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Justice Department Seeks Ebonics Experts

samzenpus posted more than 4 years ago | from the my-mama-no-raise-no-dummies-I-dug-her-rap dept.

Crime 487

In addition to helping decipher their Lil Wayne albums, the Justice Department is seeking Ebonics experts to help monitor, translate and transcribe wire tapped conversations. The DEA wants to fill nine full time positions. From the article: "A maximum of nine Ebonics experts will work with the Drug Enforcement Administration’s Atlanta field division, where the linguists, after obtaining a 'DEA Sensitive' security clearance, will help investigators decipher the results of 'telephonic monitoring of court ordered nonconsensual intercepts, consensual listening devices, and other media.'”

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ebonics (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344164)

I hear Ebonics being spoken in the monkey cages at our local zoo.

Re:ebonics (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344202)

nigger nigger nigger

Needed one when watching The Wire (-1, Troll)

schwit1 (797399) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344194)

It was impossible to understand without the subtitles.

Re:Needed one when watching The Wire (1)

Krahar (1655029) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344454)

Little Jacob in the game GTA IV is even worse.

Re:Needed one when watching The Wire (1)

object404 (1883774) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344906)

Dah bredda deh mout ah massy eeh! Cho! Ah weh eem tink eem ah guh duh? Da bull bucka bucky massa bin trayn ta keep de bredren, down braa! Massive reespec, peace out niyamen

Re:Needed one when watching The Wire (1)

Phrogman (80473) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344774)

I got it eventually, at least most of the time, and I am a white Canadian living on the west coast :P

Loved The Wire by the way, some of the best TV I have ever seen.

Re:Needed one when watching The Wire (1)

Compaqt (1758360) | more than 4 years ago | (#33345002)

Just when you need it the most:

http://www.gizoogle.com/ [gizoogle.com]

For some reason it isn't working at the moment. (Are the North Koreans translating their Facebook page [slashdot.org] ?)

Qualifications? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344196)

I know that Playa Degree in Ebonics at Fo' Shizzle U would come in handy!

That's not the professional term (2, Interesting)

Beryllium Sphere(tm) (193358) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344218)

Linguists say "African-American Vernacular English".

What does it say about our society if a group we need to integrate is so isolated it's developing an incompatible dialect?

Re:That's not the professional term (1)

morphotomy (1655417) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344244)

Lil' wayne can hardly be called a group.

Re:That's not the professional term (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344294)

It says said group does not want to be assimilated and would instead prefer retaining certain unique cultural and linguistic elements.

Re:That's not the professional term (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344508)

> It says said group does not want to be assimilated and would instead prefer retaining certain unique cultural and linguistic elements.

Meanwhile, the Vietnamese are buying up their neighborhood.

Re:That's not the professional term (-1, Flamebait)

PitaBred (632671) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344548)

Then said group should GTFO

Re:That's not the professional term (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344888)

but WWDD?
(what would Dre do?)

Re:That's not the professional term (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33345062)

Yeah, and the Amish need to GTFO and start their own country somewhere where it's still 1600. And the Welsh and Scots need to GTFO of the UK, and the Quebecois need to GTFO of Canada. (Wait, they want that already, and Canada won't let them.) And white folks need to GTFO out of America since they won't assimilate the native cultures. Basically, everybody needs to GTFO out of everywhere.. And maybe live in orbiting space bubbles or some shit.

  I have a song for you! Everybody, sing along!

  o/~ YOU ARE! AN IDIOT! o/~

Re:That's not the professional term (5, Funny)

WiglyWorm (1139035) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344298)

s3r10usLY, t3h 1MPl1c4T10NS 0f 4 Su8CUltur3 D3V3L0p1N' 1t's 0wN l4n9U493 R S3R10USLY d1sTur81n'. truLy 4M3r1c4 h4S F41L3d tH3Z3 c1T1Z3ns.

Re:That's not the professional term (3, Funny)

AltairDusk (1757788) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344600)

The sad thing here is I read and understood that sentence on the first try...

Re:That's not the professional term (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344714)

Not really. leetspeak is just character substitution with letters or numbers that look like the original word. It is still English as we know it and just requires the mental gymnastics to realize the substitute characters.

Re:That's not the professional term (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344880)

The sadder thing is I thought it was rot13, and mentally translated it, and still understood it.

Re:That's not the professional term (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33345012)

I only missed the the 'a', silly txt speak is slowing handicapping my 1337 speak

Re:That's not the professional term (2, Funny)

HelioWalton (1821492) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344626)

Is it a bad sign that I read that just as easily as English?

Re:That's not the professional term (1)

Flea of Pain (1577213) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344690)

No! It's a good thing! Now all we need is a comfy government job translating teh interwebs!

Re:That's not the professional term (2, Funny)

snowgirl (978879) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344746)

No! It's a good thing! Now all we need is a comfy government job translating teh interwebs!

*ahem* "intarwebs"... you get a D.

Re:That's not the professional term (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344836)

intartubes, plz

Re:That's not the professional term (1)

snowgirl (978879) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344952)

intartubes, plz

Both are accepted varieties, however it is plainly clear to all scholars of the topic that "intar-" is the proper first component of the word. "webz" and "tubez" are highly variable.

Re:That's not the professional term (2, Funny)

oodaloop (1229816) | more than 4 years ago | (#33345026)

Blagosphere FTW

Re:That's not the professional term (2, Funny)

BassMan449 (1356143) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344694)

I hope not because otherwise all of /. is officially a lost cause.

Re:That's not the professional term (1)

phyrexianshaw.ca (1265320) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344900)

the only word I stumbled on was "tH3Z3" for some reason. I kept trying to read-ahead as "it's"

Re:That's not the professional term (2, Insightful)

at_slashdot (674436) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344382)

"it's developing an incompatible dialect" -- this is not a recent development, I interpret "it's developing" as "now", while actually the A-A vernacular has been developing for centuries with most of its characteristic features probably established long time ago.

AAVE is a fairly recent development (5, Informative)

kurisuto (165784) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344698)

Actually, it appears that AAVE is a product of the Great Northern Migration of African-Americans in the early 20th century. Prior to that time, there was little to no distinction between the dialects of southern whites and southern blacks.

The pieces of evidence for this claim include:

  • Phonograph recordings made in the 1930's of former slaves
  • Diaries and letters written by semi-literate slaves and former slaves in the 19th century. Since the writers were semi-literate, the spelling is a better indication of the pronunciation than standard spelling would be.
  • Something which linguists call "age grading". If you take speakers of AAVE today and compare younger speakers with older speakers, the younger speakers actually have a higher percentage occurrence of the distinctive features of AAVE. This suggests that AAVE is becoming increasingly distinct from standard American English over time.

There are other pieces of evidence as well, but those are some of the important ones.

Re:AAVE is a fairly recent development (1)

at_slashdot (674436) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344834)

Informative response, thanks.

"This suggests that AAVE is becoming increasingly distinct from standard American English over time."

I wonder if this "age grading" doesn't just suggest that young people will eventually learn standard English better when they get to a certain age instead of the opposite conclusion, it's always hard to compare apples with oranges.

Re:AAVE is a fairly recent development (1)

at_slashdot (674436) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344912)

"opposite conclusion" is not the right choice of words, I meant: instead of assuming that older people speech is a good indication of how they were speaking when they were young.

Also should have said "learn standard English better by the time they get to a certain age" -- English is not my first language, it plays tricks on me.

Re:That's not the professional term (4, Insightful)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344392)

So-called "Standard English" and AAVE are mutually comprehensible languages, and always have been. Even in Airplane!, where they're deliberately exaggerating the differences for comic effect, you can understand the meaning of "My momma no raise no dummies, I dug her rap!" perfectly well.

Another way of thinking about it: which is easier for your average Standard English speaker to understand: AAVE or a cell phone contract?

Re:That's not the professional term (2, Insightful)

hedwards (940851) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344606)

Indeed, however some of the dialects down south are less comprehensible. Cajuns have their own language which is a challenge to say the least for people that aren't familiar with it. But even the relatively easy to understand AAVE does have disadvantages and does carry with it a limitation on gainful employment in some sectors, unless the individual is able to use standard English or whatever dialect the local well to do use.

Re:That's not the professional term (1)

Mongoose Disciple (722373) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344760)

Well, look at it this way:

Is it possible for most English speakers to follow most of it, figuring out words they don't know from context cues, etc.? Sure, I think it is.

Is it also possible to lose possibly important nuances in the process? I think that's the case, too. For example, a hooptie is a car but there's also a fair amount of connotation to that choice of word.

Re:That's not the professional term (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344970)

Maybe if I was reading a screenplay / written transcript, but the combination of the accent and the speed makes it incomprehensible. It's just like if you're not fluent in a foreign language -- you might be able to understand it but only if the speaker speaks very slowly and enunciates.

Re:That's not the professional term (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 4 years ago | (#33345006)

Another way of thinking about it: which is easier for your average Standard English speaker to understand: AAVE or a cell phone contract?

Given that most people I know have never understood the contract much beyond "how much must I pay, how long am I stuck with you and what would I have to pay to get out early?" I don't think you made a good point.

Re:That's not the professional term (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344408)

> What does it say about our society if a group we need to integrate is so isolated it's developing an incompatible dialect?

Probably not what you think.

Re:That's not the professional term (2, Insightful)

snowgirl (978879) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344416)

What does it say about our society if a group we need to integrate is so isolated it's developing an incompatible dialect?

Not "is developing", "has developed".

And it says nothing at all... separated groups will develop separate dialects. The issue of "dialect" even to the point of unintelligibility has been a pervasive issue throughout Europe in the modern age. America (all of it) is so new, that separate unintelligible dialects are rare due to everyone having such a recent base language to develop from.

Re:That's not the professional term (4, Insightful)

hsthompson69 (1674722) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344458)

AFAIK, this kind of thing happens all over the place. Pidgin in Hawaii, Creole in Louisiana...most localities have slang, dialects and accents that can be terribly confusing for outsiders. I'd bet even with the "African-American Vernacular English" you've got slang variations between regions.

Part of the problem here is that speaking proper english is often seen as "selling out", and any attempts to crawl out of poverty or to get educated are harshly treated by peers. With groups that consider their suffering a badge of pride, and dissuade others from escaping the cycles of poverty and violence often associated with those groups, it's really difficult to make any headway. It may not be politically correct to mention, but a lot of the damage done in impoverished communities is self inflicted.

Re:That's not the professional term (3, Insightful)

snowgirl (978879) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344596)

"Proper english" is a misnomer. The proper way to say it is, "Speaking English in the dialect of power is often seen as 'selling out'."

There is nothing more "proper" or "correct" about Standard American English as opposed to AAVE. Both have their own (ofttimes overlapping) rules of grammar and vocabulary.

Re:That's not the professional term (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344712)

Call it the dialect of majority if you want propriety.

Re:That's not the professional term (2, Informative)

snowgirl (978879) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344822)

Call it the dialect of majority if you want propriety.

Afrikaans was not the "language of the majority" in South Africa, yet it remained the "language of power".

I spoke correctly, and used the pedantically correct term.

Re:That's not the professional term (2, Funny)

ISoldat53 (977164) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344524)

Do they have a name for NASCARonics? I can't understand a thing they say.

Re:That's not the professional term (1)

DevConcepts (1194347) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344722)

The professional name is "Redneck", translator is here. http://www.rinkworks.com/dialect/ [rinkworks.com]
Also translates to Jive, Cockney, Elmer Fudd, Swedish Chef, Moron, Pig Latin, or Hacker.

Re:That's not the professional term (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344708)

We cain't hep it if da lizzle be confoundin' tha govinizzle

Re:That's not the professional term (1)

Anomalyx (1731404) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344804)

Ever notice how "professional terms" just get really long and add hyphens everywhere? I just call it the "black accent" and leave it at that. And since I know someone's thinking it, no that's not being racist. Racism implies that I implied something derogatory towards them. I haven't. Don't mind the people; the accent is just difficult to understand, just like any other strong accent.

Re:That's not the professional term (2, Informative)

snowgirl (978879) | more than 4 years ago | (#33345000)

Ever notice how "professional terms" just get really long and add hyphens everywhere? I just call it the "black accent" and leave it at that. And since I know someone's thinking it, no that's not being racist. Racism implies that I implied something derogatory towards them. I haven't. Don't mind the people; the accent is just difficult to understand, just like any other strong accent.

Ok, accepting your definition of "racism", it's not racist. It's still factually wrong though.

AAVE has different mood, tenses, and aspects on its verbs, some of which are not expressible in Standard American English.

It is a "dialect", not an "accent". An accent is a different way of pronouncing words. For instance, the British speak a different dialect of English from Americans, but if a British person were to say a sentence with American word choice, they would still pronounce it in a British Accent.

Likewise, one can pronounce Standard American English with an AAVE accent, but "they ain't be doin' that."

Re:That's not the professional term (1)

raddan (519638) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344978)

I think it is rather remarkable that the United States and much of Canada share mostly-comprehensible dialects of the same language. If you look at the same land area anywhere else in the world, you don't have as much homogeneity as we have here. Even China has two main dialects (although their written language has the curious property of being readable by everyone).

But it's not surprising to me that dialects develop. I think, after the black-white school-integration era, people realized that there was more to "assimilation" than simply mixing people together. When you take a group of people who had been culturally isolated so long, through slavery, you're going to get a different set of shared values, even when you make efforts to put them on a level playing field (legally speaking, anyway).

Whether black people and white people in this country are growing more or less isolated, I don't know. I don't think it "says" anything in particular about our society. Cultures form and disappear. It would be nice if everyone could be friends, or at least civil, but that's not the way people work.

Re:That's not the professional term (1)

Comrade Ogilvy (1719488) | more than 4 years ago | (#33345004)

What does it say about our society if a group we need to integrate is so isolated it's developing an incompatible dialect?

I get your drift, but by putting this this way, you are making it sound worse than it is. This is not a new development but simply a practical step in coping with the world as it actually exists (and has for some time).

Law enforcement having a few experts on hand to check that a transcription is actually accurate is a very good thing.

African Americans - not people of African Decent (2, Insightful)

AnonymousClown (1788472) | more than 4 years ago | (#33345020)

I know plenty of Africans (People from Nigeria and there about - real African Americans) and people of African decent (also with a history of slavery no less) who speak perfect English and are also highly educated - have Dr. as a title many times. If you call them "African Americans" they take it as an insult, btw. And then there are educated American blacks who speak perfectly.

It's more of a sub set of our black population that doesn't want to learn or get educated; which also happens to be the part of the population with the highest crime rate.

And I find it interesting, when I'm being spoken to in AAVE (*rolls eyes at the PCness*) and find the speech incomprehensible, usually I hear very clearly, "What, you don't understand English?" - they're fucking with the white boy.

Not enough mod points... (5, Insightful)

strokerace (912726) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344228)

There aren't enough mod points in the universe to mod down all the trolls that are going to be posting on this topic.

Re:Not enough mod points... (1)

longhairedgnome (610579) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344432)

I used my last mod point to mod you "Informative." Oh SHI--zzel.

Re:Not enough mod points... (0, Offtopic)

at_slashdot (674436) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344444)

There aren't enough mod points in the universe to mod down all the trolls that are going to be posting on this topic.

Of course there are, for example I'd like to see your post moded down as troll, flamebait or offtopic.

The Wire (1)

amundb (1830912) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344230)

Has already done it.

Airplane! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344252)

Oh, stewardess, I speak jive: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fhJDvI3gUO8

HTML 'a' tag (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344688)

Read all about it:

http://www.w3schools.com/tags/tag_a.asp [w3schools.com]

awesome! (5, Funny)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344254)

all those years of wigger training is finally going to pay off! YOU HEAR THAT MOM?!?!?!?!

Perhaps they can get the Barbara Billingsly charac (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344256)

Perhaps they can get the Barbara Billingsly character from "Airplane!" " I speak jive!"

Wow... (1)

Zantac69 (1331461) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344258)

I mean...really. Wow.

Ebonics is not like "jive" from the 70s. Anyone who really listens can understand it - its just a butchering of southern USA english.

Re:Wow... (1)

Amouth (879122) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344418)

No it isn't "southern" - i'm not sure what it is but i know southern and it isn't this.

Re:Wow... (2, Insightful)

hedwards (940851) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344686)

It's derived from the dialects of the south, but that doesn't mean that it's likely to bear much of a resemblance. I mean after all, down south for a really long time there were limitations on education, employment and just general mixing of the races. Suggesting that a linguistic grouping would be derived in a straightforward way is ignorant. If you don't believe me, try comparing the dialects of Korean between the speakers from the North and the speakers from the South and you'd get the picture.

Re:Wow... (1)

rickb928 (945187) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344878)

"its just a butchering of southern USA english"

If that were true, the Justice Department would need translators to watch Paula Deen. [pauladeen.com]

You cannot make this stuff up. Not even Colbert can make this stuff up.

Were are living in the Onion (1)

cosm (1072588) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344264)

What it do pimpinz? We be keepin it real in dis bitch. All yo' base iz belong to us, go tell that homie. Be real, be ez /.ers

Similarly, this [theonion.com] just in. Looks like the administration is taking a page out of the Onion's book.

Ebonics experts (1)

DevConcepts (1194347) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344284)

Whats next... Spanglish experts?? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanglish [wikipedia.org]

Re:Ebonics experts (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344730)

It's been a need for sometime to have niche language experts. For instance the German English hybrid which common in Amish country, is difficult to understand without some understanding of the languages involved, and almost impossible to speak without knowing the specific rules. Not to mention the parts of the country where there's still holdover languages from times past before English became the more or less default language for everything.

Couldn't help it... (5, Insightful)

John Pfeiffer (454131) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344288)

ENGLISH, motherfucker. DO YOU SPEAK IT?

Re:Couldn't help it... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344422)

What?

Re:Couldn't help it... (3, Funny)

cosm (1072588) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344504)

Say 'what' again, I dare you, I double dare you motherfucker, say what one more Goddamn time!

Re:Couldn't help it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344800)

What??

Re:Couldn't help it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344990)

Que?

Re:Couldn't help it... (1)

amolapacificapaloma (1000830) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344702)

Whaaat?

I'm curious... (2, Interesting)

Mongoose Disciple (722373) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344328)

First, how does the Justice Department, as part of their interviewing process, figure out if someone legitimately has this skill or is faking it? This can't be that far from being the linguistic equivalent of a non-technical company trying to hire a programmer or IT person with a particular kind of expertise. In the tech world those situations are dailywtf's waiting to happen -- it can't be much better in this one.

Second, if you had this expertise, how would you keep it current? Spend an hour a day riding public transportation in Oakland?

Re:I'm curious... (2, Insightful)

PCM2 (4486) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344456)

First, how does the Justice Department, as part of their interviewing process, figure out if someone legitimately has this skill or is faking it?

Have them translate something. It's not like this skill does not exist already. You have an expert write up a dialogue (or get one from a wire tap) and then have applicants decipher it. If they're right, they're in.

Second, if you had this expertise, how would you keep it current? Spend an hour a day riding public transportation in Oakland?

Probably a little more than that, but essentially, yeah. You need to speak to the people in question on a regular basis. Social workers might be good candidates.

Re:I'm curious... (1)

retchdog (1319261) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344710)

A group of the moderately skilled can, through consensus and planning, quite efficiently evaluate an individual of higher skill. For example, psychometricians generally speaking aren't geniuses but their IQ tests are pretty good at detecting them.

Is there an N-word exemption by contract? (2, Interesting)

SlappyBastard (961143) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344348)

Because, ya know, as a white dude I'd hate to lose my job translating negrospeak because I used the N-word.

Is it really that hard to understand negrospeak? Or are all the old guys who the DoJ just starting fossilize? Will this lead to black street gangs using Valley Girl Talk to throw the police off their trail?

Re:Is there an N-word exemption by contract? (1)

longhairedgnome (610579) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344494)

You would be more likely to lose your job if you were omitting words like that

Re:Is there an N-word exemption by contract? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344886)

Will this lead to black street gangs using Valley Girl Talk to throw the police off their trail?

Like gag me with a spoon, k?

I say. (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344390)

Robin Hood. this fin' might 'eaven and 'ell lead ter the bloody Cozzer's makin' less unfounded 'rrests. 'cause sometimes a Sexton Blake recipe is just a Sexton Blake recipe.

Herein follow a few terms to help you get started (5, Informative)

MRe_nl (306212) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344460)

on your merry way towards the ve-nak-u-lar

"Damn- that shit is DOPE".
That is a wonderful concept/object/action.
"Can't FADE that".
I am unable to comprehend or assimilate that concept at this time.
"Shante ain't havin' it".
This is not something that Shante will allow to occur.
"Homey- Boo was dropping PHAT beats".
Our friend Boo was playing some wonderful music.
"YO!- Let me GAFFLE that BLUNT"!
Might I be able to indulge in your marijuana cigarette?
"JIMMY was on and I was HITTIN' it"!
I had in my possession a condom, which was used in my engagement of sexual activity.

http://www.ebonics-translator.com/ebonics_101.php [ebonics-translator.com]

Re:Herein follow a few terms to help you get start (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344666)

You made me smoke coffee from muh ma fuckin nostrils
ya'll is mad stupid.

http://joel.net/ebonics/translator.asp

Re:Herein follow a few terms to help you get start (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33345050)

"JIMMY was on and I was HITTIN' it"!
I had in my possession a condom, which was used in my engagement of sexual activity.

Dude, this is Slashdot, such fictional sentences are useless to this population, most Slashdot users ain't gonna be gettin' jiggy with it, you dig? Word to your mother.

Re:Herein follow a few terms to help you get start (1)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 4 years ago | (#33345060)

Gentlemen, I inquire; Who hath released the hounds?

Here is more information.... (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344470)

http://humor.beecy.net/misc/ebonics/ [beecy.net]

how many credit hours would that be? and I am wondering what the topic would be in Advanced Ebonics classes?

Re:Here is more information.... (1)

Zeek40 (1017978) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344584)

I'm pretty sure the 'Advanced Ebonics' classes would involve making up new nonsense words until one of them becomes popular, then repeating that word until most of society can recognize it as an 'idiot indicator'.

Hire Barbara Billingsley (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344482)

"Oh stewardess! I speak jive!"

It might not be street... (1)

ddrichardson (869910) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344544)

This [wordpress.com] comes to mind...

Re:It might not be street... (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344936)

LOL...izzle.

I don't see how this helps... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344564)

Professional black criminals are smart enough to speak in code, so the only thing this hurts are stupid people who talk plainly about their illegal activities. Nevertheless, I suppose it can help understanding innocuous dialogue between the parties involved.

Wow. Pure flamebait. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344568)

I'm sure the DEA has plenty of translators for a variety of languages and dialects. The only reason this is "news" is because it will create some passionate, if often irrelevant, debate.

Recognize the autonomy of African-Americans (2, Funny)

hessian (467078) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344798)

This is an excellent development as it further legitimizes the idea that:

(a) African-Americans are a separate group that should not be assimilated;
(b) African-Americans have their own culture, values and heritage that is distinct from the majority;
(c) African-Americans are best treated as a self-governing cultural community within the political entity "USA".

In other words, it's a step forward for true African-American autonomy, and an implicit recognition of Pan-Nationalism [pan-nationalism.org] .

Re:Recognize the autonomy of African-Americans (1)

Mongoose Disciple (722373) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344908)

Respectfully, I think you're choosing to read a lot more into this story than is really there.

Re:Recognize the autonomy of African-Americans (2, Insightful)

snowgirl (978879) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344924)

a) They are a separate group, but being so does not mean that they "should not be assimilated".
b) They do have their own culture, values and heritage that is distinct from the majority... this is fact. Ignoring it, or refusing it does not make it less of a fact.
c) What what?

Ah crap, I'm arguing with a nut job conspiracist... :(

Re:Recognize the autonomy of African-Americans (1)

uncanny (954868) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344966)

So, maybe African-Americans probably would like it if they were given their own facilities. Progress is here!

Re:Recognize the autonomy of African-Americans (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344974)

There's a Mr. Eminem here and he'd like to disagree with you that African-Americans are separate, have their own culture, or should be treated different.

Translation: (5, Insightful)

twoallbeefpatties (615632) | more than 4 years ago | (#33344840)

In other words, we have a dialect of English that is generally spoken in the inner-city areas that have a predominance of crime, and we need someone who understands this dialect to help us make sure that we understand what's being talked about when we intercept criminals speaking that way. You dig?

Re:Translation: (1)

snowgirl (978879) | more than 4 years ago | (#33345034)

You need mod points. This is the clearest explanation I've read.

Wait'll they spy on geeks ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#33344848)

And have to bring in a Klingon translator.

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