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RIM's Encryption 'Too Secure' For Indian Government's Taste

timothy posted more than 4 years ago | from the nsa-smiles-and-nods-politely dept.

Privacy 140

climenole writes "Research in Motion, the creator of the widely used enterprise-cum-consumer BlackBerry device, has an uncertain position in India. The Indian government's internal security and intelligence services cannot break the encryption of the device, which makes countering terror threats and national security matters difficult — especially for a region which faces constant threats and attacks from domestic Maoist insurgents and extremist Islamic groups." Does it make you wonder how much safer everyone would be if parkas, mailing envelopes, cash, and superglue were all evaluated on the same basis?

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And GnuPG? (2, Insightful)

ciaran_o_riordan (662132) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103376)

What about sending email with GnuPG?

Re:And GnuPG? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33103422)

The Indian Government can go to Hell for all I care. Period. Full stop.

Re:And GnuPG? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33103570)

Dot. (For good measure.)

It's 2010 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33105478)

You're both being syntactic reactionaries. Use the semantic <end-of-sentence> instead.

Re:And GnuPG? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33104566)

The Indian Government can go to Hell for all I care. Period. Full stop.

And we have to care about what you think because?

"I can tell you to go to hell, but I guess you are already there"

Re:And GnuPG? (2, Interesting)

stephanruby (542433) | more than 4 years ago | (#33106620)

And so most European governments except the UK I take it. All European governments (except for the UK) have warned their own government officials and company executives NOT to use BlackBerry/RIM.

The main problem is that if you send a text, an IM, an email, or anything to the person sitting next to you in any European country you might be located in, it's encrypted all-right, but your blackberry will always route that message to the UK first (and the Canadian company Research In Motion is able to decrypt that message of course). And with the Anglo/Canadian/US/Australian intelligence-sharing pact and the presence of Echelon in the UK, that might as well mean you're letting the NSA and its friends index all your BlackBerry communications for US consumption.

India is not stupid. It would have to have known about this. Probably someone from the US/UK is still pressuring them to keep this trojan horse around their neck, as they're trying to get rid of it -- not wanting to make the US lose face -- still toeing the US anti-terrorist official line (hoping that they don't get sanctioned for this small act of insolence toward their masters).

Re:And GnuPG? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33106804)

The Indian Government can go to Hell for all I care. Period. Full stop.

you can go suck a kinky kelly's donkey's dick for all we care.

No one does (4, Funny)

Rix (54095) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103442)

So they don't care.

dupe (5, Insightful)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103448)

Wow, I haven't seen a dupe this bad [slashdot.org] in a long time. The story is still on the front page. Add to it the story of being detained at the border, Verizon changing router passwords, and the hacker tapping phones for $1500, and today is privacy Sunday, eh guys?

Re:dupe (0)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103544)

Um, I'm a bit confused on how the UAE is related to India, last time I checked they were entirely different regions of the world.

Re:dupe (1)

Michael Kristopeit (1751814) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103568)

that story did say they were following india's example... so it's worse than a dupe... it's breaking a story that another story already referenced in the past tense.

Re:dupe (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33103592)

Read the original story - India is mentioned.

Re:dupe (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33103950)

Also, summary.

Re:dupe (3, Insightful)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103608)

Heh, so you are one of those guys who only reads the title and not the summary, I see. Sign up to be a Slashdot editor, they need more people like you.

Re:dupe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33103602)

I believe the proper term is "Think of the Children (and the Troops) Sunday".

Re:dupe (1)

Anubis IV (1279820) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103688)

timothy is on a roll.

Re:dupe (1)

Peach Rings (1782482) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103882)

Don't you mean on a role? Wait, augh! Too much slashdot!

enterprise-come-consumer

;_; What are they doing to you my poor language?

Re:dupe (1)

EdIII (1114411) | more than 4 years ago | (#33104148)

What are they doing to you my poor language?

You act like the English Language is just in the beginning parts of that movie Deliverance. Sorry to break this to you Nizzle, but the English Language has already been metaphorically sold into brutal slavery and is currently wearing cheap leapstick, dirty lingerie, and is waiting for the next sweaty john to take her for a ride.

I don't know how much animation you watch, or perhaps Serenity, but I have the strong impression that communications 50 years from now will consist of emoticons, characters borrowed from many different writing systems, made up characters (Klingnon, LOTR, etc.), abbreviations for longer words and concepts, and largely comprised of slang.

The ability to speak, write, or in other words, communicate with a single language correctly and precisely will probably be a distinguishing characteristic or the intellectual elite and upper classes. Those people who drink from fancy glasses with their pinky fingers held outward.

I jest a little, but my command of the English language and grammar would probably be considered adequate at best in those circles.

Re:dupe (1)

suman28 (558822) | more than 4 years ago | (#33105480)

It is typically written as "enterprise-cum-consumer", meaning "enterprise as well as / with consumer", but in the US? not sure about Europe, that word has becum known for other things besides the cleaner version

Re:dupe (1)

worx101 (1799560) | more than 4 years ago | (#33106960)

I have to ask, who was the guy who sat down and decided how English should be spoken? And, do we speak the same English today that was spoken 500 or even 200 years ago.

Re:dupe (1)

unixan (800014) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103708)

today is privacy Sunday, eh guys?

It's DefCon weekend.

Re:dupe (1)

EmagGeek (574360) | more than 4 years ago | (#33105814)

When did India and UAE become the same country?

That's what I get for sleeping in on Sunday...

Re:dupe (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 4 years ago | (#33105900)

Read the summary.

It was good enough for the /. editors (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33103468)

They could even read the previous article [slashdot.org] today :)

Here in Lebanon! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33103494)

The gov can wiretap anyone without a warrant and even the different gov agencies are loyal to different political factions so I may have my phone tapped cause I belong to a certain political group or if I hampered a corrupt official from taking bribery by questioning the deal, contract or law (no way to stop them, they are tooo strong). Different political groups have their own cell phone taping and listening groups; if a politician could not get someone on a list, then his/her political group can do that independently. I have not mentioned that most other countries have strong intelligence in Lebanon so they too can have a phone tapped either via the gov agencies or thru their own espionage groups. I am not exaggerating here.

I pity those living in Saudi Arabia, India and UAE, and I bet they feel less important cause only one gov can invade their privacy!

Re:Here in Lebanon! (1)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103628)

The problem is that, when wide snooping infrastructures are in place, organizations other than the native government learn to listen in.

Remember the Greek phone-tapping fiasco? [wikipedia.org]

When governments attack, only one thing matters (2, Interesting)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103530)

How can we can keep private, secure communications from being blocked?

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (1, Insightful)

Michael Kristopeit (1751814) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103546)

not rely on a corporation to provide the service for you

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103796)

Gee, thanks! Now find a non-corporate internet provider that can stay out of reach of government tentacles. In fact find a publicly accessible internet connection that is non-corporate at all. You neighbor's wifi doesn't count for obvious reasons. We'll have to build our own.. from scratch... that's invincible... We need people with the resources that are willing to do so.

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (0)

Michael Kristopeit (1751814) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103830)

well if you don't have the resources, or are not willing, what are you complaining about? i don't recall reading about the right to encryption in the constitution.

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33103906)

i don't recall reading about the right to encryption in the constitution.

I don't recall the power of government to keep me from having encryption being in the Constitution either.

In a perfect world, I'd win this argument. With our corrupt Republocrat government, you've won hands down.

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (0, Troll)

Michael Kristopeit (1751814) | more than 4 years ago | (#33104134)

how are they keeping you from having it? the corporation unwilling to fight with the government is keeping you from having it. RIM offered the service. RIM is now not offering the service. the people you've entrusted (to provide you with services you are in no way guaranteed) have let you down. you have no one to blame but yourself.

trust me, i'd win regardless if the government was corrupt or not... "republocrat" or not, or even existed or not. you are a whining child. you want to provide a channel for terrorists to secretively communicate? go ahead. don't do it believing no one should care or will attempt to stop you... or do you believe people don't have the right to attempt to stop people doing things they disagree with? the whining child turns hypocritical awfully quickly.

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 4 years ago | (#33104056)

Read the 9th Amendment... The government only has the authority explicitly written into the document. But that doesn't matter since I'm talking of a global scale, which isn't subject to American law (so it thinks). And all written law, and our rights are toothless without a weapon to back them up. That's life in a world run by savages...

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (1)

Michael Kristopeit (1751814) | more than 4 years ago | (#33104206)

unlike a world where encryption is necessary to communicate? what are you afraid of?

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 4 years ago | (#33104374)

The savages make the encryption necessary. What are you talking about?

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (0, Flamebait)

Michael Kristopeit (1751814) | more than 4 years ago | (#33104512)

so either way i'm supposed to fear "savages"... and i suppose you can protect me from these "savages" for a price? no?

go sell your FUD to someone else.

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 4 years ago | (#33104552)

i suppose you can protect me from these "savages" for a price?

Yep... Let's see if you can make worth my trouble

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (-1, Flamebait)

Michael Kristopeit (1751814) | more than 4 years ago | (#33105030)

you're dumber than i thought. why would you be waiting to see if i could make it worth your trouble after i already said i don't want anything that you're selling. it troubles you to provide the services you offer? because of the hypocrisy or your incompetence?

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (-1, Troll)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 4 years ago | (#33105252)

You should leave the thinking to professionals. Now, be off...

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (-1, Troll)

Michael Kristopeit (1751814) | more than 4 years ago | (#33105438)

do you assume i don't expect to be paid to be off? why would i not?

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (1)

EdIII (1114411) | more than 4 years ago | (#33104254)

Privacy and Anonymity are a right, and yes it is in the Constitution. Furthermore, it is a basic human right.

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (1)

Michael Kristopeit (1751814) | more than 4 years ago | (#33104480)

it's not very practical to expect privacy while broadcasting on a public network.

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (2, Insightful)

MysteriousPreacher (702266) | more than 4 years ago | (#33104738)

By that logic no-one should complain if wiretaps were to be installed in restaurants. It's not reasonable to expect that no-one will overhear a conversation in a public place but quite reasonable to expect that there won't be microphones in your beef satay - at least not without proper judicial oversight.

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (0, Troll)

Michael Kristopeit (1751814) | more than 4 years ago | (#33105000)

well then, if you are already expecting privacy, then why do you need to encrypt?

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 4 years ago | (#33105922)

Insurance... against those don't respect our rights.

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (0, Flamebait)

Michael Kristopeit (1751814) | more than 4 years ago | (#33106376)

so no matter what, "those" people will always exist. how could you be so sure unless you were one of "those" people yourself?

if you can't trust the law, and encryption can be hacked, then what point does that insurance serve?

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (2, Insightful)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 4 years ago | (#33106548)

Ya takes yer chances... Life's a gamble... No guarantees... I make the effort, hope for the best.. and expect the worst.. That way I'm never disappointed. I derive no benefit from simply lying down and living the lie. Yours may be a different story... Whatever makes you confortable

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (-1, Flamebait)

Michael Kristopeit (1751814) | more than 4 years ago | (#33107060)

so by admittedly living a lie yourself, you surmise, perhaps i might not be...

your insistence on continuing to speak doesn't make me not comfortable. is "confortable" where prisoners build makeshift dwellings?

you're an idiot.

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (2, Insightful)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 4 years ago | (#33107176)

you're an idiot.

From you, I'll take that as a complement...

Now please, go take some reading lessons.

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (-1, Troll)

Michael Kristopeit (1751814) | more than 4 years ago | (#33107330)

so i can learn how to read the words you make up and the words you misspell, and not be disappointed with you? how long does a class like that take?

you are NOTHING

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (4, Insightful)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 4 years ago | (#33107416)

you are NOTHING

Ahhh, excellent :-) That's what I've been waiting for. What took you so long?

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (2, Interesting)

LaRainette (1739938) | more than 4 years ago | (#33105432)

braodcasting on a private network with encrypted protocols ?

Try to hack encrypted information from any company in the world and we'll see if someone wasn't expecting "privacy"... when your ass rots in jail.

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (1)

Michael Kristopeit (1751814) | more than 4 years ago | (#33105796)

no, they were expecting someone to try and view their data... that is why they encrypted it... and then someone did make that attempt, just like they planned for... and from the way you describe it, it sounds like your jail rotter was not successful....

it sounds more like a trap to me.

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (1)

LaRainette (1739938) | more than 4 years ago | (#33105418)

you fail to understand what technical aspects are at stake.
I access the internet through a corporate ISP but it doesn't mean I cannot use encrypted protocols to communicate.

RIM doesn't provide internet access. It provides comminucation protocoles and server infrastructure for services. (and smartphones) The same way you could use free FLOSS decentralised solutions for encrypted communication adn that wouldn't be provided by a corporation of any kind. So his point stands.

But seriously the issue here is can a government ban a telecommunication service because they "connot break the encryption" ?
I mean : I wouldn't go as far as to say I would expect them not to be able to (I don't know what my governments exact abilities are, but I would certainly hope they would no DO it even if they could !

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (1)

dooode (1134443) | more than 4 years ago | (#33106178)

I am not sure which country you are from. But if you are from US, there is a high probability the government already has access to all your emails, cellphone communications and messages. It is not that government cares about who you are, or people whom you talk to. Your communications are merely data nodes where these data elements are part of large networks that go through regular network analysis for keywords. If you happen to be some one from Sudan or Pakistan, with close association defined by your name or some other similarity measure, the chances of such analysis are high.

Now, you may call it a privacy breach. But if this analysis saves lives, why the heck should government not do that?

And if US is allowed to do that, its duplicity to cry foul when India asks for the same?

Re:When governments attack, only one thing matters (1)

WCguru42 (1268530) | more than 4 years ago | (#33107332)

Now, you may call it a privacy breach. But if this analysis saves lives, why the heck should government not do that?

And if US is allowed to do that, its duplicity to cry foul when India asks for the same?

It is a privacy breach, and no the government shouldn't be doing it. The US might do it, but that doesn't mean it should be allowed to do so.

/. fails again (0, Troll)

david_bandel (909002) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103538)

Don't take any articles that /. posts with it's hilariously childishly biased language in the subject header seriously. /. has one of the most embarrassingly airheaded left-wing biases I've ever seen in a news outlet.

Re:/. fails again (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103614)

While perhaps commendable for its honestly, a policy of implying that concern for individual privacy is a "left-wing bias" is arguably not the best of strategies...

Re:/. fails again (1)

Gonoff (88518) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103894)

Well it certainly is not a right wing bias!

In actual fact, possly no unnacountable, large and secretive organisation is 100% keen on individual privacy. Corporates are much better at lying about it though. They are less bothered by FOI requests.

Re:/. fails again (2, Insightful)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103630)

What's the matter, are you an Indian-government apologist, or something? The title summarizes exactly what the Indian government wants.

It's not left-wing, either: neither the right nor the left in America wants the government to control communications (I'm not talking about congress people, of course).

Re:/. fails again (1)

dooode (1134443) | more than 4 years ago | (#33106256)

You are ignorant my dear friend...

Your emails, messages and communications are regularly analyzed by DOD for keywords. You won't even realize the amount of money and effort US agencies spend on network analysis, and the amount of funding available for such projects.

What disses me off is so much hypocrisy by American companies. They would co-operate with US federal agencies and provide the required data discretely, but would keep cribbing when other agencies ask for the same.

Re:/. fails again (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 4 years ago | (#33106300)

You won't even realize the amount of money and effort US agencies spend on network analysis, and the amount of funding available for such projects.

That is true, I don't realize the amount of money and effort US agencies spend on this stuff. Do you have numbers, or are you just making stuff up?

Re:/. fails again (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33106982)

Not specific to network analysis, but the government knows few bounds in intelligence spending. See the recent Washington Post article. [washingtonpost.com]

Re:/. fails again (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33107258)

- DARPA grants from their tactical and strategic technology offices alone exceeded $40 million for network analysis related projects involving 8 universities. Data for these varies from emails to social network nodes.
- US military projects to IBM are worth above $100 million this year. A big fraction of these deals with data analysis.
- ONR sanctioned more than $10 million for analyzing networks
- US airport names screening heavily relies on mining information, and is a huge project.
- DOD, FBI and CIA all have initiated large projects dealing with network analysis.

Further, if you have to gauge the funding levels for network analysis check out the new faculty recruits in most big universities.

Re:/. fails again (1)

dooode (1134443) | more than 4 years ago | (#33107304)

> That is true, I don't realize the amount of money and effort US agencies spend on this stuff. Do you have numbers, or are you just making stuff up?

- DARPA grants from their tactical and strategic technology offices alone exceeded $40 million for network analysis related projects involving 8 universities. Data for these varies from emails to social network nodes.
- US military projects to IBM are worth above $100 million this year. A big fraction of these deals with data analysis.
- ONR sanctioned more than $10 million for analyzing networks
- US airport names screening heavily relies on mining information, and is a huge project.
- DOD, FBI and CIA all have initiated large projects dealing with network analysis.

Further, if you have to gauge the funding levels for network analysis check out the new faculty recruits in most big universities.

Re:/. fails again (1)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103748)

Try Fox News. [foxnews.com]

It's fair and balanced, with non of the media's liberal bias.

Re:/. fails again (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33106652)

Try Fox News. [foxnews.com]

It's fair and balanced, with none of reality's liberal bias.

FTFY

ZDNet Article Author has been Brainwashed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33103586)

For a student studying towards a Bachelor of Arts in Criminology and Social Policy (Honours) the author of the article seems rather uninformed about the real world. Government will always tend to stifle individual freedoms and rights in the name of security whether it be local, regional, provincial, national or territorial.

Re:ZDNet Article Author has been Brainwashed (1)

Andorin (1624303) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103680)

That doesn't make it okay.

Re:ZDNet Article Author has been Brainwashed (1)

Delarth799 (1839672) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103766)

There is no clear cut solution to this. On the one hand people want privacy for their communications and they don't want people or the government being able to read what they are sending. On the other hand, the Indian government also has to worry about extremist threats from many groups based inside the country against the government and its people. Intercepted information from known or suspected terrorists could be used to prevent attacks if the government can decrypt it. If the blackberry has an encryption that the government is capable of breaking, then the people won't be happy because they will worry about the government listening in. Then of course if extremists use the blackberry with RIM's encryption to send information and plan and launch an attack and kill tons of innocent people, then the people be pissed about how they government should have been able to prevent this. Its not a right or wrong answer as to how to go about this I doubt there will ever be a solution where both sides can be happy, where the government can protect its people from extremist attacks and the people can have their privacy as well.

Re:ZDNet Article Author has been Brainwashed (1)

Andorin (1624303) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103874)

Unfortunately, the smart extremists will keep away from communications methods the government can monitor. India's government basically just publicly told terrorist groups that if they want to safely organize a bombing or assassination, they should use a Blackberry.

Re:ZDNet Article Author has been Brainwashed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33104220)

India's government basically just publicly told terrorist groups that if they want to safely organize a bombing or assassination, they should use a Blackberry.

Which probably means that the Blackberry is the only device the Indian government has been able to crack so far.

Re:ZDNet Article Author has been Brainwashed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33105746)

This is very good publicity for RIM. Unless, of course, they capitulate.

Besides, there's always the avenue of custom encryption software; all you need is a run-of-the-mill smartphone and a data plan.
Is it really so hard to send ciphertext in a regular-ass email?

Re:ZDNet Article Author has been Brainwashed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33106232)

Here let me fix that for you

India's government basically just publicly told terrorist groups that if they want to safely organize a bombing or assassination, they should NOT use a Blackberry.

Cum, not come (2, Informative)

jone_stone (124040) | more than 4 years ago | (#33103938)

Am I really the first to point this out? The proper word there is "cum", not "come". Come on, people! Latin!

-David

Re:Cum, not come (1)

misexistentialist (1537887) | more than 4 years ago | (#33104632)

True, one need only watch the documentary Caligula to put the "cum" in "enterprise-cum-consumer" in context.

Re:Cum, not come (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33105808)

"enterprise-cum-consumer"

Am I the only one who sees this as a name of a potential porn?

Re:Cum, not come (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33105042)

Yes, come on people! Preferably, women. On their tits.

Re:Cum, not come (2, Funny)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 4 years ago | (#33105824)

Am I really the first to point this out? The proper word there is "cum", not "come". Come on, people! Latin!

*smirk*

Indian English (1)

RandySC (9804) | more than 4 years ago | (#33106762)

It is an Indian English issue.

"Tea Boy cum Houseboy cum cleaner wanted"

"My head is paining me" 'pain' used as a verb

"he is not lifting the instrument" 'He is not answering the phone"

2 BHK flat wanted 'BHK' = bedroom + hall + kitchen

As pointed out in the other article on the FP (1)

ducomputergeek (595742) | more than 4 years ago | (#33104420)

India wants a RIM NOC in their country like the Chinese got.

Of course the funny thing (3, Informative)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 4 years ago | (#33104518)

Is that the very secure nature of the Blackberrys is precisely why the US government loves the things so much. They are RIM's biggest customer. They love all the security features BBs have, and love the Exchange integration.

Fancy-ass terrorists (1)

airfoobar (1853132) | more than 4 years ago | (#33104520)

I'm sure all terrorists use Blackberries. After all, it's a high-income job, right?

Re:Fancy-ass terrorists (1)

dooode (1134443) | more than 4 years ago | (#33106212)

Cellphone services are cheap in India. (Blackberry services start from Rs 249 per month == $5).

Default Password? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33104636)

Did this guy ever consider the fact that the reason Verizon was able to access and change his router password is because he left it at the default of password1 in the first place?

I didn't look into it enough to see if the back door was legit, but it seems pretty damn retarded to complain about security when you leave your passwords at the defaults.

Government can't crack the encryption? (1)

CompMD (522020) | more than 4 years ago | (#33104722)

Boo-fucking-hoo.

Stay out of people's lives.

Re:Government can't crack the encryption? (1)

dakameleon (1126377) | more than 4 years ago | (#33105318)

So given that this is being raised in the context of intelligence agencies attempting to monitor communications between suspected terrorists, if/when an attack occurs will you say the same thing?

(Not that I'm in favour of the whole PATRIOT act thing, but all too often those saying "government should stay out of people's lives" are those who clamour the most for increased power to intelligence agencies.)

Re:Government can't crack the encryption? (1)

mano.m (1587187) | more than 4 years ago | (#33106000)

I`d prefer my government not stay out of the lives of insurgents and of terrorists from across the border. India`s been fighting terrorism far longer than the word has been a part of the daily vocabularies of Americans.

Re:Government can't crack the encryption? (1)

dooode (1134443) | more than 4 years ago | (#33106436)

Boo-fucking-hoo to your post.

I want my Government to save me from terrorist threats. Tracing calls from Terrorists has been one of the important tool. And in the past they have. If these telecom providers can cooperate with US agencies, why the heck Indian Govt not expect the same.

Ans seriously, who needs blackberry. Google, Apple, Nokia all provide decent alternatives...

BB Really much more secure than IMAPS/SMTPS (3, Interesting)

simpz (978228) | more than 4 years ago | (#33105014)

..to a server outside the country.

Or is it that most people when using other smartphones don't know or just don't bother to use the SSL versions of these services.

UAE and Saudi Arabia have already blocked it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33105234)

It has already been blocked in those middle-eastern commercial hubs
UAE, Saudi Arabia block Blackberry [indiatimes.com]

Evaluations (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33105626)

Does it make you wonder how much safer everyone would be if parkas, mailing envelopes, cash, and superglue were all evaluated on the same basis?

Burqas are evaluated on the same basis, and nobody seems to mind.

Just the beginning (3, Insightful)

joeszilagyi (635484) | more than 4 years ago | (#33106036)

Any communications product, vendor, or service that can't be backdoored by government(s) will be banned.

Re:Just the beginning (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33107180)

Indian government is pissed because RIM gave backdoor keys wholesale to China and are refusing to do same in India.

Re:Just the beginning (1)

BangaIorean (1848966) | more than 4 years ago | (#33107244)

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/BlackBerry-server-in-China-India-wants-a-monitoring-unit-too/articleshow/6230540.cms

Extract from the article:

This is the second time that the (Indian) government has threatened to block the operations of BlackBerry. In the earlier instance, tensions were defused after RIM agreed to provide its encryption code to security agencies burdened with having to monitor the chatter among increasingly tech-savvy terrorists. The fresh confrontation comes after reports that RIM was ready to set up a server in China to address Chinese security concerns. Officials here believe that if the Canadian company can take care of China's concerns by reportedly setting up a server there, it can do the same for India which is an equally big market for BlackBerry.

China angle (1)

shadows83 (1644707) | more than 4 years ago | (#33107140)

Indian government have been trying to find a solution for this for last 2 years with BB. Now there is urgency as BB has set up infra in China and all Indian calls will be routed via this infra. I am all for privacy but I will prefer Indian govt snooping on my data rather than china. And, as others have said, there is a legitimate requirement for Indian Govt to monitor all communications.

Easy to talk... (0, Troll)

BangaIorean (1848966) | more than 4 years ago | (#33107168)

I want to see the American reaction if Mexico were to suddenly turn into a terrorist sponsor state with the Al-Qaeda operating from Mexican soil. Imagine that tomorrow, Mexico becomes a country which churns out madarssa 'educated' men by the droves who are unemployable and have only one goal in life - Jihad against America. And in addition, imagine that Mexico constantly disputes the ownership of Arizona and sends men into Arizona to lob grenades and detonate bombs near railroads and bus stations.

The above situation pretty accurately describes Pakistan. India has been experiencing Islamic terrorism long before most current-generation Americans were born. I do not mind the Government monitoring suspected blackberry communication (Remember, India is HUGE - it is simply NOT possible to monitor ALL blackberry communication). I don't want even one more ISI-trained terrorist to enter my country and detonate a bomb. And anyway, as if the RAW even cares about my blacknerry conversations with my manager, girlfriend and sundry others!

Oh don't go there... (1)

FatdogHaiku (978357) | more than 4 years ago | (#33107248)

Does it make you wonder how much safer everyone would be if parkas, mailing envelopes, cash, and superglue were all evaluated on the same basis?

Well, before they start messing with things like parkas, I hope they take a moment to remember Why Raincoats are Yellow... [blogspot.com]

data security vs. national security (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33107294)

This is the 2nd news story this week about how governments are saying BB's are a threat to national security.
I find it very interesting how the word security is being used. On the one hand, the governments are saying it's
a threat to security, but those of us who work on protecting private data are saying the BB's are really good for security.

The same word is being used about the same product, but means very different thing.

Personally, I feel conflicted about this whole thing. I would like to protect my data but I would also like the
government be able to catch and prosecute terrorist. So I suppose the challenge is for the engineers to now
find a way to allow me to have my cake and eat it too.

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