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Android Outsells iPhone In Last 6 Months

CmdrTaco posted about 4 years ago | from the more-competing-please dept.

Cellphones 514

tomhudson writes "Despite all the hype about Apple's latest iPhone, Android has sold more in the last 6 months (27% of all smartphone sales) than Apple (23%). The gains for Android are coming at the expense of RIM (still #1 at 33%, down from 45% a year ago), Windows Mobile (11%, down from 20%) and the iPhone (down from 34% at it's peak 6 months ago). If the current trend continues, Android is expected to be #1 within the year."

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Already #1 in the US market (5, Informative)

SilentSage (656382) | about 4 years ago | (#33125768)

Boy Genius [boygeniusreport.com] and Engadget are circulating a report that says that Android has already overtaken Apple and RIM in the US. Android devices collectively represented a 34% share of the US market in the quarter, and with growth of 851% Android became the largest smart phone platform in the country.

Re:Already #1 in the US market (1)

FlashBuster3000 (319616) | about 4 years ago | (#33125832)

According to the article RIM is still #1 in the US.
Always interesting to see how much US, Europe and Asia markets differ.
Almost noone has a Blackberry in Europe but there is much more Nokia.

Re:Already #1 in the US market (3, Insightful)

hedwards (940851) | about 4 years ago | (#33125944)

A lot of that has to do with the fact that Nokia doesn't ship their best phones to the US. And really it's been a recent phenomenon for any good phones to make it to the US. Admittedly, that's largely because it's much more common in other parts of the world for people to have multiple phones or be willing to put up with beta gadgets.

The smartphone market in the US is consequently just starting to get going. And it shouldn't be shocking that Android with it's increasingly diverse set of options would be overtaking the iPhone and it's limited selection.

Re:Already #1 in the US market (3, Insightful)

mark72005 (1233572) | about 4 years ago | (#33126188)

One reason is that there are many more Android devices out there than anything else.

Blackberry has what, 4 current lines. iPhone only has one, most of the time. There are numerous Android phones on every carrier, pretty much.

And even people who want the iPhone can't get the latest one without spending a month on a waiting list, or I think their numbers would be higher. (Though this applies to Android in some devices like the Droid X or the HTC EVO).

It's most telling that Palm is flatlining and Windows Mobile has lost half of its already meager market share in the past year.

Re:Already #1 in the US market (1)

SilentSage (656382) | about 4 years ago | (#33125952)

Please read my post carefully and refer to the article in the link. This refers to a different survey where Android has already passed RIM.

Re:Already #1 in the US market (1)

Mongoose Disciple (722373) | about 4 years ago | (#33125976)

Out of curiousity, what do people typically have for business phones in Europe? Nokia?

My impression in America is that almost no one has a Blackberry for their personal phone, but that nearly every business smartphone is a Blackberry.

(Which also explains why it's interesting to talk about iPhone vs. Android -- they're currently seen as more "personal" phones, whereas Blackberry's market dominance is largely based on businesses, a market in which neither is remotely competitive with Blackberry yet.)

Re:Already #1 in the US market (2, Interesting)

oldspewey (1303305) | about 4 years ago | (#33126514)

iPhone vs. Android -- they're currently seen as more "personal" phones, whereas Blackberry's market dominance is largely based on businesses, a market in which neither is remotely competitive with Blackberry yet

At the company where I work, tons of my co-workers have picked up the iPhone. Corporate IT has been forced to offer Outlook email integration for iPhone in addition to Blackberry (they offer no such support for any other smartphone OS, including Palm, Android, and Windows). I'm happy to stick with my Blackberry as it does everything I want in a smartphone, but to say none of the others are remotely competitive is to ignore the reality on the ground.

Re:Already #1 in the US market (1)

Mongoose Disciple (722373) | about 4 years ago | (#33126612)

Obviously we're trading anecdotes here, but I've yet to encounter a business iPhone.

Re:Already #1 in the US market (2, Interesting)

QuantumRiff (120817) | about 4 years ago | (#33126074)

In our company, any smartphone under the sun is supported. Until September, when we start enforcing passwords, remote encryption/wiping abilities, etc.

Pretty much every major smart phone made in the last couple of years supports these features, except Android based phones.

People are very upset that their very nice Drod's will stop working soon, and they still have over a year on their phone contracts. (many people get re-imbursed by the company for monthly expenses).

Microsoft has published their spec for ActiveSync for exchange. Google so far has not bothered to code it in. This is keeping iphones and blackberries (and winMobile 6.5 and above) phones popular here.. otherwise everyone would drop them.

Re:Already #1 in the US market (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33126430)

In our company, any smartphone under the sun is supported. Until September, when we start enforcing passwords, remote encryption/wiping abilities, etc.

Pretty much every major smart phone made in the last couple of years supports these features, except Android based phones.

Android does not support text password locking, but it does support a lock pattern. There are apps that allow remote wiping.

Microsoft has published their spec for ActiveSync for exchange. Google so far has not bothered to code it in. This is keeping iphones and blackberries (and winMobile 6.5 and above) phones popular here.. otherwise everyone would drop them.

And is it able to be distributed under a opensource license?

Re:Already #1 in the US market (4, Informative)

Fnkmaster (89084) | about 4 years ago | (#33126564)

Eh? Android does support ActiveSync. It just that prior to 2.2, it didn't enforce all the corporate security policies of ActiveSync. See Feature Enhancement Request 4475 [google.com] and see this article [informationweek.com] for a summary of related changes in 2.2.

2.2 seems to address most of the password/security policy issues with ActiveSync. I have 2.2 running on my Nexus One, but don't use Exchange server, so can't comment here.

For Droid owners, the update to 2.2 is supposed to come out officially this week [androidcommunity.com] , though I'm pretty sure there are unofficial 2.2 ROMs out there already. So basically, what you are talking about is no longer an issue, or at least not a particularly significant one.

Re:Already #1 in the US market (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33126004)

I don't get it, I've seen quite a few articles compare the number of Android and iPhone, wouldn't it make more sense to compare Android and iOS? To be fair you'd have to compare Droid X to iPhone 4. Android is the OS and iPhone is the hardware.

What am I missing?

Re:Already #1 in the US market (1)

nicolas.kassis (875270) | about 4 years ago | (#33126630)

There is only one Phone that supports iOS, there is no point in making a difference.

Re:Already #1 in the US market (5, Insightful)

unix1 (1667411) | about 4 years ago | (#33126218)

Notes:

- numbers are for new devices only (not total market share)
- does not include iPhone 4 - not a lot of people would buy an iPhone 3 in Q2 when new model was expected shortly

More interesting will be Q2 and Q3 totals combined when Q3 numbers are available. Then put BB6 and WP7 in the mix by year's end and it will get really interesting.

Re:Already #1 in the US market (1)

rolfwind (528248) | about 4 years ago | (#33126522)

Also note, that iPhone infers an actual model differing only in capacity depending on time reference. An iPhone now implies iPhone 4, last year, a 3GS, etc.

Android is just an OS with lots of different models. It's actually surprising that one device has that much dominance.

Re:Already #1 in the US market (4, Insightful)

Dixie_Flatline (5077) | about 4 years ago | (#33126462)

IN THE QUARTER. In the quarter. It's the biggest platform IN THE QUARTER.

Rather than admonishing other people to read your links, please read the story that you're talking about. They haven't caught up to anyone yet, they're just selling faster.

Ignore the 851% figure because it's meaningless. If I sell 1 phone in my first quarter and TEN phones in my second quarter, that's a growth of 1000% per quarter! All it tells us is that Android didn't have much market penetration before and it's up now.

In the end, this isn't news. There are MANY manufacturers using Android as a platform and only Apple using iOS as a platform. Apple is tied to the most hated major network in America, and Android isn't. The actual question is 'what took them so dang long?'

After almost 20 years (5, Insightful)

OrangeTide (124937) | about 4 years ago | (#33125808)

Turns out Linux doesn't suck and it is good for something mainstream after all. I still haven't seen the real "year of the Linux desktop" but Android has already given us a year of the Linux phone, and we barely even realized it.

Re:After almost 20 years (1, Interesting)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 4 years ago | (#33125846)

Google's ChromeOS is on the horizon.

Re:After almost 20 years (-1, Redundant)

JustinRLynn (831164) | about 4 years ago | (#33125882)

Google's Chrome OS is based on Linux.

Re:After almost 20 years (1, Funny)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 4 years ago | (#33125910)

Nice job.

Re:After almost 20 years (1, Funny)

oodaloop (1229816) | about 4 years ago | (#33126102)

Were you merely trying to state the obvious, or did you think that contradicted him?

Re:After almost 20 years (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33126132)

Whoosh...

Re:After almost 20 years (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33125884)

But at the same time, people are most likely *not* buying these phones because it's Linux. How many people tell you (who are not geeks) they're buying Phone X because it runs Whatever OS? And folks buying Android phones, do they say "I'm buying an Android phone!" or "I'm buying the Droid X, the Galaxy S, or whatever name the vendor has called it."

Re:After almost 20 years (2, Funny)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 4 years ago | (#33125930)

How many people buy a windows computer and tell everyone "I bought an NT kernel based computing device!"?

Re:After almost 20 years (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33125990)

None. That's the point. No one gives a shit that these run Linux or any other kernel. The only reason people want Android phones is due to the look of the phones and the GUI.

Re:After almost 20 years (2, Insightful)

arth1 (260657) | about 4 years ago | (#33126146)

People also buy phones because of the apps they can get for them.
Just like they buy a Windows PC not because they are Microsoft fans, but because there are apps they want that's available for Windows. Similar with Android devices; the chance of finding the apps you want is higher for Android than any other system, and this helps drive sales.

Re:After almost 20 years (1)

dancingmilk (1005461) | about 4 years ago | (#33126176)

Why does that matter? If they are buying Android because it has an awesome GUI... so what? They are still buying Android.

Who cares if they are buying it for being Linux? They are buying it because it is the superior product, which is all that matters. I'm a geek and I bought my Android phone because it was the best option. The "Hey my phone runs linux!" bit is an afterthought.

Re:After almost 20 years (1)

oldspewey (1303305) | about 4 years ago | (#33126566)

How many people buy a windows computer and tell everyone "I bought an NT kernel based computing device!"?

Hey! I have that exact t-shirt!

Re:After almost 20 years (1)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | about 4 years ago | (#33126120)

How many people tell you (who are not geeks)

More than you'd think. The week I got my Evo I was in a meeting with a bunch of non-technical people, and one guy commented that I was "playing with my Android". I had my pants on, so I'm pretty sure it wasn't a euphemism. Another of my non-technical friends asked me if it was "a droid phone". Non-technical consumers do know the difference between an iPhone and an Android device, but they still have no clue or care that it's powered by Linux.

Re:After almost 20 years (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 4 years ago | (#33126542)

do they say "I'm buying an Android phone!"

I've heard a fair number of people say exactly that.

My daughter, who's as fashion-conscious as you would expect a 21 year-old to be, said she "wanted an Android phone", in fact. She currently has an iPhone and has complained about it a bit. Her complaint is equally divided between connection issues (dropped calls) and the App Store lockin. She seems to have recently picked up an awareness of lock-ins and open-source software.

God, I hope she's not dating a Linux geek. She has recently said she wants to change her major to Math. Her mother and I would be heartbroken.

Re:After almost 20 years (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33126026)

Yeah, but you'll only see it on embedded devices, because Google has provided a good environment, whereas Linux Desktop distro's are too fragmented. They can't even decide on a packaging system. Its almost like they WANT to make QA and packaging as difficult as possible (thats why many of them release twice a year probably)

Re:After almost 20 years (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 4 years ago | (#33126568)

whereas Linux Desktop distro's are too fragmented

For whom?

Re:After almost 20 years (1)

Kitkoan (1719118) | about 4 years ago | (#33126028)

Turns out Linux doesn't suck and it is good for something mainstream after all. I still haven't seen the real "year of the Linux desktop" but Android has already given us a year of the Linux phone, and we barely even realized it.

I wouldn't say its the "Year of the Linux desktop" since Android is a highly modified version of Linux. Like how no one is waiting to call OSX's rise as the "Year of the Unix/BSD desktop".

Re:After almost 20 years (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33126260)

it has nothing to do with linux, iPhone is just one phone, Android is on a lot of phone. does the following ring any bells? "Be unique, just like everyone else."

Bring tha hate, bring tha noise! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33125822)

Yeah, the iPhone wasn't even close to being the #1 Smartphone in the US. That honor goes to Blackberry. So why compare to Apple? Ah, because it's cool to hate on Apple.

Re:Bring tha hate, bring tha noise! (0)

jedidiah (1196) | about 4 years ago | (#33125876)

> Yeah, the iPhone wasn't even close to being the #1 Smartphone in the US. That honor goes to Blackberry. So why compare to Apple? Ah, because it's cool to hate on Apple.

And why is it so cool to "hate on Apple", noisy fanboys spreading all sorts of nonsense.

Hopefully the acendancy of Android will serve as a collective cold shower for all of the Apple hysteria.

Choice and competition are good.

Re:Bring tha hate, bring tha noise! (5, Insightful)

SerpentMage (13390) | about 4 years ago | (#33126014)

I am sorry, but this comparison is pretty crap.

RIM = 1 company
Apple = 1 company
Android = oodles of companies...

Its comparing apples to oranges here.

Of course you do see that Android is doing well. Something that I expected and it will continue. This is why I question RIM's, Microsoft's and Nokia's sanity of trying to go against either Apple or Android.

Though I wonder how long Android will do well. Here is the thing, people buy gadgets, but upgrade devices. With the iPhone 4 people upgraded. With RIM people upgraded. Nokia less so, and Android is an open question mark. I don't know either way and only time will tell.

Re:Bring tha hate, bring tha noise! (4, Insightful)

GameMaster (148118) | about 4 years ago | (#33126536)

It's an excellent way to compare them. The strength of platforms like iPhoneOS, Android, WindowsCE, etc. is that you can run the same apps across all of the devices. The more devices there are out in the population, the more enticing it is for developers to develop for them. The more developers there are developing for a platform, the more decent quality apps there are, and the more decent quality apps there are the more people will want to buy into the platform. It's a cycle that accelerates at an increasing rate as the install base increases. It's what has made the Apple app store so successful up to this point and will work the same way for Android.

Re:Bring tha hate, bring tha noise! (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33125954)

Yeah, the iPhone wasn't even close to being the #1 Smartphone in the US. That honor goes to Blackberry. So why compare to Apple? Ah, because it's cool to hate on Apple.

they buy a phone because it has a brand name that they think is hip and cool. rather than being ashamed of how they justify their purchasing decisions, they are instead smug about hopping on the walled-off Apple bandwagon where customizing a device you own is not allowed unless it's approved by the company that sold it to you. apple fanboys deserve every last piece of derision they receive. that's because they are fanboys. if they bought iPhones because they were familiar with their needs and saw that the iPhone and the carrier were the very best match for their needs, it would be different, but then they wouldn't stick up for Apple and defend it no matter what it does.

there's no comparison to the blackberry. it's popular because it is geared towards corporations and business users. businesses don't generally care about how hip and cool a brand name is. they care about how it affects their profitability. that's the difference. that's why it is not cool to "hate on" the blackberry, for they made their choice based on rational utilitarian reasons and not because they were dazzled by Steve Jobs' reality distortion field. got it?

Re:Bring tha hate, bring tha noise! (1)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | about 4 years ago | (#33126104)

they are instead smug about hopping on the walled-off Apple bandwagon where customizing a device you own is not allowed unless it's approved by the company that sold it to you.

I hate to break it to you, but the vast majority of people who own phones don't care about customizing it.

Re:Bring tha hate, bring tha noise! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33126468)

they are instead smug about hopping on the walled-off Apple bandwagon where customizing a device you own is not allowed unless it's approved by the company that sold it to you.

I hate to break it to you, but the vast majority of people who own phones don't care about customizing it.

Agreed. That was not the point. The point was, that isn't something to be smug about.

Now that it has been broken down for you into little bite-sized pieces of thought, do you get the point?

Re:Bring tha hate, bring tha noise! (3, Funny)

Mongoose Disciple (722373) | about 4 years ago | (#33126066)

Yeah, the iPhone wasn't even close to being the #1 Smartphone in the US. That honor goes to Blackberry. So why compare to Apple? Ah, because it's cool to hate on Apple.

Slightly different markets. People have Blackberries for business, mostly. iPhones and Android phones are more personal consumer use products.

If we're going to ignore the business/personal distinction, then I'm going to hate on Macs for doing terribly in the business server market. You just can't win! :)

Re:Bring tha hate, bring tha noise! (1)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | about 4 years ago | (#33126378)

I think the survey shows that Apple needs to free itself from an exclusive contract with ATT. I have an Android phone, but I would replace it with an iPhone as soon as it becomes available on T-Mobile.

Curious... (1)

Pojut (1027544) | about 4 years ago | (#33125826)

...I wonder which is more popular amongst geek culture. Android is Linux based, so it has a ton of geek cred...but many a geek has allowed Apple's products to take them over (Ars Technica recently had a statistic in which roughly 26% of their visitors use macs)

Re:Curious... (1, Informative)

geekoid (135745) | about 4 years ago | (#33125936)

Every culture has their sellouts.

Re:Curious... (0, Troll)

jedidiah (1196) | about 4 years ago | (#33125956)

When the rubber hits the road, it's the device with the 500G hard drive that gets used.

The one with the shiny fancy widgets ends up staying home.

Apple gear is fine if you have no imagination and no ability to run up against it's limitations.

There will probably be an Android for every type of user, rather than just one version that everyone will be forced to adapt to.

Ars has a much larger than average Linux user population as well.

Re:Curious... (1, Flamebait)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | about 4 years ago | (#33126334)

There will probably be an Android for every type of user, rather than just one version that everyone will be forced to adapt to.

Because people are forced to buy and use iPhones against their will? *rolls eyes*

Re:Curious... (1)

Kitkoan (1719118) | about 4 years ago | (#33126466)

There will probably be an Android for every type of user, rather than just one version that everyone will be forced to adapt to.

Because people are forced to buy and use iPhones against their will? *rolls eyes*

You'd be amazed at how marketing will effect your thoughts and buying habits. Thats why companies will spend so much on it.

Re:Curious... (1, Troll)

socz (1057222) | about 4 years ago | (#33126048)

Well, while osx is part of the bsd family (though the white sheep of the family), I still prefer android simply because I disagree with apple's ethics. Everyone is good and bad, it just depends on what benefits you. I don't like mindlessness and intolerance so I stay away from apple. More specifically, growing up with BSD and it's freedom makes me feel like i'm in jail when dealing with apple products. Don't like their music devices (never have or will own one), phones or computers. Though I originally "learned" on an apple and worked with them in the past.

Re:Curious... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33126364)

Although your post is pretty much both content free and apropos of nothing, I'm glad you posted it! I was sitting here wondering what your view on Apple products was. Elaborating on why you feel "jailed" using BSD on a Mac or what you meant by "mindlessness and intolerance" or even what about Apple's ethics you disagree with would have really dilluted your thesis, so good call on leaving that part out.

Higher demand after iPhone 4 release in Q3 (4, Insightful)

Xemu (50595) | about 4 years ago | (#33125828)

The numbers for the iPhone are of course going to reflect that the apple crowd has been holding off and waited for the new generation iPhone 4. The numbers for Q3 will be more interesting.

And then again, who cares, it's just a phone.

Re:Higher demand after iPhone 4 release in Q3 (3, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | about 4 years ago | (#33125918)

It's not just a phone. It is determining how portable device will be used by the mainstream. Locked down, or open? The ability to load your own music and ring tones, and app, or only loading what you are allowed ..at a price, of course.

Re:Higher demand after iPhone 4 release in Q3 (1, Interesting)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | about 4 years ago | (#33126022)

It is determining how portable device will be used by the mainstream. Locked down, or open?

And how many non-geeks really care about such a thing? Oh yeah, almost none. They buy Android phones because of the marketing of slick looking phones.

Re:Higher demand after iPhone 4 release in Q3 (3, Insightful)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 4 years ago | (#33126432)

And how many non-geeks really care about such a thing?

You do realize that you're posting it on a website titled "news for nerds", right?

Anyway, which model dominates does affect you as a geek, because it defines how much you will have to shell out for an open phone, how many applications will there be for it, etc.

Re:Higher demand after iPhone 4 release in Q3 (1)

jittles (1613415) | about 4 years ago | (#33126472)

You'd be surprised at how many technologically clueless people are lurking in the development forums for the HTC Evo. I have two Evos and the second one is used by someone who might be branded a Luddite and a rooted phone has gone over swimmingly with that insignificant sample pool.

Re:Higher demand after iPhone 4 release in Q3 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33126234)

I'll give you a hint: Most of the people who own a "locked down" phone, that care about the fact that it's "locked down", simply "unlock" it. Or maybe you're just misinformed about the capabilities of said devices, as I'm unaware of android or ios forbidding people to load their own music or ringtones, or only offering for-pay content.

Both are locked down to the mainstream (2, Insightful)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 4 years ago | (#33126352)

It's not just a phone. It is determining how portable device will be used by the mainstream. Locked down, or open?

To the mainstream, both devices are locked down. Android requires rooting for full openness, the iPhone requires jailbreaking.

Where you got confused is that the degree of open differs more significantly if you are a developer. But then you should not be confusing what is relevant to the mainstream, vs. the developer.

What are you smoking? (0)

blahbooboo (839709) | about 4 years ago | (#33126474)

It's not just a phone. It is determining how portable device will be used by the mainstream. Locked down, or open? The ability to load your own music and ring tones, and app, or only loading what you are allowed ..at a price, of course.

Uh what android devices are as free as you claim? Last I heard you have to wait for someone to "jailbreak"/root the android device to be able to do what you want with it. This "android is open and free" is a load of bull. Motorola phones are all locked up so are HTCs. I also heard many Android devices, just like iPhone, has apps you can't even remove by the user. Yes, that doesnt sound very open to me.

Re:Higher demand after iPhone 4 release in Q3 (1)

pete-classic (75983) | about 4 years ago | (#33126512)

What phone are you talking about? I have loads of music ripped from my own CDs and purchased from Amazon on my iPhone. And I've been using a free utility to make my own ringtones for like two years. [rogueamoeba.com]

I'm not saying that the iPhone is as open as most Android phones, but overstating your case only makes it seem like you're spreading FUD.

-Peter

Re:Higher demand after iPhone 4 release in Q3 (1)

Kitkoan (1719118) | about 4 years ago | (#33126114)

The numbers for the iPhone are of course going to reflect that the apple crowd has been holding off and waited for the new generation iPhone 4. The numbers for Q3 will be more interesting.

And then again, who cares, it's just a phone.

The iPhone 4 was released on June 24th, so if the Apple crowd was holding off for it then June/July should have had one hell of a jump making Android outsell iPhone for 5 month's before being re-taken by the iPhone, but that hasn't happened. So its more likely not the case.

Re:Higher demand after iPhone 4 release in Q3 (1)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | about 4 years ago | (#33126220)

Who says there wasn't such a jump? The figures in the article are before the iPhone4 release.

Re:Higher demand after iPhone 4 release in Q3 (1)

Kitkoan (1719118) | about 4 years ago | (#33126420)

The article is dated for Aug, and it only mentions "the last 6 months" in the article's text which would make me think July was a part of that time frame. Didn't look closely at the graphs that showed they are using a Quarterly time scale.

Re:Higher demand after iPhone 4 release in Q3 (1)

agent_vee (1801664) | about 4 years ago | (#33126306)

Except the phone feature is the least used function, for me anyways.

Re:Higher demand after iPhone 4 release in Q3 (1)

jittles (1613415) | about 4 years ago | (#33126440)

I agree that the Q3 numbers will be interesting but Q3 also holds the release of the HTC Evo and The Motorola Droid X, which were both highly sought after Android platforms. So all this Q3 competition should be a sight to see. Now if only I liked popcorn...

Not to trivialize these facts... (3, Insightful)

dingen (958134) | about 4 years ago | (#33125836)

...but hasn't the iPhone sales been slow the past 6 months due to anticipation for the new model coming out last month?

Re:Not to trivialize these facts... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33126166)

The one with the gimped antenna?

If this trend continues... (5, Insightful)

BorkBorkBork6000 (769812) | about 4 years ago | (#33125840)

If this trend continues, Android will have 100% of the market in just over 8 years!

I love linear extrapolation.

Re:If this trend continues... (1)

natehoy (1608657) | about 4 years ago | (#33125886)

But what happens when it exceeds 100%? That's what I want to know.

Guess we'll find out a few minutes past just over 8 years from now.

Re:If this trend continues... (2, Funny)

oodaloop (1229816) | about 4 years ago | (#33126148)

Everyone will have at least one phone?

Re:If this trend continues... (2, Funny)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | about 4 years ago | (#33126210)

But what happens when it exceeds 100%? That's what I want to know.

This dial goes up to 11.

Re:If this trend continues... (1)

sznupi (719324) | about 4 years ago | (#33126386)

If it exceeds 100%, then...it will exceed 100%. Just like overall mobile phone penetration in many/most(?) developed places.

OMG (1)

dingen (958134) | about 4 years ago | (#33125890)

In about half a century, Android will dominate a 1000% of the market!

Re:If this trend continues... (1)

Maarx (1794262) | about 4 years ago | (#33125906)

Obligatory XKCD [xkcd.com]

Re:If this trend continues... (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | about 4 years ago | (#33126546)

I also love how a single model mobile phone (well maybe four versions or so by now) is compared to a complete ecosystem of maybe dozens of models, and then decried that this single phone can not keep its total sales larger than a pool of a few dozen models. It's apples and oranges. The iPhone versus "all phones running the Android OS" - many with so different functionality and user interface that if you know one runs Android you wouldn't recognise the other as running it as well.

Is there any single phone model that is selling as well as the iPhone these days? Or even nearly as well? It is almost like Microsoft's marketing statistics putting the Zune as market leader in "brown portable music players with a 80GB hard disk".

At the moment when looking at smartphones, the iPhone is still simply #1, no contest. Pretty impressive for what is basically a newcomer in the market. And as long as that phone is selling so much better than whoever is #2 there will be people that try to find ways of making the iPhone look like they're not #1 any more. Sorry for the rest but as long as they do not thoroughly improve their offerings it's going to be "iPhone and the rest". Apple's offering is on the market long enough for the novelty to wear off, and that it is selling this well indicates to me that for many people it's simply a great device, and that the rest of the competition still has to catch up.

I, for one (1, Funny)

c0d3g33k (102699) | about 4 years ago | (#33125878)

welcome our new Android overlords.

Re:I, for one (1)

hedwards (940851) | about 4 years ago | (#33125984)

And hopefully three law compliant as well.

Makes sense... (1, Troll)

tool462 (677306) | about 4 years ago | (#33125880)

I always thought of the new iPhone as a #2.

I wonder how much of this you can blame on AT& (3, Informative)

Mongoose Disciple (722373) | about 4 years ago | (#33125904)

Or rather, the exclusivity deal between AT&T and Apple.

Anecdote: I had lunch over the weekend with a friend who lives in a part of the country that AT&T doesn't cover at all. He and his wife had seen other peoples' iPhones while travelling outside of that area, and all things being equal, would have preferred to buy iPhones, but couldn't. (Yes, they could have bought one someplace else, sucking up a useless contract, jailbreaking, etc., but come on -- that's not a real option for most people.) They ended up getting Android phones instead.

AT&T's commercials assert that it covers 97% of Americans, but if you live in or spend much time in one of the areas (more than 3% of the map) it doesn't cover, the iPhone loses by default even if Apple's marketing is successful.

Re:I wonder how much of this you can blame on AT&a (1)

ThermalRunaway (1766412) | about 4 years ago | (#33126122)

Ya, I think the exclusivity with ATT hurts the market share. Many people don't want to go near ATT, or they are stuck with a huge contract break fee to leave where they are. Or like me, I have a family plan on VZ, but the other two lines just need to be regular non "smart phones", so it would be a huge pain to move all three of us to ATT just so I could get an iPhone.

Also, I think Apple is a bit more polarizing than Google/Android. Some people just don't want to buy apple.

And finally, when you have multiple HW manufacturers and multiple carriers it's seems that it would be easier to get a larger base established.

Re:I wonder how much of this you can blame on AT&a (2, Informative)

sznupi (719324) | about 4 years ago | (#33126316)

Quite a bit more than 3%; size of the map area not served doesn't follow anywhere near that close the percentage of population served.

Wow. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33125916)

I find it impressive that the Apple's single handset is selling comparably to the multitude of Android phones currently being offered.

But the swarm of Android devices reminds me a little of the horde of Wintel PCs that swamped Apple's desktop offerings.

Re:Wow. (1)

AndrewNeo (979708) | about 4 years ago | (#33126078)

Well, what else is it supposed to do? There's only one current-generation iPhone, whereas there is a large selection of Android phones (the way it should be)

Re:Wow. (2, Insightful)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | about 4 years ago | (#33126400)

But the swarm of Android devices reminds me a little of the horde of Wintel PCs that swamped Apple's desktop offerings.

A little? The parallels are many. Apple has a platform that is considered the superior platform by many people. The problems with their platform are all based on how closed it is, either that they can't install what they want, or they can't use it how they want, or they have to use AT&T, etc. Other than the antenna issues, criticism for the iPhone isn't very technical, it's all usability issues related to the closed Apple system.

Contrast that with Android, which is designed to run on many different platforms with varying hardware. It might not be as shiny as the offering from Apple, but it's more flexible. This is exactly the scenario that allowed Microsoft to crush Apple with Windows, and if Apple isn't careful they're going to end up getting crushed again, this time by Google. Apple is just one company, they don't allow anyone else to sell their products. Anyone can license Android and build and sell a device that runs it. This is the same as the PC scenario, where it turned out to be Apple versus everyone else, where everyone else was selling the same competing product.

You'd think they would learn that more openness translates to more market penetration, but their mindset is so stuck on controlling the user experience that it seems like they're doomed to keep repeating history until consumers and businesses "evolve" to desire a more controlled experience. Even just licensing iOS to other vendors to allow them to create other devices powered by it would level the playing field, and I truly have no idea why they refuse to do that. It's all about control, and Apple refuses to relinquish any of it, even if they keep control all the way into the ground.

problems with data (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33125968)

There is a bunch of problems with the title. The data is talking about NEW subscribers only, and has no iPhone4 data. Now people whom when from an iPhone to an iPhone, nor people whom bought an iPhone4. Apple is selling more iPhone4s alone then the iPhone and Androids in this review COMBINED.

Here's the trouble with Android (1, Interesting)

bogaboga (793279) | about 4 years ago | (#33125992)

I should have called it the problem but anyway, 'Android' is mis-understood or even mis-represented.

Case in point: Look at the title of this story, " Android Outsells iPhone In Last 6 Months". Essentially, the author is comparing an OS, (Android) to a device, (iPhone)! It would be better and more informative to the reader to rephrase the title to something near "Android devices outsell iPhones In Last 6 Months".

This is the same plague in Linux land. Some folks know Linux is an OS while others think it's RedHat or Debian or Ubuntu - troubling!

Since this is a platform for geeks or geek story lovers, I expected better. And even then, Android devices outselling iPhones should be expected because the latter is only sold on one carrier in the US and comprises of just 'one' product from one manufacturer.

Re:Here's the trouble with Android (1)

sznupi (719324) | about 4 years ago | (#33126232)

Why should it matter it is "just one" (not quite...different gens, different memory sizes...even different colors! ;p ) phone? Its manufacturer limits it that way...

Going further, one could say it's not that big of a deal how Android (for example) has 99% of the market - if it's uniformly distributed across 100 devices, while iPhone, with one model, has 1%.

Re:Here's the trouble with Android (1)

ADRA (37398) | about 4 years ago | (#33126406)

Why are you battling semantics? People make the comparison with iPhone's because Apple exclusively uses iOS on their phones. If They licensed the OS to other companies, you know damn well they'd be comparing iOS vs. Android. Just like how we always compare phones with Symbian and WinMo against RIM phones. Since RIM doesn't license, we never really refer to the OS independently. The only real break from this trend was with Palm and their WebOS. The WebOS became such a large selling point for Palm that people weren't talking about palm phones, they were talking about WebOS phones.

Plus, if they really just talked about handsets, the Android universe is so diversified that their handhelds could have 70-80% market share and still have iPhone beating every Android handset individually.

Re:Here's the trouble with Android (1)

recoiledsnake (879048) | about 4 years ago | (#33126548)

And even then, Android devices outselling iPhones should be expected because the latter is only sold on one carrier in the US and comprises of just 'one' product from one manufacturer.

I don't see how this should be expected. Windows Mobile runs on all carriers but is soundly being beaten. And Windows Phone 7 will run on all carriers too. Does that mean it is automatically expected that it will outsell the iPhone? The fanboy logic trying to downplay the successes of Android breaks down .

Yawn... (3, Interesting)

illumin8 (148082) | about 4 years ago | (#33126010)

Yawn... These are sales from January to June - before the iPhone 4 was released. People were intentionally holding off purchases because they knew iPhone 4 was coming out. Wake me up if they outsell iPhones for the next 6 months.

Re:Yawn... (2, Insightful)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | about 4 years ago | (#33126152)

Not to mention that this is a comparison of a phone from a single company to a multitude of phones from a variety of companies. The fact that the iPhone holds it own so well with so few models against all the Android phones is quite a feat.

I wonder how this factors in... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33126012)

... workplace blackberry usage

I'd never get a blackberry myself but my employer gives me one "for free" (i.e. I'd rather they just give me what they spend on it and I'd setup my own device on something besides at&t so it actually works... but they won't allow that)

I don't believe the others phones have quite the same degree of corporate lock-down functionality so they're typically less often paid for by one's employer...

Re:I wonder how this factors in... (3, Interesting)

crow (16139) | about 4 years ago | (#33126202)

My employer-provided phone is an HTC EVO 4G (Android). I could have chosen a Blackberry or an iPhone (or even Windows Mobile). And I work for a large Fortune-500 company. Corporate America is opening up to the new options.

(My company is large enough that they've outsourced the phone purchasing to some other company that specializes in it. I went to that company's web site, selected the phone that I wanted from the list that had been approved by our IT department, and they shipped it directly to me. All said, it seems like a very good system, especially compared to some of the other services that have been outsourced.)

Android 2.2 is supposed to take Exchange integration a step further, letting corporate IT wipe the phone if it's reported as lost or stolen, as well as allowing corporate security policies to be enforced. So expect Android to compete even more heavily with Blackberry once 2.2 comes out.

Its all about choice... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33126038)

...I'd rather have a robot than some fruit

the year of linux on the palmtop? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33126060)

Maybe the desktop wasn't the platform you were looking for...

But, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33126140)

In another 6 months time the statistics will be different. This report doesn't include the launch of iPhone 4.

fuck a 8igga (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33126230)

A couple things (2, Interesting)

funkylovemonkey (1866246) | about 4 years ago | (#33126370)

First of all these numbers directly contradict the numbers presented a few weeks ago that only 20% of Android users would buy another Android phone. Here it says that 71% of Android users would buy another Android phone. Still lower then Apple's 91%, but that can partly be ascribed to the fact that Apple has built a very strong brand loyalty over the last several years. Secondly, there is a direct negative correlation between the release of the Motorola Droid (which began the release of many droid phones like the Incredible) and the drop in recent acquirers of IOS4, going from 34% to 23% in the same period that droid went from 6% to 27%. Now this could be that people were holding out for the iphone 4, however the trend started nine months ago. It's doubtful most people were holding out nine months for the latest iphone. There were probably a few, but I don't think that explains these numbers. Third these numbers are going to be dramatically different in the third quarter simply because the hype of the release of the iphone 4. Because the new iphone is released rarely compared to a most other phones that event atmosphere lends itself to what I'm sure will be a spike in iphone sales. What will be most telling is what happens in Q4 as things balance out.

What is a smartphone exactly? (1)

Posting=!Working (197779) | about 4 years ago | (#33126444)

Where is the line between smartphone and non-smartphone? My last two phones have not been considered smartphones, despite being multifunctional, supporting multiple web browsers, having downloadable apps, handling email, camera, GPS, etc. My latest one does all that, is a touchscreen and better at multitasking than the iPhone 4, but isn't considered a smartphone. Why not?

I'm thinking they draw an arbitrary line that suits their point and only look at the phones above it, despite the many below the line that do the same things.

Is there any real definition for smartphone? It doesn't seem to be based on function. Is there a minimum technical requirement to be considered one?

We won! We won! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33126602)

What the FUCK did we win?

Every day I look in the mailbox for my Android prize.... nothin'.

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