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Man Patents Self-Burying Coffin

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the ashes-to-ashes-righty-tighty dept.

Idle 159

disco_tracy writes "A California inventor has filed a patent for a coffin that screws into the ground vertically. The reason? It greatly reduces excavation labor and burial costs, decreases land use, and opens up more space for burials in unused areas of a cemetery. Writer Clark Boyd also lists 5 other unconventional burial options, including lye, ecopods, GPS devices that track bodies buried without headstones, cryogenics and — my favorite — getting buried in the sky."

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159 comments

Already been done (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33228748)

In a Ray Bradbury story called 'The Coffin.' Although Bradbury's was fictional, it had the benefit of being a lot cooler, with little arms that dug the hole and a portable record player that did a eulogy. It even covered itself in earth once it was done.

And (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33228760)

Puts someone else out of work while increasing cost to the family

Ooooookay (1)

SiaFhir (686401) | more than 3 years ago | (#33228782)

That's just screwed up. Bet this guy's dying to sue anyone who implements these devices without his permission...

Re:Ooooookay (1)

iamhassi (659463) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229304)

"Bet this guy's dying to sue anyone who implements these devices without his permission..."

Honestly I don't see this going anywhere, with the patents and stuff this will probably cost more than a simple casket that any company can produce without a licensing fee. I can't imagine any family choosing this, if they were willing to screw grandpa into the ground and have him rest vertically they'd probably be just as inclined to choose cremation first.

Only people I could imagine opting for this is the US Govt to bury soldiers, but I'd imagine there'd be enough outrage to put an end to that.

We've had backhoes forever [wikipedia.org] , if a cemetery wanted to bury people vertically they could have been doing that for the past 50+ yrs but obviously there's not much of a market because I've never heard of a cemetery that buried people vertically... actually I take that back, Upright Burials [verticalburials.com.au] has been offering vertical burials since Dec 2009, but judging by their News Archive [clubsonline.com.au] and Media page [clubsonline.com.au] not much has been going on.

Re:Ooooookay (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 3 years ago | (#33230006)

I can't imagine any family choosing this, if they were willing to screw grandpa into the ground and have him rest vertically they'd probably be just as inclined to choose cremation first.

Paupers cemeteries would probably be interested, if the price was right, and they didn't have rocky soil.

I suspect the previous problem was getting the head of the coffin 6' under. On a regular 8' coffin you'd need a hole 14' deep - that's pier-setting equipment, not the auger on the PTO of a tractor.

Still, over the course of thousands of burials, perhaps it would pay for itself. Most funerals I've been to lately don't even lower the coffin into the grave anymore (I found that emotionally disappointing, frankly).

Overall, I'd be more concerned with the lower surface area of the dirt over the buoyant coffin and the lower weight of that dirt. It's got to be 5:1 or worse. Re-burying can't be cheap.

Re:Ooooookay (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 3 years ago | (#33230028)

Come to think of it, with a plug-type burial, a 'top-kill' of 12 bags of cement should be easy enough. No need to even mix - pour in the fast-set in a 4' sonotube and be happy if it's set up in a month's time.

Re:Ooooookay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33230092)

What are you, some sort of funeral expert?

Re:Ooooookay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33230110)

That's just screwed up. Bet this guy's dying to screw anyone who implements these devices without his permission...

how deep does this go? you may hit pipes / power l (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 3 years ago | (#33228806)

how deep does this go? you may hit pipes / power lines?

Re:how deep does this go? you may hit pipes / powe (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33228890)

typically they don't put graveyards in areas that are covered in pipes and power lines...

Re:how deep does this go? you may hit pipes / powe (1)

Smauler (915644) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229184)

It'd be a lot more fun if they did... imagine the hilarity that would ensue when the recently deceased bursts out of their coffin after hitting a high voltage line.

Filed... in 2006 (2, Informative)

Theaetetus (590071) | more than 3 years ago | (#33228822)

"A California inventor has filed a patent...

Note to Submitter and Editor - you don't "file a patent" in this country, you file a patent application, which was done four years ago. The patent has now been granted, so you could say "A California inventor has been awarded a patent..."

With how often patents come up on Slashdot, we should at least make an effort to get the basics correct.

Re:Filed... in 2006 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33228850)

Cue, "You must be new here".

Re:Filed... in 2006 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33229028)

Anal.

Re:Filed... in 2006 (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33229302)

You must be the kind of guy who goes to the bathroom just to say it smells like shit in here.

mix the ash with concrete (4, Interesting)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 3 years ago | (#33228866)

make a structure OUT OF dead people, not over them. not necessarily mausoleums and cenotaphs, but houses for the living too, or town squares: you become, literally, part of the community you helped to build/ that you loved

ok, it's a little creepy

"dad, where's grandpa?"

"in the third load bearing column by the kitchen"

at the very least, it would be a good backstory for a horror movie, or ghostbusters iii

Re:mix the ash with concrete (1)

timeOday (582209) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229582)

I'm planning to have my ashes scattered in an alpine forest and be recycled into a pine tree - no cement required.

Surely that's better than being a mouldering corpse for hundreds of years.

Re:mix the ash with concrete (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33229776)

There was a horror movie I watched where the architect of a building put live victims in hollow wall spaces then filles them with concrete. Part of his belief that human suffering added to the building strength. Creepy.

Yes, it did issue. (2, Informative)

Macblaster (94623) | more than 3 years ago | (#33228868)

Don't know why the Discovery article links to the published application, but here is a link to the actual issued patent: 7,631,404 [google.com]

Appropriate (3, Funny)

dangitman (862676) | more than 3 years ago | (#33228888)

There couldn't be a better audience for this product announcement than slashdot. This is perfect for all of us who will die alone in our basements, with nobody to attend the funeral. Just flick a switch and it's done.

Re:Appropriate (1)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 3 years ago | (#33228980)

Yeah, but who the hell wants to be buried and visited like some sort of shrine for the next decade or so? Cremate me please, it's the only way to go......

Re:Appropriate (1)

dangitman (862676) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229236)

Cremate me please, it's the only way to go......

No problem, are you free around 3pm? I'll meet you at Bob's BBQ Shack.

Re:Appropriate (1)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229816)

Nah, I want an open air Roman style cremation. Think the County Health Department will give me any fits with that? ;)

Re:Appropriate (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229892)

Nah, I want an open air Roman style cremation. Think the County Health Department will give me any fits with that?

You're dead and burned up, what are they going to do?

(just set enough aside to make it worth sombody's while)

Re:Appropriate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33230172)

but if you are cremated it isn't possible to come back as a zombie.

zombies always have work in the movie industry! and you might even get to eat some tasty braaaaaaiiiiinzzz

Re:Appropriate (1)

Crudely_Indecent (739699) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229258)

Just flick a switch and it's done

Not exactly...

According to TFA, "Self-Burying" isn't an accurate description. It's slightly (100%) wrong.

Per TFA:

The idea is that coffin would then be torqued into the ground, either by machine or even by hand.

Basically, your body is installed into this big ass screw. A cap is fixed to the top and it's *ready* to be screwed into the ground. This coffin can bury itself just like my lunch can eat itself.

On the topic of lunch... After looking at the patent drawings, it occurs to me that this device needs to be fairly robust to withstand the pressures of being screwed into the ground. I didn't see any drainage holes in the drawings. I'm guessing that shortly after burial, the deceased decays into a chunky soup at the tip of the screw...er...coffin.

Re:Appropriate (1)

dangitman (862676) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229652)

Basically, your body is installed into this big ass screw. A cap is fixed to the top and it's *ready* to be screwed into the ground. This coffin can bury itself just like my lunch can eat itself.

Oh well, at least the nerdly occupant has one final, desperate, chance to get screwed.

Re:Appropriate (1)

AhabTheArab (798575) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229352)

We, as geeks, are often interested in unconventional ways of doing things, and what to do with our bodies after death is probably no exception. I'm sure many of us here have a desire for something other than the traditional funeral/casket/burial/headstone approach. I for one have always been intrigued by the idea of a Viking Funeral. Put my body on a wooden boat, send it out to sea, then shoot a FLAMING ARROW at it and watch it burn. Hell yeah. Though, I highly doubt I'll actually ever put that in my will.

Of course, there's also a lot of ultra-practicalists here who would say "who cares?".

Re:Appropriate (1)

dangitman (862676) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229670)

Yeah, I have little doubt that somebody here is going to end up combining the Klingon Opera thing with their funeral.

Re:Appropriate (1)

cp.tar (871488) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229676)

It’s one of the ways I wouldn’t mind being disposed of when the time comes.

Sure, it’s not that I have a real interest in it either way, but it’d be cool.

Re:Appropriate (1)

jimmydigital (267697) | more than 3 years ago | (#33230376)

I don't know about you people but I plan to ascend... and you can keep the clothes. Failing that.. give me a proper Jedi funeral so I can come back and haunt your ass... giving advice you don't really need.

and Ray Bradbury's story comes true (2, Informative)

james_shoemaker (12459) | more than 3 years ago | (#33228892)

I immediately thought of the "Braling Economy Casket" from the Ray Bradbury story.

James

if you want something done right do it yourself! (1)

computerchimp (994187) | more than 3 years ago | (#33228918)

Independent minded?
Can't rely on others for important things?

Then do it yourself. It is the only way to make sure it gets done right.

My Favorite (3, Interesting)

b4upoo (166390) | more than 3 years ago | (#33228924)

Why go to all that negative bother? A good old fashioned gator pit suits me. Not only is burial not even an issue but the hides from the happy, and well fed gators make lovely luggage. The rest of the gators harvested could be used as hog feed.

Re: My Favorite (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33229556)

Why go to all that negative bother? A good old fashioned gator pit suits me. Not only is burial not even an issue but the hides from the happy, and well fed gators make lovely luggage. The rest of the gators harvested could be used as hog feed.

And well-fed hogs make lovely bacon! I'm in!

Great... (3, Insightful)

ITBurnout (1845712) | more than 3 years ago | (#33228926)

Now maybe if the civilized human race were finally able to get past the rather strange tradition of putting their loved ones' preserved physical remains into (usually rather expensive) boxes in the ground, in order to last as long as possible, filling up acres and acres of land with these, increasing on a daily basis with every new death -- then that might be some REAL progress. At some point this whole "burying" thing needs to go. It is not an infinitely sustainable model to follow.

Re:Great... (1)

Cathoderoytube (1088737) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229014)

Trouble is cemeteries are green space in cities that developers can't get their hands on.

Gotta take what you can get these days.

Re:Great... (1)

IndustrialComplex (975015) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229048)

It is not an infinitely sustainable model to follow.

Neither is the universe if we want to get completely nihilistic about it.

Filling up cemeteries isn't a problem, and when it is, we can easily fix it with a few backhoes (which you would need anyway if you wanted to build there) and a few changed laws.

You really think Cemeteries are what's holding back 'REAL progress'? And all this time it was not being able to develop on that land that was holding back 'REAL progress'.

You know, what's funny is that if our ancestors didn't take some efforts to bury/preserve their dead, we would know a great deal less about them.

Re:Great... (1)

ITBurnout (1845712) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229616)

Neither is the universe if we want to get completely nihilistic about it.
That is a poor counterargument, as methods such as cremation are (while not infinite, I suppose), still far more sustainable than burial.
Filling up cemeteries isn't a problem, and when it is, we can easily fix it with a few backhoes (which you would need anyway if you wanted to build there) and a few changed laws.
You really think Cemeteries are what's holding back 'REAL progress'? And all this time it was not being able to develop on that land that was holding back 'REAL progress'.
I'm not even talking about development on that land necessarily. It's just that using that land for burial seems a poor use of it. Even keeping that land as natural open space would be a better use in my opinion.
You know, what's funny is that if our ancestors didn't take some efforts to bury/preserve their dead, we would know a great deal less about them.
Yeah, but that was then -- when written and digital methods of information preservation were not available or used -- and this is now, when there are numerous methods of knowing a great deal about anyone, without having to have their remains in a box in the ground.
The deceased person is not there anyway. That person can be honored anywhere. It doesn't have to be at the site where his/her Earthly body is now in a box in the ground.

Not sustainable... (1)

maillemaker (924053) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229050)

While I agree with the absurdities of burials, it has been working for tens of thousands of years with little trouble.

Re:Not sustainable... (2, Informative)

ITBurnout (1845712) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229660)

While I agree with the absurdities of burials, it has been working for tens of thousands of years with little trouble
No it hasn't, really -- not in the way we are doing it now. For most of those tens of thousands of years (maybe with the exception of Egyptian pharaohs and selected others), the remains were not embalmed -- and even if they were embalmed, certainly not with the level of technology now used. And the caskets were degradable, not the fancy things we use today that are designed to last and last.

Re:Not sustainable... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33230058)

Modern human remains are much less preserved than egyptian pharaoes. The embalming process is only meant to keep the body together long enough for the funeral; after a few years in the ground, you've got a skeleton regardless.

Caskets are either wood or metal. If metal becomes valuable enough, it's not like we don't know where it is; grave robbers will recover it.

Re:Great... (1)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229120)

Birthrates are going down over much of the world. This problem will become less acute, not more.

Re:Great... (2, Interesting)

iamhassi (659463) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229144)

"At some point this whole "burying" thing needs to go. It is not an infinitely sustainable model to follow."

According to the Cremation Association, burying is already dying out [cremationassociation.org] , with over 1/3rd of deaths currently resulting in cremations and they're projecting over 50% by 2025.

However I see nothing wrong with burying the dead, it's deeply rooted in many cultures and religions [wikipedia.org] and to say someone is wrong for burying their dead is equal to telling them their culture is wrong.

Re:Great... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33229604)

"equal to telling them their culture is wrong."

*throws a grenade into the room*
DM: Everyone that makes their spot check is able to read the following on the grenade: Communist Muslim.
*ducks and runs*

Re:Great... (1)

ITBurnout (1845712) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229692)

Agreed; I am not about to tell anyone that they are "wrong" for burying their dead. If their choice is burial, that is their choice. I am just saying that as a whole, I think that better solutions exist and that burial has always seemed a bit absurd to me. But maybe that's just me.

Re:Great... (4, Insightful)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229810)

I have no problem telling someone their culture is wrong if it is wasteful and unsustainable. We're all the same species, created equal and therefore qualified to comment on one another.

Re:Great... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33229830)

Certain aspects of certain cultures are, lacking better words, wrong; slavery, arranged marriage, blood sacrifice to name a few. Burial may not be one of them, but it is, as GP points out, not infinitely scalable. There is a limited amount of space on our planet. Heck, there's even a limited amount of coal atoms from which to produce new people. At some point, you'll simply have to accept that the bodies of dead need to be recycled.
Whether this scaling problem will actually cause real problems before we infect other planets (and thus buy ourselves more space and, potentially, coal atoms) remains to be seen.

Re:Great... (1)

bluie- (1172769) | more than 3 years ago | (#33230122)

I agree that it's a completely ridiculous tradition. In fact, what I'd prefer to happen for myself is to be composted. It's the natural order of things. Your body is built with nutrients from the earth, and that's what you should return to. Aside from being unsustainable, traditional burial puts a lot of chemicals into the ground. http://www.squidoo.com/composting-the-dead [squidoo.com]

Obilg Simpsons (4, Funny)

seven of five (578993) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229006)

"Hi, I'm Troy McClure. You may remember me from such do-it-yourself videos as "Dig Your Own Grave - and Save"

not sure which is worse (4, Funny)

Midnight's Shadow (1517137) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229026)

I can't help but be reminded of when my niece (who was 3) used my grandfather's homemade wooden urn as a stool so she could reach the sink to wash her hands. At least my grandfather was being useful.

Re:not sure which is worse (2, Interesting)

kungfugleek (1314949) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229282)

Reminds me of my aunt who took her cousin's ashes across the country (US) to be buried in her home town. She kept the ashes in the glove compartment of her car. And forgot about them. Until a year later when she was planning her next trip out west she suddenly remembered her promise, and the ashes that were still in the glove compartment. So she rushed out to the cemetery (or wherever) with a video camera and quick held a funeral with her brothers and sisters so she would have evidence that she did, indeed, bury the ashes. Then she quick packed the video and headed out on her trip to meet the very family that had made the request to begin with. Now the only question I have is, was the video date-stamped, and did anyone notice? I don't think I will ever know.

Re:not sure which is worse (1)

IndustrialComplex (975015) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229398)

I have a couple of old tombstones stacked up to make a nice set of stairs leading up to our garden.

One of the perks of being a cemetery caretaker (former)

Re:not sure which is worse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33230148)

"When I die, I just want them to plant me somewhere warm. And then when pretty women walk over my grave I would grab their ankles, like in that movie."
American Gods by Neil Gaiman

Maybe this is the solution for the social networks (1)

manybit (1876458) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229092)

Facebook and Twitter should automatically send this to the home of their dead users and then -maybe- people would stop complaining that the social networks aren't doing enough on death? But I guess people would just complain when they get a coffin a few years too late, so how about a coffin on sign-up? "Sign up today and get this brand new self-burying coffin!"

Hmm (1)

paragon1 (1395635) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229172)

Rather gives new meaning the the phrases "You're digging your own grave" and "Oh, go screw yourself" doesn't it?

To be crushed into a diamond... (1)

kungfugleek (1314949) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229314)

That's [lifegem.com] how I want to be disposed of.

Re:To be crushed into a diamond... (1)

cp.tar (871488) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229760)

Imagine, if you will, a great-granddaughter with a diamond ring or necklace who, upon someone’s expressed admiration, says “oh, yes, it’s a memento from my great-grandfather.”

Then imagine the expression of the inquirer upon explanation that the diamonds themselves are bits of the great-grandfather. Priceless.

Re:To be crushed into a diamond... (1)

smaddox (928261) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229882)

I never understood how you can know they aren't just taking the ashes, throwing them in the trash, and giving you an overpriced diamond in return.

Re:To be crushed into a diamond... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33230160)

If you look at their website (who am I kidding) you'll see that natural colored diamonds are very rare and therefore worth several orders of magnitude more than what LifeGem charges.

Re:To be crushed into a diamond... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33230268)

meh, either way it is the symbolism that really counts.

Similar Results (1)

morari (1080535) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229478)

It greatly reduce excavation labor and burial costs, decreases land use, and opens up more space for burials in unused areas of a cemetery.

Cremation does the same thing. So does a burlap sack and a roadside ditch. Seriously people, you're dead. Get over it.

Re:Similar Results (1)

EmagGeek (574360) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229724)

You're wrong about what happens when you die. It's not an eternity of nothingness.

When you die you're going to go to
                                        your favorite place in the whole
                                        world. And you're going to be with
                                        all of the people you've ever loved
                                        and who have ever loved you. And
                                        you're going to be young again, and
                                        you'll be able to run through the
                                        fields and dance and jump, and
                                        there will be no sadness, no pain,
                                        just love and laughing and
                                        happiness. There will be ponies
                                        made of gold, and everyone will
                                        live in giant mansions, and
                                        everything will smell like cookies.
                                        And it will last for an eternity,
                                        Grandma. An eternity.

Screwdrivers (1)

Ukab the Great (87152) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229480)

This means that the cemetery security guards now have to keep on alert for shady characters with really large screwdrivers.

It's an evil conspiracy! (1)

EmagGeek (574360) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229550)

These coffins are actually big, evil drilling machines designed to penetrate the walls of Zion, allowing swarms upon swarms of robotic killers loose on what remains of the human race!

hmmm (1)

Syberz (1170343) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229554)

I'm not too sure if this is practical though.

Think about it, you would need quite a bit of force or leverage to screw that thing in. Having a huge, dirty, bright yellow backhoe driving in granddad while spewing diesel smoke and making lots of noise doesn't quite feel the same as the coffin gently descending in its hole with a discrete pulley system with soft music playing in the background.

Re:hmmm (1)

compro01 (777531) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229936)

You could always have the pallbearers do double duty.

Though I suspect this is more intended for places like Japan, where cemetery space is becoming a problem.

My current preference: (1)

Jaqenn (996058) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229654)

I keep telling my wife that I want to be cremated, then have the remains pressed into an artificial diamond, then make the diamond into a piece of jewelry or furniture.

She prefers traditional burial. :)

Re:My current preference: (1)

Jaqenn (996058) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229718)

Forgot to add: after a huge percentage of me is taken by people waiting for organ/tissue transplant.

Broadband growth in the U.S. is Slowing (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229732)

There's an important story to be covered and we get ... this?

Seriously, mods. Do away with voting on the firehose, or at least override it when a story is clearly off-topic and puerile. Leave this crap for Fark.

Why? (1)

sorak (246725) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229764)

Why do this? Seriously? If you're not into traditional funerals, why not just be cremated and save the land for someone living? It seems like this is a series of inventive ways of mangling an unnecessary tradition. Is there someone out there saying "I want to be buried the traditional way, but inside some morbid transformer that can drill me into my final resting place"?

Re:Why? (1)

Monchanger (637670) | more than 3 years ago | (#33230610)

If you're not into traditional funerals, why not just be cremated and save the land for someone living?

It depends on what you consider 'traditional': You might still follow the religious tradition requiring burial (or prohibiting cremation or other body disposal methods) but acknowledge that the traditional horizontal plot may be less socially-considerate than a vertical grave.

How deep can it go? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33229766)

Drill, baby, drill?

Good tie-in with previous post... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33229788)

... about Facebook, Myspace, etc... dealing with dead people. (http://tech.slashdot.org/story/10/08/12/143223/Can-Twitter-and-Facebook-Deal-With-Their-Dead) They should offer a package deal.

Hey, it's PMR! (1)

macraig (621737) | more than 3 years ago | (#33229794)

This reminds me of perpendicular recording but for meatspace. Cool! When do we get the option to screw them in three deep?

Or you could become a diamond (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33229814)

The article lists several great alternatives to the traditional burial, but let us not forget LifeGem [lifegem.com]

GPS? (1)

SpinningCone (1278698) | more than 3 years ago | (#33230146)

did the GPS coffin thing make no sense to anyone else? mean GPS units don't transmit. did they mean an RF transmitter like they use on wild animals (hardly global)? or do they mean that they record the GPS coordinates and give family's a unit to go find the spot?

throwing your garmin in with grandpa seems a bit silly since he doesn't care where he is and he ain't goin' nowhere

Re:GPS? (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 3 years ago | (#33230576)

I think it is more like geocaching, so the position of the body would be noted and publicized, but there wouldn't be a physical marker.

That's perfect! (1)

SparkleMotion88 (1013083) | more than 3 years ago | (#33230550)

This is great! I've been looking for a new metaphor for my current software project. The "two story outhouse" metaphor wasn't quite working anymore.
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