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Radioactive Boar On the Rise In Germany

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the stay-in-the-car-while-I-check-this-out dept.

Earth 165

Germans who go out in the woods today are sure of a big surprise, radioactive boars. A portion of the wild boar population in Germany was irradiated after the Chernobyl nuclear meltdown, and the boars are thriving. In the last two years government payments to compensate hunters for radioactive boar have quadrupled. From the article: "According to the Environment Ministry in Berlin, almost €425,000 ($555,000) was paid out to hunters in 2009 in compensation for wild boar meat that was too contaminated by radiation to be sold for consumption. That total is more than four times higher than compensation payments made in 2007." I think the Germans are overlooking just how much money there is to be made from regenerating bacon.

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165 comments

quoth the radioactive boar: (3, Funny)

neko the frog (94213) | more than 3 years ago | (#33111534)

GET OUT OF HERE STALKER

Re:quoth the radioactive boar: (2, Funny)

Runefox (905204) | more than 3 years ago | (#33111726)

I said come in, don't just stand there!

Re:quoth the radioactive boar: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33112050)

I wish I had mod points for you and grandparent.... :-)

Boar hunting (1)

zildgulf (1116981) | more than 3 years ago | (#33113554)

To hunt boars in America it takes cunning, patience, stealth, patience, an uncanny knowledge of the boars' habitat, a good aim, and more patience.

In Germany all you need to hunt boars is a Geiger counter and a good aim.

First radioactive hog. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33111556)

We are just there for the beer, really.

Profit (0)

MyLongNickName (822545) | more than 3 years ago | (#33111560)

No question marks in this one

1) Kill Boar
2) Irradiate it
3) Sell to German government
4) PROFIT!!!!111!!!

Re:Profit (1)

slick7 (1703596) | more than 3 years ago | (#33111806)

No question marks in this one

1) Kill Boar 2) Irradiate it 3) Sell to German government 4) PROFIT!!!!111!!!

Bacon that cooks itself, what's better than that, other than bacon with ketchup.

Re:Profit (1)

Talderas (1212466) | more than 3 years ago | (#33112070)

Bacon that cooks itself, what's better than that, other than bacon with ketchup.

Bacon coated bacon that cooks itself in bacon fat.

(With a side of ketchup)

Re:Profit (1)

MyLongNickName (822545) | more than 3 years ago | (#33112226)

Bacon coated bacon that cooks itself in bacon fat.

You, sir are my new hero!

(With a side of ketchup)

Never mind you damn vegetarian freak!

Re:Profit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33113104)

Ketchup?

Ahh! I'm bleeding! Quick. Give me more bacon!

Ahh! I'm still bleeding! More bacon!

Oh, you meant to eat the ketchup with the bacon. Meh... keep the ketchup, I'll just take the bacon.

Re:Profit (1)

mangu (126918) | more than 3 years ago | (#33113154)

Bacon that cooks itself, what's better than that, other than bacon with ketchup.

Bacon coated with cheddar cheese inside a doughnut with ketchup.

Re:Profit (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#33112444)

You would make a lot more money selling the meat to resturants and it would involve less upfront investment as you would not need to purchase a radiation source.

Don't worry... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33111582)

Just stock up on Rad-X before venturing into the wastel... I mean forest.

I find this article boaring ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33111608)

I was expecting Giant mutant boars rampaging through cities and destroying buildings and then ultimately being stopped by a Giant Robot (or a Giant Lizard).

It's actually a good thing! (3, Funny)

Just_Say_Duhhh (1318603) | more than 3 years ago | (#33111618)

Germany could market these as "Self-Cooking Boar!"

Too lazy to cook? No fuel for your stove? No problem - just shoot, wrap in foil, and a few hours later...DINNER!

Dusterwaldkeiler (3, Funny)

Improv (2467) | more than 3 years ago | (#33111620)

Ahh, reminds me of my Magic: The Gathering days... cast "Wild Growth" on the "Dusterwaldkeiler" and goodbye to enemy "Serra Angel"s. Muhaha

Re:Dusterwaldkeiler (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33112218)

Dusterwaldkeiler isn't MTG card. You made it up.

Re:Dusterwaldkeiler (1)

Improv (2467) | more than 3 years ago | (#33112970)

Re:Dusterwaldkeiler (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33113656)

I'm kind of frightened that I recognized the picture and realize that the American version of this card is Durkwood Boars.

Re:Dusterwaldkeiler (1)

Improv (2467) | more than 3 years ago | (#33113810)

Yeah... I stopped playing Magic right after Ice Age was released, but before I quit, I was working on two collections: Atogs and Durkwood Boars. With a bit of trading, I ended up with a good number of Durkwood Boars in foreign languages.

I recently fit my many boxes of Magic into a backpack (barely, and it was damned heavy!) and went to a Magic gaming night at a local toy store. Apparently (and unsurprisingly), the game has changed a lot, as I was lost. Also, apparently it's a lot easier to make fast decks - the pace of the game used to be a lot slower except for tournament quality decks, and my casual decks didn't stand up very well. Oh well - people were kind of amused to see my ancient cards (and a lot of people wanted to trade or buy)

Re:Dusterwaldkeiler (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33112738)

I think you mean "Giant Growth". Wild Growth was for lands. Of course could be lost in translation...

Re:Dusterwaldkeiler (1)

Improv (2467) | more than 3 years ago | (#33112996)

Oh, you're right. I haven't played the game for years and my memories are slightly foggy.

Re:Dusterwaldkeiler (1)

pisces22 (819606) | more than 3 years ago | (#33112928)

Could it be that "hunters" are irradiating the meat for the money? No, I didn't RTFA. Why do you ask?

What????? (3, Insightful)

Dynedain (141758) | more than 3 years ago | (#33111622)

I'm having trouble understanding how the Cherynobl meltdown [google.com] has anything to do with wild boar populations in southern Germany. The article specifically mentions Bavaria, a region a thousand miles (and several countries) away. I admit I'm just an ignorant American, but surely this doesn't make any sense? [google.com]

Re:What????? (1)

Ephemeriis (315124) | more than 3 years ago | (#33111738)

I'm having trouble understanding how the Cherynobl meltdown [google.com] has anything to do with wild boar populations in southern Germany. The article specifically mentions Bavaria, a region a thousand miles (and several countries) away. I admit I'm just an ignorant American, but surely this doesn't make any sense? [google.com]

I'm just as clueless... But I'm going to assume that you've got radioactive dust drifting in the wind. Maybe?

Re:What????? (4, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 3 years ago | (#33112054)

I'm just as clueless...

Just a idea. Sit down. Have a drink. Now don't get mad at me or all stressed out, I know it's hard to deal with new things. Just consider to concept at least:

Read the Fucking Article.

Re:What????? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33112306)

to all the nutt cases who think that "Nucular is the new green energy".... ... When Chernobyl blew up we (i lived in bavaria at that time) got a healthy dose (pun intended) of fall out from the wind drift.

It was in fact so bad that no agricultural products could be sold that year, public playgrounds closed, and people generally were advised to not go outside.
(and when they come back in, to decontaminate their shoes)

I bought a geiger counter and was amazed that the lettuce from our garden was more radioactive than the "calibration probe" which came with the counter.
Most of it was radioactive iodine which had a half life of 30 days, but it was BAD.

In fact so bad that german milk powder was classified as radioactive waste, and had to be stored in radioactive containment to cool down the Iodine.

Most of the stuff left now is Caesium which will be with us for a few generations, and it accumulates in forests, because trees act as pesky little "air filters" trapping dust and such on their leaved and dropping it to the ground.
The german season for wild mushrooms ended in April 1989.
for good.

Thanks to Russia
and THANKS to the NUCLEAR LOBBY

(OH THE IRONY.... the captcha for posting this post was "neighbor"... gotta love it.

Re:What????? (3, Informative)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 3 years ago | (#33112418)

No, it's thanks to the Russian designers and managers who decided to build a crappy and unsafe nuclear plant.

Germany is next-door to France, which has tons of nuclear plants, and sells lots of power to the rest of Europe. In fact, you might be using nuclear-generated power from France right now, since you're so close to them. How many disasters has France had with their nuclear plants? Zero?

Cars can be very dangerous too, for instance if you put the gas tank in a place where it will rupture and explode in a small collision (like the Ford Pinto). Should we stop making all cars because of this? No, of course not; we stop making crappy, unsafe cars like the Pinto.

BTW, I don't think the nuclear lobby had anything to do with nuclear plants in the Soviet Union. They didn't have lobbyists there, and environmental concerns weren't very important to Communist ideology.

Re:What????? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33112640)

It sucks that you were affected by Chernobyl, and you have my sympathy. But please, for the sake of the planet and our children, stop repeating this ridiculous idea that modern nuclear power is dangerous.

Chernobyl was a design that was theoretically known to have a problem, and that was run by a crew rushed into doing an experiment that they weren't trained for, and which they fucked up in a way such that the void coefficient problem caused a feedback loop. And even then the automated systems kept it under control until somebody got nervous and scrammed it, which blew shit up due to the utterly, obviously retarded design of the control rods. That can't happen in a modern reactor. Nothing like that can happen in a modern reactor, and even if it could, the way they are run absolutely precludes anything like Chernobyl happening.

Nuclear is the only clean power source that we can deploy right now and get all our baseline energy needs from. The known reserves are enough to last for hundreds of years assuming current growth, and thorium could potentially keep us going for thousands of years. We need to stop burning oil for electrical power as soon as humanly possible. There's no workable replacement for the internal combustion engine. There's no workable replacement for plastics. There is an EXTREMELY workable replacement for oil burning power stations, and we need to get rid of them so that we have as long as possible to figure out what we can do about plastics and petrol. And the more nuclear power is opposed, by people like you who hold opinions that are demonstrably contradicted by science, the sooner we run out of oil, the sooner we run out of plastics and petrol. God knows what will happen then, but I doubt it will be pretty. And I doubt anyone will care about wild mushrooms.

Re:What????? (0)

pixelpusher220 (529617) | more than 3 years ago | (#33113600)

Nothing like that can happen in a modern reactor, and even if it could, the way they are run absolutely precludes anything like Chernobyl happening.

It's not the 'expected' stuff that's troublesome. re: 9/11 and the Towers. It wasn't considered reasonable that someone would purposely fly fully loaded aircraft into them. Oops. Now imagine if that had been a radioactive waste storage pond next to a working reactor.

Nuclear is the only clean power source that we can deploy right now and get all our baseline energy needs from. The known reserves are enough to last for hundreds of years assuming current growth

This is the one thing that gets glossed over. You talk about deploying base load 'right now' and then say the fuel will last hundreds of years at current growth rates. You just said growth rates would have to increase way more than it is currently growing. So current growth rates aren't relevant. How many years at base load amounts in fuel do we have? That's the relevant question.

Thorium is an interesting alternative to uranium, but still I wonder about the first scenario above.

Even if we go nuclear in the interim, we still have the waste storage issue to deal with for hundreds of years...not anything we've even considered in terms of cost.

This is why renewable sources combined with energy storage tech is the wave of the future. The fuel is completely free. Added benefit that flying a plane into a power plant doesn't have massively disastrous consequences. (dams are localized to just the flood plain and not 'massive' in effect)

Re:What????? (1)

operagost (62405) | more than 3 years ago | (#33113694)

The USA is covered with radiation and pollution-generating coal power plants-- thanks to the anti-nuclear lobby. But it was worth it, because look at how much radiation all those exploding nuclear plants put out! All ONE of them!

Re:What????? (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33111744)

Here's something that will really baffle your puny American mind:

http://www.farmersguardian.com/home/livestock/scotland%E2%80%99s-chernobyl-sheep-no-longer-radioactive/32935.article

Re:What????? (5, Informative)

rrohbeck (944847) | more than 3 years ago | (#33111778)

I guess you weren't around back then.
There was no fresh milk, fruit or vegetables for some time in most of central, east and northern Europe because everything had to be tested and much had to be trashed. People were warned against collecting berries and mushrooms for years.
The radioactive cloud went northwest to Scandinavia first and then southward to Central Europe.

Re:What????? (1, Funny)

powerlord (28156) | more than 3 years ago | (#33112374)

The radioactive cloud went northwest to Scandinavia first and then southward to Central Europe.

Then it swerved left and settled over France, first diminishing the intelligence of local elected officials (which went undetected), before finally being fermented into a new "glow in the dark" cheese.

Happy to have finally found a home, the Radioactive Cloud settled down and while currently still unattached, hopes to one day have little "Containment Leaks".

(sorry all, I think I'm in a giddy mood today)

Re:What????? (1)

KevinIsOwn (618900) | more than 3 years ago | (#33113522)

Note that certain mushrooms are still contaminated! Chanterelle mushrooms are still somewhat radioactive, at least the ones from Belarus, and that's where most come from. You can only eat them a few times a year, which is truly a shame, as they are one of the most delicious mushrooms that exists.

Re:What????? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33111798)

It is a well known fact in europe that the weather pattern at that time moved the nuclear fallout all over middle europe, especially austria and southern germany were heavily affected by it.

Even until today you have to take care when collecting mushrooms in these regions and the other wildlife for sure has its own contamination.

So yes, you read it correctly - the chernobyl disaster has its effects thousands of kilometres away in dense populated areas.

http://www.lfl.bayern.de/iab/bodenschutz/14896/linkurl_0_2.pdf [bayern.de]

Sorry, this pdf is only in german - but if you take a quick look, you should still determine the meanings of the diagrams inside. It gives an overview of the contamination after chernobyl for bavaria.

Re:What????? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33111836)

I can only tell stuff i know by growing up in germany after the chernobyl incident. While we didnt get a "full" shower of everything that was pumped into the athmosphere, radiation was a real threat that was taken seriously in europe. Milk and milk powder was destroyed because the radiation levels were too high for human digestion. Sand and soil that was regularly used for human use was turned over or discarded - i remember that sand in sandboxes for children was changed on a regular base for years. Would you like your child to play in irradiated sand and fry his/her reproductive organs ? No...probably not.

While the effects have lessened till now, some dangers still exist. While soil is usable and not poisonous (well...), soil that didnt get turned over and cleaned still retains cesium. This means forests. Particularly material that is renewing itself, i.e. mushrooms. Mushrooms collect a lot of radiation, but are eaten by boars. Boars digest the shrooms and defecate, leaving good base for new mushrooms. Essentially, the boars and deer collect a lot of radiation and therefore must be checked to see if its safe to eat.

With the current situation with forest fires out of check in russia, with some of their nuclear plants in the vincinity...if the shit hits the fan every european should run like hell.

Re:What????? (1)

jaak (1826046) | more than 3 years ago | (#33111852)

It's called radioactive fallout. A large plume of radioactive debris was spread over Europe (in fact, this was how the accident was first detected outside of the USSR, not because the authorities reported it).

The debris contaminated ground water, lakes, rivers, forests, animals, livestock, etc. all over parts of Europe.

I was in the UK at the time and I remember the contamination almost destroyed the lamb and mutton industry there.

Wikipedia has some information on the effects of the disaster: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chernobyl_disaster [wikipedia.org]

Re:What????? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33111994)

Understandable. You might want to read up about the prevailing winds, and how widespread the radioactive release really was. When Chernobyl exploded, a lot of really radioactive stuff got into the atmosphere and spread a surprisingly long way.

Chernobyl-released Caesium-137 was and still is present as far away as UK, and continues to affect the sheep, and this monitoring continues in some (albeit now very limited) areas of the UK even today.

But, "good news, everyone!" C-137 has a half life of 30 years. This is not a geological-timescale disaster.

However, that does mean that it's nearly half as radioactive as it was when it was first released, and it's had that to work its way very thoroughly into the food chain. Some animals tend to eat plants that are very good at absorbing it. Fungi and lichen seem particularly adept at concentrating it.

Chernobyl released a LOT of radioactive material. Anyone downwind of Chernobyl, or downstream of anywhere downwind, got a dose of varying size.

Boars and sheep and certain other animals just seem to eat things that absorb it readily. Carnivorous animals seem to get a good share of it, too, for obvious reasons (herbivores concentrate it, then carnivores eat the herbivores).

Not a whole lot can be done other than monitoring the animals and telling people not to eat them (or setting intake limits) until the radiation drops to safe levels.

Re:What????? (1)

burni2 (1643061) | more than 3 years ago | (#33112350)

The radioactive fallout from "Tschernobyl" went down in several european countries. So in the first it's not a purely german problem, but we might have strikter rules for certain radioactivity levels.
The radioactive isotopes are the problem as they stay active due to their rate of radioactive decay ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radioactive_decay [wikipedia.org] ). And those isotopes were thought to be taken deeper into the earth through rain. But boars have an interesting habbit .. they shovel into earthy grounds with their nose.

The fallout isotopes are still there with a high level radioactivity plus you have a species that hunts for food at a certain depth. It seems that the isotopes wandering deeper into the earth now just managed to reach the right depth for boars. That's an explanation for the rise.

The most prevalent isotope found is Cs-137 which acording to wiki has t-half of 30,17 years. So the back of the envelope shot says at the moment of now not even half of the Cs-137 ejected in 1986 has decayed yet to other also possible radiactive elements. Cs-137 emits electrons (or beta minus radiation) shielding is very easy even a piece of paper blocks most radiation but Cs-137 will be used from the human body as it shows similar chemical reactions like potassium so this isotope will be a long life friend, t1/2 = 30 years but the best thing is that cs137 decays to Ba-137 with a t1/2 of 2 minutes, and Ba-137 in this configuration is a gamma-radiator, it's like a double punch.

In "Tschernobyl" the amount of radioactive material was much higher than what was emitted during the Hiroshima & Nagasaki bombing, but it would be interesting to correlate the ejected material with above ground nuclear tests ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_nuclear_tests [wikipedia.org] )

Re:What????? (0, Flamebait)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#33112484)

As someone who was a child then, in that region I can assure you the wind did carry it. That and you are in fact an ignorant american.

Re:What????? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33112682)

I'm having trouble understanding how the Cherynobl meltdown [google.com] has anything to do with wild boar populations in southern Germany. The article specifically mentions Bavaria, a region a thousand miles (and several countries) away. I admit I'm just an ignorant American, but surely this doesn't make any sense? [google.com]

Yes, you are an ignorant American. Not your fault, it's the fault of US media. But you should visit more international news sites, because US media is extremely US centered and very low quality.

Many (random) parts of Europe was contaminated by radioactive rain caused by the Chernobyl meltdown (and the radioactivity won't magically disappear), thus contaminated wild boars (and mushrooms, berries, fish et.c.). Some of the radioactive rain caused by Chernobyl reached as far as the most northern parts of Sweden and Finland (where game, mushrooms, berries, fish et.c is no longer fit for human consumtion). If you look at an earth globe you discover that if the radioactive clouds would have blown as far to south, instead of north, they would have rained down somewhere in Central Africa. Nuclear power plant disasters is not a local problem, neither is any air pollution and most water pollution (e.g. the acid rain caused by coal burned in GB and Germany mostly fall over the Nothern parts of Scandinavia, the radioactive leeks in the sea from nuclear plants in Brittain finally end up in The Baltic Sea (where the radioactivity get higher and higher), much of the garbage dropped by Americans into the sea from the East Coast shores of USA end up in The Mediterranian Sea, half of the air pollution from USA end up in Canada) .

What this article is about:

Radioactive wild boars -> No one wants to eat wild boar meat -> No one wants to hunt wild boar -> More wild boars

Global Warming -> Warmer winters -> More wild boars survive winter -> More wild boars

Many wild boars -> Farming get impossible in the area + People and pets get attacked by wild boars -> Government pays hunters more to compensate for unsaleable wild bore meat

Re:What????? (1)

Solandri (704621) | more than 3 years ago | (#33113078)

The article specifically mentions Bavaria, a region a thousand miles (and several countries) away. I admit I'm just an ignorant American, but surely this doesn't make any sense?

Most of the U.S. sits between 30-48 degrees latitude. The prevailing winds there blow from West to East, so it's easy to understand your confusion about radioactive fallout making its way westward.

Most of Europe sits from 40-60 degrees latitude, with Scandinavia going even higher. When you get up near 60 degrees latitude, the prevailing winds blow the opposite way [wikivisual.com] from East to West. Chernobyl was at about 50 degrees latitude. The day it caught fire, the high level winds were blowing mostly to the North. That took the fallout up near the 60 degree mark, where the winds then blew it SW over Scandinavia and Britain. Then it got picked up by the regular West to East trade winds at 40 degrees latitude and contaminated most of Central Europe. One of the first clues the world outside the USSR got about the disaster was from a nuclear plant in Sweden [wikipedia.org] having its radiation alarms triggered by the clothes of workers trying to enter the plant.

Re:What????? (1)

tenco (773732) | more than 3 years ago | (#33113102)

Beeing of age 5 at this time and living in bavaria, I remember that my parents didn't allow me to play outside (government recommendation) and dairy farmers weren't allowed to sell their milk for quite some time.

If you ever wondered why nuclear energy isn't that popular in europe - that's the most likely reason.

Re:What????? (1)

budgenator (254554) | more than 3 years ago | (#33113158)

It doesn't, the Wild Boar population increase is due to primarily milder winters, and that's independent of the the fallout from Cherynobl. There might be some cross-over from fewer people not hunting because the pigs are radioactive and inedible, but mostly it's just coincidence. I'm surprised nobody has cued up the AGW band yet.

Re:What????? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33113198)

I admit I'm just an ignorant American, but surely this doesn't make any sense? [google.com]

I like the part where driving directions were used instead of walking ones.

If radioactive boars have learned to drive, we're in even bigger trouble than we thought.

cumulation in food chain (1)

aepervius (535155) | more than 3 years ago | (#33113606)

Radioactivity fall out on earth,and is literally the radioactive long life element are absorbed by the tree and mushrooms, which are eaten by the boar, where the radioactive long life element cumulate. The radioactive cloud went over germany more than once.

Well, which is it? This or... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33111688)

"Chernobyl Area Survey Finds Lasting Problems For Wildlife"?

Sigh its just the farmers trying it on (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33111736)

Another way of milking the Eu's farming subsidies.

Interesting factoid (2, Informative)

ChienAndalu (1293930) | more than 3 years ago | (#33111766)

Hunters also have to pay a fee to dispose of the boar carcass. So some let the animal go to a neighboring territory where the animals can be shot to be eaten.

On the bright side .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33111768)

The ones that are edible are the size of Rhinos.

Just in.... (0, Troll)

Roskolnikov (68772) | more than 3 years ago | (#33111794)

Al Gore has been sighted in the Black forest, the search for Manbearpig continues.

Re:Just in.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33112232)

That's not offtopic, that's funny! Come on, mods! Watch SouthPark and get a clue!
Captcha: "corpse" - Not kidding!

radioactive boar overlords (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33111818)

I, for one, welcome our new radioactive boar overlords

exploding game (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33111822)

"You don't have to be a nuclear physicist to realize that it's only a matter of time before one of these deer reaches critical mass, and some unsuspecting sportsperson takes a shot at it, and BLAM, all that's left of the immediate forest is a large crater and a mushroom cloud containing billions of tiny glowing sports molecules. We can only hope, as caring humans, that such a tragedy never occurs; or, if it does, that it will be available on rental videocassette." --Dave Barry

Holy nostalgia (1)

Jake Griffin (1153451) | more than 3 years ago | (#33111928)

Holy nostalgia! Thanks, samzenpus!

Picnic time for teddy bears,
The little teddy bears are having a lovely time today.
Watch them, catch them unawares,
And see them picnic on their holiday.
See them gaily dance about.
They love to play and shout.
And never have any cares.
At six o'clock their mommies and daddies
Will take them home to bed
Because they're tired little teddy bears.

Re:Holy nostalgia (1)

Jake Griffin (1153451) | more than 3 years ago | (#33111976)

And for those who don't understand the reference:

From the article: "Germans who go out in the woods today are sure of a big surprise, radioactive boars."

From the song: "If you go out in the woods today, you're sure of a big surprise. If you go out in the woods today, you better go in disguise..."

There is some good news (4, Funny)

GammaKitsune (826576) | more than 3 years ago | (#33111982)

At least the Yao Guai and Deathclaw populations remain at normal levels.

Re:There is some good news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33113132)

Don't feed the Yao Guai! That is all

The mind boggles (1)

tchdab1 (164848) | more than 3 years ago | (#33112042)

So now we have wild animals that can be classfied as radioactive waste?
Put it in the freezer for 50,000 years!

Is anyone working on breeding an animal that concentrates human-made radioactive pollution, a biological wild skimmer?

Re:The mind boggles (3, Interesting)

natehoy (1608657) | more than 3 years ago | (#33112658)

And, yes, such an animal exists. They are called "boar."

(see also "sheep" in the UK, which have the same issue with Chernobyl fallout, and "reindeer" in certain Nordic regions, not to mention carnivores in a lot of places)

Lichen (aka. reindeer chow), fungi (loved by boar) and certain other plants (probably including the grasses or some other plant that sheep eat a lot of) are apparently great radioactivity concentrators.

Fortunately, C137 has a half life of about 30 years, not tens of thousands, so in a few hundred years the radioactivity remaining in most animals should be low enough that this isn't a problem any more. As long as we keep building reactors safely and running them to standards such that they don't blow up, we'll only glow when it's REALLY dark.

fraud? (1)

frovingslosh (582462) | more than 3 years ago | (#33112172)

"According to the Environment Ministry in Berlin, almost 425,000 ($555,000) was paid out to hunters in 2009 in compensation for wild boar meat that was too contaminated by radiation to be sold for consumption...."

I'm sure that if we had a system of government payments for radioactive wild boar meat in the U.S.A. that there would be plenty of claims and payments here too. Any government program designed to hand out money attracts fraud in great numbers, why assume that this isn't happening here?

Re:fraud? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33112580)

Was it not in New-York early last century, where in an attempt to diminish rat population they paid 5 cents for each rat caught?
People started to catch rats so they could reproduce in their basement, in cages and well fed this insured a steady revenue stream.

Is it even possible to be sure the radio activity is from Chernobyl, and not from another source?

Re:fraud? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#33112756)

That could have happened only because rats have no other value. If you did such a thing with wild boar you would be better off selling the meat on the open market, you would make more money that way.

Re:fraud? (1)

operagost (62405) | more than 3 years ago | (#33113784)

I'm sure that if we had a system of government payments for radioactive wild boar meat in the U.S.A. that there would be plenty of claims and payments here too.

You couldn't go outside without an orange vest south of the Mason-Dixon.

Not all mutations are bad (1)

NotQuiteReal (608241) | more than 3 years ago | (#33112320)

and the boars are thriving

Pigs and People are pretty close, genetically speaking. They do medical testing on them, right?

Maybe eating these pigs would yield some unforeseen benefits.

Re:Not all mutations are bad (1)

natehoy (1608657) | more than 3 years ago | (#33112934)

Wild boar live about 15-20 years. They also are vegetarians which means their diet is concentrating this material for you. If you were to eat boar regularly, your own exposure to caesium-137 would be far higher than that of any of the individual boars you consume.

Carnivores have a lot higher concentrations of radioactive material, but we don't care about their radiation levels because their meat is generally nasty so humans don't eat a whole lot of it.

There may be unforeseen benefits, but they are pretty much outweighed by the foreseen and well-documented side effect of increased cancer rates.

Radiation-induced cancer from low-level radiation generally takes many years to develop, so even if the boar ended up with lots of it, their population is not about to be destroyed by something that takes most of (or more than) their lifespan to develop.

It also generally develops after fertility, which means it wouldn't really affect a "thriving" boar population to have old non-breeding boars die off. It might even be good for the younger population - less competition from no-longer-breeding elders for food.

One could, if one lacked compassion, say the same for humans. But that doesn't mean I want to die of cancer for the good of my species. Glowing Boar is not on my personal menu of choice.

You are free to make your own decision in that regard, of course. In general, I'd recommend against it. But I only have one child, and she's not on Slashdot, so I can say with great confidence that you aren't my offspring so I have little authority over what you choose to do.

If you experience any positive side effects, please do write back, OK?

Am I the only one ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33112560)

thinking Bebop & Rocksteady from TMNT? Halfway there, just need a radioactive Rhino....

Obligatory nerdy semantic argument. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33113006)

The boars are not radioactive. Only elements that emit radiation are radioactive. The boars are contaminated.

Kosher (1)

Ukab the Great (87152) | more than 3 years ago | (#33113052)

If there are mutant boar running around that ruminate (i.e. chew their cud), you'd have the beginnings of a kosher pork industry.

We'll give their descendants jobs in Duke Nukem Fo (1)

PDX (412820) | more than 3 years ago | (#33113068)

We'll give their descendants jobs in Duke Nukem Forever. We'll just give them a gun and a badge.

Germany... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33113152)

Government money is probably relatively easy to get by filling in some form sheet, with no negotiations about the market value of the specific boar required. Thus, hunting in areas where irradiated board are to be found may be quite profitable compared to hunting normal ones. Hunters should be quite used to filling lots of forms due to the legal restrictions imposed on weapons.

Probably, there's some required testing for each piece of meat acquired by hunting. However, quite likely, this is somewhat expensive, and might often be dropped. Where there's no prosecutor, there's no judge either. Testing may be getting cheaper, considering that all sorts of technical toys get cheaper, and now it simply may be conducted more often.

Thresholds for contamination are pretty low. Basically even every human corpse would have to be disposed of as nuclear waste just by the normal levels of radiation it is emitting. This isn't usually done though. Therefore it's pretty safe to assume that also in boars illegal-for-consumption levels are reached quite easily, considering that they feast on stuff that tends to accumulated radioactive (mainly toxic) materials.

Science class (1)

SnarfQuest (469614) | more than 3 years ago | (#33113618)

In our science class, we had to dissect pig fetuses. What happens now?

Be careful when you slice into the legs. you don't want to puncture the web glands, or you'll be stuck in class for several extra hours.
Don't open the eyes, unless you have correctly attached your shark first.
Watch out for the mouth. you can get either a nuclear flame blast, or a vampire bite.
If you spot anything that looks like a button, don't press it!

By the way, your parents have signed the waiver, haven't they?

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