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Large Zeus Botnet Used For Financial Fraud

CmdrTaco posted more than 4 years ago | from the zeus-shorts-out-his-enemies dept.

Botnet 68

An anonymous reader writes "A large Zeus version 2 botnet is being used to conduct financial fraud in the UK and is operated from Eastern Europe. The botnet appears to be controlling more than 100,000 infected computers. The criminals have been harvesting all manner of potentially lucrative and revenue-producing credentials — including online account IDs plus login information to banks, credit and debit card numbers, account types plus balances, bank statements, browser cookies, client side certificates, login information for email accounts and social networks, and even FTP passwords."

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Oh no (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33137006)

login information to banks, credit and debit card numbers, account types plus balances, bank statements, browser cookies, client side certificates, login information for email accounts and social networks and even FTP passwords

I was not mad right up until that last one and even FTP passwords. They can have all that other crap but when they take my precious FTP password, and I use FTP for all my most critical-to-security interent functions, well...war on buddy.

Re:Oh no (2, Interesting)

gad_zuki! (70830) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137432)

How dare they capture my unencrypted logins?!?! Seriously, its a shame SFTP or FTPS isn't more supported, and by 'more supported' I mean supported by IE and Firefox. I hate how adding encryption to FTP is suddenly "Whoa, whoa, whoa, we only provide basic support on browsers." Funny how they don't say the same thing about HTTPS.

Re:Oh no (3, Informative)

AndrewNeo (979708) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137484)

I don't know if you honestly expect Microsoft to add useful features to IE, but at least with Firefox that's what addons are for [mozilla.org] .

Re:Oh no (1)

gad_zuki! (70830) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137712)

Add-ons arent a solution. Unless a huge install base has it then its not worth using for a general audience. That like saying "Here's an add-on for HTTPS, toodles!" At that might you might as well spend those 30 seconds just installing a stand-alone FTP client that supports FTPS/SFTP instead of trying to shoehorn it into the bloat that is your browser.

Re:Oh no (3, Insightful)

datapharmer (1099455) | more than 4 years ago | (#33138094)

the browser support for ftp is typically intended for anonymous browsing. If you want full fledged support for ftp and its secured variants get an ftp client. I don't complain that filezilla doesn't browse the web well...

Re:Oh no (1)

gad_zuki! (70830) | more than 4 years ago | (#33138950)

This is the same mentality that keeps millions of smtp servers using unencrypted plain-text. I really don't think adding basic encryption should be seen as such an extravagant request. Unfortunately, a lot of people don't take security seriously and they are in charge of some pretty major corporations and popular products.

>the browser support for ftp is typically intended for anonymous browsing.

Except its not. Even Firefox allows non-anonymous browsing (uses username/passwords) and IE can do uploads. For 99.9% of FTP users, the FTP client is the browser.

Re:Oh no (1)

cnastase (1504381) | more than 4 years ago | (#33140406)

This is the same mentality that keeps millions of smtp servers using unencrypted plain-text. I really don't think adding basic encryption should be seen as such an extravagant request. Unfortunately, a lot of people don't take security seriously and they are in charge of some pretty major corporations and popular products.

That's why you have PGP/Gnupg and the like. Besides, who has time to read someone else's mails? I barely have time to read my own!

Except its not. Even Firefox allows non-anonymous browsing (uses username/passwords) and IE can do uploads. For 99.9% of FTP users, the FTP client is the browser.

Blasphemy to be honest. Browsers are for por^H^H^Hbrowsing, get an FTP client for massive downloads. Soon you'll be asking for mail servers to allow you to send more than 5M attachments. Who do you think you are? Mooo

Re:Oh no (1)

orange47 (1519059) | more than 4 years ago | (#33139380)

no, because when I see a ftp link to file I want to click on it and it downloads, that simple. I dont want to start a ftp client, then decrypt javascript html to enter pass, change dir... for a single file. damn firefox still doesnt support ACTIVE FTP grrrr

Re:Oh no (1)

nstlgc (945418) | more than 4 years ago | (#33140230)

At that might you might as well spend those 30 seconds just installing a stand-alone FTP client that supports FTPS/SFTP instead of trying to shoehorn it into the bloat that is your browser.
I think you just answered your own question.

Re:Oh no (1)

hesaigo999ca (786966) | more than 4 years ago | (#33140126)

I tend to agree with the post post to your post....I think FF should come standard with that, the same as it does for https....you do not need to download extra add on for https, so why sftp

FTP (1)

davidwr (791652) | more than 4 years ago | (#33139064)

I keep my Financial Password Protocol password written down on a piece of paper, locked securely in a safe-deposit box in one of Warsaw's larger banks.

Re:FTP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33139150)

You moron, you couldn't even get the initialism right. FTP, not FPP. Good job!

Re:FTP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33139430)

I don't know why but I lol'd.

Re:FTP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33211582)

thank you, now we at least know where to start searching!

Again ... (4, Funny)

krzysz00 (1842280) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137012)

Breaking News: Another XXl botnet steals bank account numbers. However, the acquisition of emails and Facebook accounts is worrying.

Re:Again ... (1)

1s44c (552956) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137134)

Breaking News: Another XXl botnet steals bank account numbers.

However, the acquisition of emails and Facebook accounts is worrying.

It's the bank login details that are worth money, not the facebook logins.

Re:Again ... (1)

krzysz00 (1842280) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137722)

Breaking News: Another XXl botnet steals bank account numbers.

However, the acquisition of emails and Facebook accounts is worrying.

It's the bank login details that are worth money, not the facebook logins.

Yeah, but Facebook and emails can be used for social engineering to gain more bank account numbers.

Re:Again ... (5, Funny)

oldspewey (1303305) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137760)

Are you insane? With a facebook login, these people could mess with my FarmVille and CafeWorld apps.

Re:Again ... (1)

daem0n1x (748565) | more than 4 years ago | (#33140960)

Massive Financial Fraud? Wait until Wall Street gets their hands on this. It will be a boom!

Version 2 Review -- Why upgrade? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33137054)

Zeus version 2

So, like a good little early adopter, I upgraded and installed version 2 on my machine only to find that it was a huge bloated piece of crap. The original Zeus was so much more simple and elegant and now this thing is just chewing up cycles. Yeah, like the customer won't notice that. Seriously, all I wanted it to do was safely back up my bank statements to a remote server in case I lose them. And after the "Zeus Certified" debacle, I don't know who to believe when I ask "Will this computer run the simplest of viruses like Adobe PDF Reader?" Clearly Zeus is just a resource hog ... and looking forward at Version 3 (if it's even released on time) one wonder if they're even trying to build a quality botnet anymore. It's times like these that make you wonder if it's time to switch over to Mariposa ...

Conficker design is second to none (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33137312)

Mariposa is just as bloated - if not more so.

not only that, its less secure because it doesnt have a "benevolent dictator" calling the shots design-wise.

im running Conficker and its been working like a charm. granted, its market share is not that great, and as long as you hold the mouse the right way, it "just works".

honestly, i think this will be the year of the Conficker. Mariposa and Zeus are just too behind the curve.

Conficker Fanboy! (3, Funny)

BigSes (1623417) | more than 4 years ago | (#33141022)

I'm sick and tired of all these Conficker fanboys. You sit and talk about your botnet being so great because its open source, and you can expose your information to any malicious actions you choose, big deal! I'll take my Mariposa walled garden any day, at least I know that I can give up my SSN, mother's maiden name, and current home address and I know it will "Just Work" when it comes to stealing my data.

Re:Conficker Fanboy! (3, Funny)

oldspewey (1303305) | more than 4 years ago | (#33141966)

If anybody needs proof that Mariposa is the superior botnet just ask yourself this question: is anybody lining up for 12 hours in the rain to get trojaned by anything else?

Exactly

Re:Version 2 Review -- Why upgrade? (2, Funny)

Necroloth (1512791) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137830)

You're right, it's gone downhill since v1. Seems they're running out of good programmers and are being led by business-types who are demanding quantity over quality.

Which OS? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33137096)

Is this thing limited to Redmond Operating Systems?

Re:Which OS? (2, Interesting)

fwarren (579763) | more than 4 years ago | (#33138158)

Probably. Not that it is imposible for Mac OSX and Linux to be compromised. But right now the numbers show that almost all bot net activity comes from compromised Windows PC's.

The average user wants to be able to use a computer like they use a car, or a door, or a toaster, or a toilet. No need for technical training, no cryptic messages, etc. The problem is a computer is not that kind of device. It is more like an aircraft. If you don't gain some level of technial expertise, it is easy to "crash and burn" the system.

It is a crime to put John Q Public on the internet with a Windows PC. Watching it is like watchin a baby seal be clubbed to death. They are helpless and have no clue the danger they are in.

If the government, or banks or anyone with a vested interest in the web being secure (let alone spam free) was serious. Every user would be given a liveCD of some Linux to run on their computer to browse the internet.

Pardon me, I have to ask... (2, Funny)

Xaedalus (1192463) | more than 4 years ago | (#33138436)

If you want Linux, Ubuntu, and the rest of the free OS's to stay superior and exploit-free, then why on earth would you ever want mainstream acceptance of said OS's? Wouldn't Linux et all going mainstream and replacing Windows/OSX mean that the botnets (and their owners) and scriptkiddies would then change their tactics to exploit whatever's currently dominant in market share?

If I were you, I'd be praying to the FSM for Windows/MS to stay dominant forever, just so that you could continue to use Linux without fear of someone writing script specifically to target YOUR OS's weaknesses. But that's just me

Re:Pardon me, I have to ask... (1, Funny)

Shompol (1690084) | more than 4 years ago | (#33138658)

Wouldn't Linux et all going mainstream and replacing Windows/OSX mean that the botnets (and their owners) and scriptkiddies would then change their tactics

Yes, they would, but with two orders of magnitude less success. You see, windows is a crapware operating system built on the cheap, somewhat based on with DOS. Redmond's strong point is marketing, not quality. With closed source code you are guaranteed that security holes will be found perpetually, because not as many people can review the code.
On the other hand, Linux is based on UNIX, where even file system had built-in security system, while DOS was happily crashing the whole OS when your current app went down.

you could continue to use Linux without fear

A little beside the point, but being a nerd, i will move on to the next fledging technology when Linux (or another GNU OS) becomes dominant, and I don't doubt that it will happen.

Re:Pardon me, I have to ask... (4, Insightful)

jbeach (852844) | more than 4 years ago | (#33140456)

It seems clear to my personal experience, and friends of mine who are in computer security, that Os X and Linux are orders of magnitude more secure than Windows.

While I'm sure OS X and Linux can be exploited, I think we'd all be far safer if they were adopted to anywhere near the ubiquity of windows. And who knows? That may be soon, if Google apps and other productivity software is available for free or cheap as compared to Windows, and its current lock on business drone software.

Re:Which OS? (2, Insightful)

cdrguru (88047) | more than 4 years ago | (#33138748)

Yes, but can you install WeatherBug on your Linux live CD? No? Then is isn't going to be of any use to the millions of housewives and grannies that have installed it.

Seriously, a live CD is only of use if you don't want to save anything. And no, you aren't going to get people to boot into an unfamiliar environment to do banking or whatnot.

The "other" problem is that what is really needed is an Internet Appliance for these folks. No software installs, no executable anything. It does email, web browsing, media playing and not much more. Sure, you probably want capacity to add sanctioned applications over time but it needs to operate a whole lot like an iPad - which pretty much is an Internet Appliance. This would be reasonable and could be extremely secure. More secure than the iPad is today as it has way too much capability of having stuff added to it that could be used to exploit it.

We have known about the problem for at least 10 years but nobody has done anything real about it. WebTV and a couple of other devices tried, but they were pretty restricted and oriented towards dial-up access at the time. The iPad is the first such appliance that has come along and it will be a while before it can be seen how effective it is and what the acceptance is. Clearly, we need some more wireless devices that are "appliances" that offer a limited walled garden approach and are designed with the idea of being hack-proof from the beginning.

Re:Which OS? (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 4 years ago | (#33138754)

The average user wants to be able to use a computer like they use a car, [...]. No need for technical training

You got your driving license without any technical training?

Re:Which OS? (2, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 4 years ago | (#33139328)

You got your driving license without any technical training?

The vast majority of (at least US) drivers certainly act like they found a driver's license at the bottom of their Cocoa Puffs box.

Re:Which OS? (1)

GeorgeS (11440) | more than 4 years ago | (#33140008)

yup...I didn't have to learn how to gap a spark plug or change the oil or any of that fun stuff. Just had to learn how to "point" the wheels and "click" the right pedals.

Re:Which OS? (2, Insightful)

fwarren (579763) | more than 4 years ago | (#33142042)

Yes I did. I was not required to learn anything at all about the engine of the car. There is not even a requirement to understand the lights that say "check engine" or "oil". How many RPM's are bad for the car? What should my tire pressure be? How do I open the hood? None of those things are requirements.

Knowing how to open the door, operate the gas/break, read the stuff in the dash, that is about the same as "put a CD in" or "click on that icon there."

There is a requirement on how operate a car. Not how to buid, fix, troubleshoot, or maintain one.

I predicted this (4, Insightful)

1s44c (552956) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137108)

Botnet herders have access to a very large number of computers, it was only a matter of time until they realized that the data on these computers is worth far more than the few pence they are making from Viagra spam and blackmailing gambling sites with DDOS attacks.

Re:I predicted this (1)

JohannesJ (952576) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137574)

I'd like to know the 'Security savvy' level of the infected users . Did they surf with administrator credentials ? Follow email links and foolishly install? Had no anti-virus? and What OS version and patch level? Did they all use one particular program which lead to their being compromised ?

Re:I predicted this (3, Insightful)

Delarth799 (1839672) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137716)

Usually people who end up infected with this sort of stuff are the same people who ignore the patches and updates for the operating system, which usually happens to be windows. They almost never download and install the updates because it slows down their web browsing or whatever and to them they just see it as an annoyance. They likely have only the most basic of anti-virus software installed and never actually bother to run it, or they just don't have anything at all. They click on ads left and right because it says "free download" or some other crap and they probably wouldn't know that the advertisement for free wallpapers or whatever could do anything bad to their computers. The people who usually get infected are the same across the board sadly enough, they don't care to take a few basic steps to protect themselves and take the 20 minutes or so to just get some good anti-virus software on their computer and run it once a week or not open and download every advertisement they see and click on every link in every email they get which is probably where most of them get infected from. Now I am sure there are a small percentage who are very tech and security savvy and take good measures to stop infections and whatnot and something may have slipped through, but again that's likely a very small percentage.

Re:I predicted this (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33138304)

They simply did like my wife and my mother-in-law, they pressed "okay" when the pop-up came asking them to install this weird executable that they didn't ask for. They just wanted the pop-up to go away, you see.

Firewall, anti-virus, tea-timer, a host of other security measures... but you can't fix the user.

Re:I predicted this (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33138380)

Should it matter? Dell and Best Buy didn't educate them about the security hazards of using Microsoft Windows(R).

Is it BMW's (and their dealers) responsibility to tell the buyer of any operability issues inherent in the car before purchase?

Yes.

Re:I predicted this (2, Informative)

moreati (119629) | more than 4 years ago | (#33138258)

You do realise this isn't the first incidence? Botnets have been installing key loggers and stealing sensitive data for years now. Credit card numbers harvested thus sell for a few dollars/thousand.

Re:I predicted this (1)

orange47 (1519059) | more than 4 years ago | (#33139458)

gee, no shit, sherlock.. except when they get caught for this (and some surely will) it won't be the same situation as with viagra spam.

Re:I predicted this (1)

ralphdaugherty (225648) | more than 4 years ago | (#33139754)

Botnet herders have access to a very large number of computers, it was only a matter of time until they realized that the data on these computers is worth far more than the few pence they are making from Viagra spam and blackmailing gambling sites with DDOS attacks.

      I happened to be working on my site at 4am (EDT) this morning and got hit simultaneously by several bots that turned out to be from major US universities. Not only do they own university networks, but use them to recruit others, so to speak.

  rd

That's awesome, but... (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137124)

One detail in the report struck me: the claim that they capture all web traffic and store it in an SQL server w/ a search frontend at CNC. This is evidently unfeasible, they would have to filter out only data posted into forms and the like. It would have been helpful had the report told about what "shape" this data took, what kind of auth mechanisms was leeched from. They had no whitepaper/analysis on their website, but there was this OS distribution pie chart: http://www.trusteer.com/sites/default/files/ZeusbotnetOSstats.jpg [trusteer.com]
Still, imagine having a line into that kind of setup, on a pay per-password-search basis.

Re:That's awesome, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33137156)

No Windows 7, No OS X, No Linux?

Supprisingly as all new machines are OS X or Windows 7 and MSFT have pushed out a tonne of updates to Windows 7 for diff checking.

Re:That's awesome, but... (2, Funny)

RivenAleem (1590553) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137272)

As a precaution I've changed all my passwords to "DROP TABLE Stolen Data"

Re:That's awesome, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33137310)

You're doing it wrong, it's:

x'; DROP TABLE Stolen Data; --

Re:That's awesome, but... (2, Interesting)

RivenAleem (1590553) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137360)

On a side note, it would be interesting to use x'; DROP TABLE Passwords; -- as my actual password for email, banking etc, and see if A) my password is hashed for that site, and B) if it destroys their databases

Re:That's awesome, but... (3, Insightful)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137770)

Anyone doing that would be liable ten ways till Sunday. Anyone doing that to several banks would be called "A one-man super-hacker ring bent on destroying the western economic system."

Re:That's awesome, but... (0, Redundant)

Necroloth (1512791) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137870)

oblig XKCD strip [xkcd.com]

Re:That's awesome, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33138546)

Woosh!

Always wondering... (2, Interesting)

euyis (1521257) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137126)

How do the criminals process all the information and filter out the valid ones?
Considering all these weird captchas on the login pages, I don't think it's possible to check every collected bank account automatically, and doing that manually would be too tiring.

Re:Always wondering... (2, Insightful)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137284)

Too tiring - compared to what?

Re:Always wondering... (1)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 4 years ago | (#33138894)

Not all services use captchas. I'd guess that most assume that if you're a bot trying to log in, you will make multiple attempts and can be locked out of making futher attempts. How many architects would think to protect against automated entry of the correct credentials?

Re:Always wondering... (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 4 years ago | (#33140540)

Do you have any idea how big a computer a large botnet makes?

It's RUSSIA you fucking DWEEB !!!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33137202)

Eastern Europe? What the fuck is this "Eastern Europe"? Have you ever been to the "Western Europe?" You are one fucking asshole, dweeb !!

Re:It's RUSSIA you fucking DWEEB !!!! (2, Informative)

Threni (635302) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137784)

> Eastern Europe? What the fuck is this "Eastern Europe"? Have you ever been to the "Western Europe?" You are one fucking asshole, dweeb !!

Uh.. I'm in the UK, which is in Western Europe. This botnet is believed to be operated from the Ukraine, amongst other places, and Ukraine is in Eastern Europe. Got it now?

Re:It's RUSSIA you fucking DWEEB !!!! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33137966)

Eastern Europe? What the fuck is this "Eastern Europe"? Have you ever been to the "Western Europe?" You are one fucking asshole, dweeb !!

And you are one idiot, or a troll

mynuts won; hidden? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33137210)

why delete/obscure this perfectly good/topical post(mortem), attached to the space station repair article? we're talking quick fix for all difficulties now, right?

creators to repair planet/atmosphere. population? (Score:?0?)
by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 04, @06:21AM (#33135678)

save for the rescue of several billion innocents, everything else will be 'different'. it's all in the manuals. see you there?

meanwhile (hard to know how long); the corepirate nazi illuminati is always hunting that patch of red on almost everyones' neck. if they cannot find yours (greed, fear ego etc...) then you can go starve. that's their (slippery/slimy) 'platform' now. see also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antisocial_personality_disorder

never a better time to consult with/trust in our creators. the lights are coming up rapidly all over now. see you there?

greed, fear & ego (in any order) are unprecedented evile's primary weapons. those, along with deception & coercion, helps most of us remain (unwittingly?) dependent on its' life0cidal hired goons' agenda. most of our dwindling resources are being squandered on the 'wars', & continuation of the billionerrors stock markup FraUD/pyramid schemes. nobody ever mentions the real long term costs of those debacles in both life & any notion of prosperity for us, or our children. not to mention the abuse of the consciences of those of us who still have one, & the terminal damage to our atmosphere (see also: manufactured 'weather', hot etc...). see you on the other side of it? the lights are coming up all over now. the fairytail is winding down now. let your conscience be your guide. you can be more helpful than you might have imagined. we now have some choices. meanwhile; don't forget to get a little more oxygen on your brain, & look up in the sky from time to time, starting early in the day. there's lots going on up there.

"The current rate of extinction is around 10 to 100 times the usual background level, and has been elevated above the background level since the Pleistocene. The current extinction rate is more rapid than in any other extinction event in earth history, and 50% of species could be extinct by the end of this century. While the role of humans is unclear in the longer-term extinction pattern, it is clear that factors such as deforestation, habitat destruction, hunting, the introduction of non-native species, pollution and climate change have reduced biodiversity profoundly.' (wiki)

"I think the bottom line is, what kind of a world do you want to leave for your children," Andrew Smith, a professor in the Arizona State University School of Life Sciences, said in a telephone interview. "How impoverished we would be if we lost 25 percent of the world's mammals," said Smith, one of more than 100 co-authors of the report. "Within our lifetime hundreds of species could be lost as a result of our own actions, a frightening sign of what is happening to the ecosystems where they live," added Julia Marton-Lefevre, IUCN director general. "We must now set clear targets for the future to reverse this trend to ensure that our enduring legacy is not to wipe out many of our closest relatives."--

"The wealth of the universe is for me. Every thing is explicable and practical for me .... I am defeated all the time; yet to victory I am born." --emerson

no need to confuse 'religion' with being a spiritual being. our soul purpose here is to care for one another. failing that, we're simply passing through (excess baggage) being distracted/consumed by the guaranteed to fail illusionary trappings of man'kind'. & recently (about 10,000 years ago) it was determined that hoarding & excess by a few, resulted in negative consequences for all.

consult with/trust in your creators. providing more than enough of everything for everyone (without any distracting/spiritdead personal gain motives), whilst badtolling unprecedented evile, using an unlimited supply of newclear power, since/until forever. see you there?

"If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land." )one does not need to agree whois in charge to grasp the notion that there may be some assistance available to us(

boeing, boeing, gone.

Time to go back to phone banking (3, Insightful)

davidwr (791652) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137280)

Hmm maybe we should go back to phone banking. It's not like phones can be easily hacked to sniff passwords.

Oh wait, I forgot, we aren't in the 1980s [cunatechno...ouncil.org] any more. Nevermind.

I think I'll do my business in person now. I'll just have to make sure the Russian Mafia doesn't set up a look-alike storefront [collisiondetection.net] down the street that looks like my bank's latest branch office.

Sigh.

Well, at least I know my currency is real [slate.com] .

Re:Time to go back to phone banking (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33137436)

Umm, using an ATM is not banking "in person" and a fake ATM is not a "look-alike storefront that looks like your banks latest branch office".

Re:Time to go back to phone banking (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33138040)

The nice grandparent poster referred to the fake ATM as an example of the kind of thing that the Russian Mafia does, and implied that they might set up a fake branch office next. I believe it was a humorous exaggeration.

No shit (1)

PPalmgren (1009823) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137332)

Really? Botnet used for financial gain, just like every other botnet in the past decade?

I'm flabbergasted!

Well my machine is safe (3, Funny)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137790)

I do all my banking at an internet cafe

Large? I'll show you large! (2, Insightful)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | more than 4 years ago | (#33137816)

Large Zeus Botnet Used For Financial Fraud

The botnet appears to be controlling more than 100,000 infected computers

Is that really large nowadays?

Oh no!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33139066)

Bankaccount details, ID details, I don't care about.
But even FTP passwords?

Eastern Europe (2, Funny)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | more than 4 years ago | (#33139894)

Given that virtually every botnet seems to originate in Eastern Europe, I can only assume that neck of the woods is now an endless tableau of McMansions, world-class prostitues, and Mercedes dealerships.

CUZ THAT IS ALL THEY KNOW TO DO (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33142406)

We are fucking scoundrels, thieves, and third-world scum of the earth. Donchano? We are EASTERN EUROPEONS! I surely take from you for it longs to be mine. Thank you for your support!

1996 called (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33143246)

they want their botnet ideas back.

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