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How the Internet Is Changing Language

samzenpus posted more than 4 years ago | from the l337-speak dept.

The Internet 295

Ant writes "BBC News reports on how the internet is changing language. What was once understandable only to the tech savvy has become common. From the article: 'To Google' has become a universally understood verb and many countries are developing their own Internet slang. But is the Web changing language and is everyone up to speed?'"

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LOL (5, Funny)

ShakaUVM (157947) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285332)

LOL.

And yeah, I've heard people say it IRL. I've also heard people say IRL IRL.

Re:LOL (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285340)

did u tak him 2 da bar|?

Can anyone be really up to date? (2, Interesting)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285578)

I've been on the online scene since the Fidonet era, circa the 1980's, and I'm still trying to learn new online slangs all the time.

Re:Can anyone be really up to date? (4, Interesting)

rolfwind (528248) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285798)

Just read the Lolcat Bible:
http://www.lolcatbible.com/index.php?title=Main_Page [lolcatbible.com]

You'll turn the tables and be confusing the kids in no time.

Re:Can anyone be really up to date? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285836)

Lame. They don't even have basic stuff like "elite" and "lamer". They also have nothing on using mixed cases in the "proper" way (ie. lower case vowels, "o" replaces "0") and extended ASCII.

Re:LOL (2, Interesting)

Aeternitas827 (1256210) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285392)

I've found myself using those face-to-face...among others (O RLY, variations of LOLcat speak, WTF)...it's rather scary how much these little routine things we use, more or less to save time, can permeate the corporeal world.

Re:LOL (1)

WinstonWolfIT (1550079) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285460)

My favourite was a m8 who got into a scrapup and he called it rlpvp

Re:LOL (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285484)

"WTF" ends up particularly charming IRL, IMHO...though YMMV.

Re:LOL (1)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285824)

"WTF" ends up particularly charming IRL, IMHO...though YMMV.

lol whats "charming"? liek uber?

Re:LOL (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285982)

I always think it sounds lame. It's rather cumbersome - 5 syllables instead of the three. Plus when I see WTF I don't see it as the letters, I read it as "what the fuck?" anyway. With something like "lol" I just read it as its own word now, it doesn't mean laugh out loud anymore, it's more of a "I know what I'm saying is kinda lame but I hope you don't mind"

PS lol

Re:LOL (2, Funny)

RulerOf (975607) | more than 4 years ago | (#33286208)

My uncle and I were talking once and he wanted to be discreet, so he said "Whiskey Tango Foxtrot."

....which kinda made me LOL.

Re:LOL (1)

cgpirre (1838252) | more than 4 years ago | (#33286268)

I hear it quite often in Dutch, where WTF is also just 3 syllables. I read it as 'wtf' most times too, even in English sentences. LOL is used sometimes irl too, but most people seem to think it's an actual word ('lol' = Dutch for 'fun').

Re:LOL (1)

MachDelta (704883) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285532)

Whenever I hear someone attempt to pronounce "LOL" it always makes me cringe. It always reminds me of Jeremy from Pure Pwnage (and his "LUL!"), which immediately paints the person as a colossal idiot. Sadly it's usually pretty accurate too.

Re:LOL (1)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285548)

Yeah I've heard people say LOL too. What made me cringe is when something was REALLY funny, so instead of laughing, they actually went "Loooooooooooool", holding a pause on the o sound during pronouciation.

Re:LOL (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285684)

wiki snip: Lol is a Dutch word (not an acronym) which, coincidentally, means "fun" ("lollig" means "funny").
so don't blame us.

Re:LOL (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285898)

Yes, heard in several places like at work (male, 27) and gf of my friend (female, 24) and her friends too. First off it seems you can use the word more - if you actually laughed out loud as often you'd seem rather manic. Also I've noted they manage to use it as an emotional state like sad, happy etc. for being either amused or finding something silly. Or as an interjection like "The boss said so, lol, but I just did it anyway."

Re:LOL (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33286106)

Save me Jeebus!

Re:LOL (1)

Deus.1.01 (946808) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285940)

One of my years in secondary school was a vocational year called "ICT"(Information Communication yada yada).

Didn't get much out of it.

What i did get was retarded CS gamers as classmates, and i swear the incesant "llOOOOooL"(verbatim) nearly drove me to sock 'em.

Re:LOL (1)

RulerOf (975607) | more than 4 years ago | (#33286218)

i swear the incesant "llOOOOooL"(verbatim) nearly drove me to wtfpwn 'em.

Fixed that for ya ;)

New additin to Dictionary (1)

rossdee (243626) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285334)

First Post becomes common

It has it's uses, I suppose (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285336)

More interesting is the language the internet hasn't changed, but, until now, hasn't been allowed to be heard. [youtube.com]

No. (3, Insightful)

JanneM (7445) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285338)

"[...] is everyone up to speed?"

No. That's the whole point of slang - you use it to show that you belong in a specific subgroup. If everyone is "up to speed" on some slang it no longer works as slang. Everyone who wants to show subgroup membership (and that's everybody, pretty much) will start using other new words and expressions instead.

Re:No. (2, Interesting)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285472)

The point is how it ceases to be a slang... And on a quite global scale, enabling unprecended level of direct interboundary (interocean even) communication - the very act of which is what has always shaped languages. But rarely among so diverse people (and, face it, with not terribly impressive / solid familiarity with the languges they use; vide this post...)

Re:No. (5, Insightful)

JanneM (7445) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285588)

"And on a quite global scale, enabling unprecended level of direct interboundary (interocean even) communication"

Not as much as many native English speakers seem to want to think. Most people here in Japan, including academics and other well-educated professionals, never visit non-Japanese language websites - or if they do (some social websites or similar), only the subset that is in Japanese. And this is generally true even when their English proficiency is quite good. I saw similar behavior (though to a lesser extent) in my native Sweden some years ago.

"Language globalization" or not, the vast majority of people around the world are most comfortable communicating in their own language, with people largely sharing their own culture. We don't really have one internet as much as a number of separate, semi-permeable internets, each with their own language, culture, trends and memes but with some high-profile stuff "leaking" between them. We may superficially seem as we're sharing the same online culture, but for every runaway meme shared by the world, you have tens, hundreds that never go beyond the particular internet where it was born.

Re:No. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33286144)

Yoo Sveedish, tooz? Bork bork bork.

Re:No. (1)

NovaHorizon (1300173) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285618)

"[...] is everyone up to speed?"

No. That's the whole point of slang - you use it to show that you belong in a specific subgroup. If everyone is "up to speed" on some slang it no longer works as slang. Everyone who wants to show subgroup membership (and that's everybody, pretty much) will start using other new words and expressions instead.

what subgroup uses "lawl" in actual speech? Because I wish to slap that group.

Re:No. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285760)

People with weird accents who don't pronounce "lol" as "loll".

Re:No. (1)

vegiVamp (518171) | more than 4 years ago | (#33286050)

Correct, although it's worth pointing out the difference between slang and (tech) jargon, also: jargon is used as shortcuts for otherwise long descriptions of specific concepts. (Knowledgable) use of it also shows subgroup, but only as a side effect.

And, honestly, "to google" and the like are slang, not jargon, and thus the "tech savvy" have nothing to do with it.

WIBBLE (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285348)

WIBBLE

Re:WIBBLE (1)

sjwt (161428) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285396)

flibble and snoff

Re:WIBBLE (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285912)

Engfeh.

what about (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285358)

d0 57upid 7r4|\|5147i0|\| 14|\|gu4g35 (0u|\|7?

Re:what about (2, Funny)

aquabat (724032) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285378)

d0 57upid 7r4|\|5147i0|\| 14|\|gu4g35 (0u|\|7?

\/\/|-|y |\|07?

Re:what about (3, Funny)

ducomputergeek (595742) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285482)

Yes, there is a perl module for that.

Re:what about (2, Informative)

ducomputergeek (595742) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285496)

Clicked enter for some reason:

Here is the module: http://search.cpan.org/~jmadler/Acme-LeetSpeak-0.01/lib/Acme/LeetSpeak.pm [cpan.org]

Re:what about (2, Insightful)

aquabat (724032) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285512)

aw, that takes all the fun out of it!

Re:what about (5, Funny)

derGoldstein (1494129) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285590)

Yes, there is a perl module for that.

I'm pretty sure that --
d0 57upid 7r4|\|5147i0|\| 14|\|gu4g35 (0u|\|7?
is valid perl6. You don't need a module.

Re:what about (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33286080)


> perl6 -e'd0 57upid 7r4|\|5147i0|\| 14|\|gu4g35 (0u|\|7?'
===SORRY!===
Confused at line 1, near "d0 57upid "

Re:what about (2, Funny)

RulerOf (975607) | more than 4 years ago | (#33286246)

===SORRY!===

Confused at line 1, near "d0 57upid "

You need to get the lastest nightly build. That code starts a loop that churns out nonstop images from memegenerator.net.

Language changes when people talk to each other (1)

billstewart (78916) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285360)

The Internet lets everybody in the world talk to each other, faster and more flexibly than before. So yes, that's going to change language, because people who would have never talked to each other are doing so, and people who had obscure things to talk about can find other people to talk about them with that they wouldn't have before.

Surely.. (4, Funny)

zmollusc (763634) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285368)

'How teh intartubez are changing how ppl speak' ?

The "Internet"? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285384)

Is that thing still around?

Re:The "Internet"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285478)

It sits on top of the Big Ben.

Re:The "Internet"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285620)

That show is anti-lulz

Re:The "Internet"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33286276)

You are mistaken. The anti-lulz is Family Guy.

Re:The "Internet"? (1)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285528)

Of course it's still around! It's all tubes, you know.

Slashdot (4, Insightful)

matt007 (80854) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285398)

back in time : Slashdot = News for nerds, stuff that matters.
now : Slashdot = Useless stuff, badly reported, just to get clicks.

Re:Slashdot (1)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285600)

Back then Slashdot was the original /. - with the /. effect.

Now, slashdot has become a ??

Re:Slashdot (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33286200)

??

... Profit!

So many complaints (4, Insightful)

slackarse (875650) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285806)

So many complaints about /. articles.

So why do you people come back ... and waste time reading ... then wasting more time commenting?

H3Y GUYS (0, Redundant)

TheVelvetFlamebait (986083) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285428)

I FOUND THES N3AT ANGLISH 2 INT3RNAT SP3AK TRANSLA2R!11!!! OMG LOL

http://ssshotaru.homestead.com/files/aolertranslator.html [homestead.com]

Re:H3Y GUYS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285534)

EXC3PT ITS FROM 2005!11111!1! LOL UR JUST NOT UP 2 SPEAD !11!1!! OMG WTF

Re:H3Y GUYS (0, Offtopic)

TheVelvetFlamebait (986083) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285928)

LOL THNGS FROM 205 STIL EXIST DUMBAS

1337 (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285438)

and "Leetspeak" in which some letters are replaced by numbers which stem from programming code.

Last time I checked, none of my code l00k3d 1ik3 7h15.

Re:1337 (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285466)

Modded you insightful, but I realized that I've been using DEADBEEF, C00FEEBABE, FEEDFACE, and other magic numbers in my code.

I are in ur brainz (5, Funny)

jez9999 (618189) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285454)

... changing ur langwigez!

Keyboards (3, Insightful)

txoof (553270) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285458)

Not only has the internet changed the way some people speek, but just the common use of keyboards without the intervention of editing or editors (or thinking, sometimes) has contributed to the way we speak online, and occasionally in real life. A few examples that pop to mind are "borken," a simple transposition of the "r" and "o" in broken-- and of course thanks to the Swedish Chef [youtube.com] . That transposition also gave us the incredibly useful word "bork" as well. The transposition "teh" has also crept into usage, usually to show some sort of derision or sarcasm.

What other transpositions or artifacts of keyboard usage can /. come up with?

Re:Keyboards (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285506)

It's a tarp!

Re:Keyboards (2, Interesting)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285556)

@txoof You've forgotten those #$^& stupid at-signs that people have to use on linear forums

:) <--- keyboard smiley

Re:Keyboards (3, Insightful)

RulerOf (975607) | more than 4 years ago | (#33286258)

@martin-boundary naw dude. it's a gazillion times moar convenient to click thru a gazillion pages to read the whole conversation rather than seeing a threaded view. And the character limit is good cau

Re:Keyboards (1)

comm2k (961394) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285570)

Oh noes...

Re:Keyboards (3, Funny)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285638)

What other transpositions or artifacts of keyboard usage can /. come up with?

*^#%@#NO CARRIER

I hate^h^h^h^hlike this

ITS LIKE SHOUTING

h tee tee pee colon slash slash slash dot dot org

Re:Keyboards (1)

AtomicDog1471 (1881258) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285838)

That has nothing to do with keyboards... "O" and "R" are nowhere near each other. Same for "teh", it sounds more to do with mild dyslexia.

Also... what says "bork" in real life? Come to think of it, who's said "bork" since 1999 anyway?

Re:Keyboards (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33286164)

Has more to do with fast typing with both hands

to Bork (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285972)

To defeat a judicial nomination through a concerted attack on the nominee's character, background and philosophy.

To fire an honest government official in an attempt to prevent embarrassment to and exposure of a dishonest government officeholder who has conspired to commit high crimes (term first used by the National Lampoon Radio Hour in to describe the 1973 firing of Watergate Special Prosecutor Archibald Cox by Solicitor General Robert Bork in the "Saturday Night Massacre" orchestrated by Bork and President Richard Nixon).

Re:Keyboards (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33286092)

PWN!

Surely you've heard... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285464)

OMG PONIES

What about television? (3, Funny)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285536)

Go back 50 years, and you will probably find the same commentary about television. How it was spreading new terms and speech patterns and what not.

It's funny, though. I tried to Google for articles, posts and blogs about this from 50 years ago, and didn't find anything.

Were people back 50 years ago too lazy to post crap on the Internet . . . ?

Re:What about television? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285860)

Er... for one, Internet didn't exist 50 years ago

Re:What about television? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285910)

O RLY?

Whoosh

(...insert other appropriate memes here)

Re:What about television? (1)

wannabgeek (323414) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285944)

Can you tell us how people used to "woosh" 50 years ago...?

Re:What about television? (1)

bronney (638318) | more than 4 years ago | (#33286008)

Whoosh~

BBC talking about changing language is irony (0, Troll)

kaladorn (514293) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285544)

There are some questions about BBC and the abuse of language its broadcasters seem to engage in.

BBC : Normal Humans

Reg you lay toe ree : Regulatory (lah instead of lay)
Drugs War : Drug War
Drink Driving : Drunk Driving (or Drinking and Driving)
Al bee nizm : Albinism (with a pine sound in the middle)
BBC Sport : I guess they used up there stocks of the letter s on Drugs War
Sigh rah que suh : Syracuse (with a see sound at the start)
Aw say kah : Osaka (with an oh sound and then a saw sound)

The BBC has a tongue firmly in cheeck if they are addressing the changes in language. Surely they do not speak the Englis of the King anymore. Nor that of the Queen. Nor even some unacknowledged bastard, nine degrees removed variant therof.

I am totally ignoring their pronunciation (or is that pro noun see ae shun?) of various English town names. I assume some of those are at least rooted in antiquity.

Re:BBC talking about changing language is irony (4, Informative)

Xest (935314) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285692)

Are you from the UK? Some of your suggestions are just plain weird, no one in the UK says "Al-bine-izm" or "drunk driving". "BBC Sport" is a name so I fail to see what's invalid about that.

The BBC just pronounces things the way their primary audience (i.e. the British public that funds them) speak and expect them to speak. They seem to be using the standard accepted pronunciation that everyone else here in the UK uses.

I've never heard them say Osaka or Syracuse as they're not words that come up for any reason, but I suspect that's a clue to the fact that you're perhaps not British? If that's the case, then there's the reason you seem to think their pronunciations are abuse of language, rather than the standard accepted pronunciations of British English speaking people.

I guess it's like how in the UK we generally call Mathematics "maths" rather than "math", and pronounce "route" closer to "root", rather than the common North American pronunciation of "rowt".

The BBC is just using the pronunciation native to their staff, and that their primary audience- the ones who pay for their existence, the British license payer, would expect.

Re:BBC talking about changing language is irony (1)

gmhowell (26755) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285780)

Yeah, you might want to look into your assertions regarding American pronunciations. I don't recall Chuck Berry singing about "rowt" 66. You know how many dialects and accents one will find just in the British Isles? Well, multiply the landmass considerably and you'll see that there are one or two variations here in the colonies.

That said, your point is pretty much dead on. Why the hell wouldn't the Beeb feature pronunciations that ape the majority of its listeners.

Re:BBC talking about changing language is irony (2, Informative)

AtomicDog1471 (1881258) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285804)

Are you a troll or are you honestly suggesting that the BBC should use "American English"?

Reg you lay toe ree : This is correct
Drugs War : This is correct (it's the "War on Drugs")
Drink Driving : This is fine (ie "Don't drink and drive")
Al bee nizm : It's pronounced "Albeeno" in Britain
BBC Sport : What could possibly be wrong with this?
Sigh rah que suh : Seriously, how often is this word said on the BBC?
Aw say kah : Same as above

Re:BBC talking about changing language is irony (1)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 4 years ago | (#33286174)

Funnily enough they're using the form of English that they speak, namely British English. It wouldn't be fair for me to demand you speak in Scots just because your stupid words make my ears want to cry, would it?

your what you speak. (1)

bronney (638318) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285572)

The single most hacked word is "your" lol. Who started it?

Not so much the internet as games (4, Interesting)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285594)

My eight year old son plays the usual games in the playground but I noticed that it is now possible to pause them. The way it works in you are running around playing Tag or something and somebody says Pause and everything stops. Its a bit like time out in basketball, but for me it is directly derived from the electronic games they play which generally have a Pause function.

Re:Not so much the internet as games (2, Informative)

vadim_t (324782) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285766)

Maybe the specific usage of the word "pause" is new-ish, but the concept has been there as far back as I can remember, from before I or anybody I knew even knew what the Internet was.

So long you were playing with people who weren't jerks, you could always request for people to wait a minute while you tie your shoelaces or whatever.

Mod parent up (1)

WaroDaBeast (1211048) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285902)

When I was a kid (early nineties, had no idea what the Internet was; all I knew about computers was Prolog), anyone could pause the game if they had a valid reason to do so. We even had a particular gesture for that.

Re:Not so much the internet as games (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33286264)

GAME OFF!!!

[...]

GAME ON!!!

Re:Not so much the internet as games (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33286162)

Yes, the term "pause" for the game is new, but the game is old. It was called "freeze" tag back in my day (I was a kid in the '80s).

WOW (1)

prefec2 (875483) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285604)

I have never thought languages can change. I thought they talk the way they do since stone age. Honestly. They found out that languages change due to a new innovation which changed the life of many people? The industrial revolution also changed the language of people. They now know what a company is and a factory and in most countries they know what a labor union is and what it is good for.

But even more astonishing then finding out, that new things influence languages, is the fact that they came up with this result just now. The people know verbs like to google now almost since Google became so popular. And kids use abbreviations very often. So they use LOL as word or IRL or IMHO or BTW. Some of these abbreviations are used in speech and text and other are only present in text form. Almost forgot cu, me 2, and all those SMS shortcuts.

But now I have to tend to something more important. I heard a rice sack has fallen over. In China. Can you imagine.

To google.. (4, Informative)

MoellerPlesset2 (1419023) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285636)

Language evolves.. but it still evolves along the same lines and 'rules' as before.
For instance, we now have "to google" in English, but if you turn that into a French verb, it needs a French verb ending, thus "googler".
In German you'd need an -n but "googlen" doesn't work, but by transposing the letters you can use the -eln verb ending and so you have "googeln".
In Swedish, verbs need an -a ending, requiring the 'e' be dropped, so "googla".

I thought in swedish ... (1)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285752)

... you'd just lengthen the first syllable so you'd have "Gooooogle".

Hey , the Muppet Show taught me all I need to know about language! Though admittedly some of
its facts were a bit fozzy around the edges.

Re:I thought in swedish ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285842)

Well, you were wrong. There is more to languages than the Muppets relized. I'd recommend you to read this

http://www.escapeartist.com/efam/84/Swedish.html

it is also wery funny (at least if you are from Sweden).

Re:To google.. (2, Interesting)

rzlq (1820250) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285840)

right, some languages will even use a prefix, like the czech "vygooglit" -- literally "to google out" [as in 'find out'].

Re:To google.. (4, Interesting)

kumanopuusan (698669) | more than 4 years ago | (#33286096)

In Japanese, verbs often end in ru. guguru [google.com] (one transliteration of Google) ends in ru and it's used as a verb. With only a handful of exceptions, all Japanese verbs are regular, so once a new verb is coined all of its many forms are used more or less naturally.

From the verb stem (gugur-) one can derive all the other forms of the verb, including gugureba [google.com] (if [one] googles), gugutta [google.com] (googled), gugurimasu [google.com] (google [polite]) and even gugurikata [google.com] (googling technique), gugutteirassyaru [google.com] (to google [exalted]), gugutteitadakereba [google.com] (if [I] humbly receive the addressee's act of googling), guguritai [google.com] ([I] want to google) and gugure [google.com] (google [impolite imperative, similar to "Google it, motherfucker!"]).

Re:To google.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33286124)

Sorry, gugutteitadakereba is closer to "if [I] may humbly receive the [addressee's] act of googling."

Re:To google.. (1)

Alioth (221270) | more than 4 years ago | (#33286182)

The worst, I've found, in Spanish is "wikipedear". I've noted that these neologisms (googlear, wikipediar etc.) only get used in the participle or gerund, never as the usual first/second/third person etc. conjugations (you see things like "Lo he googleado..." but never "lo googlearé" etc.

Interestingly, "cederrón" - which means CD-ROM - is actually in the Diccionario de la Real Academia Española ( http://buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltConsulta?TIPO_BUS=3&LEMA=cederr%C3%B3n [buscon.rae.es] , so long as slashdot doesn't butcher the URL)

Re:To google.. (1)

migla (1099771) | more than 4 years ago | (#33286256)

...and in Finland, the verb would be "googlata". Many finns never learn to pronounce g, though, so they'd pronounce it with k-sounds instead.

Re:To google.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33286274)

You mean the French Have allowed the word 'Google' into their sacred Francais? Mon Dieur Heresey!

Why realize now? (1)

acs.judit (1810240) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285762)

How can they talk so "professionally" about internet slang when it took them 20 years to realize its importance?

The internet made you stupid (4, Funny)

RivenAleem (1590553) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285786)

Reminded me of this: http://i.imgur.com/MFEQB.jpg [imgur.com]

Re:The internet made you stupid (1)

AtomicDog1471 (1881258) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285892)

Absolute bullshit.

For one thing, she wasn't necessarily stupid; she used proper spelling and punctuation in one reply, she obviously chose to type that way.

Secondly, even if she was typing like a retard it would be her shoddy genes and half-hearted upbringing that would have "made her stupid". Not the internet. One thing the internet hasn't done is made people stupid.

Not really (2, Interesting)

rikkards (98006) | more than 4 years ago | (#33285868)

I was expecting this to be more about how languages are infiltrating other languages (think Firefly and how they swear in Chinese). More like how the internet is making people more knowledgeable of tech terminology.

This again? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33285888)

Subby, I'm afraid that if you're only going to repost the same tired article despite the fact that this issue has been chewed and rechewed throughout the entire history of written language ... well, I'm going to have to replace you with a shell script. A short one.

When (1)

ciderbrew (1860166) | more than 4 years ago | (#33286056)

the CEO ends a two hour meeting with "All your base are belong to us." I'll know it's true.
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