Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Sandisk Debuts World's Smallest SSD Yet

CmdrTaco posted more than 4 years ago | from the itty-bitty-bits dept.

Data Storage 222

siliconbits writes "Weighing less than a paper clip and smaller than a postage stamp, Sandisk's iSSD comes in a tiny Ball Grid Array and boasts support for the SATA standard, which means that it can be soldered directly on motherboards."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Make them cheaper, not smaller (0)

e065c8515d206cb0e190 (1785896) | more than 4 years ago | (#33301974)

Please?

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33302042)

I think that the two are actually positively correlated.

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (1, Redundant)

jeffmeden (135043) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302546)

Exactly. It would be pretty hard to make something that sells for less by ultimately putting more of [xyz] material in it... Making them smaller pretty directly leads to same-size price reduction. GP needs a -1, Whining mod created just for him.

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (-1, Offtopic)

marco.antonio.costa (937534) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302720)

That he got the prized "Insightful" badge just goes to show how many people on Slashdot are idiots.

Ah, the internet. I'm going to find something better to do RIGHT NOW. :)

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (4, Insightful)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302064)

Cheaper and higher capacity I'd say. I don't care if they've got some weight/size. 2.5" form factor for notebooks and very small pc's and 3.5" form factor for normal sized desktops is absolutely fine. My computer sits under my desk anyways.

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (2, Interesting)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302082)

What is it with everyone and their demands from hard drive makers?

Don't make them smaller (in physical size) make them more affordable!
Don't make them bigger (in memory) make them faster!
Don't make them hold more, make them more reliable!

Did it ever occur to you guys that maybe, just maybe, SSD manufacturers only know how to do ONE thing?

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33302220)

Did it ever occur to you that drive manufacturers and researchers work on all of those things, but don't magically make breakthroughs in a given area simply because a bunch of jackasses on slashdot want them to? I mean, over the past 5 years, SSDs have gotten smaller, cheaper, bigger, faster and more reliable. This story just happened to be about a development in one of those areas.

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (1)

ciderbrew (1860166) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302464)

Almost a Daft punk song there "Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger".

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (2, Funny)

ultranova (717540) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302780)

Did it ever occur to you that drive manufacturers and researchers work on all of those things, but don't magically make breakthroughs in a given area simply because a bunch of jackasses on slashdot want them to?

Actually, they do. No through magic, but because they are cunning businessmen who have had the divinely inspired realization that if they direct their research towards producing what their customers - such as the jackasses on Slashdot - want, they might make more sales. Yes, I know, I didn't believe it either at first, but it really works!

I guess that's why they're manufacturers and you're an Anonymous Coward. And congrats to whoever modded you Insightful, too.

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (2, Insightful)

CeruleanDragon (101334) | more than 4 years ago | (#33303238)

Maybe someone thought him calling us jackasses was insightful. :)

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (2, Informative)

Bigjeff5 (1143585) | more than 4 years ago | (#33303076)

Furthermore, smaller = faster, smaller = cheaper, and the smaller = denser (that is, more memory in the same package).

Making them smaller accomplishes all your goals, that's why they continue to make them smaller. Saying "don't make them smaller, make them cheaper instead" is like saying "don't add horsepower to my car, just make it go faster"*. Uhh...

Seriously people. The way you make electronics cheaper is by making them smaller. The more chips they can fit on a platter, the cheaper each chip is.

*This is obviously ignoring the minor speed improvements that can be had by reducing weight or removing parasitic losses like the flywheel and AC unit. Changing these invariably changes the purpose of the car (from a comfortable cruiser/street car to an uncomfortable racer) as well, which is assumed to be an undesirable compromise in the analogy.

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33302226)

yea take your money for a oversized sd card

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (4, Insightful)

e065c8515d206cb0e190 (1785896) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302232)

In the end their purpose is to sell the product. That's why listening to consumers matters.

The only way I'm buying SSDs is if they become dramatically more affordable ($/GB). And I tend to think most people would agree. I'm not exactly asking for free stuff here, just helping those guys understand what matters. And I couldn't care less about a postage stamp SSD. I don't need that kind of speed at that price in my phone or my fridge. I want a fast disk for my workstation/server. And unless I have $1M to spend on a RAID array of 1024 SSDs the size of a postage stamp, I'm not going to mind if they're 3"1/2.

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33302366)

I'm not exactly asking for free stuff here, just helping those guys understand what matters.

Because anyone at SanDisk is going to know that you made this and the other posts? Because they are just sitting with baited breath at a computer hitting F5 to see what Slashdot thinks of their latest announcement? Puuuhleaze. Go back to the basement whacking off to your furry porn and shoving fists full of cheetos and totinos pizza rolls down your gullet.

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (2, Funny)

somersault (912633) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302520)

Why would they bait their breath? I await your reply with bated breath.

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (1)

AndroSyn (89960) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302564)

Yes, something sure does seem fishy around here....

Stop the presses!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33302680)

We have just received breaking news that somersault is a faggot. He was spotted leaving a gay bathhouse that is frequented by many Apple employees.

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (3, Interesting)

petermgreen (876956) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302498)

I want a fast disk for my workstation/server.
In a desktop you can put in a SSD as your OS drive (which is where most random access takes place afaict) and keep a spinner for your data. Doing this is already reasonablly affordable.

However if you want a laptop with a SSD at the moment you have to either choose a SSD that can store everything you want on the laptop (which if you store a lot on your laptop means $$$), go for a monster size machine or sacrifice the optical drive (and pick your laptop from the very limited choice of machines that support replacing the optical drive with a hard drive).

With this a laptop vendor can put the SSD on the motherboard while having negligable impact on the rest of the machine.

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (1)

MozeeToby (1163751) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302798)

I got an 80 gig SSD for my laptop which is enough for the OS and applications (as long as you don't go too crazy with AAA games). I put the old 500 gig spinning drive into my desktop and made it a network share for data. Got enough fast storage for the things I do and plenty of slow storage over the network. When it comes to putting an SSD into a desktop, I really have to question if its worth it. A couple of 7200 RPM raided will provide nearly the nearly same performance for a much lower cost. The advantages on a laptop are speed without a RAID, better battery life, better reliability when being moved around, and less noise; for the most part those things don't matter with a desktop.

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302704)

Actually you do care.
Getting 64G on a postage stamp means you get 650G(or more) in your half size HD.

I suspect you wouldn't buy 64G SSD the size of a normal HD.

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33302774)

You only complain, you didn't buy anything, you are not yet a customer.

This new SSD seems quite nice. What you have to realize is that you are not in the intended customer group and your opinion does not matter at all. This chip is intended for useage in embedded PC's, netbooks and possibly laptops. You might be a customer for the end product but since you haven't bought a SSD yet... well.. they tend to market stuff to people who actually buy things, they sort of make more money that way.
Sinced it uses a standard SATA interface it will be possible for laptop manufacturers to just place one of those chips next to the SATA controller. It's very little design work and the SATA controller probably already has a spare port. The end result is that your laptop gets an internal SSD while still leaving the standard HDD port for whatever you like to place there.
If they want to slim down the laptop they can just drop the 2.5" format and only support the internal chip.

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (1)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302934)

You are not the target market. People who need raw IOPS are the ones who are buying these things, and their budgets are *WAY* bigger than yours. Stick to spinning media if $/GB is what matters to you.

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (1)

Kepesk (1093871) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302348)

Oh yeah?? Well my SSD is smaller than a pinhead, weighs less than a flea, and can hold 1.21 jigabytes!

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (-1, Troll)

Desler (1608317) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302440)

Well my SSD is smaller than a pinhead

That's funny. I heard your dick is the same size, too.

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33302910)

Bazinga!

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (1)

ilsaloving (1534307) | more than 4 years ago | (#33303092)

1.21 jigabytes, is it?

But... can it transfer data at 88 MBps?

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (1)

blai (1380673) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302494)

Make SSD manufacturers more efficient! Do all three at same time!

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (1)

Tim C (15259) | more than 4 years ago | (#33303148)

What is it with everyone and their demands from hard drive makers?

It's quite simple - until a product meets my criteria I'm not going to buy it.

I'd love an SSD, but at the current price/GB there's absolutely no way I can afford one, so when the subject is discussed I may well opine that they're too expensive (for me). That won't do anything to make them cheaper of course; sucks to be me.

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (1)

hattig (47930) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302614)

It will be cheaper to build in most cases.

Normal SSD: SSD controller chip, cache RAM chip, PCB, flash chips, SATA interface, etc.
iSSD: Integrated chip (probably a sandwich chip - the controller, then RAM, then up to 8 (or 16) flash dies.

But new technology commands a premium. It will be interesting to see how these are used initially. The fast read/writes compared to normal flash storage in low-end systems could be a real boost on tablets.

Re:Make them cheaper, not smaller (1)

Bigjeff5 (1143585) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302968)

With electronics, smaller = cheaper.

It was recently leaked that Intel has moved their NAND chips to a 25nm process instead of the much larger 45nm process, which is expected to cut price per GB in half.

The smaller they can make them, the more of them they can make at a time (they don't do these one-off you know). For example, if they have one square foot of space per run and each chip takes up one square inch, that means they can do 144 of them in a single run. If each chip takes up only 1/2 inch squared, they can make 288 in a single run.

The costs per run don't change much, if at all, and it significantly reduces the amount of expensive materials (like pure chip-quality silicon) per chip which leads to a halving of the cost per chip.

What you really pay for when you buy the "latest and greatest" is the engineering and design time, as well as any re-tooling. That's why prices drop so fast - as soon as the money is recovered they drop the price to expand the target market, and they can do that because the manufacturing costs are very low (and continue to drop with smaller chips).

That's why today you can buy a microcontroller that has the same power as the original 486dx processor, but smaller than your pinky-nail, for around $4. The 486 cost $1500 (adjusted for inflation) initially, and still costs around $100-$150 today because the chip itself is so much larger, and therefore more expensive to produce.

Smaller = cheaper.

That's a great idea! (1)

Pojut (1027544) | more than 4 years ago | (#33301978)

SSD being soldered directly to a motherboard? I'm a bit torn about that idea...

Re:That's a great idea! (4, Insightful)

Going_Digital (1485615) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302052)

Would be pretty good if one was soldered on the main board of a laptop for the boot drive, still leaving space for a traditional hard drive for mass storage.

Re:That's a great idea! (4, Insightful)

v1 (525388) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302078)

SSD being soldered directly to a motherboard? I'm a bit torn about that idea...

ok, so you're saying my hard drive died. How much will that cost to replace?

Excuse me?

(they'd BETTER put it in a socket)

Re:That's a great idea! (5, Insightful)

Criliric (879949) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302120)

exactally, and if the mother board craps out, good luck getting your data back

Re:That's a great idea! (4, Informative)

v1 (525388) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302176)

heh, I hadn't even considered that, excellent counterpoint.

Re:That's a great idea! (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302740)

You people.

Did you even read the article? I don't think that 4-64GB will be replacing your hard drive.

SHeesh.

Re:That's a great idea! (2, Insightful)

Zerth (26112) | more than 4 years ago | (#33303140)

Considering my netbook has 8 gigs of onboard storage, yes it could.

Re:That's a great idea! (2, Interesting)

gmack (197796) | more than 4 years ago | (#33303176)

I just put a machine together for a Church's overhead display. Since they don't do much file storage on that machine I opted for a 32 GB SSD instead of going for a traditional drive since the price was roughly the same.

The machine it replaced didn't have a drive much larger than that and after installing Windows 7, office and Easy Worship I still have 16 GB left on the drive so the upper end of that size range is easily enough to replace your hard drive.

Re:That's a great idea! (1)

ihatejobs (1765190) | more than 4 years ago | (#33303270)

Modern OS takes up to 20GB once you tack on log files, temp files, etc. This could *easily* replace the notion of using a disk drive for your OS install. Disk drives could purely be used for mass storage.

Re:That's a great idea! (3, Funny)

jeffmeden (135043) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302276)

You *did* have a backup, right?

Re:That's a great idea! (1)

shadowknot (853491) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302676)

It would be an absolute pain in the ass but as it uses the SATA standard there should be a way of connecting up the pins and getting the data off somehow. I actually just sent an email, however, around the company I work for entitled "Imaging these will be a bitch" (digital forensics company).

system drive (1)

reiisi (1211052) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302686)

Well, if you use the soldered-in flash as the OS drive, you shouldn't need to worry about lost data? Maybe?

Also, although I don't agree with what I'm saying here, there is a target device here that many people will consider disposable. Specifically, if the motherboard dies, remove your micro-SD card and buy a new cheap tablet for lost than the cost of repair.

Except that you and I will use our toaster oven to reflow the SSD and/or remove it, perhaps.

Re:That's a great idea! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33302692)

You didn't back it up into the cloud, home NAS, optical disks, iPod, ... Shame on you.

Who cares if the motherboard craps out and you lose your OS boot iSSD. You did put your data on your main data drive, didn't you?

And as for devices where the iSSD is the only storage, that's a client machine like a tablet, netbook, etc - you're getting the data from a primary machine anyway.

Re:That's a great idea! (1)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302952)

God forbid you backup your data.

Re:That's a great idea! (1)

Zocalo (252965) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302200)

I think that directly soldering the device to motherboards is more likely to be restricted to devices that are more economical to just replace when they fail; stuff like MP3 players, phones and thumb drives[1]. Anything larger than that and you'd have to be a pretty dumb manufacturer or working to very tight space constraints not to see the potential revenue that might come from putting the chip on a daughter board to create higher spec systems and end-user upgrades.

[1] This doesn't preclude sending the thing to some 3rd world country to be recycled, only that the costs of skilled labour for the a repair exceed the manufacturing cost.

Re:That's a great idea! (1)

Zerth (26112) | more than 4 years ago | (#33303192)

It would make a nice replacement for recovery partitions. That would be a fairly low-write and you wouldn't really miss it if your MB died.

Re:That's a great idea! (1)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302436)

What about the motherboard of an iPhone?

Re:That's a great idea! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33303096)

You are obviously not a Mac guy.

Re:That's a great idea! (3, Insightful)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302130)

It's a great Idea for Apple products. Because if it breaks, you just send it in to their support and they give you a replacement for the time being (ignoring the fact that you actually need your files right away) while they work on your computer for 4-6 months only to ship you a brand new one in the end. And when its time to upgrade, you just toss your computer out and buy a new one.

Re:That's a great idea! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33302624)

My Apple trolling gets an insightful?

Yeesh

Re:That's a great idea! (1)

guruevi (827432) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302666)

Well, it probably wouldn't be a good idea for Dell then. Because if it breaks, you just call their support phone lines in India, they keep pushing you from person to person (ignoring the fact that your boss actually has to pay you for all that time wasted calling them) while they keep promising to call you back for about 4-6 months only to charge your credit card to ship you a replacement part that you have to fix yourself and if you don't send back the bad part they won't ever give your money back. And when it's time to upgrade, you just toss your computer out and buy a new one.

Actually I have never had any issues with Apple support - all repairs were either made on-site by their techs or within 1 week (if you live outside the coverage area of their tech support) and if they can't commit to that (backlog or known issues) they send you a replacement, an empty box for the bad unit and all shipping labels completely free of charge. Plus it's international so you can walk in any store, anywhere in the world and get it fixed for free.

Of course, you will always lose your data if your hard drive goes bad (which is probably the most common failure in computers) regardless of manufacturer so there is no excuse for losing your data if YOU don't have a backup.

Bullshit (1)

copponex (13876) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302932)

I bought a Dell laptop for $700 that included a business warranty. I sent two tickets complaining about a screen defect, provided a picture, and the next day a technician was sent to my location and swapped out the part in less than an hour.

If you don't want to spend the extra $100 on the business warranty, it might take a couple days to get a replacement part. But you can buy a machine with with a three year accidental replacement on-site warranty for far less than you can get a similarly specced Apple product with AppleCare. Even if you pay $350 for the AppleCare for your MacBook Pro, they don't send on-site technicians. You still have to go make a reservation at an Apple Store, talk to a purple haircut who revels in informing you that you'll have to send your $2500 laptop off for repair, and maybe it will be back in a few weeks.

Your best bet is to go to an independent Apple Repair Center. At least they give a shit, and get the part overnighted and your laptop operable within 24 hours.

You'd think that paying $1,200 for a Core 2 Duo laptop would get you some actual customer service. But you'd be wrong.

Re:That's a great idea! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33302184)

Would be great for laptops and netbooks, well, generally anything really.

A 30GB on-board SSD would work for OSes and some basic setting storage.
A main SSD could be used for everything else.
There could also be an option to copy the entire OS to the child SSD(s) as a form of write-protecting the OS area so it could act as a recovery solution as well.

This is something i have wanted to do for a while, but of course, money was a barrier at those times.

Re:That's a great idea! (1)

KnightBlade (1074408) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302216)

We've been hearing about on board storage for eons now. Is this going to be yet another, look we can put this on the motherboard itself and all these magical things will happen announcement followed by disappearance of the technology, followed by yet another, look we can...

Re:That's a great idea! (1)

jeffmeden (135043) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302354)

Here's how it could work: solder a 16GB version to the motherboard, make it fast, give it a dedicated SATA channel. Then write a storage driver for windows (or whatever) that masks space from the primary disk for the OS and moves the data to the SSD. Think of it as a lower level cache for the hard drive before going to RAM. Hell, you could keep a synced copy on your actual hard disk to remove the risk of losing anything at all. Bottom line is it's basically "readyboost done right" since it makes for a very fast place to store files that's not as expensive as adding that much RAM (in dollars, watts, space, etc.)

Re:That's a great idea! (1)

mlts (1038732) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302786)

This is is what some SAN companies do. One of them has SSD media that functions as a persistent cache. This way, data that is read/written to often goes off of the SSD, while other items end up being written directly to the array that can be made slower.

The good about this method: Not having to worry as much about what tiers of storage, because the SAN head determines where data is placed.

The bad: It might be that OS files end up there as opposed to what you want to have the great performance with. So, it doesn't completely replace the need for tiered storage.

Re:That's a great idea! (1)

alen (225700) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302402)

maybe not for PC's, but for HP server and probably Dell with the CD/DVD they provide to set up the server it's a good idea. more storage on the motherboard means you can put more logic into the scripted set ups that HP/Dell provide. and you can use it as a cheap storage for diagnostic data for servers

Re:That's a great idea! (1)

mlts (1038732) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302610)

I would like this myself. What this would be great for would be putting OS images on and having it be read-only. This way, if Joe Sixpack gets their computer compromised and trashed, it would be trivial to enable the boot device in BIOS and boot from it for a reinstall or a recovery mode. Well, more trivial than getting Joe to find the OS recovery media or buy another copy of Windows.

Even better would be the option of booting to recovery media, or having a recovery partition with tools to do offline malware checking, hard disk imaging, filesystem scanning, and other utilities.

Best would be a the above as well as a hypervisor that supported encryption and trusted booting via a TPM. This way, VMs can boot, regardless of OS and be protected against local tampering or malware tagging the MBR.

Incredible (1)

mahiskali (1410019) | more than 4 years ago | (#33301990)

To think that several years ago, a 64GB SSD was the size of a laptop hard drive and ridiculously expensive. Just awesome.

Re:Incredible (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33302234)

To think that you won't be doing more than several years ago while we continue to burn fossil fuels to build such useless crap, and there's still no life-extension technology out there because all we do is entertain each other to death. Just awesome.

Re:Incredible (1)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302474)

Life extension technology, listen to you. Are you Holt Fasner or something?

Re:Incredible (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33302542)

no life extension technology? During my lifetime (~30y) the life expectancy in my country has gone up 10 years. Maybe it's not molecular repair or whatever it is you're waiting for but it's still pretty impressive to me.

SATA=solder to motherboard? (4, Insightful)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302024)

I don't think that the SATA spec mandates a BGA interface be provided on motherboards. You couldn't really solder this directly on there any more than you could directly solder a USB device on a mobo that had no headers. You'd have to precision-solder onto the tracks on the board. I think what's meant is that this component can be integrated onto existing motherboard designs without adding a new interface. It can use the existing SATA controller.

This opens the door to a mobo that not only has onboard graphics and sound, but onboard mass storage. That'd be pretty amazing in an "all my hard drives just ate themselves" scenario.

Re:SATA=solder to motherboard? (1)

v1 (525388) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302156)

Our POS systems at the bars use a little card with a pair of little ROM chips on it, about the size of flash nand chips, and run windows xp embedded. If the storage fails, you just unplug it and plug in a new one. They'd be out of their minds not to socket this thing or otherwise jumper it.

The obvious way would be to have a regular sata connector at a strategic location on the board, and have this ssd in a slightly larger package, and have it just plug into the connector and screw down with a couple tiny screws, sort of like the wireless cards on laptops. I suppose they might want to use some other sort of better suited connector, which would make their lives easier, but would be less flexible to work on. I'd like to be able to pluck the little guy off the mobo and attach it to a sata cable for troubleshooting, (or to be able to plug in a real HDD for troubleshooting) and not have to fight some proprietary connector.

Re:SATA=solder to motherboard? (1)

Statecraftsman (718862) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302258)

I'm failing to see the benefit of soldered-on in this context as well. To me soldered-on means disposable and my data is anything but. (Yes, I do backup but why make it harder to recover for no significant return?)

Re:SATA=solder to motherboard? (2, Insightful)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302372)

It'd be guff as a data partition, but you could stick a Linux environment on there for basic tasks. Like those instant-on OSes, but user-accessable. Heck, they could market it as a built-in Readyboost drive.

Re:SATA=solder to motherboard? (1)

ultranova (717540) | more than 4 years ago | (#33303248)

I'm failing to see the benefit of soldered-on in this context as well. To me soldered-on means disposable and my data is anything but. (Yes, I do backup but why make it harder to recover for no significant return?)

No significant return? You just said yourself that if this thing is soldered on, you need to replace the whole motherboard if it dies, rather than just this tiny chip. That means more sales for the motherboard manufacturer.

Or did you mean a significant return for you?

Re:SATA=solder to motherboard? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33302282)

You couldn't really solder this directly on there any more than you could directly solder a USB device on a mobo that had no headers. You'd have to precision-solder onto the tracks on the board. I think what's meant is that this component can be integrated onto existing motherboard designs without adding a new interface.

I thought it was pretty damn clear that that's exactly what they were talking about. You'd have to be a pretty big fuggin idiot to think that they were suggesting that you could go out and buy one of these and solder it to the motherboard you already have in your computer.

Re:SATA=solder to motherboard? (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302530)

It's probably less for PCs and more for embedded platforms (which increasingly do have SATA interfaces - a MIPS board on my desk right now has TWO SATA interfaces).

But it can be useful on a MID - 64GB storage without having to waste space for a 1.8" hard drive or SSD. This will enable smaller handheld PCs (literally - Windows 7 or Linux on a device the size of an iPhone). Or for tablet PCs, you can fill the space the hard drive left with battery and get easily another 20-100% more battery life by having the SSD soldered in.

Sure it eliminates the ability to upgrade, and if the SSD dies, the device dies, but that's not unusual in a lot of things these days (e.g., cell phones - if your iPhone/Android flash dies, it's bricked). Though in the PC case, there's always USB boot.

Re:SATA=solder to motherboard? (2, Informative)

blind biker (1066130) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302918)

Like the motherboard of the original Eee PC, or the Macbook Air?

Re:SATA=solder to motherboard? (1)

Bigjeff5 (1143585) | more than 4 years ago | (#33303218)

You apparently have no idea how wires work. (i.e. they can be replaced by copper traces and soldered connections - it's pretty frickin easy)

mini-itx (3, Interesting)

petermgreen (876956) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302032)

I wonder if anyone will build a mini-itx board with one of these on? IDE is on it's way out and while you can get SATA disk on moudules a largish lump hanging out of a flimsy sata port doesn't seem like a very robust soloution. A board with one of these on would mean all you would need to add is ram to make a fully functional embedded PC.

Re:mini-itx (1)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302138)

Just be a lil more creative :). When I built my FreeNAS box I decided that I didn't want the OS on any of the hard drives. I just took a 2GB USB thumb drive with FreeNAS on it, hooked it via a cable up to one of the motherboard USB headers (some electrical tape wrapped around the drive/cable connection to make sure it wouldn't come out), and then zip tied the drive to the side of the case.

Looks a little goofy if you pop the hood, but it works flawlessly and you can't tell at all from the outside. And for $20 in materials I'm guessing it's a lot cheaper than one of these :).

Re:mini-itx (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302504)

"some electrical tape wrapped around the drive/cable connection to make sure it wouldn't come out), and then zip tied the drive to the side of the case"
Amateur
Pros use heat shrink tubing and double sided foam tape.

.

Re:mini-itx (1)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302962)

And hot glue guns.

Re:nano-itx (1)

rwa2 (4391) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302378)

Hell with mini-itx, I don't know why more manufacturers don't pump out nano-itx gear. NVidia already showed us it could be done years ago, but no manufacturer has really stepped up to the plate:
http://www.google.com/images?q=nvidia [google.com] ion reference platform

Sure there's the fit-PC2, which is cute... but still suffers from the crappy PowerVR video with limited driver support.

Summary++ (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33302046)

The whole article is just about 5 times longer than the very short summary. I didn't read it very attentively, but the following 2 quotes should be informative and reading them, I think you won't need to spend the 30 seconds it would take to read the full article:

"160MB/sec sequential read and 100MB/sec sequential write speeds being quoted."

"will target the "fast-growing" mobile computing platforms such as tablet PCs and ultra-thin notebooks (and netbooks we presume); as expected, they won't be available to consumers directly but as an integral part of devices."

Re:Summary++ (2, Interesting)

Kjella (173770) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302992)

"160MB/sec sequential read and 100MB/sec sequential write speeds being quoted."

Which is the least interesting performance statistic, making me think the random access and IOPS is not that hot. Still, 64GB with reasonable performance, combined with a TB platter drive makes for one helluva laptop.

iSSD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33302088)

One rotten apple spoils 'em all.

boost? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33302094)

You mean "boasts"? The literacy level in here is shameful.

Possible Applications (3, Interesting)

dmgxmichael (1219692) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302310)

Possible Applications of 64 GB integrated into the motherboard.

  1. BIOS
  2. Hypervisor
  3. Drivers

And that's right off the top of my head.

Cue The Joke (1)

Ukab the Great (87152) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302344)

About the guy carrying a Sandisk SSD and postal stamp in his pocket who goes down the post office to mail a letter and then sticks the stamp in his smartphone.

different from microSD? (4, Informative)

iamhassi (659463) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302358)

How is this much different from a MicroSD?

--Smaller than stamp? Very much so, [wikipedia.org] Check!
--4gb to 64gb? Check!
--100MB/sec read and 160MB/sec write? Hmm... well not by itself, but if you Raid 0 a few MicroSDs it'd probably reach those speeds, and we're hoping the article is correct with the MB term meaning Megabyte and not Megabit because MicroSD's also offer 100 Mbit/s [wikipedia.org]

So while this is announcement is nice, I still feel like they took the same thing we've been using for the past few years, put it in a new box and labeled it as a totally new product.

Re:different from microSD? (2, Informative)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302560)

They solder a MicroSD card to a MicroSD-to-SATA controller chip (really, to the IDE front-end chip: the whole integrated drive electronics thing can skip all the physical media management stuff like stepper motor control and an I/O subsystem, since we're using a tiny flash chip as backing storage with a flash controller built-in). So you get a SATA interface just like a SATA IDE drive (or an ATA interface like an ATA IDE drive, or a SCSI interface like a SCSI IDE drive), but with a flash back-end. The whole thing takes up... roughly the same space as an SD card anyway.

Re:different from microSD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33303034)

do you even know what IDE is

there is no such thing as a STATA IDE drive, there is no such thing as a SCSI IDE drive, before you run your mouth please take a second to look at wikipedia

and besides its trivial to interface SD cards to pretty much anything you want, they run on simple 3 wire serial, arduino 101

Postage Stamp (1)

ProfessionalCookie (673314) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302570)

I really want to know how is this much different than a postage stamp?

Postage Stump (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33303122)

I really want to know how is this much different than a postage stamp?

The postage stamp isn't dropping in price.

Re:different from microSD? (3, Informative)

TheThiefMaster (992038) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302622)

1: MicroSD only goes up to 32GB, and is actually the limit of MicroSDHC. The standard to go above that (expected to be MicroSDXC, based on SDXC) is yet to exist.
2: The MicroSD interface is limited to 100Mb/s, so the 160Mb/s couldn't be had from MicroSD at all

Other than that, yeah, it's just the same data chip as they probably already had but with a sata device-side chip integrated.

social convention (1)

Carebears (1867786) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302430)

Haven't you heard, "Thin is in" , people will pay more money to get the same product, just thinner and smaller. Example, Ps3, xbox, etc.

Filteration solution (-1, Offtopic)

filter-supply (1882368) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302462)

Thank you for this meaningful information Filtration Solutions Inc. (FSI) is comprehensive distributor and manufacture of filtration products and services. We represent a world wide network of filter manufactures. For Over 20 years, FSI has been developing solutions that can effectively benefit you and your company. http://www.filter-supply.com/ [filter-supply.com]

Weighs less than a paperclip! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33302500)

I measure all my small item weights in paperclips and sizes in postage stamps.

Just for clarification, what are its actual dimensions?

Actual Dimensions (1)

Maarx (1794262) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302860)

It has a mass of roughly 7.37346606 x 10^(-31) Jupiters.

It is a square with sides of length 2.31481482 x 10^(-4) football fields.

It has a storage capacity of 6.25 x 10^(-3) Libraries of Congress.

Geek Version of 20 questions ruined... (3, Funny)

MrMe (172559) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302536)

I chose SSD for my "thing" in 20 questions all the time, now Sandisk has ruined it!

It's a thing.
Q1: Is it smaller than a breadbox?
Yes
Q2: Is it around the size of a postage stamp?
yes
Q3: does it weigh less than a paperclip?
yes
Is it a SSD?
Yes! Damn you Sandisk! You'll rue the day!

Awesome! (2, Interesting)

thechemic (1329333) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302792)

They basically took a MicroSD card and made it SATA compatible. Now stop farting around and put 10 of these in parallel (RAID0) for combinations of blistering speeds and decent sizes. Until then, I’ll stick to my MicroSD cards. At least I wont have to replace an entire mobo if my micro takes a crap.

Embedded Computing Platforms (1)

Cormacus (976625) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302848)

When they boast about being SATA compliant, I don't think the point is that it could be used in {lap|desk}top motherboards, but more as a point of interest for embedded system designers who want onboard storage. Think of it rephrased as "hey, our chip uses that standard interface that your embedded ARM-based processor uses."

More Phone Storage! (1)

gsmalleus (886346) | more than 4 years ago | (#33302966)

This is going to be great when it gets integrated into mobile phones. My Moto Droid only has 512MB of for the OS and apps. Recently I have been getting low storage space warnings because of the number of apps I have installed.

mod 3oWn (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33303188)

Needs OS. Now bSDI

So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33303204)

Just pre-install Windows on the motherboard, write-lock a few key sectors, and viola, no more Linux installations. MWAH HA HA

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?