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King Tut's Chariot a Marvel of Ancient Engineering

kdawson posted about 4 years ago | from the ride-like-an-egyptian dept.

Transportation 124

astroengine writes "King Tutankhamun, who ruled Egypt over 3,000 years ago, looks as if he was chauffeured around the desert in one of the earliest-known high-performance vehicles. Tut's chariots surpass all monumental structures of the pharaohs in engineering sophistication. Discovered in pieces by British archaeologist Howard Carter when he entered King Tut's treasure-packed tomb in 1922, the collection consisted of two large ceremonial chariots, a smaller highly decorated one, and three others that were lighter and made for daily use. 'These vehicles appear to be the first mechanical systems which combine the use of kinematics, dynamics and lubrication principles,' said Alberto Rovetta, professor in robotics engineering at the Polytechnic of Milan."

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bwahahahahaha (5, Funny)

Pojut (1027544) | about 4 years ago | (#33129922)

. 'These vehicles appear to be the first mechanical systems which combine the use of kinematics, dynamics and lubrication principles

I combined your mom's use of kinematics, dynamics, and lubrication principles with my mechanical systems last night.

OH SNAP!

Re:bwahahahahaha (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33129982)

Yup, you can definitely tell it's the end of the work day on the east coast of the US or time to go home from the pubs if you're in Europe =P

Re:bwahahahahaha (1)

Pojut (1027544) | about 4 years ago | (#33129998)

I leave work in nine minutes :-)

Re:bwahahahahaha (0, Offtopic)

blair1q (305137) | about 4 years ago | (#33130232)

Suddenly it's twitter [twitter.com] in here...

Re:bwahahahahaha (-1, Redundant)

toastar (573882) | about 4 years ago | (#33130852)

You know, one of the greatest art exhibits ever to tour the United
States is the treasures of Tutankamen or King Tut!
(King Tut)
(King Tut)
Now when he was a young man,
He'd never thought he'd see,
(King Tut)
People stand in line,
To see the boy king.
(King Tut)
How'd you get so funky?
(Funky Tut)
They said you do the monkey.
(Born in Arizona, moved to Babylonia, King Tut)
(King Tut)
Now if I'd known,
They'd line up just to see him,
(King Tut)
I'd've taken all my money,
And bought me a museum.
(King Tut)
Buried with a donkey,
(Funky Tut)
He's my favorite honkey.
(Born in Arizona, moved to Babylonia, King Tut)
Dancing by the Nile,
(Disco dancing)
The ladies love his style.
(Fox Tut)
Rockin' for a mile,
(Rockin' Tut)
He ate a crocodile.
He gave his life for tourism.
(King Tut)
(Tut, tut. Tut, tut . . .)
Golden idols!
He's an Egyptian!
They're selling you.
(King Tut)
Now when I die,
Now don't think I'm a nut.
(King Tut)
Don't want no fancy funeral,
Just one like old King Tut.
(King Tut)
He could'a won a Grammy,
(King Tut)
Buried in his 'jamies.
(Born in Arizona, moved to Babylonia, he was born in Arizona)
He's got a condo made of stone-a. . .
(King Tut)

Re:bwahahahahaha (4, Funny)

couchslug (175151) | about 4 years ago | (#33130326)

Sounds like a slow, loose, and greasy event!

Re:bwahahahahaha (5, Funny)

ultranova (717540) | about 4 years ago | (#33130408)

I combined your mom's use of kinematics, dynamics, and lubrication principles with my mechanical systems last night.

I see your ability to craft a joke is far inferior to ancient Egyptians's ability to craft chariots.

Re:bwahahahahaha (1)

Pojut (1027544) | about 4 years ago | (#33130802)

"Oh ultranova...if only you knew how correct you are." -my wife

Re:bwahahahahaha (2, Insightful)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | about 4 years ago | (#33130934)

Oh Pojut, I always waver on whether or not I want to friend you. I like your site and you can be funny on occaison. But then you pull a Your Mom with an Oh Snap and... well...

You can see where I'm torn, yes?

Re:bwahahahahaha (1)

Pojut (1027544) | about 4 years ago | (#33131228)

I too sometimes feel that way about myself -_-;;

Re:bwahahahahaha (1)

ultranova (717540) | about 4 years ago | (#33134972)

"Oh ultranova...if only you knew how correct you are." -my wife

Does your wife know you're doing things with Alberto Rovetta's mom? And, seeing how Prof. Rovetta seems to have just turned 70, with his mother presumably being older, that you apparently have a thing for older women?

I guess that would explain your need for advanced lubrication principles...

Re:bwahahahahaha (1)

earthforce_1 (454968) | about 4 years ago | (#33133634)

Dad? Is that you?

and that's why (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33129934)

And that's why I bought a Saturn.

Re:and that's why (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33129996)

Yeah, but Jupiter's chariot has cruse control.

Re:and that's why (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33133128)

your pretty lame for buying a saturn

I would expect nothing less... (5, Funny)

jaymzter (452402) | about 4 years ago | (#33129962)

from our pyramid building, cat worshipping, space travelling, interstellar overlords.

Re:I would expect nothing less... (1)

Philomage (1851668) | about 4 years ago | (#33130090)

I was going to post a "cue the alien conspiracies 3...2...1..." thread, but you beat me to it (with a great deal more grace.

Re:I would expect nothing less... (3, Informative)

metlin (258108) | about 4 years ago | (#33130316)

I would expect nothing less...

from our pyramid building, cat worshipping, space travelling, interstellar Goa'uld overlords.

There. Fixed that for ya! ;-)

Re:I would expect nothing less... (1)

molnarcs (675885) | about 4 years ago | (#33134220)

I would expect nothing less...

from our pyramid building, cat worshipping, space travelling, interstellar Goa'uld overlords.

There. Fixed that for ya! ;-)

Cat worshipping Goa'uld lords??

Re:I would expect nothing less... (3, Funny)

RealGrouchy (943109) | about 4 years ago | (#33133894)

Engineering, sure. But could they explain all these complex concepts using chariot analogies?

- RG>

Pimp my ride (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33129990)

kinematics, dynamics and lubrication principles

What a chav. King tut, with the worlds first height adjustable suspension.

Um, Not? (1)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | about 4 years ago | (#33130002)

King Tutankhamun, the pharaoh who ruled Egypt more than 3,300 years ago, rode full speed over the desert dunes on a Formula One-like chariot, according to new investigations into the technical features of the boy king's vehicle collection.

They were the Ferrari of antiquity. They boasted an elegant design and an extremely sophisticated and astonishingly modern technology,"

Did you look at the picture? The wheels are out of round. That thing had a worse ride than a shopping cart with metal wheels. And how fast could a horse pull a chariot over 'the desert dunes' without ejecting the occupant?

Re:Um, Not? (2, Informative)

Crudely_Indecent (739699) | about 4 years ago | (#33130070)

Lets see how round your tires are after 3300 years.

FTA

Even at speeds of about 25 miles per hour on Egypt's irregular soil, King Tut's chariots were efficient and pleasant to ride.

I seriously doubt that 25MPH over a sand dune will eject the occupant.

Re:Um, Not? (5, Informative)

blair1q (305137) | about 4 years ago | (#33130298)

Egypt isn't all sand dunes. Near the Nile it's pretty light on the sand dunes, and 4600 years ago could have been even less sand-duney.

They even had paved roads [nytimes.com] .

Re:Um, Not? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33132926)

Citing the NYT means shit, these days.

Re:Um, Not? (5, Insightful)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about 4 years ago | (#33130180)

And how fast could a horse pull a chariot over 'the desert dunes' without ejecting the occupant?

Well, that's why he is called "The Boy King" and not "The King Who Reached a Ripe Old Age." He got tossed from his Mach Five Chariot, while still young, broken his leg, and died from an infection.

Ferrari chariots? I guess he was more like James Dean of his time. Except James Dean had a Porsche Chariot.

Re:Um, Not? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33130452)

As the article mentioned, it's been recently discovered that Tut suffered from Malaria and the current thinking is that was the main cause of his death.

Re:Um, Not? (4, Funny)

Walt Dismal (534799) | about 4 years ago | (#33130994)

Well, Egyptian Consumer Reports noted that "The Tut Chariot, made by Toyota, is prone to unexplainable sudden acceleration. However, it gets good hay mileage. And depending on the whip you use, it can do 0-60 in under 3 minutes."

Re:Um, Not? (1)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | about 4 years ago | (#33131174)

I guess he was more like Xzibit of his time.

FTFY.

Re:Um, Not? (1)

jomama717 (779243) | about 4 years ago | (#33132818)

I think it is interesting that one of the wheels is heavily worn, while the other is new looking, indicating it had been replaced - makes me wonder if his accident didn't involve a busted chariot wheel which was replaced after he died...presumably so Tut could use it in the afterlife.

Re:Um, Not? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33134010)

Maybe this was just his NASCAR chariot. Turning left all the time just wore one out faster than the other.

Re:Um, Not? (1)

lennier (44736) | about 4 years ago | (#33133888)

Live fast, die young and leave a good looking sarcophagus?

This thing could do 0-25 MPH in under 38 secs!!!!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33130006)

And that was without whipping your Jews!

Re:This thing could do 0-25 MPH in under 38 secs!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33131668)

The jews didnt pull Chariots - they had their Own cars. After all the word of god book states Mospeh came down the mountain in triumph.

HOLY AMAZING! (4, Insightful)

qoncept (599709) | about 4 years ago | (#33130020)

The fact that they realized all those years ago that soft is more comfortable than hard, slippery is faster than sticky and light is less work than heavy is amazing! And that easily makes these chariots "surpass all monumental structures of the pharaohs in engineering sophistication." Moving thousands of tons of rock without machinery is easy compared to slopping fat on a stick!

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33130160)

Dancin' by the Nile, the ladies loved his style.
Rockin' for a mile, he ate a crocodile.
Born in Arizona, moved to Babylonia, King Tut.

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (1)

kryliss (72493) | about 4 years ago | (#33130240)

Gotta love Steve Martin!!

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (1)

dkleinsc (563838) | about 4 years ago | (#33130782)

He's an Egyptian!

vid link [nbc.com] for those who've lived deprived lives.

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (1)

nacturation (646836) | about 4 years ago | (#33133522)

Dancin' by the Nile, the ladies loved his style.
Rockin' for a mile, he ate a crocodile.
Born in Arizona, moved to Babylonia, King Tut.

Wow, and he wasn't even old enough to use Burma Shave.

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33134232)

already modded, so I'll toss you a 'Funny'.
I do loves me some old-school Dr. Demento...

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (5, Informative)

Beryllium Sphere(tm) (193358) | about 4 years ago | (#33130224)

Light is easy, light and strong is sophisticated. Also, the article alludes to springs and shock absorbers, a step up in engineering from just building a light and strong cart.

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (3, Informative)

avandesande (143899) | about 4 years ago | (#33130354)

That's nice but the engineering behind the pyramids construction impresses me (and many others) more.

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (1)

medv4380 (1604309) | about 4 years ago | (#33130766)

I have to agree. As nice as the cart is it's a simple cart and the tech isn't beyond what they could do and would just require the rite ingenuity. The Pyramids and the Sphinx are just a bit more on the complicated side of possible and yet they were done. It would be like those crazy people going and building their Space Scraper. Sure it's possible but the economic, material, and tech would push us to our limit and you'd still have to convince enough people to go along with it to pull it off. There's nice hypothesis about how the pyramids were built but no one knows exactly what they did.

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (1)

qoncept (599709) | about 4 years ago | (#33130390)

"Alludes to" ? What is it, an informative article or a crossword puzzle?

Ok, ok, trick question. It really isn't either. It seems to have attempted to be informative, though. The problem is it lacks any substance whatsoever. It's all grandoise claims about how technologically advanced these chariots were without any evidence. Other than the 3d rendering (uhhh, why not a photo?!), of course, that looks like something a caveman could have made. You know, if he had the wheel.

I can appreciate that this thing was top of the line when it was built. But comparing it (actually, saying it doesn't even compare) to the pyramids, dams and dance moves of ancient Egypt has got to be a joke.

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (5, Informative)

fishbowl (7759) | about 4 years ago | (#33130964)

>Other than the 3d rendering (uhhh, why not a photo?!)

I would bet that it is related to the fact that the article doesn't feature Zahi Hawass chiming in.

It's funny how much control Hawass has on what is said and shown about Egyptian antiquity.

Now you'll notice that you rarely, if *ever*, see anything in Egypt without Zahi Hawass telling you what to think about it.

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (4, Funny)

vlm (69642) | about 4 years ago | (#33130242)

And that easily makes these chariots "surpass all monumental structures of the pharaohs in engineering sophistication." Moving thousands of tons of rock without machinery is easy compared to slopping fat on a stick!

The patent/copyright finally ran out on the chariot thing about 200 years ago, leading to the Industrial Revolution.

When the patent/copyright runs out on "magically levitating giant stone blocks into pyramid shapes" sometime in the future, I think we're going to have a heck of a lot of fun.

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (3, Funny)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | about 4 years ago | (#33133160)

When the patent/copyright runs out on "magically levitating giant stone blocks into pyramid shapes" sometime in the future, I think we're going to have a heck of a lot of fun.

There's no particular mystery to how they did it - without magical levitation.

It's interesting to pull a few blocks off a pyramid. You find inscriptions on them that say things like:

"We DID IT! - Tiger Team Eight."

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (-1, Redundant)

blair1q (305137) | about 4 years ago | (#33130322)

compared to slopping fat on a stick!

Last night your mom...aah, forget it. I don't need the -1 Redundant points.

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (0, Offtopic)

ChrisMP1 (1130781) | about 4 years ago | (#33134332)

First principle of karma whoring: the self-fulfilling prophecy. If you mention you'll probably (or probably not) get modded a certain way, and you want to, you won't be. If you don't want to, you will be.

Nice job.

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (0, Offtopic)

kanto (1851816) | about 4 years ago | (#33130378)

It's the Italian take on things; if the chariot wins, it's beautiful. Probably why they've never won a war or mass-produced a decent car (30 Rock).

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (1)

kanto (1851816) | about 4 years ago | (#33132286)

_This_ post is Offtopic, but RTFA, RTFP. Milan is in Italy, they seem easily wowed by shiny speedy things, not so good at the stuff the parent was referring to... and no, I'm not taking my first Offtopic tagging personally:)

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (1)

metlin (258108) | about 4 years ago | (#33130404)

Well, they did sleep on hard surfaces, without a pillow. So, their "awesomeness" sort of takes a hit.

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (1)

jbeach (852844) | about 4 years ago | (#33130446)

Why, it's almost as if they were ALSO intelligent primates with language skills, EVEN THOUGH they didn't have televisions!

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (1)

EdIII (1114411) | about 4 years ago | (#33130604)

Moving thousands of tons of rock without machinery is easy compared to slopping fat on a stick!

That and I know for damn sure the Egyptians were not the first instance of man using "lubrication principles".

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33133326)

Evidence?

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (3, Interesting)

CAIMLAS (41445) | about 4 years ago | (#33130798)

The fact that they realized all those years ago that soft is more comfortable than hard, slippery is faster than sticky and light is less work than heavy is amazing!

Well, it is pretty amazing if your Egyptology worldview accepts things like:

* geometrically perfect granite sarcophagi, which modern machinery tools would be hard pressed (if even able) to replicate, were made by slaves - who used basalt chisels.
* The pyramids, which have no scientific or explicable cultural explanation as to their function were constructed by slaves using pulleys, and crude tools - despite their geometric perfection, astronomical and astrological representation, and demonstration of very advanced science all around.

* The same people who built these things - the supposed Egyptians of not that long ago - went into decline inexplicably, and some of the most powerful kings were buried in caves, not the pyramids.
* The same people who built these things (and kept slaves, used primitive tools, and had bad teeth) were capable of complex hieroglyphic communication which we do not fully understand today.
* The Sphinx, which is obviously water stained and eroded by anyone who has ever viewed the spillway of a dam, is eroded by sand.

Honestly, the "Ancient Egyptian gods were really Go'ould" explanations are more reasonable than the nonsense espoused by contemporary Egyptology.

So really, these chariots aren't surprising. What's surprising is that Egyptologists stick with what they think they know instead of accepting the facts of the world around them.

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (4, Interesting)

stephanruby (542433) | about 4 years ago | (#33132124)

I thought that the claim that slaves built the pyramids was placed in serious doubt [harvardmagazine.com] recently.

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (1)

dfghjk (711126) | about 4 years ago | (#33133144)

Not really recently.

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (1)

djconrad (1413667) | about 4 years ago | (#33133004)

Tut was buried in a cave, and so cave burial, with this chariot, is evidence of cultural change, not technological decline. I'm in Classics, not Egyptology, but I have never read that the Valley of the Kings was an indicator of a declining civilization.

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (1)

dfghjk (711126) | about 4 years ago | (#33133166)

The moved away from pyramid burials because the burial chambers were too easily looted. Tut's chamber was not a cave, it was a small chamber taken over from a less important person. Tut died suddenly and young and had not yet prepared an elaborate chamber of his own.

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33134136)

Well, it is pretty amazing if your Egyptology worldview accepts things like:

* geometrically perfect granite sarcophagi, which modern machinery tools would be hard pressed (if even able) to replicate, were made by slaves - who used basalt chisels.

These were not mere slaves, but highly skilled craftsman that had nothing else to do but learn how to work granite. Spend 12-16 hours a day for 20 years working with a chisel and hammer and you'll get pretty good at it.

* The pyramids, which have no scientific or explicable cultural explanation as to their function

Public works project that showed off the power of the Pharaoh and the wealth of Egypt.

were constructed by slaves using pulleys, and crude tools - despite their geometric perfection, astronomical and astrological representation, and demonstration of very advanced science all around.

Egyptian tools were high-tech at the time, it's not like these things were built in the Stone Age, as you are suggesting, but in the Bronze age. Assuming we are talking about the Great Pyramids at Giza, a lot of the earlier pyramids were built in the borderline era of Iron and Bronze, but they were not nearly as ambitious either. Still monumental achievements for the time.

* The same people who built these things - the supposed Egyptians of not that long ago - went into decline inexplicably,

Egypt's decline in power coincides nicely with Rome's rise. And lest us not forget the Persian and Turksish invasions, internal stuggles, etc. It's not as though Egypt had a huge empire to begin with, and it was under the rule of a Pharoh from unification (Circa 3000 BCE) until Cleopatra made her deal with Mark Anthony (Circa 32 BCE), making Egypt a protectorate under Rome, making it one of the longest lasting independent nations on Earth.

and some of the most powerful kings were buried in caves, not the pyramids.

The pyramids were for show, the caves were supposed to be secret and would protect the Pharohs from grave robbers.

* The same people who built these things (and kept slaves, used primitive tools, and had bad teeth) were capable of complex hieroglyphic communication which we do not fully understand today.

Never heard of the Rosetta Stone? Egyptian hieroglyphics are fully understood, there are books available if you want to read hieroglyphics on your own.

* The Sphinx, which is obviously water stained and eroded by anyone who has ever viewed the spillway of a dam, is eroded by sand.

There are three main theories:

  • The wind erosion theory. Tradition theory and least likely to be correct, based on physical evidence.
  • The Sphinx is over 10,000 years old (Last time Egypt saw significant rain) Only slightly more likely possible then the wind erosion theory, if only because it can explain the physical evidence, but I'm skeptical.
  • The religious rites theory. Basically this theory is that the top of the Sphinx was used for ceremonies, and that at the end of each ceremony, the top would be cleaned with water, and that water would be pushed over the sides with brooms. Over the years, as the water was pushed off the sides of the Sphinx, it eroded the sides, much like rain would. This is my personal favorite as it fits the physical evidence, and doesn't throw the timeline of known Egyptian history all out of whack.

Honestly, the "Ancient Egyptian gods were really Go'ould" explanations are more reasonable than the nonsense espoused by contemporary Egyptology.

So really, these chariots aren't surprising. What's surprising is that Egyptologists stick with what they think they know instead of accepting the facts of the world around them.

Re:HOLY AMAZING! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33133148)

Moving thousands of tons of rock without machinery is easy compared to slopping fat on a stick!

I'll thank you to leave my lunch out of the discussion.

Huh? (1)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | about 4 years ago | (#33130064)

...he was chauffeured around the desert in one of the earliest-known high-performance vehicles.

I seriously doubt he ever went faster than his horses. So what does "high-performance" mean? It didn't wear them out so quickly?

Re:Huh? (3, Informative)

blair1q (305137) | about 4 years ago | (#33130366)

Sure.

Lower rolling resistance means more speed per horsepower and less fatigue per horse.

Re:Huh? (3, Informative)

Tuidjy (321055) | about 4 years ago | (#33132270)

The tallest horse skeleton from that period barely passes the horse/pony barrier (by 3cm) The average horse of the period was 1.3m tall and the bones suggest that it weighted about 30% less than the light riding horses of today. It probably would not have be able to go very fast or very far with a rider. Yes, people rode them sometimes, but mostly they were used in chariots.

In a race between a rider and Tut's chariot, I'd definitely bet on the chariot, even with a driver in addition to the Pharaoh.

Canada Wikileaks: U.S. Military Uses (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33130110)

ALIEN [youtube.com] technology.

Spreading Democracy and Freedom my BUTT !

Yours In Novosibirsk,
K. Trout

Really really old news (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33130134)

Modern Marvels on History channel already covered this years ago

Re:Really really old news (1)

blair1q (305137) | about 4 years ago | (#33130394)

Nothing really exists until it passes by the rolled-up theater program pressed to the eye of /.

Re:Really really old news (2, Informative)

reverseengineer (580922) | about 4 years ago | (#33131166)

Especially old, in the sense that this chariot was excavated in 1922, and has been on display in Egypt for decades. The rash of recent articles about this "high-performance chariot" is due to it being loaned out to a foreign exhibit for the first time, which is noteworthy, but from the press you'd think this object was newly unearthed a few days ago.

Detroit Called (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33130236)

They want access to this latest technology to build muscle cars,

Exaggeration of Ancient Greece that is .... (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33130416)

in modern western philosophy, literature and science, we are all thought about how great the greek civilization was, how they invented most of the concepts we use today, and ideas and principles, how glorious it was in that cesspit of ancient history, this and that.

however, when one takes up history as a hobby, and reads up by himself/herself, it is a soon made discovery that for centuries before and during the climax of ancient greece, greeks went to egypt to study. the schools and learning in egypt encompassed practically everything, classified in two different school genres : school of life taught matters related to physical world - medicine, architecture, geometry and so on, school of death taught matters related to the otherworld. one finds out that a goodly number of the greek prominent figures, at least those who could afford it, went to egypt to study, or studied material transferred from egypt.

it is an even more stunning discovery to find out that, most of the spiritual and philosophical concepts we use in everyday life today, even extending to some customs, originate from egypt.

but, due to the most free material that is being free of church influence that was available in renaissance and baroque being ancient greece material that the byzantine scholars brought from istanbul when they fleed the ottoman conquest, western literature and science has developed by a misplaced influence of greece. which is quite natural actually, because until the end of 18th century, there wasnt any awareness of existence of a civilization like egypt.

what is appalling though, is, that still goes on ....

Re:Exaggeration of Ancient Greece that is .... (1)

markov_chain (202465) | about 4 years ago | (#33131224)

It is a travesty that the Great Library was burned down; who knows what kinds of Egyptian treasures were to be found there...

Re:Exaggeration of Ancient Greece that is .... (4, Informative)

realityimpaired (1668397) | about 4 years ago | (#33132852)

Tragedy, not Travesty. It's a tragedy that it burned down. It's not, however, a travesty, unless you consider the irony in the fact that the fire was set by the Romans in an effort to limit the communication of their enemies. Even then, though, the fire was set on docked ships, it's just that it got out of control and spread to the docks themselves and then the city of Alexandria... the library itself was not intentionally burned down: it was an accident.

One thing that may have been lost (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33134342)

Other guy: Philosophers can drive me nuts... "It's only a pillow because we view it as a pillow." No, it's a pillow because it's a goddamn pillow.
Me: Yeah, sometimes you wonder what drugs are involved. Though, in all seriousness, many of Plato's dialogues were written as Socrates having a discussion with friends at a party, discussions lubricated by alcohol.
Me: That class did have some interesting lessons about historical provenance - Plato, who was one of Socrates' student/followers, is among the few surviving sources.
Him: What, burned in the library of Alexandria?
Me: Wouldn't be surprised.
Me: "Caesar...not cool."
Him: Biggest disaster in the history of knowledge.
Me: What was #2? The invention of organized religion?

Eh, Electricity would have made it stop working anyways, but it's a big help while you're behind.

test (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33130442)

test

Too bad history channel said the same thing (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33130464)

like 4 years ago

I forget which show it was on but it was talking about Egyptian engineering though out the empire's time

Glad were pissing away time and money for something that any dolt with cable TV could have known

WELL THEY BUILT THE FUCKING PYRAMIDS !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33130500)

The only Wonder of antiquity still standing. Is it really so hard to think a lubed axle is not such a big deal to them? I mean, it's got to be hard to think with those towels on their heads, and all !!

Wait, you can't crash a comforatable car? (1)

jandrese (485) | about 4 years ago | (#33130692)

The end of the article suggests that King Tut may not have fallen off of the chariot and broken his leg because the chariot offers a ride that is too comfortable. This smells like a tremendous leap of logic to me. It's not like the thing was equipped with seatbelts, why would a design that allows for great speed with relative comfort preclude the possibility that maybe he fell out of the thing?

Re:Wait, you can't crash a comforatable car? (1)

realityimpaired (1668397) | about 4 years ago | (#33132884)

I think you need to go back and read the article again. It said that there's a 50/50 chance that this was the chariot that Tutankhamun fell from when he broke his leg.

It was instead mentioning other factors in Tut's health that could have led to his death... the fact that he had malformed bones in his feet, and the fact that he had apparently been suffering from malaria. That he fell off the chariot and broke his leg isn't really in question... that it was an infection from the broken leg and not, say, succumbing to the malaria, is what they were calling into doubt.

Just like modern Porche owner (4, Funny)

Okonomiyaki (662220) | about 4 years ago | (#33131060)

Sounds like more evidence for that small penis theory.

http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/UnNews:King_Tut_had_a_small_penis [wikia.com]

Re:Just like modern Porche owner (1)

grouchomarxist (127479) | about 4 years ago | (#33135134)

after embalmment and 3000 years there is shrinkage, significant shrinkage!

Ancient Egypt had good engineers (5, Interesting)

smellsofbikes (890263) | about 4 years ago | (#33131092)

I recently saw the travelling King Tutankhamen exhibit and got to reading a bit about their technology. Besides being able to organize and motivate well enough to build the Great Pyramid, which required cutting, transporting, and installing twelve 3 ton blocks per hour, every hour, for 20 years [wikipedia.org] , they knew about prime and perfect numbers, the Sieve of Eratosthenes, first-order linear equations, and summing linear and arithmetic sequences. They knew about pi and calculated it to about five digits, and could calculate the surface area of hemispheres and the volume of frustrums [wikipedia.org] , which means they could do integral calculus (although they didn't realize that's what they were doing.)

Re:Ancient Egypt had good engineers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33131538)

And they used slaves to do it all

Re:Ancient Egypt had good engineers (4, Interesting)

c0lo (1497653) | about 4 years ago | (#33131922)

And they used slaves to do it all

Using slaves to compute the first 5 digits of PI and do integral calculus, eh?
Fast-forward 3000 years, these slave are called engineers - and the "masters" are no longer called kings but MBA (some owing Ferrari-es too).

Re:Ancient Egypt had good engineers (1)

c0lo (1497653) | about 4 years ago | (#33134104)

I wonder what the moderator found funny in my post above: I'd consider it rather depressing (wink)

Re:Ancient Egypt had good engineers (1)

silveride (1844238) | about 4 years ago | (#33134344)

Maybe because we are discussing ferrari-es and not engineers!

Re:Ancient Egypt had good engineers (1)

c0lo (1497653) | about 4 years ago | (#33134374)

Maybe because we are discussing ferrari-es and not engineers!

  1. what's so funny about Ferrari?
  2. I thought the parent post side-tracked the discussion on slaves computing PI decimal places and doing integral calculus?

Re:Ancient Egypt had good engineers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33134498)

until I read your whole post, I thought somehow you knew about Logopolis, Oh never mind, poor human

Re:Ancient Egypt had good engineers (1)

c0lo (1497653) | about 4 years ago | (#33134586)

until I read your whole post, I thought somehow you knew about Logopolis, Oh never mind, poor human

For this, I need to fast-forward more than 3000 years. BTW, master, do you own a Ferrari?
Yours, who.

Re:Ancient Egypt had good engineers (1)

DamnStupidElf (649844) | about 4 years ago | (#33131680)

And their civilization collapsed utterly and was almost lost to history. Quite a warning for the oil-will-never-run-out-and-global-warming-is-a-myth crowd.

Re:Ancient Egypt had good engineers (1)

tomhath (637240) | about 4 years ago | (#33132532)

Yup, and it only lasted 3000 years. Guess we better panic.

Re:Ancient Egypt had good engineers (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33133562)

Well, for one thing, a bunch of Christians ganged up and murdered the last people able to read and write hieroglyphs, so their civilisation didn't exactly collapse, it evolved due to conquest.

Egyptians go home. (5, Funny)

Pseudonymus Bosch (3479) | about 4 years ago | (#33132854)

Yeah, but apart from the Great Pyramid, prime and perfect numbers, the Sieve of Eratosthenes, linear equations, sequences, pi, surface areas and volumes, what have the Egyptians done for us?

SLAVES (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33134444)

Hmmmmm
All these great cultures in the past achieved massive projects and were able to accelerate; except nobody really mentions THE SLAVES. No wonder they had so much free time to dedicate to other stuff because their slaves allowed their empire to expand. China with the Great Wall used slaves/forced labor, Hitler used slaves to build his missile development sites, etc....
We might be giving these dictators too much credit when all they did was use slaves to achieve ends meet. It's like "oh look at this nice environment they have to do all this stuff"

"Where's your hot rod now, Moses?" (2, Funny)

Snufu (1049644) | about 4 years ago | (#33133198)

Best vintage garage find evar. It's gonna be a bitch to find parts.

Xizbit "a" (2, Funny)

NetNed (955141) | about 4 years ago | (#33134144)

Wasn't this on pimp my chariot? They put 22's on it and Mad Mike installed 5 hieroglyphics flat panels on it.

Really? (2, Insightful)

dfuess (72488) | about 4 years ago | (#33134246)

"They boasted an elegant design and an extremely sophisticated and astonishingly modern technology,"

I find the premise of the article arrogantly modern. "They" didn't boast modern technology at all but rather demonstrated the of the state of the art in Egypt 3000 years ago. Perhaps the appropriate view is that today's engineering despite all its plastic and glitter has not advanced significantly beyond that of ancient Egypt in some areas. I do wonder why it is that we do so often equate ancient with stupid and marvel that those stupid old folk could actually have come up with a "modern" idea (which is the underlying theme of the article)?

maybe they had Beetles as well (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33134542)

I hope that Michelin cited this as prior art for their Tweel, and now that I think about it,
  what the lunar hell is an LRI AB Scarab Tweel ?

Hyksos chariots? (1)

S3D (745318) | about 4 years ago | (#33134610)

"chariot was introduced to Egypt by the Hyksos. It did not take Egypt long -- just two generations -- to have the world's best chariots"

Could it be that Hyksos had world's best chariots?

Metallic hinges (3, Interesting)

ModelX (182441) | about 4 years ago | (#33135232)

In the Cairo museum, next to the Tut's collection (it may be part of it, I'm not sure, I was there years ago), I saw a foldable bed frame with metallic hinges. I thought that was the technological high-point of the museum, I haven't seen anything like that from the same time frame anywhere in the world.

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