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Tech Specs Leaked For French Spyware

CmdrTaco posted about 4 years ago | from the i-see-what-you-did-there dept.

Privacy 212

An anonymous reader writes "With the 'three strikes' law now in effect in France, the organization tasked with implementing it, Hadopi, has been working on technology specs for making the process work — and those specs have now leaked. It appears to involve client-side monitoring and controlling software, that would try to watch what you were doing online, and even warn you before you used any P2P protocol (must make Skype phone calls fun). It's hard to believe people will accept this kind of thing being installed on their computers, so I can't wait to see how Hadopi moves forward with it. It also appears to violate EU rules on privacy."

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Butt (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151080)

Butt. *fart* *poop* *queef* CmdrTaco has a tiny penis.

Re:Butt (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151252)

It is so tiny that it is usually referred to as a micropenis.

Re:Butt (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151688)

How do you know? Did you look?

Re:Butt (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33152212)

Yes. I see him at the local glory hole at least 4 nights a week.

Not to worry (5, Insightful)

elrous0 (869638) | about 4 years ago | (#33151094)

The government pinky-promised that they won't use this for anything other than enforcing this law. And you have their *word* on that.

Re:Not to worry (4, Insightful)

mlts (1038732) | about 4 years ago | (#33151180)

Just wait until the blackhats get ahold of this and change the phone home site from the standard to the blackhat's servers. Voila, instant botnet that is illegal for a French citizen to remove. I'm sure the guys on Elbonia are just drooling over that they can do once they can poison an ISP's DNS to get command/control access to the machines.

Re:Not to worry (2, Insightful)

HungryHobo (1314109) | about 4 years ago | (#33151350)

The internet seems to be going down the shitter now that all the politicians kids are using it and those in power have started thinking internet==facebook.

So what's the next communication medium that the government has so little understanding of that they don't even think about regulating it?

Darknets are halfway there but they'll probably be outlawed in a few years.

Re:Not to worry (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151352)

Your sarcasm sadly hides the real problem: The laws themselves are so abusive, they'd be hard pressed to find a use outside of law enforcement that would actually be any worse.

Re:Not to worry (1)

AnonymousClown (1788472) | about 4 years ago | (#33151360)

No worries. All you have to do is just install some anti-spyware programs - no need to run it - and the French spyware will just uninstall itself.

Re:Not to worry (5, Funny)

gandhi_2 (1108023) | about 4 years ago | (#33151402)

Liberté, égalité, fraternité, and pervasivé monitoré.

Re:Not to worry (2, Interesting)

jittles (1613415) | about 4 years ago | (#33151568)

No of course not! They'll pay a 3rd party to collect all the juicy data and then they'll buy it back from them! Therefore THEY didn't use the data for anything other than enforcing the law.

Who does (-1, Offtopic)

conares (1045290) | about 4 years ago | (#33151102)

It's hard to believe people will accept this kind of thing being installed on their computers,

that remind me of WW2 and germans? Weird...

Re:Who does (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151330)

Godwined in two posts, within 3 minutes of submission, not too bad. Extra points for the fact that the comparison doesn't make even the slightest bit of sense.

Re:Who does (1)

hbush (130363) | about 4 years ago | (#33151386)

Oh no, it's typical KGB of worst Soviet times. 3-rd Reich wasn't so advanced technically . In fact this is worse than KGB.

And yes, I did live in Soviet Union when it was still strong. I know about KGB.

Woot (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151110)

Oh, nice! Can I have the Linux version?

Re:Woot (5, Insightful)

kipd (1593207) | about 4 years ago | (#33151176)

They came first for the Windows-users, and I didn't speak up because I didn't use Windows...

Re:Woot (-1, Redundant)

kipd (1593207) | about 4 years ago | (#33151202)

They came first for the windows-users, and I didn't speak up, for I didn't use Windows...

Re:Woot (1)

Bearhouse (1034238) | about 4 years ago | (#33151228)

I'm (sadly) sure that they're working on it...

Not so sure they need to have client-side stuff, tho', deep packet inspection techniques seem to have evolved enough for people to see what you're downloading; torrenting a distro, OK, a film not.
Wonder if they can automate this (identifying 'illegal' content)? Otherwise would seem to be difficult to massively deploy...

Re:Woot (1)

John Hasler (414242) | about 4 years ago | (#33152196)

> Wonder if they can automate this (identifying 'illegal' content)?

Of course. Anything not identified by an authorized publisher as legal is illegal.

Re:Woot (1)

darkvad0r (1331303) | about 4 years ago | (#33151250)

Yes you can : the tech specs say that the software should be open source and work on any OS

Re:Woot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33152222)

Great, I use QNX.

Re:Woot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151296)

What about a version for my phone?

Re:Woot (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151332)

Oh, nice! Can I have the Linux version?

No, Linux is now illegal because it can't be monitored by this software.

Re:Woot (1)

lcarnevale (1691570) | about 4 years ago | (#33151424)

Where can I download the source so I can compile it with x64 and QT support ?

Re:Woot (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151434)

This is for France... but of course they will insist on using Wine.

Re:Woot (2, Insightful)

cpghost (719344) | about 4 years ago | (#33151522)

Which one do you prefer? qt-hadopi, gtk-hadopi, ... or just that plain old fashioned nvidia/ati binary blob driver for your graphics adapter?

Re:Woot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151620)

While you're at it, can you get a FreeBSD port? What about Plan9? No? Okay, maybe for Haiku?

This is going to be laughably unenforceable.

Re:Woot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151720)

And make mine the 64-bit version, please.

Re:Woot (1)

Wowsers (1151731) | about 4 years ago | (#33151822)

Perhaps only in Mandriva?

Re:Woot (-1, Redundant)

kipd (1593207) | about 4 years ago | (#33151900)

First they came for the Windows-users, but I didn't speak up, for I didn't use Windows...

Re:Woot (1)

Albanach (527650) | about 4 years ago | (#33151936)

Preferably open sourced.

Re:Woot (1)

Abstrackt (609015) | about 4 years ago | (#33152022)

Oh, nice! Can I have the Linux version?

Who knows, it might run on Wine.

Re:Woot (1)

jvillain (546827) | about 4 years ago | (#33152038)

I'm sure you meant there won't be a Linux version meaning Linux will be made illegal or Linux will become the most popular OS because you are free. I give it less than 6 months before they are talking DPI instead.

Re:Woot (1)

davester666 (731373) | about 4 years ago | (#33152060)

Sure. The Linux version just reformats your HD and installs Windows 7 on it, which then prompts you to enter your credit card number to by a license for it.

Good luck with that (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151116)

What are they going to do? Fucking outlaw Mac OS X, Linux and all the other non-Microsoft operating systems?

Funny fact: in french it's called système d'exploitation. Maybe that's why they want such software. To exploit you and your computer.

Re:Good luck with that (2, Funny)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 4 years ago | (#33151472)

Maybe this is just a clever, french way to kill off Windows usage in France.

Re:Good luck with that (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151798)

this is going to be funny to watch!

didn't the Chinese try something similar with Green Dam?

how many people will pirate windows just to run th (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | about 4 years ago | (#33152044)

how many people will pirate windows just to run this?

Re:Good luck with that (1)

Hatta (162192) | about 4 years ago | (#33152086)

What are they going to do? Fucking outlaw Mac OS X, Linux and all the other non-Microsoft operating systems?

Yes, probably. Why wouldn't they?

Microsoft doesn't do that? (1)

h00manist (800926) | about 4 years ago | (#33151168)

Doesn't Windows have built-in monitoring, or are non-US government entities not allowable parties to contract services for it?

Government mandated spyware. (1)

Kylock (608369) | about 4 years ago | (#33151198)

Basically, it's your everyday snooping software, that will monitor all internet traffic, including searching through files on your computer, and checking the router configuration

This is enforced by a representative government?

Seriously?

FrenchGeek (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151204)

Can't wait to see the French Gov. forcing me to install this kind of software on my computer.
VPN is still safe for now I guess ...

They will have to enforce this law on any computer entering the country, I can see lines forming at the customs where a Gov official will install something on tourists computers.

The French government has better things to do than trying to regulate the internet...

Hadopi will fail because it is already obsolete, what a fucking good way to waste tax payers money...

Odd. If it's law, should be done at the ISP (1)

h00manist (800926) | about 4 years ago | (#33151208)

I don't see why they don't just put in some sort of sniffer at ISP switches. Like the Carnivore/Omnivore things.

Re:Odd. If it's law, should be done at the ISP (1)

John Hasler (414242) | about 4 years ago | (#33152168)

> I don't see why they don't just put in some sort of sniffer at ISP switches.

I'm sure they already have that, but it's reserved for more important uses.

nods (1)

jDeepbeep (913892) | about 4 years ago | (#33152174)

Exactly. It's got to be much less of a PITA to get the ISPs to roll over for them instead of deploying known snoopware client-side.

how could they! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151212)

""It's hard to believe people will accept this kind of thing being installed on their computers""

its the french, when was the last time they fought against anything

P2P isn't illegal (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151216)

The act of using peer to peer software isn't illegal. Downloading content with peer to peer software isn't illegal. Downloading copyrighted content with *ANY* software will infringe someones copyright. Driving cars should be as illegal as using p2p software, since both can be abused! Cars are still on the road though. Pedestrians are killed and cars are still on the road. P2P is used to distribute software (some of it legal, some of it illegal), lets quit throwing out the baby with the bathwater.

I have no problem with French Spyware (3, Funny)

AnonymousClown (1788472) | about 4 years ago | (#33151218)

All of have to do just install anti-spyware software - no need to even run it - and the French spyware immediately uninstalls itself without me having to do anything.

Skype calls (1)

blueg3 (192743) | about 4 years ago | (#33151226)

Yes, I'm sure the software magically divines whether or not an arbitrary communication channel is being used for a peer-to-peer or client-server protocol. Maybe it uses an oracle to determine what protocol is being used on the channel and consults Wikipedia automatically to determine whether or not it's peer-to-peer.

Or just maybe the software detects a collection of known protocols, and Skype calls would only generate a warning if Skype was intentionally targeted by the software. In this case, you're just equivocating on the definition of "peer-to-peer".

Spread (1)

parse.here (1791910) | about 4 years ago | (#33151242)

How will this spyware-like software be disseminated? or done successfully? I see a lot of road bumps with just the pure nature of the software along this path. Let alone questioning the privacy breach and ethics of this software.

They'll be prying my pristine Linux install... (2, Funny)

stevegee58 (1179505) | about 4 years ago | (#33151248)

...from my cold, dead fingers.

So how Naive are the French? (2, Insightful)

Dyinobal (1427207) | about 4 years ago | (#33151258)

Looking over the spec I can't honestly think that the French are dumb enough to think something like this could work, the scope is to broad, and software solutions are silly easy to bypass.

Thanks Numerama, and their source. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151262)

And we (well, the other Frenchie around here and me) (oh, come on, there has to be one) can all thanks Numerama, and their source, for the leak. The funny thing is that the document is specified to be subject to "public consultation", but the Hadopi fordade everyone to distribute it. Well, too bad for them, there are some French laws about the right to be informed, and the availability of documents.

Reminiscent of Green Dam... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151276)

That didn't even work in China, did it?

client-side enforcement is stupid (4, Insightful)

bugs2squash (1132591) | about 4 years ago | (#33151300)

The whole suggestion of enforcing this client-side is so idiotic that I'm inclined to believe that there will be ISP-side enforcement and that in fact the client is only there to warn the user.

And the software will be platform agnostic (1)

grebonoj (890593) | about 4 years ago | (#33151322)

working on all flavors of Linux, Windows, OSX, iOS, Android, etc. And of course it will not be a vector for malware. And of course it will not interfere with any operations except illicit ones, nor impact performance. Didn't China try this??

anyone with link... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151328)

for the spec? thanks!

Like having your mom in the room (2, Funny)

Drakkenmensch (1255800) | about 4 years ago | (#33151364)

Except my mom is more open and understanding about the porn.

what were they thinking? (1)

MonoSynth (323007) | about 4 years ago | (#33151368)

Why did they develop a solution that has to be installed on the part of the infrastructure they have the least control of and that has the biggest diversity?

How will they roll this out? Forced install? For every OS? Including the OS on my media box with its crappy bittorrent client? And since the software physically runs inside the homes of people, that could open up a ton of legal troubles. What's so hard about making a law that forces ISP's to install monitoring software?

Somehow I'm happy that this seems to be a typical govenment IT-f#ckup.

Re:what were they thinking? (1)

John Hasler (414242) | about 4 years ago | (#33152268)

> What's so hard about making a law that forces ISP's to install monitoring software?

I expect that is what they are going to do: make a law that forces ISPs to install monitoring software on their customer's machines.

The power and influence of the copyright industry (1)

erroneus (253617) | about 4 years ago | (#33151388)

Wow. This is just sensational. It seems unworkable and may even result in some interesting legal responses from users and businesses when that software is blamed for system instability and data loss. My guess is that this software won't be required until after the first or second strike... yeah, I can't read the full referenced links... one is slashdotted already and the other is scant on details. Otherwise, I would guess that if they hope for any of this to work, they would make a tiny router/bridge box thing that would be required in order to access the internet. Pop-up messages warning of P2P usage sounds like software on the client side though.

This is pretty far beyond ridiculous and only goes to show how incredibly influential the copyright industry is... and all this ultimately paid for by the same people who are being punished.

If it weren't for the fact that the rest of the media industry already has a strong stake in these sorts of actions going forward, we might be able to create some sort of global public awareness program.

Well, I live here (1)

CrashandDie (1114135) | about 4 years ago | (#33151394)

And I sure as hell won't allow them to install any of that stuff here.

What are they going to do if I refuse? Throw me in jail? Fine me? We'll see how far this "land of the human rights" will take this farce.

To quote Mass Hysteria "Liberté, égalité, fraternité. Trois mensonges dans une phrase, ça fait quand même un peu pitié."

hypothetical situation (1)

chichilalescu (1647065) | about 4 years ago | (#33151400)

I get a phone from the Netherlands, where there are no problems with downloads. I connect to the internet through this phone, while in France (I assume it costs a lot, but whatever). What laws am I supposed to obey?

It'll Pass. Flawlessly. (1)

Maarx (1794262) | about 4 years ago | (#33151448)

As always, 98% of people won't have a clue what it does or how it works, and will install it because someone tells them to.

After that, it's wide acceptance will be cited as a justification for it's existence.

Jeez. Sounds like a certain operating system I know.

the law is a ass (1)

slick7 (1703596) | about 4 years ago | (#33151462)

Does this count as strike one because the Frogs thought they could get away with it,
or does it count as strike two because they thought they could get away with it and got caught,
or does it constitute strike three because they thought they could get away with it, got caught, and were dumb enough to think such a lame idea would work?

Client side? Good luck. (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 4 years ago | (#33151474)

So, the whole thing depends on forcing everybody to install spyware on their machine which will monitor their activity and report on it?

From a security stand point,it's obviously going to be doing much of the same stuff as malware; and from getting people to actually install this, I just can't see this working at all, who is going to voluntarily install this crap?

What happen when someone refuses to install this, or, the operating system they run does support it? Will they outlaw Linux? This is why you can't force a solution to this kind of thing.

I don't think they have a hope in hell of making this actually work. People aren't going to voluntarily install it, and they're not going to be able to jam it into every operating system without fundamentally destroying privacy and security. This sounds like the Sony rootkit, but on a national scale.

I can see it now -- any form of general computing device not running OS designed, built, and vetted by the copyright holders will be outlawed. Good luck with that.

Better oil them guillotines up! (1)

KlomDark (6370) | about 4 years ago | (#33151482)

Like in the days of yore, you French had better consider using this against the politicians again before they trap you worse than last time. You did good last time. Time to put the fear of the people back in your leaders, they have apparently forgotten their lesson.

Easy... (1)

Psychophrenes (1600027) | about 4 years ago | (#33151490)

It's hard to believe people will accept this kind of thing being installed on their computers, so I can't wait to see how Hadopi moves forward with it.

Easy! If you don't comply, they'll pretend you're not french [google.com] .
The best thing is, by the time this crap makes it to users' computers (if it ever does), most downloaders will have moved on to non-P2P systems.
So this thing will only bother legal P2P users, nice...

Sarkozy is the pawn of the media elite in France (1)

rsborg (111459) | about 4 years ago | (#33151506)

It's clear this is a SNEP (RIAA equivalent in France) move to "bolster" the music export business (France is a big music/media exporter along with India and USA), and dovetails nicely with the plans of Président Sarkozy (previously Minister of the Interior, in effect head of national security) to make France even more of a nanny and police state.

So much for liberté... we still have egalité and fraternité (until further notice)

Modem/routeurs deathtrap in France (5, Informative)

McTickles (1812316) | about 4 years ago | (#33151520)

In France your ISP (well 99% of them) provide you with a preconfigured modem/routeur that they call a "box". This box handles IPTV and VoIP too. IPTV and VoIP depends on specs often known only to the ISP and therefore it is hard to find a compatible modem/routeur of your own, forcing you to use the ISP's if you want to use VoIP and IPTV (which is actually forced upon you as part of most ISP's basic package, it is difficult to get a truly IP-only connection here for a reasonable price, IP+VoIP+IPTV is actually cheaper than just IP) The long term plan is for all ISPs to agree on some basic standards for their "box" and the filtering software/spyware would be implemented on the "box" thus making it "unavoidable". Most people won't notice (don't get me started on how completely technically illiterate people are even allowed to connect to the network) the firmware update (they already don't as it is and most rely on basic out of the box settings) and blacklist updates and so on. Thank you ISPs who catter to technical morons and thanks to the french government for basically planning to introduce a mandatory in-your-home wiretap for everyone, guilty or not.

Deplyoment? (1)

W3bbo (727049) | about 4 years ago | (#33151530)

Forgive my ignorance (hey, I'm not French), but can someone explain how this works? If it's client-side monitoring software then it means users have to install it themselves, the government cannot force people to use this. Is it just a utility program that companies can deploy on to their own computers as a means of auditing their own computers? If so, that's perfectly fine and no different to software from the BSA and others that audits product keys. We need more information.

the law is a ass (1)

slick7 (1703596) | about 4 years ago | (#33151534)

Does this count as strike one because the French (I fart in your general direction) thought they could get away with it,
or does this count as strike two because they thought they could get away with it and got caught,
or does it count as strike three because they thought they could nget away with it, got caught, and were lame enough to think that it would work?

Cache (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151544)

Just me or did the specs get slashdotted already?

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:t0jSKjZTm2wJ:www.iptegrity.com/index.php%3Foption%3Dcom_content%26task%3Dview%26id%3D552%26Itemid%3D9

Google being useful.

Re:Cache (1)

chichilalescu (1647065) | about 4 years ago | (#33152280)

as far as I can tell, slashdot got slashdotted too around now. maybe it's the pesky kids [theatlantic.com] from before? (yes, it's offtopic)

any issues RTFA? (1)

CubicleView (910143) | about 4 years ago | (#33151552)

Just mail Andrew

Chinese (1)

SolidAltar (1268608) | about 4 years ago | (#33151590)

Looks like Green Dam found another source of funding!

cached (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151592)

It's getting slashdot'd so here's the Google cache: link [googleusercontent.com]

Pandoras box (0, Redundant)

McTickles (1812316) | about 4 years ago | (#33151594)

In France your ISP (well 99% of them) provide you with a preconfigured modem/routeur that they call a "box". This box handles IPTV and VoIP too. IPTV and VoIP depends on specs often known only to the ISP and therefore it is hard to find a compatible modem/routeur of your own, forcing you to use the ISP's if you want to use VoIP and IPTV (which is actually forced upon you as part of most ISP's basic package, it is difficult to get a truly IP-only connection here for a reasonable price, IP+VoIP+IPTV is actually cheaper than just IP) The long term plan is for all ISPs to agree on some basic standards for their "box" and the filtering software/spyware would be implemented on the "box" thus making it "unavoidable". Most people won't notice (don't get me started on how completely technically illiterate people are even allowed to connect to the network) the firmware update (they already don't as it is and most rely on basic out of the box settings) and blacklist updates and so on. Thank you ISPs who catter to technical morons and thanks to the french government for basically planning to introduce a mandatory in-your-home wiretap for everyone, guilty or not.

Group reversed engineered HADOPI software (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151600)

Here: http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/2010/Jun/346

A group reversed engineered the software and wrote up a small review/paper on it. Apparently, it's easily hacked, buggy and has one hell of a weak link for being a botnet.

Removing the software is easy (4, Funny)

riskeetee (1039912) | about 4 years ago | (#33151630)

It surrenders itself immediately!

How to get it onto user PCs (1)

klingens (147173) | about 4 years ago | (#33151654)

It's hard to believe people will accept this kind of thing being installed on their computers, so I can't wait to see how Hadopi moves forward with it.

Easy: when HADOPI detects the first P2P usage via their network sniffing, they don't just send a letter, but also mandate that the user installs said spyware.
Of course hilarity ensues if the user uses Linux or OSX or Android or whatever.

Typical (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151656)

Typical method from the current french government : make a lot of noise about some new superlaw, make the law a few month mater, get blocked because it's against the constitution, well everybody forgot about it already.

Carambar (I'm too lazy to create an account right now)

Malware by any other name... (1)

noidentity (188756) | about 4 years ago | (#33151672)

Malware is malware, no matter who wrote it or what they name it.

Windows only in France? (1)

shogun (657) | about 4 years ago | (#33151676)

Will this run on an iPhone or will they have to jailbreak it for me to run it?

Just do away with the Internet already! (1)

linebackn (131821) | about 4 years ago | (#33151692)

You know, with all of this filtering and monitoring and restricting going on that those in charge seem to want, I've got a better idea: Just outlaw and unplug the entire freaking Internet. That's the way things seem to be going anyway.

[Ploinks cable from the wall]

NO CARRIER

Where would this run? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151708)

Would this software run on the computers of convicted file sharers? Chez ISPs? On everyone's computers?!

What only a windows version? (0, Redundant)

shogun (657) | about 4 years ago | (#33151758)

Is there an iPhone version and/or will they jailbreak it for me to get it running?

And how long (1)

esocid (946821) | about 4 years ago | (#33151786)

Until someone finds GPL code in it?

Hadopi (which, we should remind you, was caught infringing itself in using a font it did not license for its logo)

Joking aside, why not just make a federal sysadmin to block users from doing anything useful with their computers?

Tor/Freenet (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151792)

fight back.

setup Tor Relays (http://torproject.org) and Freenet nodes (http://freenetproject.org). Now, if someone would only write a worm that auto-created Tor Exit Nodes....

And how long until (0, Redundant)

esocid (946821) | about 4 years ago | (#33151830)

Someone finds GPL code in it?

Hadopi (which, we should remind you, was caught infringing itself in using a font it did not license for its logo)

Joking aside, why not just make a federal sysadmin to prevent people from doing anything useful with their computers?

As long as it works on FreeBSD... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33151906)

Since FreeBSD is my desktop, I'll have no problems

awesome (1)

Lord Ender (156273) | about 4 years ago | (#33151938)

Spoof this thing so that it only reports what you want it to report, and you'll have deniability in case they ever come after you for something. If it goes to court the prosecution will look like clueless idiots as they try to reconcile mismatched data.

We Joke, but... (3, Insightful)

carp3_noct3m (1185697) | about 4 years ago | (#33152004)

You know we around /. like to joke about things like encryption and the year of the linux desktop, but the more intrusive governments get, the more I see the internet as a whole routing around this damage and increasing both the use of *nix based systems and encryption. Imagine facebook levels of popularity but with encryption, privacy, and control as primary factors of computing for the masses. Because, in the end, its either that or we might as well just start walking around naked because we have "nothing to hide".

ISPs? (1)

jDeepbeep (913892) | about 4 years ago | (#33152100)

Wouldn't they have better luck getting the french ISPs to roll over for them instead of deploying known snoopware client-side?

What happens if you don't install it? (1)

harl (84412) | about 4 years ago | (#33152104)

To point out the obvious flaw here:

If it's client side how are they going to get it installed? Keep it installed?

Even if they mandate that all computers sold must have it preinstalled it won't matter. It's trivial to remove.; just reinstall the OS. What about people who build their own? People who buy in other countries? People who run other operating systems?

This is just nonsensical. It can't possibly work. I can't believe no one pointed out that the emperor has no clothes.

We make fun, but (1)

carp3_noct3m (1185697) | about 4 years ago | (#33152114)

There are two outcomes (long term) that I see for the internet and computing for the masses. Those are, wither we basically give up all control, and walk around figuratively naked, or we, the geeks, must actively start promoting things such as encryption and OSS (*nix) as a standard for even non geeks. Imagine facebook level popularity of encryption, privacy, and control of computing systems. The catch is that as the geeks started the internet, politicians like to think they own it (or their portions of it). We must fight back! The internet will route around any damage.

What? (1)

Balinares (316703) | about 4 years ago | (#33152190)

Uh, I thought they'd given up on that idea when it turned out to be absurdly impractical? (Their idea was that you could opt to install some magic software, whose purpose would be to 'prove' your innocence if wrongly accused of piracy. How that was supposed to work out was never clarified.)

Did they change their minds again? Just how old are the specs in question? Anyone?

Where's the hacked version? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33152198)

It'd be fun to see the hacked version of this that you can program it to "surf" for you and report that back to Hadopi while you freely download all your warez and mp3's and movies to your heart's desire.

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