 6 months balance transfer option to borrow nearly the full amount of a new credit card and put into a savings account for that time. It gave me a good credit history and made me money at the same time. I was also offered limit increases.

AMEX probably would have ignored the 7 year old default if it wasn't for my lack of debt. They only want interest payers. Not system abusers

Re:A regular bank account? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33100316)

That's illegal though (at least over here, and probably in aus too), placing overdrafts in a savings account.

Re:A regular bank account? (1)

MoonBuggy (611105) | more than 3 years ago | (#33100420)

Really? Why?

Re:A regular bank account? (1)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099912)


A cell phone contract will establish history in the US as well.
Any contractual obligation over time whether pre or post paid (I.e. phone Vs. Car loan) will show up on your credit history. So does renting an apartment, paying facilities (gas, electric, cable, phone, etc.)

Interesting and unbelievable ... in most western countries keeping such records would be illegal.

Regards angeel'o'sphere

Re:A regular bank account? (1)

TheEyes (1686556) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099926)

I actually don't recall any of that showing up on my credit history either, and I just had a look at my credit history because I got a home loan. My student loans, car loan, credit cards, and now home loan all showed up (basically as a bunch of check boxes showing if I paid on time or not), and that was it.

As far as I know, cell phone bills and the like don't show up at all. You can use phone bills and the like as proof of address for background checks, if you don't have two forms of photo ID, but that's completely different from credit history.

Re:A regular bank account? (1)

Khyber (864651) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099950)

none of my cell phone contracts have shown up on credit reports. I'm still totally blank.

Mod Down (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33100086)

Above post has been copied from http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=1739310&cid=33099926 [slashdot.org] .

Feel free to mod redundant, flamebait or troll. Khyber usually falls under all 3 categories.

Re:A regular bank account? (1)

JWSmythe (446288) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100228)

    That's interesting. Most of mine did. I've used various carriers over the years.

    I had a case of identity theft years ago, and that's how I found out about detail on two of them. Someone went on a buying spree and purchased phones online from a few different carriers. Once I found out about the first ones, I called all the major cell carriers to find out if "I" had an account. The ones who said "yes", I asked to be immediately transferred to their fraud department. One of them had allowed the purchase, but refused to fulfill it, and marked it as fraud. I told them to keep it that way, since I wasn't a customer. Another one said the attempt was made, but they flagged it as fraud before the transaction was completed.

    I didn't live anywhere near where the person doing the fraud was at. Since a couple of them gave me "my" information including the street address where the phones were to be shipped, I considered going there and beating the shit out of the guy who did it. Since they were over 1,000 miles away, I called their local police who were completely disinterested in it. "File it with your local police." My local police were again completely disinterested, since the suspect was so far away. {sigh} I finally got someone to at least write down my complaint and hand me a semi-formal piece of paper saying that I had filed a complaint.

Re:A regular bank account? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33100028)

Just because they perform a credit check doesn't mean it shows up on your credit history. All of the services that you mention will only show up on your credit history if you fail to pay for them, and that certainly isn't a good thing.

Re:A regular bank account? (5, Informative)

Cimexus (1355033) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100202)

Indeed. The US system seems bizarre to the rest of the world.

In the rest of the world, countries either don't even have a credit reporting system, or if they do, it works from the assumption that you start with GOOD credit history, and the only thing that hurts it are previous debts you have defaulted on. I.e. someone that has never had any credit cards or other debt will be able to get a loan just as easily as someone who has had previous debt, but has paid it off on time etc. The idea of 'building' a credit history is un-necessary - just don't default on debts and you will be fine.

In my country all they do is look at your income, assets, expenses and any records of previous defaults, and make a judgement on that. There is no 'credit score' as such. The US system seems really weird (and unfair!) to me - since I am a person that has never really had any debt and almost never uses credit cards.

Re:A regular bank account? (2, Informative)

Kr3m3Puff (413047) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099846)

As far as I know that is pretty much a US-only phenomenon. At least in most of Europe, the notion of "positive credit history" is all but unknown, when applying for a loan it doesn't matter if you've ever had a credit card unless you've failed to pay up. In many European countries many people don't have credit cards at all.

The UK has been starting to introduce a "credit rating" system (thanks to the same companies in the US flogging their wares over here). It isn't as rigorous or specific as the US one and simply rates the risk. It tends to be some financial activity is good (no matter what type) but late payments or defaulted debt is bad. A lot of it has to do with a verifiable history. When I first moved over here from the US, I had a really hard time because I didn't have a previous address. Once I moved about a year in, and had a previous address in the UK, everything got substantially easier. Youth (I think 25) get a high risk rating no matter what.

In the UK they are card happy (whether it be Debit or Credit) and has moved more and more to a cashless and chequeless society, but I had to remind my partner, who is a Brit, that on our recent holiday to Germany, we needed to carry cash with us and pay for things in cash, because lots and lots of places don't take credit cards and in fact, we found places that do take a card, only take one type of Debit card. Not fun if you aren't prepared.

Re:A regular bank account? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33100074)

"Starting to introduce"? Credit rating and credit rating agencies for individuals have been with us in the UK for at least the last 20 years when I first encountered them, probably much longer.

Re:A regular bank account? (1)

Redlazer (786403) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099870)

It's true for any 'debt-based' (probably not the best term) economy, which is just about everyone.

Same can be said for Canada: If you ever need to borrow money, and don't have a credit history, you're going to be in rough shape.

It occurred when my family moved back to Canada, after living in the US. My mother couldn't get a credit card because she had no Canadian credit history, even though her US credit was quite good.

Re:A regular bank account? (2, Informative)

bazorg (911295) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099990)

As far as I know that is pretty much a US-only phenomenon. At least in most of Europe, the notion of "positive credit history" is all but unknown

I live in the UK and confirm what the other guy said. If your credit history shows a blank list, you will not get a normal mortgage.

Re:A regular bank account? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33100068)

Completely untrue. On what basis are you making this statement?

Re:A regular bank account? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33100240)

Step one: Get a credit card.
Step two: Don't spend more than what you could pay.
Step three: Avoid going over 30% of your unsecured credit. So, $500 limit means don't spend over $150 on the card per month.

For me, it works like this...
Maybe I buy $10 worth of groceries per day on average. I use my debit card. So, maybe for 15 days of each month, I'll use my credit card instead, then just transfer the money from my checking to credit card to pay it off.

Anything wrong with this? Please let me know.

Re:A regular bank account? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33100444)

If you never get a credit card or loan of any type, you will not have a credit history. This will be very bad later, when you need to apply for credit or a loan, you will be denied, or require a cosigner, and pay a much higher interest rate..

So your life (in this society dependent on the credit... well... cancer) depends not on whom you you vote for, but on the unwritten rules of the banking establishment.

Re:A regular bank account? (4, Insightful)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099826)

Credit cards are so much better than debit cards for online purchases, or anything really. If someone steals money from your debit card, it is your money that is gone. If someone steals money from your credit card, it is someone else's money that is gone.

Re:A regular bank account? (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099916)

That's why debit cards here in Portugal all have a PIN, and almost all the shops have little readers with keypads.

Re:A regular bank account? (2, Interesting)

TheEyes (1686556) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099940)

More to the point, it's the credit card company's money that is gone, so they are a lot more proactive about hunting down fraud. Most banks don't give a flying crap if someone drains your account of $5,000, but if someone charges $100 at a gas station on another person's card the company is quick to nullify the charge. They usually don't even charge to stop payment, unlike the banks who've been getting really creative with fees lately.

Re:A regular bank account? (2, Informative)

Mr. Freeman (933986) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100056)

"If someone steals money from your debit card, it is your money that is gone. If someone steals money from your credit card, it is someone else's money that is gone."

I'm not convinced that you understand how credit cards work, or for that matter, how money works.

Doesn't matter if it's your bank or your credit card company, it's YOUR money that's gone. With a debit card the money comes out of your bank, with a credit card the money initially comes from the credit company, who sends you a bill, and you send them money from your bank. In either case you can file paperwork claiming fraud, and in both cases a valid claim of fraud will result in your money being returned. (specific policies vary by company and bank)

Given the choice, I'd rather deal with a bank than a credit card company. I can walk into my bank and actually talk to someone, can you do that with ANY credit card company? My bank actually wants me to remain a customer, not because I have so much money that it's in their interest to keep me there, but because they actually care about customer service. Any credit card company won't give a flying fuck about you unless you hold one of their super exclusive cards (i.e. Amex Centurion, aka Amex black) that actually cost you roughly two grand per year to have. That's two thousand dollars per year just to hold the card. You're not even eligible for it unless you spend HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS of dollars on an Amex gold card. So, yeah, they'll take care of you if you're in the top 0.5% of customers.

Re:A regular bank account? (5, Informative)

jareds (100340) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100248)

I'm not convinced that you understand how credit cards work, or for that matter, how money works.

And I think you're being willfully obtuse.

Doesn't matter if it's your bank or your credit card company, it's YOUR money that's gone. With a debit card the money comes out of your bank, with a credit card the money initially comes from the credit company, who sends you a bill, and you send them money from your bank. In either case you can file paperwork claiming fraud, and in both cases a valid claim of fraud will result in your money being returned. (specific policies vary by company and bank)

When you receive a bill, there is no force of nature causing you to send payment. Here's how it works with a debit card:

  1. Money is stolen via your card, coming immediately from your bank account.
  2. You notice the discrepancy (perhaps because you want to withdraw money you expected to have but don't, in which case it sucks to be you).
  3. You ask the bank to return or restore the money, claiming fraud.
  4. (a) The bank returns the money, or (b) the bank denies the claim.

In case 4(a), you have no access to the money in the time between 3 and 4(a), which could be 10 business days (two weeks). In 4(b), it is up to you to pursue legal action against the bank.

Here's how it works with a credit card:

  1. Money is stolen via your card, being paid from the card company's accounts.
  2. You receive a bill including the fraudulent charge (note: the company is asking you for money, rather than vice versa).
  3. You make a claim for fraud.
  4. You send a payment only for the non-fraudulent amounts.
  5. (a) The company accepts your claim, and that's the end of it, or (b) they deny your claim, so you keep getting bills and other collection action.

In 5(b), it's up to the company to pursue legal action against you, rather than vice versa. In all cases, the money remains in your control at least until the company wins in court. (Of course, you would lose the money with the debit card as well if you lost against the bank in court, but the money would have remained out of your control immediately.)

The point is clear: your money is gone with a debit card in that you lose actual control of it, and have to ask for it back. The card company's money is gone with a credit card because they have to ask you for it back (perhaps not entirely, if they haven't paid the merchant yet, but that's not your concern).

Re:A regular bank account? (3, Informative)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100252)

I'm not convinced that you understand how credit cards work, or for that matter, how money works.

It doesn't take a black card to get good response to fraudulent charges on a credit card because federal banking laws very explicitly define what the banks must do and for once the rules are very favorable to consumers instead of the banks. Meanwhile the only rules governing fraudulent debits are arbitrary ones set up by individual banks and the debit networks. Violating a federal law is a huge deal, the banks don't play around with that -- but breaking their own internal policies, the consequences are practically nil, it puts you at the mercy of someone who might just be in a bad enough mood to take it out on you.

Furthermore the previous poster is exactly on the mark about it being the bank's money at risk for fraudulent charges and your money for a fraudulent debit. At best you can expect your bank to refund the lost money and any of their internal fees. But if that fraud caused any of your checks to bounce or your automated payments not to go through you are looking at fees from the payees - returned check and late payment fees - and you have no chance of getting your bank to reimburse those fees since they aren't internal and really are whatever the payee wants to set them at.

No, the only people who should ever use a debit card are the ones who just plain can't qualify for a credit card or are so bad with money that they can't control their spending (and they better be sure not to get so-called "over-draft protection" on those debit accounts because until recently it was impossible to get a debit card without over-draft protection since those over-draft fees are massive cash cows for all banks).

Virtual-card load with paypal? (1)

smasha (1849308) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099696)

I would also love to know where i would be able to get a virtual card that can be loaded with paypal. All the sites I've been to all seem like scam sites.

I'm interested too... but where? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33099698)

Depending on your needs I know of no good solutions but here are some:

You can buy a Simon Gift Card at malls around the country. Don't be fooled by the name. You probably know your mall by a different name even though it is owned by Simon malls. You most likely have one in your town even if you think you do as I discovered. If you don't you will within close driving distance. I live in in the middle of nowhere practically! Not a major city or anything. The NJ/PA border area and have one even. Initially I thought I had to drive a ways. Wasn't true though. Had one 5 min down the road. The fee is $2.95 and you can get them as low as $20. The nice thing about these cards is whatever is left on the old one can be put onto the new one. BUT don't ask them to transfer it- that will cost money. Instead when you buy the new one split the transaction paying partly cash and pay the rest with the old Simon Gift Card. You can have them check the balance of the old Simon Gift Card if you don't know what it is for free.

http://www.simon.com/giftcard/

Another one is citiibank. I'm not a fan of citibank but you can open a checking account and they have a feature just like what paypal had which lets you create virtual numbers. Of course this doesn't work if you are a privacy conscious consumer. Or at least you can't open an account without ID.

Cash Credit Card (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33099700)

Why don't you just use a (re)loadable credit card? Pretty sure most major banks have them.

Orbiscom has the patent (4, Interesting)

Distan (122159) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099730)

The general patent to do virtual credit card numbers is held by Orbiscom. They are the provider of most of the Credit Card vendor's solutions: Citi, Discover, BoA, etc.

http://www.orbiscom.com/

Re:Orbiscom has the patent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33099876)

The general patent to do virtual credit card numbers is held by Orbiscom. They are the provider of most of the Credit Card vendor's solutions: Citi, Discover, BoA, etc.

http://www.orbiscom.com/

Business patents just got tossed and software patents will be curtailed or tossed soon enough.

This post smells like lawyer put it up.

Re:Orbiscom has the patent (0)

iammani (1392285) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100022)

So?

Re:Orbiscom has the patent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33100160)

They might have told PayPal to go shove an anvil where the sun doesn't shine or get sued if they never had a licence for it. (most likely)

Re:Orbiscom has the patent (3, Informative)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100262)

Well, for one thing, Mastercard recently bought Orbiscom. Mastercard sees paypal as a competitor. Since all disposable credit card numbers (including disposable VISA numbers) are handled through Orbiscom's systems Mastercard may have made it prohibitively expensive for Paypal to do business that way.

Entropay (2, Interesting)

DamonHD (794830) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099748)

See https://www.entropay.com/ [entropay.com]

Disclaimer: I'm biased as I was one of the founders!

Rgds

Damon

Re:Entropay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33099978)

looks like for a 5% +2.50 fee you can get around credit card charges for cash withdraws.

Re:Entropay (1)

tru3ntropy (1632547) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100010)

This is exactly what i need. Thanks

Re:Entropay (2, Interesting)

ygslash (893445) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100120)

See https://www.entropay.com/ [entropay.com]
Disclaimer: I'm biased as I was one of the founders!

This looks like a great service - the best that I've seen in this topic, among those that don't require an existing account at a specific bank.

Here are several other pre-paid card services that are designed for youth accounts, but can be used as a plain pre-paid card as well:

  • PayJr [payjr.com]
  • Allow Card [allowcard.com]
  • Prepaid cards [visaprepai...essing.com] of various kinds directly from Visa, supported by at least 30 different banks (see drop-down lists on site)
  • USAA Federal Savings Bank [usaa.com] (requires USAA membership - really, really worth it if you qualify)

Re:Entropay (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33100428)

4.95% charge to deposit? $8--9 to get it back.? Do you use computers or have guys with green eye shades?

I would like to pose another question (2, Interesting)

mysidia (191772) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099758)

Is there a way you can get a virtual account number with multiple physical cards issued against the same CC account?

Of course, optimally would be a physical card that changes its own magstripe, based on you typing a code and a mnemonic identifying the vendor.

Online shopping may be risky... However, offline shopping can involve the same risks.

Old fashioned physical theft by employees is a real possibility, especially in restaurants where your physical CC leaves your sight. While the cashier is behind the counter, you have no idea they are running your card through a hidden skimmer.

Also, big companies store CC information in their computer systems nowadays, just like online stores do.

Virtual account numbers are nice, and solve one problem, but they aren't comprehensive.

Especially if you use the physical CC associated with the same account you have virtual numbers against. If your physical CC gets lost, the thief can make unlimited charges against your entire account, and when you get it cancelled, suddenly you can't use your virtual accounts based on that card anymore either......

So are there more comprehensive solutions? :)

Re:I would like to pose another question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33099844)

If your physical CC gets lost, the thief can make unlimited charges against your entire account, and when you get it cancelled, suddenly you can't use your virtual accounts based on that card anymore either

Untrue, at least with BoA's ShopSafe. I had my physical card number compromised by a stupid data breach by an "undisclosed party", so I was automatically forced to get a new "physical card"/account number. BoA Did The Right Thing and automagically repointed my virtual account numbers over to the new account. In short, it seems that the problems you purport are based on a flawed premise.

I love the level of indirection that I get from my ShopSafe numbers. Were you cognizant that once an account number has been used by a merchant, then it is *solely* valid for subsequent charges from the same merchant? (up to the limit that you have preset, naturally) So, even if someone compromised the number—which I have only used with one vendor—then it still can't be used by the thief. This allows me great confidence that I can create a virtual account number and never have to worry about having a recurring charge (internet service, etc) bouncing in the future due to compromise of my "root" account number or the virtual account number.

That said, there can be issues. I once had my health insurance premium bounce on an virtual account number because the company changed their charge entry and the BoA system thought that counted as a different merchant. However, that was certainly a boundary case; how often does a sane merchant change their charge entry?

To summarize, it's great to have these numbers, especially when you can stick it to vendors who think they can keep charging you indefinitely once they have your credit card number (I am looking at you XBox Live). "So sorry, bitches!"

Not that I know of (1)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100090)

The best thing over all to deal with that is just watch your account carefully. In this day and age of online banking there's no excuse not to check your accounts once a week minimum. The next thing to do is get yourself multiple CC accounts. That way if one is deactivated, you don't have any real problem. Personally I have 4, a visa, a mastercard, a discover card and an american express card. The discover and amex are basically for special deals, since they sign on some merchants to give you bonuses if you use them, and there are some places (like Costco) that only take them. The visa is my primary card since it gives miles on the airline I like. The mastercard is a general purpose backup. Have a card compromised isn't a big deal with a setup like that.

Something else you can do is pick a card that is your "high risk" card. Since there's less activity on it, it is easier to monitor and you don't have as many problems if you have to cancel it. I usually use my mastercard, the backup card, for phone purchases like pizza orders for that reason.

You can go and get a prepaid debit card if you really want to have some insular security. These are cards you put money on to and then can spend. Problem is that it is a pain to do, and that it is debit. With a credit card, if fraud happens you haven't lost anything. You are simply disputing you owe the money. That means if push comes to shove they have to take you to court to get money out of you in the case of a disagreement. With a debit card the money is gone and your are claiming they should give it back. That means if push comes to shove you have to take them to court to get it back.

Just keep a backup card or two and you should be fine. If you are really worried, keep one of them in a safe at home. That way if your wallet is taken it is still available.

We can hope that some day they'll start to use smartchip cards in person. This is popular in some other countries and between the chip and the pin they require they are extremely hard to use fraudulently. But until then you just have to deal with it from time to time. Just take some precautions and it is fine. You are never responsible for fraudulent charges by law.

Even if you do everything right, you may get hit sometime. One of my cards was hit (though it never got used) because a payment processor got broken in to. No problem, the bank was informed by the processor, canceled the card and issued a new one. A pain, but not a big one.

Try the Citibank/Citicard (1)

Lobsang (255003) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099766)

I have a Citibank/American Airlines card that has this option. The interface to create the virtual card number is somewhat crappy (flash) but it works. This is probably available on other citibank cards as well.

Neteller has virtual preloaded Mastercards (1)

twomi (986768) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099770)

See intro about Neteller's virtual MC here: http://public.neteller.com/content/en_GB/cards_virtual.htm [neteller.com]

Re:Neteller has virtual preloaded Mastercards (1)

Black.Shuck (704538) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100174)

I don't have mod-points, but I can vouch for Neteller's service.

Not dead (1)

tagno25 (1518033) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099776)

The Paypal virtual credit card service is not dead. I can still create new virtual credit cards and did just yesterday. It may just be limited to specific people or you just need to know where to click.

Re:Not dead (2, Informative)

butlerm (3112) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099802)

It is not dead yet, but it will be. Paypal has announced they will be discontinuing service after September 22, 2010. Check out the link.

For those outside of America (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33099790)

http://www.virtualvcard.com.au/home.aspx

can be used from Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, India, and the United Kingdom

still exists to prior users (1)

ZeroNullVoid (886675) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099792)

people grandfathered in can still use it,

I have only used the plugin once prior to uninstalling, but if you were a member with it, the option is paypal plugin on the right when you login.

I depend on it and use it all the time.

One side note, if paypal detects fraud because you login from an unusual area in their opinion, all your virtual cards get deleted and you will have to make new ones and send them to people who regularly charge on them for reoccurring payments.

Will never deal with Paypal (3, Insightful)

syousef (465911) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099796)

I've had what I consider a very bad experience with Paypal and now I only use them begrudgingly if I have no other alternative. I consider their assurances technically accurate but due to their execution to be of no use whatsoever to me. So I treat all transactions put through Paypal as high risk "might not get what you pay for" transactions. If I were looking for a credit card, I'd rather poke out both my eyes than get one with that company. I don't think I'm alone.

Re:Will never deal with Paypal (3, Interesting)

iamhassi (659463) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099832)

"I've had what I consider a very bad experience with Paypal and now I only use them begrudgingly if I have no other alternative."

I've had more "very bad experiences" with Paypal than you can shake a stick at, watching them steal thousands of my dollars over the years using various excuses, and of course they won't provide any evidence as to why I owed them the money. Unfortunately I still use them because they are the only ones. They have the easiest website integration, thousands of programmers know how to setup advanced shopping carts and customers trust them. There's nothing I can do.

I seriously considered google shopping cart but apparently there's just as many complaints again them and there's no 800 number for customer service, everything is by email.

If anyone knows an alternative to Paypal that customers trust please let me know.

Re:Will never deal with Paypal (2, Interesting)

iammani (1392285) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100042)

Amazon Payments is a good alternative. Google (as in Google Checkout) has always have had customer service problems, but in terms of easy of web integration and shopping cart setup, I would rank them pretty much on par with paypal.

Re:Will never deal with Paypal (1, Interesting)

SpzToid (869795) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100370)

All I can do is mention www.moneris.com since a friend in the CC industry suggested this fairly recently, towards a charity we're both involved in. Aside from this suggestion to research on my own for our own purposes, I have nothing else to offer you except this simple mention.

Re:Will never deal with Paypal (1)

beadfulthings (975812) | more than 3 years ago | (#33100422)

If anyone knows an alternative to Paypal that customers trust please let me know.

I don't think there is one, and it's something I've searched for. The other problem is that they've become a household name on the end-user side of things, and most buyers trust them, rightly or wrongly. It's rare to find a customer who refuses to use them. When you do find one, their story is usually pretty bloodcurdling.

I'd like to shuck them as well, but I don't see myself doing it for a long time. I set up a pretty good service (Propay) that enables me to take cards in person at shows and over the phone (and that doesn't cost me the $30-plus per month that "Paypal Virtual Terminal" soaks you for). But Propay wants hundreds for the api that would let me interface them to my shopping cart.

Re:Will never deal with Paypal (2, Interesting)

Zemran (3101) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099840)

I find Paypal completely unusable as they freeze my account every time I use it. I am always traveling (currently in Kazakhstan) and each time I access the account they see my access as unauthorised because I am in a different country and they freeze my account until I re-authorise it by jumping through a series of hoops. I have spoken to people and complained but they are unable to see my moving around as normal for me. One time, whilst in Azerbaijan, I transferred some money from my bank account to pay for something and they froze the account with my money trapped in the Paypal account and I had to wait until I returned home (several months later) to release the money as they wanted me to be able to check the amount of a couple of payments they make into my bank account. I felt like they had stolen from me. How many unauthorised users pay money into the account? I could not use my money to pay for what I wanted to buy and had to use an actual credit card. Now I just accept that they are rubbish and I have to use actual credit cards.

Re:Will never deal with Paypal (1)

jroysdon (201893) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099858)

I'd suggest using a US-based webproxy service so your web traffic appears to come from the US.

Re:Will never deal with Paypal (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099972)

Well duh - set up a socks proxy to a server in a friendly country.

Re:Will never deal with Paypal (3, Insightful)

thegarbz (1787294) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100276)

Well duh - set up a socks proxy to a server in a friendly country.

Are you actually saying that your solution to a rubbish company is to use stupid workarounds so you can keep using that company? I ... simply don't know what to say to that.

Can't recommend Citibank . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33099842)

I had a CitiBank card, and this was a nice feature. Unfortunately a few years ago it seemed like they started to get desperate and started playing any game they could think of to collect extra fees. Like changing the billing date and interest rate every billing cycle. When I set up automatic weekly payments to thwart that, they sent me a letter saying they were going to start charging me a yearly fee for a card that wasn't supposed to have one. When I declined, paid off the full balance, and asked them to close the account, they kept it open for several months and continued to charge small fees. When I asked why the account hadn't been closed they told me it was all a mistake and the fees would be removed and the account closed, but then they sent me a letter threatening to report me to a collection agency instead. Over less than $2 in fees charged to an account that was supposed to be closed two months prior to the fees being charges. So, what I'm saying is, I can't really recommend them as an alternative to PayPal -- when I canceled my account with them (or tried to anyway) I was disappointed to hear that PayPal was killing off their program. I have a Discover now, but their system is much more limited.

Convenience factor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33099856)

Virtual card numbers are primarily beneficial for the banks, since they cover the losses if your number gets stolen. I used to generate virtual card numbers with Citicards all the time in hopes of avoiding the inconvience of reporting fraud, getting a replacement card, etc. even though it was a hassle (because I could otherwise memorize my number and not have to login to citicards.com to generate one). Still, twice in the last year my card number was stolen somehow and had to be replaced. The first time, fraud was detected before the transaction was allowed, so I just got a notification stating as much, and that my card would be replaced. The second time, I caught the fraud while checking my account online. I reported it and again, the card had to be replaced.

So, I no longer bother with virtual card numbers. PayPal may be a little different, but since other commenters are recommending Citicards, I felt this was relevant.

An alternative (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33099868)

An anonymous, alternative to paying online.

www.bitcoin.org

Dumpster behind Olive Garden, Penny's, near mall (0)

catmistake (814204) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099898)

YMMV

HDFC Bank India (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33099904)

http://www.hdfcbank.com/personal/payments/netsafe/netsafe.htm

It's an Indian bank. I have been using it successfully and with no hassles over the last 5 years.

Why are things like this discontinued ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33099906)

Why the hell do good services like this get discontinued ? American Express and another bank I used also had this. Simple to use and gave me peace of mind since more or less no one takes security seriously. Both services were killed without a reasonable explanation. They must profit off fraud or something.

RIP Paypal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33099910)

The one useful feature they still had over other services, aside from breadth of use, is now gone. I'm for switching - there have been to many bad experiences for me to realistically continue using it. It's time to let the market forces do their work.

-eruditorum

Virtual Visa (2, Interesting)

tru3ntropy (1632547) | more than 4 years ago | (#33099992)

I use virtual visa card http://www.virtualvcard.com.au/home.aspx [virtualvcard.com.au] dont know if it works in America but it was the only thing i could find at the time. Instead of giving you a one time card number it allows you you to deactivate and reactive the number any time.

First p0st (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33099996)

OS don't FeAr the

Other Options (1)

Netbrian (568185) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100002)

I've had reasonably good luck with prepaid cards such as Visa giftcards. It's not quite one-time use, but has most of the same advantages.

Re:Other Options (1)

JWSmythe (446288) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100250)

    I've been totally satisfied with the Green Dot cards. They're sold under a few names, including the "Walmart Money Card". It's a physical card, so it doesn't totally apply to the question. It costs something like $3 for the card, and you can add cash to it at any Green Dot vendor. (plus a small service fee). Put as much as you're going to spend on it, and use it. If it becomes compromised, cut it up. :)

    You get a temporary card in the package. They mail the real card with your name on it within about a week. I bought one to make a road trip with, and used the temporary card at gas stations along the whole trip. You can't refill the temp card though, it only gets the initial balance. So if you get a card and put $200 on it, it costs you $203. When that $200 is gone, the card doesn't work any more. Once you get the real card with your name on it, you can add money as you see fit.

    I use mine a lot. There's no overdraft fees, since they simply don't allow it. When it gets down towards $0, it's done. The big problem is when you have like $1.68 on it, you either have to make a small purchase to burn that up, or let it sit. It's not like you can pull $1 out of an ATM, or at least nowhere I've seen.

Damn, what about the people who refuse to use cred (1)

dhickman (958529) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100080)

I am of the crowd who simply does not use credit.
I have been using the paypal virtual cards for years for internet transactions and just used it an hour ago to buy new book for my kindle.
I have no problems paying a reasonable price for the service.
What alternatives are there for those of us who does not use credit cards under any circumstance?

Re:Damn, what about the people who refuse to use c (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33100260)

I am of the crowd who simply does not use credit.
I have been using the paypal virtual cards for years for internet transactions and just used it an hour ago to buy new book for my kindle.
I have no problems paying a reasonable price for the service.
What alternatives are there for those of us who does not use credit cards under any circumstance?

3 words: prepaid credit cards [compareprepaid.co.uk]

alternatives for ontime pay, how about one vendor (1)

dhickman (958529) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100114)

I see that there are other one time virtual cards.
The other feature that paypal had was single vendor cards for a year. I used those alot for amazon, t-mobile etc.

This was to protect from either a vendor that I do monthly business with from getting hacked or in the case of vendors like T-mobile who require a credit card for monthly service and I want the ability to cancel the account without it affecting my actual bank account.

Running out of credit card number (1)

kamaaina (1071006) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100146)

Wonder if we are going to run out of credit card numbers.

These virtual credit cards are the reverse of NAT.

Re:Running out of credit card number (1)

JWSmythe (446288) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100256)

    I suspect they'll recycle after a period of inactivity. Either that, or maybe that's why PayPal dropped the program. It was a pretty neat little deal though. I enjoyed it for online purchases. I was buying from a questionable site once. They took my card info, but then didn't allow the transaction to complete (internal error, not a card error). Rather than risking them taking money for a transaction not completed, I canceled the virtual number.

Neteller (2, Interesting)

_Shad0w_ (127912) | more than 4 years ago | (#33100242)

I use NETELLER [neteller.com] for times I need to use a card to buy stuff on the net, which is usually when they don't accept PayPal.

Portugal's MBNet (3, Informative)

Sodki (621717) | more than 3 years ago | (#33100478)

Virtual every debit and credit card in Portugal can have access to MBNet [mbnet.pt] , a nationwide initiative in which you can have your one time credit card numbers.

We actually have a pretty accessible banking system here in Portugal. We have a state regulated entity called SIBS that pretty much guarantees that every banking system should be able to talk to the others. In practive, this means that every bank has at least one ATM that is compatible with every debit and credit card in the country, and can be used for free, with no taxes for money withdrawal and other operations. It's pretty sweet.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>