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Sweden Defends Wiki Sex Case About-Face

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the our-bad dept.

Crime 454

crimeandpunishment writes "Mistake? We didn't make a mistake. That's what Swedish prosecutors said Sunday as they defended their handling of a rape allegation against Wikileaks founder Julian Assange. The Swedish Prosecution Authority said the prosecutor who issued the arrest warrant Friday did not make a mistake, even though a higher-ranked prosecutor withdrew the warrant the next day. A spokesperson for the Authority said: 'The prosecutor who took over the case yesterday had more information, and that is why she made a different assessment than the on-call prosecutor.' Assange, who was in Sweden seeking legal protection for the site as it prepares to leak more Afghan war documents, told a Swedish tabloid newspaper, 'I don't know who's behind this but we have been warned that for example the Pentagon plans to use dirty tricks to spoil things for us.'" We covered the warrant being issued and withdrawn yesterday.

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Foreshadowing. (5, Insightful)

cosm (1072588) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332772)

They will get him. Eventually. I hope not, but I believe they will. Through defamation, assassination (character or otherwise), I just want to forecast now, that as a pessimist / realists / tinfoil hat wearer, they will get him.

Re:Foreshadowing. (5, Insightful)

Jedi Alec (258881) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332814)

At this stage it's going to take one hell of a trick to pull that off though. Assange's opponents don't have all that much credibility left, so even if someone does have major legitimate dirt on the guy it's gonna be a heck of a job getting public opinion on their side.

Re:Foreshadowing. (5, Funny)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332840)

Maybe they can put it on WikiLeaks. That'll show him!

Re:Foreshadowing. (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33332856)

Yeah, just like there isn't anybody left to believe Obama is a muslim, or wasn't born in the US.

Re:Foreshadowing. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33332866)

At this stage it's going to take one hell of a trick to pull that off though. Assange's opponents don't have all that much credibility left, so even if someone does have major legitimate dirt on the guy it's gonna be a heck of a job getting public opinion on their side.

The problem here is that their attempts at character assasination do not officially involve themselves.

So who cares if a rape farce is issued against assange? Who did it? The women? They are gone, and you wont get any mediatical attention on the fact that it aws a farce.

Media bows to Big Power so even if the legal system of whatever country happens not to cave to US pressure, you can always count on the media destroying his image for their own profit.

Re:Foreshadowing. (2, Insightful)

unity100 (970058) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333378)

internet doesnt bow to any of these. see, here you are, talking about it. like millions talking about it on many other sites.

Re:Foreshadowing. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33333020)

It's not a question of credibility, that is irrelevant, it does not matter. What matters is whether by what they do to him, whether credible or not, it discourages others from choosing to doing the same as him. That is what is essential, and is precisely why I think they will assassinate him, and I do not mean "character". This is also why Pvt Manning continues to be held incommunicado at the special torture facility in Kuwait.

Re:Foreshadowing. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33333034)

You don't need public opinion to put a bullet behind his ear, leave him in a dark alley and way away. If they want him quiet, they'll get what they want.

Re:Foreshadowing. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33333284)

At this stage it's going to take one hell of a trick to pull that off though. Assange's opponents don't have all that much credibility left, so even if someone does have major legitimate dirt on the guy it's gonna be a heck of a job getting public opinion on their side.

By "public opinion", you must be referring to the fairly small minority of geeks who think he can do no wrong. In the grand scheme of things (i.e., the "rest of the world" not limited to geekdom), however, the opinion of the public is drastically different.

Re:Foreshadowing. (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333336)

People can get pretty dirty during tragic automobile accidents... Never mind the sort of dust and crud you tend to pick up falling down a couple of flights of stairs...

Re:Foreshadowing. (2, Interesting)

Suki I (1546431) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332828)

I am not jumping on the exotic CIA plot against him bandwagon yet. At least not for this incident. Are his accusers keeping quiet, like they should if this is a for real investigation/accusation? Guess they would do that too if it was a setup. If they are just making it up to get famous, look for the media blitz.

They will launch a "Stop Julian Assange" campaign. (4, Interesting)

elucido (870205) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332924)

Very similar to this http://www.stopthechamber.com/ [stopthechamber.com] where the amount of money in rewards which lead to the arrest and conviction of Julian Assange will reach into the millions, or tens of millions, and once that happens it's only a matter of time before somebody accuses him of something. Or maybe they don't have to accuse him of anything, there are enough laws and enough ways to entrap people that anybody can be taken out if enough informants agree to take them out.

Confidential informants working in teams can entrap or find evidence on anybody. If the money is big enough and the government agrees to look the other way on the quality of the information, they could get him for some esoteric unknown law that he probably doesnt even know hes breaking and never heard of. And once hes arrested it's all over.

Re:They will launch a "Stop Julian Assange" campai (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33333350)

They don't need to arrest him to bring him down, or anything so dramatic, all they have to do is destroy his credibility. That's why they used rape charges, nothing solid, very hard to prove by either side. There are also other crimes that have the same aspect, a lot of public damage, but without real consequence. The US government already has a strategy in place just for this kind of thing, they simply divert the viewers attention to something else, look at slashdot now, everyone talks about the guy and rape charges, not the secret documents, the next step will take this further, until only a minority will remember how everything started, after that, they'll drop it all.

Re:Foreshadowing. (2, Interesting)

omidaladini (940882) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333182)

We need two Jullian Assanges; We need many!

Re:Foreshadowing. (5, Insightful)

Cutterman (789191) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333342)

"If you give me six lines written by the hand of the most honest of men, I will find something in them which will hang him."
Cardinal Richelieu

they've been trying ot get lots a people (1)

chronoss2010 (1825454) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333354)

just dont be good be good at what you do

Assange and his team are doing great things (4, Insightful)

FuckingNickName (1362625) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332800)

I wish I had his skill and his balls. He, at least, is going some way to watching the watchers.

And if there are any times that attention whoring is absolutely warranted, it is now.

I just hope he's not David Kelly'd.

Before I go, let me just accuse every /. commenter below me in this article of rape. I hope you judge Assange for the accusations against him as you'd hope people treat mine against you.

Re:Assange and his team are doing great things (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33332882)

And I wish there were more leaks from leftist governments, NGOs and parties. By visiting Wikileaks, it would look like the only ones conspiring (or, more likely, stupid enough to be leaked) belong to the right wing.

Re:Assange and his team are doing great things (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33332884)

Well maybe she should of thought about that before she asked me for directions...

Re:Assange and his team are doing great things (4, Insightful)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332888)

>>>let me just accuse every /. commenter below me in this article of rape

Worse: Accuse them of child rape. Even if you are found "not guilty" you'll still be treated as a pariah. We need to stop assuming someone is guilty upon mere accusation, and instead assume they are innocent until the Lords have proved their case.

Re:Assange and his team are doing great things (4, Insightful)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332982)

Sorry. In this day and age of hyper-feminist(and yes it is womens groups who are at fault for this), with any and all hits of anything relating to rape, child rape, pedophilia, child abuse, etc. You're already screwed, because the law has already decided in various countries that you have the hint of guilt, you're already guilty. Leaving in some cases may not even counter your accuser, because they're required to be protected to the fullest, even from questioning.

Re:Assange and his team are doing great things (1)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333126)

Modded insightful?

Re:Assange and his team are doing great things (2, Interesting)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333200)

Modded insightful?

I'm guessing you don't work in anything relating to policing, law, or the court system. It's pretty fucked up right now. For lack of a better statement. There is no balance to it, rather male = insta-guilt. And that hint of any form of accusation will stay with you forever, because of various things. Hyper-feminists for one, media for a second. Idiots for a 3rd(lol ur guilty).

Re:Assange and his team are doing great things (2, Informative)

athe!st (1782368) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333220)

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Criminal_Records_Bureau#Enhanced_disclosure Some things are guilty until.... no wait always on your record nothing you can do about it

Re:Assange and his team are doing great things (1)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333176)

But in this case it may now be considered a setup regardless of what's happening so that weapon is now not as sharp as it could have been.

So I suspect that they will find a way to give him an infection with a superbug instead where no antibiotics works.

Re:Assange and his team are doing great things (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33333266)

You're only wearing one tinfoil hat.

I'm wearing two!!

Here is my theory..

Julian Assange hears that the CIA is about to sling some serious mud or take him out.
To protect himself he 'arranges' for charges against him.
There is no truth to them so the extra publicity is good.
It will also make it harder for any future mud-slinging/action to work.

Re:Assange and his team are doing great things (1)

FuckingNickName (1362625) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333262)

The enhanced CRB checks many English firms do before employment will reveal arrest records, and an arrest record with various magic words will pretty much deny you employment in various fields where you're dealing with the "young and vulnerable". If your career is in care of the young and vulnerable, of course, this may mean a ruined career.

It's hard to know what to do about this. The obvious answer would be "a CRB check shouldn't reveal arrests". But arrests should not be private, because that would enable secret internment. So, if the state stopped offering the serivce, it then becomes a matter of some private organisation trolling arrest records and sorting by person, then selling a lookup service.

Another possibility is to make it illegal to discriminate based on certain aspects of a CRB record. This will work as "well" as sex/race/etc discrimination laws, I guess.

The only long-term solution is to get it in people's thick heads that an arrest is meaningless, unless perhaps the person has been released on bail (or its local equivalent).

Re:Assange and his team are doing great things (1)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332900)

I am here to judge.

Apparently you are not the only one who want's 'his balls'. There are a few interested parties, I believe most want it on a platter.

Re:Assange and his team are doing great things (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33332950)

Dude, let it go. We were drunk and you were in drag.

Re:Assange and his team are doing great things (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33333380)

I can't believe the U.S. isn't going after this guy 'Balls To The Wall' in this time of War..

Not a mistake? (5, Insightful)

loteck (533317) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332826)

If a man can be publicly accused of rape, a warrant issued for his arrest, and his name splashed all over the international media PRIOR to you being 100% sure you want to bring him in on those charges, then I would say something is seriously wrong with your system of justice.

Re:Not a mistake? (4, Informative)

funkatron (912521) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332862)

The statement only says that the bureaucrats did their job according to the protocol. Changing the justice system is not something they can do, you need to buy politicians for that.

Re:Not a mistake? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33332926)

You might want to read up on the pirate bay trial, if you really want an insight in how well the system here works. There have been plenty of fucked up cases before that, but it's unusually well covered in English. It's pretty much par of the course though when things get political or when prestige gets involved.

TL;DR: You have no idea how fucked up the system really is, and you don't want to know, just remember the next time you hear about how fantastic we are that we're really a banana monarchy under cover, without bananas.

Re:Not a mistake? (3, Insightful)

Zironic (1112127) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332960)

Warrants are public, there's not much the justice system can do really to prevent international media from splashing it up if they want to.

Re:Not a mistake? (2, Informative)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333048)

No, you got it backwards. He was brought in on what was apparently judged to be good grounds, and then the case got dismissed by a higher-ranking/more experienced persecutor. It just happened in a very short span of time - and we don't have the details on what the girls said. From what has been released, it seems they went to the police and asked them "Hey, we did this and this with this guy/he did this and this with us - would this be rape?"
Maybe they just got fazed due to the strangeness of it all, and decided to arrest him just to clear things up?

Re:Not a mistake? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33333086)

He was never "brought in".

Foolish American False Superiority Complex (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33333244)

They were 100% sure they wanted to question him, he has no official address and a warrant was thus issued. Then later, when more information was available, they decided this was no longer needed.

The rape charges have been dropped, but not the lesser charges.

The Swedish system of justice is far superior to any other system in the world, the US system is laughable and pathetic by comparison.

But can we really believe him? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33332830)

He is an accused rapist after all.

Re:But can we really believe him? (1)

cosm (1072588) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333372)

I guess the mods have their sarcasm / dramatic irony filter turned off today.

Honesty (1)

geekmansworld (950281) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332834)

Where did this allegation come from, really? Sweden's justice system ought to come clean and let us know what source precipated these charges. The timing is so incredibly suspicious, if government authorities really are using such incredibly dirty tricks to silence a whistleblower, then they need to be exposed. That's what Wikileaks is all about.

Re:Honesty (3, Insightful)

xnpu (963139) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332854)

Indeed. I assume that false accusations are illegal under Swedish law. Why aren't we seeing the names of the people that actually committed the crime here.

Re:Honesty (1)

Elektroschock (659467) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332912)

It is punished by death according to the Codex Hammurabi.

I think wikileaks should be governed by a secret society, like the Illimunati, they had interesting pseudonymes.

Re:Honesty (2, Informative)

Zironic (1112127) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332990)

It has to be provable false, which is almost impossible to do with this sort of crime.

Re:Honesty (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33333002)

The woman who "accused" him of rape did not press charges. Neither did the woman who did not even go so far as to mention rape. Their accusations may have been sufficiently vague to evade prosecution for wrongfully accusing someone of a crime, which is what made many people question the motives of these women even before the warrant was rescinded.

No Names Allowed (3, Informative)

andersh (229403) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333202)

It is not in the Scandinavian justice tradition to name accusers, victims or indeed criminals. Warrants are usually not public unless they have no other means of locating the suspect. Assange has no address.

We don't believe in scapegoating.

No Formal False Accusations (4, Insightful)

andersh (229403) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333298)

Oh, and they are not "criminals" [the accusers] never claimed rape, they actually asked police for clarification if the alleged "actions" were criminal!

Under Swedish law false accusations of rape would most likely have lead to one year in prison, these accusations were less clear and the prosecutor would be looking for more information from Assange.

You see that's the beauty of the charges, they're not likely to lead to punishment for the accusers, the only damage would be to Assange's good name and standing. He could try for damages, but what would that help his name? It's perfect [for the people looking to smear him]!

On-Call Prosecutor?! (3, Interesting)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332844)

I'm not sure I'd want to stake my future on a country where justice is so swift they have to maintain 24 hour prosecutorial coverage...

Re:On-Call Prosecutor?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33332918)

It makes more sense than the US where they have to drag a judge out of bed to get a warrant in the middle of the night or weekend. At least that is the impression that years of Law & Order and every other police drama provide.

Re:On-Call Prosecutor?! (3, Insightful)

ciaran_o_riordan (662132) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332932)

Right. You would prefer that a public accusation on a Friday would circulate in the press until late Monday morning before being reviewed?

I think the round-the-clock system they have, which allowed them to cut the drama short by having judges working on Saturday, sounds like a good idea.

Re:On-Call Prosecutor?! (2, Insightful)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333088)

I'd prefer that over a public accusation on Friday circulating in the press until late Monday and additionally getting arrested Friday evening and spending the weekend in jail, yes.

Re:On-Call Prosecutor?! (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332980)

Why? You'd rather be held a few days longer? How would this improve your case?
Besides, he's high-profile and a likely target for US intelligence operations. You think the persecutor (and probably the security police/military intelligence) wouldn't take that into account?

Re:On-Call Prosecutor?! (4, Informative)

humphrm (18130) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333044)

Most big US cities have prosecutors on duty 24 hours a day.

Obama acting like Bush again (-1, Troll)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332848)

... interfering with EU affairs, as if the EU was a protectorate of the US.

Re:Obama acting like Bush again (2, Insightful)

elucido (870205) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332876)

... interfering with EU affairs, as if the EU was a protectorate of the US.

If this is a black op Obama probably doesn't even know. It's not like they'd tell Obama because Obama wouldn't need to know. It's likely that Obama just signs his name giving them permission to "stop Julian Assange" and then they figure out how to do it and begin the campaign.

Re:Obama acting like Bush again (4, Insightful)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332906)

>>>Obama just signs his name giving them permission

Interesting argument for why Obama is innocent. Does the same reasoning apply to Bush to forgive his actions from 2002 through 2009? I suspect not..... then neither does it apply to Obama.

Re:Obama acting like Bush again (1)

Cwix (1671282) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332988)

It doesn't apply to Obama. The leader is ultimately responsible for the work done in their name. If Obama gave the CIA carte blanche to take care of the situation, then he is the one ultimately responsible.

Note: I voted for Obama, and I think he gets blamed for a lot of things that are outside of his, or anyones for that matter, control. If this is a CIA operation he IS responsible.

Re:Obama acting like Bush again (3, Interesting)

elucido (870205) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333042)

It doesn't apply to Obama. The leader is ultimately responsible for the work done in their name. If Obama gave the CIA carte blanche to take care of the situation, then he is the one ultimately responsible.

Note: I voted for Obama, and I think he gets blamed for a lot of things that are outside of his, or anyones for that matter, control. If this is a CIA operation he IS responsible.

It's the CIA's mission to stop individuals like Julian Assange. The CIA is supposed to be focused on foreign nationals and foreign spies. Julian Assanges organization "Wikileaks" has committed the initial crime which triggered the CIA/NSA/FBI response. It's a bit late now to blame Obama as if Obama could have stopped whatever the response is. If it's true that Assange's documents influence or reveal CIA sources this would equate to Assange attacking the CIA itself because if the sources get killed it hurts the mission and the effort.

This is not good for Julian Assange. What do you expect Obama to do? Tell the CIA to leave Julian Assange alone? On what basis? Julian Assange isn't an American citizen.

Re:Obama acting like Bush again (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333122)

Julian Assange isn't an American citizen.

Yeah, because that should ever factor into the equation.

Re:Obama acting like Bush again (3, Insightful)

Cwix (1671282) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333264)

Your right...

Julian Assange isn't an American citizen.

So exactly what American law did he break, and why should he be tried for an American crime if he didn't break the law here in the US?

Perhaps if the government did one of two things...
A) Hid their secrets better
B) Didn't do something that needed to be kept secret.

We wouldn't be in this situation.

The US trying to hold him accountable for breaking our laws, when he didnt commit the crimes here, or break into any computers here is akin to a Muslim country holding your mother responsible for not wearing a burqa.

If we take outside of the realm of laws into state secrets and back room international politics, Mr. Assange did ask for trouble by toying with our intelligence agencies and military. If we were to give him that trouble, it would make us look even worse in the eyes of the world.

The cat is out of the bag, we should open discussions with Wikileaks to see if they will allow us to redact names from the documents they havn't released. Its either that or have the documents in their entirety released. Framing people for crimes they havnt committed is wrong.

Bush did not control the CIA either. (1)

elucido (870205) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333018)

Nobody can completely control an agency like the CIA or FBI.

The agency is so compartmentalized that other people who work at the agency don't know what their co-workers are doing. How do you expect the President to know?

If it's black ops probably only the people involved with it know whats going on. That would mean nobody would have the details of exactly how Julian Assange is to be stopped except the people assigned to the task of stopping him. So I don't think we can ever blame the President or the Director of the CIA for what goes on.

Re:Bush did not control the CIA either. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33333192)

Did you know, no one could control the SS either, not even hitler!

Obligatory Independence Day quote (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333240)

President Whitmore: "Why the hell wasn't I told about this place?"

Albert Nimzicki: "Two words, Mr. President: plausible deniability.'"

Re:Obama acting like Bush again (1)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332892)

like during that whole Cold War thing, after that whole WWII thing? Europe could revoke status of forces agreements and make us pack up our shit and come home, couldn't they? If we're so terrible, why don't they kick us out? Once we don't have to staff all those outposts, maybe we could cut back on defense spending by an equal proportion. Although that'd just dump a lot of unemployed soldiers onto a shitty job market. But the point is, if they don't need us to be there with our tanks and bombers to be a bullwork against the Soviet Union anymore, then telling us to leave strengthens their position when they want to tell us to fuck off on out of their politics, too.

Re:Obama acting like Bush again (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332928)

>>>why don't they kick us out?

I hear rumors that the EU Parliament will soon be doing exactly that, and replacing the US Military with its own EU defence force. Of course, these are just rumors for now, but I suspect it will happen eventually.

Re:Obama acting like Bush again (1)

Zironic (1112127) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333046)

I suspect most Europeans see those bases more as tourist attractions then defense installations at this point.

Re:Obama acting like Bush again (1)

cptdondo (59460) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333058)

But... Not only would that dump a lot of soldiers into a bad economy, it would also put a lot of large businesses out of business. Military spending is about the only thing keeping GM, Boeing, and a whole bunch of other large companies afloat.

They want to keep our troops over there, because then they get to sell Humvees, tanks, planes, weapons, uniforms, etc. If we cut that back, we'd see layoff in Detroit like you wouldn't believe, and the execs would find it harder to justify their $100M year-end bonuses.

Re:Obama acting like Bush again (1)

Obama (1458545) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333212)

I assure you I have nothing to do with this.

Follow this story! (1, Insightful)

Junior J. Junior III (192702) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332860)

At the end of the day, I'm driving home and hear on the radio that Assange is no longer a suspect and that the case has been dropped. I find this even more incredible than the initial news. To be exhonerated in less than 24 hours is incredibly dramatic. I couldn't believe what I was hearing once again.

There's pretty much only one way to read into these events. There must have been a conspiracy to destroy Wikileaks through the character assassination of Assange. There can be only one suspect for who was behind it: the U.S. government.

If there were anyone left in the world who could reasonably doubt that the U.S. government wasn't corrupt, didn't play dirty, didn't abuse its power, didn't lie as it suited them, and wasn't what Orwell warned us about in 1984 and Animal Farm, if they were within the reach of the mainstream media yesterday, that should have been their wake-up call.

Amazingly, they fucked up so badly that they couldn't get things to stick for even a day. How did that happen?

Re:Follow this story! (1)

xnpu (963139) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332908)

All governments play dirty to some extend. But that doesn't mean they always play well together.

Re:Follow this story! (1)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332916)

Amazingly, they fucked up so badly that they couldn't get things to stick for even a day. How did that happen?

- do you know how much time it takes to procure the GOOD scotch tape through Congress nowadays?

Re:Follow this story! (5, Insightful)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332922)

There can be only one suspect for who was behind it: the U.S. government.

Why do you say that? Assange has pissed off a lot of world governments, and it does not take CIA level resources to have someone file a false report. The fact that the charges were withdrawn on the same day they were filed suggests that the CIA may not be involved after all -- they would do a better job than that.

Re:Follow this story! (1)

Harinezumi (603874) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333032)

I don't know. This _is_ the CIA we're talking about.

Re:Follow this story! (4, Insightful)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333130)

Do you think CIA has magic powers? It consists of people and it is a government bureaucracy, it is mostly shuffling papers around, it's glamorous as in movies. And yes, the same problems that are found in most government organizations and large corporations are present there - various power struggles, inefficiencies, idiots, everything.

I wouldn't put it past CIA to make any sort of mistake at all, actually it's a surprise when they do anything right.

Re:Follow this story! (1)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333154)

Meant to say that it is not glamorous, as in movies of-course.

You want glamor, you don't work for CIA, you work for Glamour magazine, and I am not even sure it's that glamorous there either.

Re:Follow this story! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33333248)

You want glamor? You _buy_ Glamor magazine.

Never watch the sausage being made.

Re:Follow this story! (2, Insightful)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332946)

Misjudgment on how the case would be handled? Expecting a stronger knee-jerk reaction?

Re:Follow this story! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33332958)

Because this was as evidence free as unmarked grey aircraft striking the wtc1/2 on 9/11.
Oh, wait...

Re:Follow this story! (1)

Oligonicella (659917) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333334)

Give some credible cites for those unmarked gray aircraft.

Re:Follow this story! (3, Interesting)

elucido (870205) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332970)

At the end of the day, I'm driving home and hear on the radio that Assange is no longer a suspect and that the case has been dropped. I find this even more incredible than the initial news. To be exhonerated in less than 24 hours is incredibly dramatic. I couldn't believe what I was hearing once again.

There's pretty much only one way to read into these events. There must have been a conspiracy to destroy Wikileaks through the character assassination of Assange. There can be only one suspect for who was behind it: the U.S. government.

If there were anyone left in the world who could reasonably doubt that the U.S. government wasn't corrupt, didn't play dirty, didn't abuse its power, didn't lie as it suited them, and wasn't what Orwell warned us about in 1984 and Animal Farm, if they were within the reach of the mainstream media yesterday, that should have been their wake-up call.

Amazingly, they fucked up so badly that they couldn't get things to stick for even a day. How did that happen?

The US government need not even be behind it. They just have to offer the rewards to the vigilante squads around the world. All the informants in the world could be rewarded for information which leads to the arrest and conviction of Julian Assange. On top of that you have all the mafias, gangs, drug kingpins of the world who would want the reward.

http://www.stopthechamber.com/ [stopthechamber.com] --- if these people can organize something like this, the government could probably do much much better considering they'd have millions of dollars to offer to anybody who stops Julian Assange from releasing the classified documents. In fact if we were to have a Slashdot survey on this site and the question was "would you turn in Julian Assange for $5 million dollars in cash" I'd bet that 25% of Slashdot would be willing.

Re:Follow this story! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33333028)

now now, I actually see a much more believable scenario..
  Assange being the brilliant man he supposedly is and having the statement "expect dirty tricks form the Pentagon" out there in the wild, it would be quite easy to construct your own Strawman accusation so you can Cement the idea that the US government "is Corrupt, plays dirty, abuses its power, and lies if it suits them" in the minds of the masses.

  If the Charges had remained in force for more than 24 hours then I would me much less likely to believe that, but such a quick turnaround makes me more Suspicious feeling than before.

But yeah while the Government of the US may be out to discredit Assange, its going to be with Taxes, plagarism or something else.

We operate in the gray area between simple Smear Campaigns and Polonium dontcha know...

The "US Government" is not a single entity (1)

voss (52565) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333054)

There are competing factions and often the left hand doesnt know what the right hand is doing.
The president doesn't know everything every agent does.

The swedish government on the other hand has nothing to gain by indicting this guy and plenty to lose
if they are wrong.

Not exonerated (3, Interesting)

Henriok (6762) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333076)

He was not exhonerated, the prosecutor deemed the ititial warrant baseless, and revoked it. It says nothing about Assange guilt or not, but about the base as to prosecute him.

Re:Follow this story! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33333194)

The more likely explanation is the near compulsive behaviour of Expressen to pay police and prosecutors for "interesting" stories and apparently any rape charge is always initially treated as if there is compelling evidence (heck, I'm half surprised they didn't have comments from the security police, they seem to always be more than happy to talk to expressen about things they really shouldn't).

Re:Follow this story! (1)

bumburumbi (1047864) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333242)

[...]

Amazingly, they fucked up so badly that they couldn't get things to stick for even a day. How did that happen?

I'm not sure they did fuck up. This case was all over the media. Now, all that is needed is a woman to come forward and report him to the police for raping her in the US. Mr Assanage is needed to help the police with their inquiries, can the Swedish authorities please hand him over? If an US three letter agency can get two swedes to file a complaint against Assange, I'm sure the could also find an american to do so.

Re:Follow this story! (3, Insightful)

Dhalka226 (559740) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333376)

There can be only one suspect for who was behind it: the U.S. government.

I know that nonsense supports some peoples' world views, but that doesn't make it accurate.

Ignoring the possibility that it could reasonably be any number of other people and even a handful of other governments, maybe I'm naive, but I don't see why the US government would play games if they really cared that much. A terrible rape allegation that doesn't even stick for a day? Please. With billions of dollars of resources they could manufacture a significantly better, more serious charge with evidence that was hard to refute.

Personally, if I were in the government and wanted to put a stop to Wikileaks I wouldn't bother with that though. You'd simply find Assange in an ally with a bullet in the back of his head. Oh, there would be an uproar for a few days, maybe a few weeks, and lots of conspiracy theories (that for a change would actually be true!) but not only would it pretty much immediately slam the breaks on Wikileaks, it would be a chilling example to anybody who might consider stepping in behind him.

The "problem" with Wikileaks is that it doesn't need credibility, making some attempt to character-assassinate Assange on the worthless side. I don't like Assange, I'm not a huge fan of Wikileaks, and while I supported what they did with the original attack video I have no support whatsoever to give to leaking the Afghanistan documents or the manner in which it was done. Even with all that said I can't find them to lack credibility. They're releasing actual government documents, actual government video. I can have a problem with what they did, I can have a problem with how they did it, I can have a problem with some of the editorializing they do, but I can't claim it's somehow not credible. Other people are roughly the same; they think Wikileaks is scum or providing a public service.

So why waste the time and effort in some really bad plot? Live with it or end it. Don't play games.

Re:Follow this story! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33333382)

There can be only one suspect for who was behind it: the U.S. government.

Apparently not. Amazingly, the retraction is being covered in the US media, along with the quote from Assange about expecting dirty tricks.

Strangely, the part about "from the Pentagon" is left out, and instead they're blaming Al-Jeezera, I shit you not [cnn.com] .

Females are trouble. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33332868)

And this is why you should never even talk to females. Too much damn trouble.

Re:Females are trouble. (1)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332936)

Pffft. Please, you can be accused of rape of anybody whether you have ever seen them or not, be it a female, a male, a donkey or Obama.

Whether you talk to them prior to the accusation or not is irrelevant, in fact why would they want to talk to you if you are being set up?

It's Pretty Obvious What's Going On Here (0, Flamebait)

Greyfox (87712) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332894)

I'm sure that the USA will do anything to silence the enemies of the state, and law enforcement in Sweden is all too happy to help. I suggest that a criminal investigation be formed to get to the bottom the source of these allegations and to see if there was any improper behavior on the part of the "on-call" prosecutor. If the law enforcement establishment behaved improperly, someone should lose their job over it. Or perhaps Sweden will enjoy the prospect of being the USA's hand puppet. Kinda like Tony Blair had W's hand up his ass all those years. If you watch the videos, every time you see him talk, W can't even keep his lips from moving. You wanna be like THAT, Sweden? I bet the Big O's a much better ventriloquist.

Bribes work. (1)

elucido (870205) | more than 3 years ago | (#33332986)

Even if Swedens law enforcement doesn't want to, if the bribes are big enough and offered often enough, corruption will take over and Julian Assange will be arrested for being Julian Assange. This stuff happens in the USA, it probably happens everywhere.

Re:Bribes work. (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333272)

Not going to happen - I'm not saying Sweden is free of bribery, but almost. Also, even if that did happen, nothing would come of it. The bureaucracy here is epic, and it's not realistic to bribe that many people. It would be found out. The Pirate Bay situation was due to that being an actual crime - Anyone can see that Wikileaks actions is entirely outside of the scope of the police. If the Swedish system nabs him, it's going to be the security police (SÄPO) and/or MUST (the military intelligence and security service) and/or whatever they cook up. There's really noone else that can touch him, as long as all his taxes are in order.

Re:It's Pretty Obvious What's Going On Here (4, Insightful)

cptdondo (59460) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333108)

Or... Maybe he did it himself? Now he's more bulletproof. The first charge was baseless; any additional "character assassination" charges will be met with tin-foil skepticism.

Can you think of a better way to make sure this sort of thing doesn't happen?

If the US will do anything to silence enemies... (2, Insightful)

voss (52565) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333168)

It is doing an awfully bad job of it. In the US you can turn on the radio and hear people calling the president a muslim, a fascist or homosexual.
You can turn on the tv and watch people almost completely fabricate new charges against obama or his underlings. Castro has been in power for 50 years, North
Korea has been in power for 60 years. The US does a better job when it doesn't try to silence enemies.

More Credibility Than US Governement (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33332904)

Interestingly, I think that Wikileaks/Assange has more credibility than the US government. If he published documents detailing a plot against him by the US government (which they would, of course deny) which would you believe?

Re:More Credibility Than US Governement (1)

Cwix (1671282) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333000)

The one with the most credible evidence.

Character assassination (1)

miffo.swe (547642) | more than 3 years ago | (#33333008)

I have no doubts whatsoeven this was an attempt at character assassination by the US. That charges gets dropped within 24 hours after a warrant has been made is unusual and very strange, especially since they havent even questioned Assange or talked to him by phone.

Wikileaks has some very damning material on the US that hasnt been released yet. Imagine communicaitons between various sources in the US and their operatives. Imagine these conversations being highly inflammatory, especially for US allies. Imagine key to a file with those communications that will be released if something big happens to wikileaks.

The US dont dare to kill Assange but they will do whatever they can to make his life living hell.

Re:Character assassination (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33333268)

Imagine ... Imagine ... Imagine ....

Who's engaging in character assassination here? You don't even try to hide the fact that your "argument" requires several leaps of imagination.

bang!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33333084)

there goes the warning shot, next time it will be a bit closer, care to reconsider Mr assange?

Islam has its claws in Europe (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33333208)

Swedish men sit down to pee (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33333232)

Sweden: a nation of men who have had their balls removed by the feminist movement.

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