×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Polar Flares To Be Visible Tonight

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the shiny-happy-colors dept.

Space 88

ideaMUX writes "NASA's solar dynamics observatory recently detected an M-class flare hurling a coronal mass ejection (CME) into space. The CME is not fully directed toward Earth, but some of the plasma cloud may be visible in the magnetosphere tonight, causing a geomagnetic disturbance and possible aurora. NASA said M-class flares are medium-sized, and can cause brief radio blackouts that affect Earth's Polar regions. Minor radiation storms sometimes follow M-class flares."

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

88 comments

"Polar Flares"? (2, Informative)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 3 years ago | (#33209644)

That's an original, I think.

Re:"Polar Flares"? (1)

Megor1 (621918) | more than 3 years ago | (#33209676)

I'm not to sure about this website it says: "The cloud may also *casue* geomagnetic disturbances." and the title of the website has the word Tsunami in it?

From all residents outside the [ant]arctic circle (2, Insightful)

ThunderThor53 (836847) | more than 3 years ago | (#33209680)

Thank you Slashdot.

Sincerely,

All your readers outside of polar areas that won't be able to see anything anyway.

Re:From all residents outside the [ant]arctic circ (4, Informative)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 3 years ago | (#33209718)

That's not quite right for this event.

Here [alaska.edu]'s a forecast for tonight's event, it's possible that anyone north of about 55 degrees in North America will get a glimmer.

True, that leaves most of us SOL. But that's why CME events are special -- people who can't normally see the aurora borealis get a chance to view it.

Re:From all residents outside the [ant]arctic circ (1)

blackraven14250 (902843) | more than 3 years ago | (#33210042)

That's not quite right for this event. Here [alaska.edu]'s a forecast for tonight's event, it's possible that anyone north of about 55 degrees in North America will get a glimmer. True, that leaves most of us SOL. But that's why CME events are special -- people who can't normally see the aurora borealis get a chance to view it.

The only people in the US that will be able to see it live in Alaska - likely an extremely insignificant portion of the /. crowd.

Re:From all residents outside the [ant]arctic circ (1)

CarpetShark (865376) | more than 3 years ago | (#33210338)

an extremely insignificant portion of the /. crowd.

Yeah, and there's not many of those people either.

Re:From all residents outside the [ant]arctic circ (2, Informative)

abigor (540274) | more than 3 years ago | (#33210360)

The OP mentioned "North America". Incredible as it seems, there's this country in North America to the north of the US with 35 million people in it that might want to see this event. Remarkably, this story is relevant for them.

Re:From all residents outside the [ant]arctic circ (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33210512)

The OP mentioned "North America". Incredible as it seems, there's this country in North America to the north of the US with 35 million people in it that might want to see this event. Remarkably, this story is relevant for them.

Not really. Most of us are too engrossed in drinking beer and beating each other with hockey sticks to look at the sky. ;-)

Re:From all residents outside the [ant]arctic circ (2, Informative)

goofyspouse (817551) | more than 3 years ago | (#33210546)

Your point is valid, but the vast majority of Canadians live south of 55 degrees north. Calgary is 51 degrees, and even Edmonton is only just over 53 degrees...

Re:From all residents outside the [ant]arctic circ (1)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 3 years ago | (#33210558)

I seriously doubt most Canadians [britannica.com] even live near the lower portions of Alaska, as far as longitude goes. Of course, there aren't many Alaskans, hehe.

A lot of Canadians, if they live towards the southern part of their US-bordering province, could potentially be further south from the pole than north-eastern US states like Maine.

Nope, still not visible to most (1)

sjbe (173966) | more than 3 years ago | (#33210986)

The OP mentioned "North America". Incredible as it seems, there's this country in North America to the north of the US with 35 million people in it that might want to see this event. Remarkably, this story is relevant for them.

Seeing as how I live in the lower 48 states and am further north than a huge percentage of the Canadian population I have to say you might want to consult a map. Most of the major cities in Canada are barely north of the border. Hell I could be in one of them within 40 minutes if the border crossing wasn't crowded.

Re:Nope, still not visible to most (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33212622)

It's not his fault, Europeans are some of the most geographically ignorant people on the planet.

Re:From all residents outside the [ant]arctic circ (1)

aqk (844307) | more than 3 years ago | (#33211890)

Incredible as it may seem to people of the US, North America also includes Mexico.
(Welcome to Geography, American know-nothing)
I'm sure millions of Mexicans will certainly be up late tonight to see this magnificent polar event!

- Speaking as a Canadian, and no, I do not live in an igloo.

Re:From all residents outside the [ant]arctic circ (1)

aqk (844307) | more than 3 years ago | (#33211918)

Incredible as it may seem to people of the US, North America also includes Mexico.
(Welcome to Geography 101, American know-nothing)
I'm sure millions of Mexicans will certainly be up late tonight to see this magnificent polar event

- Speaking as a Canadian, and no, I do not live in an igloo.

Re:From all residents outside the [ant]arctic circ (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | more than 3 years ago | (#33212300)

I for one welcome our Inspector General non loo inhabitant overlords.

Re:From all residents outside the [ant]arctic circ (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33219718)

Uh, wise teacher could you tell us which part of Mexico is north of 55N?

Nope... often visible in the continental US (4, Informative)

fyngyrz (762201) | more than 3 years ago | (#33210638)

The only people in the US that will be able to see it live in Alaska

Nope. I generally do pretty well [flickr.com] here in NE Montana.

This shot [flickr.com], and this one [flickr.com], are aurora photos from the CME event last week.

Re:Nope... often visible in the continental US (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33211486)

Jesus God be careful out there!!

Don't you know that stuff steals your soul?

Re:From all residents outside the [ant]arctic circ (1)

winomonkey (983062) | more than 3 years ago | (#33210956)

The only people in the US that will be able to see it live in Alaska - likely an extremely insignificant portion of the /. crowd.

On behalf of the Alaskans who are a part of the /. crowd, I would like to convivially wave an insignificant digit in your general direction. Sadly, you will not be able to see my digit-waving-display, just as you won't be able to see the aurora display tonight.

If it makes you feel any better, our weather here in Anchorage will not likely permit viewing, either ... damn clouds.

Re:From all residents outside the [ant]arctic circ (1)

IceFoot (256699) | more than 3 years ago | (#33211964)

Actually, what is the population of Earth north of 55 degrees (north latitude)? Is there any way to find that statistic?

Re:From all residents outside the [ant]arctic circ (1)

bar-agent (698856) | more than 3 years ago | (#33212136)

Actually, what is the population of Earth north of 55 degrees (north latitude)? Is there any way to find that statistic?

Sure. Take a population density map and consider only the part of it that is north of 55 degrees. Depending on the legend, you may need to determine the land area north of 55 degrees or the total population of the world as well.

Re:From all residents outside the [ant]arctic circ (0, Troll)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#33211416)

Thank you Slashdot.

Sincerely,

All your readers outside of polar areas that won't be able to see anything anyway.

I really don't understand why this is insightful. Linux stories aren't helpful to the majority, either.

Re:From all residents outside the [ant]arctic circ (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33224434)

Thank you Slashdot.

Sincerely,

All your readers outside of polar areas that won't be able to see anything anyway.

I really don't understand why this is insightful. Linux stories aren't helpful to the majority, either.

He said all your [Slashdot's] readers. A large number of those use Linux or are interested in it for some reason or another, like its competitive pressure on Microsoft in some areas like servers. As Slashdot is a primarily American site that still includes members from around the world, and most people don't live 55 or more degrees north, a tiny number of those are going to see this aurora. So you see there is no comparison between Slashdot readers who might read a Linux story versus Slashdot readers who are going to personally witness this event. Nice try but it is you who lacks basic insight in this case.

Skinner! (5, Funny)

swanzilla (1458281) | more than 3 years ago | (#33209704)

Aurora Borealis?

At this time of year?

A this time of day?

In this part of the country?

Localized entirely within your kitchen?

Re:Skinner! (1)

luddite47 (907624) | more than 3 years ago | (#33210162)

Aurora Borealis?

At this time of year?

A this time of day?

In this part of the country?

Localized entirely within your kitchen?

May I see it?

Re:Skinner! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33210914)

Can I see it?

Science Pron (4, Funny)

cosm (1072588) | more than 3 years ago | (#33209720)

Polar Bares Coronal Mass Erection III
Guaranteed Plasma Cloud Shot

Re:Science Pron (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33209968)

Chambers sighed when asked his reaction to last week’s controversial court decision. A judge ruled that California's voter-approved ban on same-sex marriage, known as Proposition 8, violated the constitutional rights of same-sex couples.

“It’s disappointing that a judge would rule against the will of the people,” says Chambers, author of Leaving Homosexuality. “That’s the greatest tragedy.”

For 34 years, Exodus has told gay and lesbians that they can be “delivered” from homosexuality through faith in Christ, professional counseling and support groups.

But how will groups like Exodus fare if fewer Americans believe that homosexuality is a sin, and if gay marriage becomes an option?

Chambers acknowledged that “our culture is changing” and said more people are abandoning a biblical view of homosexuality.

Does he think gay marriage is inevitable?

“It certainly seems so,” Chambers says. “The jury is still out and there are certainly areas where I see a tendency for more rights for gay and lesbian people. But I also see that there’s still a fight among American people so it’s hard to know.”

Though there seems to be more acceptance of gay and lesbian people in popular culture, Chambers says demand for Exodus ministry has not declined.

“Our calls are increasing,” he says. “Our ministries say we’re busier than ever.”

He says the Prop 8 ruling shows something else: More Americans are accepting the humanity of gay and lesbian people.

“We’re entering a time when we are more compassionate and loving toward people who deserve our compassion,” he says, “and that’s gay and lesbian people.

OMGZ - I can see them from here?! (3, Funny)

eagee (1308589) | more than 3 years ago | (#33209734)

That only happens like... never!

Sincerely,

Someone from Cleveland (you insensitive clods!)

Re:OMGZ - I can see them from here?! (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 3 years ago | (#33210066)

You better hope we never have a solar flare such that the resulting aurora is visble from Cleveland.

Re:OMGZ - I can see them from here?! (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33210290)

You better hope we never have a solar flare such that the resulting aurora is visble from Cleveland.

You're not actually serious, are you? Auroras are visible* from Cleveland about once a year, on average--more during solar max, less during solar min, like now.

*Not factoring in light pollution

Re:OMGZ - I can see them from here?! (1)

JumpDrive (1437895) | more than 3 years ago | (#33210400)

Ahh, I have actually seen recordings of them as far south as Ft. Davis Texas.

Re:OMGZ - I can see them from here?! (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 3 years ago | (#33210964)

> I have actually seen recordings of them as far south as Ft. Davis Texas.

It's not the latitude. There they don't have to be so bright as to visible through the skies of Cleveland. As in most large cities, the residents think there are only five stars in the sky, all only visible when a power failure coincides with an unusually clear night.

2 questions... (1)

cez (539085) | more than 3 years ago | (#33209738)

I wonder where the best place to view this from would be? The Aurora Borealis are best viewed in Alaska, but during the winter. My girlfriend just got to Alaska recently and I'm on the North East coast, we'll have to compare notes!

Speaking of Alaska, I wonder what time dude's plane crashed?

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said a minor radio blackout event occurred at 2 pm EDT on Monday when an M1 flare erupted on the Sun. Solar flares are classified as C (low intensity), M (moderate intensity), and X (high intensity).

Re:2 questions... (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 3 years ago | (#33209878)

Loss of radio could be a problem, more for navigational aids than communications. GPS is not very accurate for aircraft, especially when changing altitude, and even when it works. They had fog and cloud and tried to get over a mountain.

Re:2 questions... (1)

plopez (54068) | more than 3 years ago | (#33212016)

we were out doing field work today in the lower 48. Our radios kept having problems tx and rx. We couldn't figure it out. At the end of the day we compared notes and others experienced the same problems. I think the flares are to blame, since everything works well under other circumstances.

Re:2 questions... (1)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 3 years ago | (#33210040)

Not from Anchorage, it's cloudy here today. If it was clear, I'd go to Eagle River Nature Center or Earthquake Park here in Anchorage.

Re:2 questions... (1)

cez (539085) | more than 3 years ago | (#33211154)

That's what she said!

Oh... wait a minute, that loses funniness when it's the truth... and not sexual at all.

Earth has two poles (4, Insightful)

Cyberax (705495) | more than 3 years ago | (#33210046)

In Australia, seriously. Aurora Australis is just as beautiful.

Earth has two poles.

Re:Earth has two poles (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33210104)

Yes, but one is clearly inferior to the other.

Re:Earth has two poles (3, Informative)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 3 years ago | (#33210174)

The article's title and description refers to polar, so no where is it north-centric.

Even the UAF site has a map for the Southern Hemisphere.

Re:Earth has two poles (1)

cez (539085) | more than 3 years ago | (#33211110)

my bad mate! Was a typo... I meant the best time to see them in Alaska was the winter... when its not all night bright and shite. Cheers!

i do not believe in you upside down people (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 3 years ago | (#33211748)

summer in winter? winter in summer? stop it now

antipodeans are a fictional kind of leprechaun invented to scare young children. there is no such thing as another hemisphere. you would fall off!

you are a poor troll trying to pull a fast one

Re:Earth has two poles (1)

aqk (844307) | more than 3 years ago | (#33211954)

Good point! (I'm in Canada)
But every time I see one of these idiot TV thingees about masses of electrons flying out from the Sun, they always seem to show them being attracted to the Northern Hemisphere. Why is this?
Do you really get to see the Southern Lights like we do?

Does maybe the South Pole just get a shitload of positrons instead? (that might make it even more dramatic!)
All kidding aside, just why is this?

Re:Earth has two poles (1)

juhaz (110830) | more than 3 years ago | (#33219910)

Not really. There aren't any settlements on southern hemisphere that are anywhere as near to the pole as there are in the north, and that quite obviously limits the show a lot.

Southern tip of Tasmania is 44 degrees south. Most of Europe and almost entire Canada is closer to the north pole than that is to south! We have _cities_ 70 degrees north, you'd have to live on Antarctica to match that on the south pole.

Time to Hide! (1)

jameskojiro (705701) | more than 3 years ago | (#33209764)

I am going to pack all of my electronic equipment into the newly built Faraday cage I built in my garage.

yuo F"ail It (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33209824)

members are Elected, we ttok *BSD is dying Yet mistake of electing FreeBSD at about 80 the channel to sign during which I spot when done For recent Sys Admin have the energy to this. For deliver. Some of conflicts that

Re:yuo F"ail It (1)

Gohtar (1829140) | more than 3 years ago | (#33210306)

What?

Re:yuo F"ail It (2, Interesting)

zeropointburn (975618) | more than 3 years ago | (#33211910)

Sometimes I think that troll is a weird form of eliza trainer, trying to produce comprehensible posts based on slashdot post histories. Clearly a non-starter unless you've been drinking sterno. Alternatively, it could be some form of encoded data, posted in a public forum and cleverly disguised as an asshat. /tinfoilhat

As to the light show, wish I could see it.

Re:yuo F"ail It (1)

tehcyder (746570) | more than 3 years ago | (#33214008)

Alternatively, it could be some form of encoded data, posted in a public forum and cleverly disguised as an asshat. /tinfoilhat

"Good morning, I see the swallows have left early for Godwanaland this year."
"Indeed, and the meerkat breeding grounds are teeming with voles."

Re:yuo F"ail It (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 3 years ago | (#33217892)

It looked more to me like someone in Russia is trying to learn English while drunk.

FUCK! (1)

Deus.1.01 (946808) | more than 3 years ago | (#33209864)

I live in Norway...and i should have a perfect opportunity to watch but every spot of sky is clouded over from hell and back!

Um... (4, Funny)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 3 years ago | (#33210048)

Nicolas Cage just drove by my house really fast shouting into a cell phone. Should I be concerned?

i was going to pull a grammar nazi (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 3 years ago | (#33211712)

and say "really fast shouting" should read "shouting really fast" but then i saw you are referring to nicholas cage, so yeah, you are grammatically correct after all

Re:i was going to pull a grammar nazi (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 3 years ago | (#33219090)

Good lord, I had to stare at it to even see it. I swap words like that sometimes and I don't why know. Yoda genes in me I have.

Re:Um... Cagey warning (1)

aqk (844307) | more than 3 years ago | (#33211982)

Nicolas Cage just drove by my house really fast shouting into a cell phone. Should I be concerned?

Well, don't let him in, unless he's brought his brother Faraday along.

Weather (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33210090)

Its raining heavily here, so I doubt they will be visible (even though I am at 46 degrees north)

But... (1)

inode_buddha (576844) | more than 3 years ago | (#33210098)

But why would I want to see polar flares? I mean, it's cool and all, whatever floats your boat... but I'm just not "like that".

Took down Ted Stevens plane. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33210110)

Fried all the electronics.

Hooray for dyslexia (3, Funny)

jtownatpunk.net (245670) | more than 3 years ago | (#33210128)

Am I the only one who read that as "Polar Bears To Be Visible Tonight" and thought, "Holy crap, they're usually invisible?!?"

Re:Hooray for dyslexia (4, Funny)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#33210260)

Every see a polar bear in a snow storm?

Here is a pic:

Re:Hooray for dyslexia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33211188)

Joke's on you! Slashdot blocks image postings for a reason!

You'll have to post a URL.

Re:Hooray for dyslexia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33211226)

Yes.

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...