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154 comments

Don't Give In! (5, Funny)

VoxMagis (1036530) | more than 3 years ago | (#33137978)

Damn it, we need to shoot back. Don't let the Sun see us flinch, make sure that we retaliate in kind!

I think we can time travel off of this but have no (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138172)

I think we can time travel off of this but have no to little control of how far.

Re:I think we can time travel off of this but have (2)

crakbone (860662) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138486)

We did travel but it was to the future at a rate of 1x normal

Oblig (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33138542)

http://xkcd.com/209/

Photo of Aurora consequent to CME (4, Interesting)

fyngyrz (762201) | more than 3 years ago | (#33139396)

Took this photo of the aurora [flickr.com] last night in the short window of full darkness before the moon came up.

There will be another shooting opportunity tonight, if the geomagnetic storm continues.

Re:I think we can time travel off of this but have (1)

Requiem18th (742389) | more than 3 years ago | (#33139158)

Which is great, the average English class travels at 0.2s/s

Re:I think we can time travel off of this but have (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33139252)

Sometimes I like to pretend my chair is a time machine. I'll spin around and around and say, "I'm traveling to the future!" And you know what, it usually works!

Re:I think we can time travel off of this but have (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33138774)

Pray for peace, prepare for war!

Re:I think we can time travel off of this but have (1)

snooo53 (663796) | more than 3 years ago | (#33139316)

From watching TV, you would think that time travel is almost always guaranteed take you to one of the iconic eras of the 20th century

Re:Don't Give In! (3, Funny)

ta bu shi da yu (687699) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138210)

I read this article without my glasses on. I was a bit disturbed that a conjugal mass erection hit the earth.

Re:Don't Give In! (4, Funny)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138240)

That's not very Christianly of you. What ever happened to "turn the other hemisphere"?

Re:Don't Give In! (4, Funny)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138582)

George W Chimpface says:

"Stars like Sol, Sirius, Canopus, and their terrorist allies, constitute an axis of evil, glowing to threaten the dark of the world. The United States will lead a coalition of the willing to blacken it!"

Re:Don't Give In! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33139108)

Only pay attention to civilian casualties, WikiLeaks is still there... Oh, wait... is it?

Seeing this headline in red... (0)

cormander (1273812) | more than 3 years ago | (#33137982)

...is really freaking me out

Ahh, that explains it. (2, Funny)

grub (11606) | more than 3 years ago | (#33137986)


I was wondering why my RealDoll with the motorized enhancements seemed extra frisky this morning.

.

Re:Ahh, that explains it. (1)

Spazztastic (814296) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138636)

I was wondering why my RealDoll with the motorized enhancements seemed extra frisky this morning. .

Can you please link that site for uh... research purposes?

Awesome. (5, Funny)

DWMorse (1816016) | more than 3 years ago | (#33137992)

Galactic porn. Very awesome. Earth was left glowing and satisfied.

Re:Awesome. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33139010)

LMAO! Yours is the funniest comment... :D

Re:Awesome. (1)

Lead Butthead (321013) | more than 3 years ago | (#33139206)

I would think been bukake'd by the sun was a humiliating experience.

Reminds me of a Star Trek: TNG episode... (3, Interesting)

ground.zero.612 (1563557) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138000)

where Dr. Crusher was commanding the Enterprise. She used Dr. Raega's (Farengi scientist) metaphasic shield to enter a star's corona with the Borg in persuit, and then fired the phasers at the star just below the Borg ship.

Moral of the story? Sucks get caught in a CME.

Re:Reminds me of a Star Trek: TNG episode... (1)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138060)

A CME happened in a Stargate Atlantis episode too.

http://gateworld.net/atlantis/s3/312.shtml [gateworld.net] . Useful info links right above the episode banner.

Re:Reminds me of a Star Trek: TNG episode... (5, Funny)

Itninja (937614) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138182)

My nerd detector just exploded.

Re:Reminds me of a Star Trek: TNG episode... (2, Funny)

Critical Facilities (850111) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138384)

You should have sprung for the extra money and gotten the model that's shielded against solar radiation.

Re:Reminds me of a Star Trek: TNG episode... (4, Funny)

SQLGuru (980662) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138398)

I hope you were wearing a condom.

Re:Reminds me of a Star Trek: TNG episode... (1)

Lead Butthead (321013) | more than 3 years ago | (#33139182)

I don't think condom comes in a size that would fit a sun.

Re:Reminds me of a Star Trek: TNG episode... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33138752)

Sucks get caught in a CME.

That's what she said!

Re:Reminds me of a Star Trek: TNG episode... (1)

kv9 (697238) | more than 3 years ago | (#33139330)

where Dr. Crusher was commanding the Enterprise.

she wasn't commanding the Enterprise in that episode, just the research team testing that shield thing. she commanded her own ship in the last episode (future) and the Enterprise when she was in another dimension with everyone else dissapearing around her. more adept TNG nerds feel free to correct me.

Induction Magnetometer (4, Informative)

lazarus (2879) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138012)

Monitor the results. [137.229.36.30]

Everyone STOP MOVING! (5, Funny)

Shanrak (1037504) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138020)

The sun just lost a contact.

Re:Everyone STOP MOVING! (1)

SemperUbi (673908) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138356)

+1 funny

Re:Everyone STOP MOVING! (1)

Spazztastic (814296) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138654)

+1 funny

Yeah I thought it was pretty funny too -- someone with mod points must hate Shanrak.

Thank goodness there's no damage (5, Insightful)

krzysz00 (1842280) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138042)

There are three bits of good news in that article.
  1. 1. There was no damage to electronics or satellites, so all of the /. community's geeky shiny is safe
  2. 2. There will be really impressive light displays (which I hope someone will post on YouTube
  3. 3. We are developing the ability to forecast "space weather", thus leading to a new field, astrometeorology

However, the bad news is that satellites might go if a bigger storm comes along.

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (2)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138142)

2. There will be really impressive light displays (which I hope someone will post on YouTube

And what you will do tomorrow with all the blind people and those strange plants chasing them on the street?

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (1)

Tim C (15259) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138184)

Think I'll head to the coast - maybe I'll be safe at the top of a lighthouse...

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (1)

Mister Whirly (964219) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138334)

When you start to hear the cheesy synth music, you know you are in trouble...

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (0)

ElectroPrime (1817866) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138168)

Umm, NASA didn't predict this - it was detected. How does that count as forecasting?

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (1)

kevinNCSU (1531307) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138260)

If NASA [discovery.com] didn't then Slashdot did [slashdot.org] . Another clue might be that same link in the summary along with the word 'predicted' if you bothered to read that far. I know the summary was a whopping 2 sentences and all, but really =P

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (1)

Combatso (1793216) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138408)

because you detect something, and then predict its path/effect... the same way we forecast everything... unless you actually think the weather man just spins a wheel.

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (1)

ElectroPrime (1817866) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138638)

That I know - I'm talking about the CME itself.

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33138854)

I don't think anyone is claiming to have predicted the CME... They detected it and then predicted that it would arrive at Earth at some time and cause a geomagnetic storm of some severity.

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33138502)

You know nothing of this event do you.

You could SEE the fricking sunspot on the sun. at sunrise you could see it with the naked eye. and if you know anything about sunspots you know that they WILL collapse and cause a CME.

You know absolutely nothing about astronomy, stop talking. It's making you look like either Glenn Beck or a Retard...

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (1)

saider (177166) | more than 3 years ago | (#33139408)

It's making you look like either Glenn Beck or a Retard

Rahm Emmanuel posts to slashdot!
Sarah Palin will reply below.

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (1)

Elektroschock (659467) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138174)

So when will the Messiah drop by and explain to us what all this means?

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (4, Funny)

nextekcarl (1402899) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138224)

Steve Jobs is busy with other matters right now, so it could be a while. /s

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33138476)

Still waiting for my bumpers so leave him alone!

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (2, Funny)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138524)

A friend of mine is a Mason and he said it's next wednesday at 4:35pm. Unfortunately the Holy Grail will not be available as it's currently in their vaults awaiting re-release after a hiatias to drum up more interest..

I guess the Aliens from area 51 stole the thunder out of seeing the holy grail, and a dumbass in the dayton Ohio Temple drank from it when they last had it and his head melted.

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (2, Funny)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 3 years ago | (#33139356)

Ah, the ol' "trick the new guy into drinking from the Grail" bit. "It'll make you immortal! We've all done it! *snicker*"

The Masons haven't been the same since they cracked down on Freshman hazing. :(

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138978)

I'm hear, sorry I'm late.
It means that everyone is to learn how to think rationally.

Also, give me your broads.

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (2, Informative)

CyberGrandad (1852572) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138250)

2. There will be really impressive light displays (which I hope someone will post on YouTube

No video (so far) but there are photos at spaceweather.com.

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33138364)

If there was some damage to satellites or the satellites malfunctioned somehow, what would stop the space lasers and missiles from hitting earth?

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (3, Interesting)

Combatso (1793216) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138378)

  1. 3. We are developing the ability to forecast "space weather", thus leading to a new field, astrometeorology

just cuz im in my nitpick mood, the origin of the word meteorology is already astronomical. It was believed that meteors were part of earths weather system. So I think this new field should be called meteorology, and the old field should be called Geoweatherology... or Global Warming

... oh yeah http://www.bigsiteofamazingfacts.com/why-is-the-study-of-weather-called-meteorology-and-where-did-the-term-come-from [bigsiteofa...gfacts.com]

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (1)

adavies42 (746183) | more than 3 years ago | (#33139442)

um, sort of. it's more accurate to say that "meteor" (in this sense meaning "bright streak in the sky") means "weather thing". so you've kind of got causality reversed there....

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (1)

Gilmoure (18428) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138440)

3. We are developing the ability to forecast "space weather", thus leading to a new field, astrometeorology

Aw, great, astrometeorologists, with bad hair pieces and stupid patter.

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33139022)

Aw, great, astrometeorologists, with bad hair pieces and stupid patter.

He smiles at the camera, then tells a little joke
He always says it's sunny if the telestrator's broke
Thinks clouds are made of cotton and are blown up to the sky,
But he's got a steady income as a TV weather guy

"They say I'm not qualified to be on the TV
Don't know Fahrenheit from Celsius so I just say 'degrees'
I just read the temperature and make up a bunch of lies
and end up being right more than the guy on channel 5."

-- Arrogant Worms

The good and the bad (5, Informative)

dtmos (447842) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138462)

The additional bit of good news (if you're a VHF amateur radio operator, or FM or TV broadcast DXer) is that there should be interesting propagation of VHF radio signals [wikipedia.org] refracting off of the aurora [wikipedia.org] , perhaps as far as 2000 km. The bad news is that the same ionization that refracts the VHF signals attenuates HF signals, so if you're an HF amateur radio operator or short-wave listener, the paths over the poles will be closed for a few days.

I guess the additional bad news if you're a VHF broadcaster (FM or over-the-air TV) is that you can expect a lot of calls from the public complaining about poor reception, as signals from far away interfere with yours. :-/

Re:The good and the bad (2, Informative)

s122604 (1018036) | more than 3 years ago | (#33139276)

It looks like 10 meters is actually doing well, maybe even better than before the event, but that might just be sporadic E, I dunno

I've always loved the top end of the HF spectrum 10 meters, and the 11 meter "freeband", sometimes it acts like VHF, sometimes HF, sometimes both.

On a side note, how ashamed should I be to say I have a "favorite" portion of the spectrum?

Re:The good and the bad (1)

filthpickle (1199927) | more than 3 years ago | (#33139386)

I don't know if this is related, just pointing it out in case. I listen to an AM radio station on the rare occasion that I drive to work...I drove today because it is outlandishly hot here today....that station was just crazy noises. This station is always the first one I lose when I drive out of town...guessing it is related.

There was some damage here... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33138584)

We lost a pair of SNE2000 SDSL ethernet extenders (bridges that use a plain dry copper twisted pair, in our case for several thousand feet between two buildings) when the geomagnetic storm first hit. The devices at both ends failed (DSP chip burnout) exactly simultaneously.

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138640)

...We are developing the ability to forecast "space weather", thus leading to a new field, astrometeorology...

Does this mean we've finally given up on trying to forecast earth weather? Time to start up the The Old Atronaut's Almanac [almanac.com]

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138662)

Sorry folks... I'm suffering Slashdot's Editor Syndrome..

Re:Thank goodness there's no damage (1)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138870)

Drat, and here I was thinking that I could add this perfectly legitimate scenario to my BOFH excuse list.

And the point of this article is? (1)

cygnwolf (601176) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138052)

Nothing but a follow up story about the relatively insignificant portion of a story that really should have been about the hardware recording it and not the event itself? http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=10/08/02/2028228 [slashdot.org]

The last time there was a... (4, Funny)

hbean (144582) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138082)

...mass ejection of corona like this, it was spring break in Cancun.

Re:The last time there was a... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33138302)

...mass ejection of corona like this, it was spring break in Cancun.

and as a result of that, later on in hotels rooms across the area there was a mass ejaculation of semen.

EMP? (1)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138100)

Could something like this have the same effect on electronics as an EMP?

Imagine the chaos if all the microprocessors on the planet burned out at once. Or just in one hemisphere.

Re:EMP? (4, Informative)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138198)

Could something like this have the same effect on electronics as an EMP?

Imagine the chaos if all the microprocessors on the planet burned out at once. Or just in one hemisphere.

On the surface, not so much - the magnetosphere funnels those charged particles to the magnetic poles, where they interact with the atmosphere and create the stunning light shows we call auroras. That said, they can induce currents to flow, especially in long lines (think power lines) which can cause circuit breakers to trip, cutting off the grid and causing power outages.

In space, they cause lots of havoc with satellites - ranging from simple loss of communication (moving charged particles generate EM radiation, after all - same ones that cause power outages mentioned above), to complete destruction if it burns out some control circuits. So not only are the electronics rad-hard, but there are shut down protocols to temporarily turn satellites "off" to prevent damage. A dead satellite is a huge cloud of space junk waiting to happen, after all, especially if you can't deorbit it.

Of course, the magnetosphere is supposed to be weakening in time for a supposed pole reversal, in which case life will get pretty interesting.

This CME didn't result in any damage to satellites, though. Not sure if there weren't other effects (power outages, notable) caused, though.

But there were neutrinos in it! (1)

SlappyBastard (961143) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138120)

Didn't any of you watch 2012?! We're doomed! Neutrinos! Just wait. This is only the beginning.

Re:But there were neutrinos in it! (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138204)

Just rotate the shields frequency.

What do you mean, Earth has no shields? There's a planetary shields manufacturer in Alpha Centauri.

What do you mean you’ve never been to Alpha Centauri? Oh, for heavens sake mankind, it’s only four light years away, you know.

How about the highlander II one? (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138338)

How about the highlander II one?

Re:How about the highlander II one? (1)

witherstaff (713820) | more than 3 years ago | (#33139394)

How about the highlander II?

Highlander 2? That can't exist as there can be only one

Re:But there were neutrinos in it! (1)

h4rm0ny (722443) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138212)


I don't think anybody watched 2012!

(Bit I did enjoy the trailer [youtube.com] ).

Re:But there were neutrinos in it! (1)

arkane1234 (457605) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138898)

Unfortunately I did... On dvd, not in the theatre.
It was completely in the face of logic and common sense and hurt to watch scientifically.
It was a good special effects bang-boom movie, though.
Scary thing is, some people watched it and thought it was a documentary...

Hey Oli, what's the weather outlook? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33138152)

SPACE WEATHER!!!

Re:Hey Oli, what's the weather outlook? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33138902)

AT THE WRONG SOLAR SYSTEM!!!

Timings (0)

Necroloth (1512791) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138190)

the vast magnetic bubble of solar plasma arrived on schedule

I wish my post did the same :*(

Re:Timings (0, Offtopic)

Necroloth (1512791) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138526)

lol@overrated mod... it wasn't even rated in the first place.

Re:Timings (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138668)

lol@overrated mod... it wasn't even rated in the first place.

Yes it was. It wasn't moderated yet, but it was rated (it had a score).

We know it's started, but when will it finish? (2)

davrob60 (1689994) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138254)

In other word, does I have better chances to spot an northern light tonight? or tomorrow? or this weekend?

Re:We know it's started, but when will it finish? (1)

arkane1234 (457605) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138788)

Only one way to find out.. Look up :)

Re:We know it's started, but when will it finish? (1)

davrob60 (1689994) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138984)

It's pretty cloudy right now and I'm wondering if it will be finished when the sky clear.

Ok, who fed the sun mexican? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33138288)

That was some burp!

Take that, Oracle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33138310)

n/t

Lame (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138424)

It was stormy here last night. The only lights in the sky were lightning.

Re:Lame (1)

arkane1234 (457605) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138836)

No it wasn't, that was a couple days ago.

I watched Flash Gordon last night (0, Offtopic)

tiedyejeremy (559815) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138468)

I watched Flash Gordon last night and obviously missed all the excitement, thinking the BluRay had been redone REALLY well.

Re:I watched Flash Gordon last night (1)

pnutjam (523990) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138822)

He saved every one of us!

Re:I watched Flash Gordon last night (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#33139002)

The unprecedented solar eclipse is no cause for alarm.

Re:I watched Flash Gordon last night (1)

tiedyejeremy (559815) | more than 3 years ago | (#33139210)

HOT HAIL!

So... (1)

Finerva (1822374) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138596)

the sun farted...?

Anyone know how low they got? (1)

rift321 (1358397) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138682)

I'd like to know how low in latitude the Auroras reached - I'm around 44degrees north, and after seeing them once before, I'd travel quite a distance to view them, as long as I can make it to work tomorrow...

Damned weather systems are making things difficult, though.

Also, I'm interested in how high the Kp index needs to be for Auroras to be highly visible at my latitude. I went to school in Potsdam, NY, and was lucky enough to see a spectacular display right overhead one late fall night during finals week... spectacular enough for me to lose even more sleep while crunching for a final exam.

Re:Anyone know how low they got? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33139164)

Try, find an answers in hidden comments. Seems ordinary people posts isn't visible by default. So, community shrinks to the scored ones in the past. For weather anomalies it's a wrong strategy. Let's say: weather anomalies video could be recorded by anobody. Not just ones who are better scored...

Computer Crashes (2, Informative)

SirBitBucket (1292924) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138696)

I had 5 of 25 machines crash last night. Could this be related? (Yes, I am serious...)

Re:Computer Crashes (1)

arkane1234 (457605) | more than 3 years ago | (#33138806)

Sure, why not.
The next time there's a coronal mass ejection, power them all down and wait in the data center until the emergency radio says it's over.

Re:Computer Crashes (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#33139018)

No. Sorry, but you can't blame you low grade administration skills on this, nice try~

A little late... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33138844)

Wish this would have been posted BEFORE the aurora. I guess it wasnt visible in north America but who knew?

Last night... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33138886)

... your was hit by a "coronal" mass ejection (CME) from my wang. Resulting in temporary blindness and some stinging. Scientists predict I'll be back at full capacity by this evening.

video of Yesterday's Northern Lights in Latvia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33138970)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eW9uEwtWUs0

  I've posted it under nickname, but seems to be no one can see it. As far as under nickname there is score 0.
It's better to stay anonymous coward in order to get noticed, than log in into slasdot. Is it supposed to work this way ?

Yo (2, Funny)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#33139286)

He who smelt it, dealt it.

Signed,

Sol

This agression will not stand! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33139368)

We will not be intimidated!

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