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Apple Patent Points To iMac Touch Running OS X and iOS

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the because-they-can dept.

Desktops (Apple) 239

siliconbits noted an interesting little tale of a recently surfaced Apple Patent covering an iMac Touch with a flex base that switches from iOS to OS X based on orientation. There's some interesting food for thought in there ... I can't decide if I like the idea or not.

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Incoming sockpuppet troll odies/sopssa/SquarePixel (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33355048)

Which sockpuppet will be used to troll this thread?

Remember it moderators, odies = sopssa = SquarePixel, three sockpuppets, one stupid troll! His posts are simple: repeat ad nauseam what the article posted, add a few 'Captain Obvious' style facts and then add his anti Linux/Google/Apple/USA innuendo. Or it's a simple China or MS apologist post that turns into a straw man, and you guessed it, it's against Linux/Google/Apple/USA.

Peace out!

FUCK APPLE AND FUCK APPLE'S BITCHBOY (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33355384)

Slashdot, you're so fucking pathetic now and you don't even know it. How the fuck does this story make it to the main page? This is fanboy jabber, not news for nerds or stuff that matters. How about running a story about housing sales in the U.S. down 27%, a 15-year low? That shit that fucking matters.

Re:FUCK APPLE AND FUCK APPLE'S BITCHBOY (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33355810)

Slashdot, you're so fucking pathetic now and you don't even know it. How the fuck does this story make it to the main page? This is fanboy jabber, not news for nerds or stuff that matters. How about running a story about housing sales in the U.S. down 27%, a 15-year low? That shit that fucking matters.

Seems like every time Steve Jobs farts there is a Slashdot story detailing how stinky it was and what it smells like.

Re:Incoming sockpuppet troll odies/sopssa/SquarePi (0, Troll)

trapnest (1608791) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356054)

I've never seen any of the sockpuppets you mention post, but I see your retard drivel here every day. I think you're the troll.

Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (2, Insightful)

odies (1869886) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355050)

This is what it has looked like for a long time. iOS is on their every other line of devices and the walled garden apps economy is a significant money maker for Apple. Combine that with the recent patent of remotely detecting and disabling jailbroken iPhones [slashdot.org] and I think Apple really wants to control the whole area, and obviously wants more and more money. Say goodbye to hobbyists or hackers, and just imagine if Microsoft did the same.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33355094)

except the patent actually covers detecting and disabling stolen phones.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33355100)

Which sockpuppet will be used to troll this thread?

Well, at least we got a quick answer to that question.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33355144)

Dude, sopssa, learn English and stop making new accounts.

iOS is on their every other line of devices and the walled garden apps economy is a significant money maker for Apple.

Huh?

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33355150)

What's with the sockpuppets, sopssa? Are you becoming the next twitter?

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (0, Offtopic)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355450)

Maybe he's Twitter's twin - the one that actually likes Microsoft.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (1, Offtopic)

BrokenHalo (565198) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356550)

Whatever happened to Twitter? Maybe got bored with his posts being automatically modded down to -1...

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (4, Insightful)

cowscows (103644) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355188)

Apple is not going to kill the desktop OS that is required to write applications for their mobile OS.. Steve Jobs isn't stupid, he knows that people aren't going to be coding 3D games or run photoshop or whatever on iOS. Killing OSX would kill iOS, and Apple knows that.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33355366)

"Steve Jobs isn't stupid"

this is the same guy that got fired from his own company, and tried to tell us we were not holding it right, are you sure about that statement?

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (5, Insightful)

cowscows (103644) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355446)

Good point. We're talking about a guy who started Apple (and then later came back and basically saved it), turned Pixar from a small company into a movie powerhouse, and has been involved in basically reinventing the music industry, the cellphone industry, and maybe the tablet computer market. Sounds like a textbook case of stupidity.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33355542)

Pedantic note. He didn't revolutionalize anything. His company may have. He may have been the final say on the design and implementation decisions, but he didn't do it. The engineers did. The researchers did. The programmers did. Just because he's the one standing on the stage during a keynote doesn't mean that he really did anything (I'm not saying he didn't, but I'm saying that just because he takes credit doesn't mean he deserves to take credit)...

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (4, Insightful)

EastCoastSurfer (310758) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355742)

If there is any company that is driven from the CEO down it's Apple. So while you're right that the he of course didn't do it by himself, he is likely a huge driving force behind what the rest of the company accomplished.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33356668)

i certainly hope you are right - coz when jobs shuffles off this mortal coil (soon please) then i'm hoping apple will quickly disappear.

sure the apple community will be in (pitiful) mourning for a while but then they'll go and find (another) religion or something - out of my hearing range completely.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (2, Interesting)

cowscows (103644) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355770)

Well I said he was involved in those things. Apple has lots of smart people who are working really hard, no doubt. But they had lots of smart, hardworking people back in the 90's as well, when the company was crash and burn'ing. The turn-around started when Jobs came back, and has continued strong for about a decade. It could just be coincidence, but it's more likely that Jobs is providing at least some useful direction/focus.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (1)

Carpathius (215767) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355784)

Yeah, but isn't it Jobs who chooses the direction that their gadgets finally take? Just because he's not the one to engineer them, doesn't mean he doesn't have a gigantic impact on how they operate.

I remember reading about the guys who developed the PalmPilot. One of the people carried around a block of wood the targeted size of the unit, pulling it out and pretending to write on it, "using" it whenever he would use the real device. He wasn't the engineer, he just had the vision. It takes both -- the guy with the vision and the engineer to realize the product.

I have no real idea about how much influence Jobs has had over the ipod or iphone. My reading has implied he had a lot to do with it, but I can't be sure. But my point is the best engineers and designers in the world can make a really horrible product. It takes the vision and willingness to see beyond what is now and what we think is possible to make a great product.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (3, Insightful)

jbolden (176878) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356394)

Leaders are generally given credit for accomplishments. Napoleon didn't personally conquer northern Italy.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (3, Insightful)

orasio (188021) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355630)

I don't know if the AC meant what I understood, but he has a point.
Steve Jobs does not succeed by lack of stupidity. Some of the stuff he pulled seemed pretty stupid before he did it, and some of it was.
A phone without keys seems pretty stupid to me. I think it's stupid, still. That doesn't stop him from making money from a phone without keys.
Seeing how stupid others are is easy, it doesn't take talent. Making money in spite of intelligent people thinking you are stupid, it does take talent.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (1)

cowscows (103644) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355916)

A phone without a physical keyboard isn't inherently stupid, it's a trade-off with significant pros and cons. While your priorities might make the presence of physical keyboard a no-brainer for you, that still doesn't make a touch-screen only device stupid, or even a bad idea.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33356426)

No, it's inherently stupid. If you disagree, then your opinion doesn't matter.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (1)

orasio (188021) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356442)

I thought I was being clear enough.

The point is that actions or ideas are only stupid in a context and from a point of view.

I was just showing an example of an idea that did seem stupid before, and can still be honestly evaluated as stupid if you think about it.

A touch screen is stupid always. The lack of feedback, the obscuring of the keys, it is plain stupid. Everybody thought about it first, and discarded it as stupid.

You can come up with a new idea out of luck or work. Being successful using an idea everyone discards is what takes talent. Not lack of stupidity.

Of course, I am not saying that a touch screen is objectively stupid. People make money out of it. It's not stupid to make money. I mean that it's a good example of an idea that would seem stupid to a regular designer, but would work nevertheless.

About being objectively stupid, I think getting fired from your own company is as close as one can get.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (1)

dissy (172727) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356570)

I'm curious how well your non-stupid phone company is doing?

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33355676)

Spoke like a true member of the Jobs Cult.

Tables have been around for 20 years, smartphones around a long time before apple jumped on the bandwagon, portable music players have been around for a very long time, way before Apple would even acknowledge music existed. Pixar's success is nothing to do with Jobs, it's their movies. Are that deluded you think you gay leader sits down a writes movie scripts and story boards too?

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33355906)

Tables have been around for 20 years

I'm pretty sure they're older than that...

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (2, Funny)

BrokenHalo (565198) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356676)

You are obviously too young to remember how we used to rest our beer glasses and coffee mugs in mid-air with nothing more than casual use of the power of our minds. The invention of these "table" things just made the activity obsolete.

Now get off my lawn. :-D

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (1)

cowscows (103644) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356168)

You have no idea how the world works. The smartest people in the world can have a really hard time getting anything useful done under poor management, bad priorities, and unwise resource allocation. All of those smart people at pixar weren't born there, somebody had to pick the right people, see their potential, give them some direction and resources, and keep them focused and motivated.

And you can talk about 20 year old hardware that nobody bought all that you want. I didn't claim that Apple invented those devices, but they certainly changed the marketplace in those areas.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (1)

darien.train (1752510) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356630)

Pixar's success is nothing to do with Jobs, it's their movies.

If I remember correctly it's largely the freedom that Pixar gives to it's directors and writers to do the story/movie they want to do that has made them so successful (ask Brad Bird). They trust smart entertaining people to make smart entertaining movies without focus-grouping and watering-it down to death. Ultimate creative freedom doesn't sound like a Jobs-style edict to me but I don't know anyone at Pixar and can't confirm this. Maybe he he holds the patent for needy robotic child-lamps or something.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33355868)

Why is this modded up? Jobs didn't revolutionize anything. Stop pushing you religion on us.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (1)

tehcyder (746570) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356006)

You forgot to mention the feeding of the five thousand and the walking on water episodes.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33355842)


Steve Jobs is ranked highly among CEOs, is a bazillionaire, can sell ice cubes to Eskimos. You're right, he's stupid.

Steve said... (4, Interesting)

copponex (13876) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355652)

Steve said... [techie-buzz.com]

Yep, freedom from programs that steal your private data. Freedom from programs that trash your battery. Freedom from porn. Yep, freedom. The times they are a changin’, and some traditional PC folks feel like their world is slipping away. It is.

If Steve thinks the desktop metaphor is too difficult for most users, he'll take it away from everyone. If he thinks only signed applications should be allowed to run on your computer, he'll make it so. Of course, Microsoft could do the same thing, but Apple is certainly more likely to make those decisions. I can only hope they will keep the "mouse option" for pro creative users, but with Apple randomly removing FireWire, ExpressCard slots, and still failing to provide professional level graphics cards, most people see the writing on the wall: average joe consumers along with iPods and iPads are the future. Steve is a smart guy, but I wouldn't put it past his ego to declare the end of computers as we know them.

OS X developers think the same thing. [arstechnica.com]

Last week, we also hosted a live chat featuring several developers whose apps were picked for our Ars Design Awards for Mac OS X. We asked them what they thought about the future of Mac OS X and Apple's development platform during the chat, and then followed up on their thoughts about languages and APIs. While current Mac developers aren't nearly as concerned as our own John Siracusa about the Objective-C language in particular, they do see new and improved APIs coming down the pike. Developers are seeing iOS influencing Mac OS X instead of the other way around.

The developers on our panel unanimously agreed that Mac OS X will eventually be subsumed by iOS, but that the Mac has plenty of life left. "Mac is the awesome old grandma, whose kids (iPhone & iPad) have left home," Atebits' Loren Brichter said. "Not dead; not really dying. But it's our job to keep her comfortable until she's gone."

Re:Steve said... (1)

shadowrat (1069614) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356042)

I don't see what difference replacing OSX with iOS makes. Jobs needs developers to make apps for iOS. if he's going to supplant OSX with iOS entirely you are going to need dev tools that run on iOS. So you pay your hundred bucks a year and get the dev app for iOS. Or maybe the dev tool actually runs on windows or linux at that point, but i think that's less likely.

I would think that once iOS has a dev app, you would also need to leverage source control and multitasking. In the end how is it going to be much different? You would launch the dev app. work on your code. compile and test it. probably send the binary right to the appstore. Or maybe iOS at that point supports only html5 and then you can make content on anything you want.

Re:Steve said... (1)

vague disclaimer (861154) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356606)

Hmmmm

Of course, Microsoft could do the same thing, but Apple is certainly more likely to make those decisions.

Trusted Computing...?

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (1)

statusbar (314703) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355672)

Rewind 26 years.... Steve jobs released the Macintosh.

Apple already had the Lisa.

Initially, all Mac development had to be done on a Lisa.

Your comment was probably said back then regarding Lisa instead of osx.

--jeffk++

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (2, Insightful)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355836)

Kill it? Of course not, nobody is claiming Apple would kill Mac OS X.

On the other hand, they might try a tactic of only supporting Mac OS X on their most expensive workstations, and shipping lower end computers with only iOS.

Compare Nintendo's business model (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356326)

they might try a tactic of only supporting Mac OS X on their most expensive workstations, and shipping lower end computers with only iOS.

True, Apple could make Mac OS X exclusive to Mac Pro hardware. Then Apple might move to a Nintendo-style model where you have to have a dedicated office and published applications for someone else's platform in order to qualify for the iOS SDK.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (3, Interesting)

fermion (181285) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355894)

I would think that Mac OS would continue in some form for the high end desktops and laptops. I would think for the lower end machines, which must come down in price to compete, might move to iOS.

I would also think that as iOS is moved to higher power machines, xcode or something like would also be made available to code on these machines. Running the emulator for iOS is necessary for the moment. At some point the devices will be powerful enough to allow software development in situ. The iPad almost could run a graphics based IDE with a set of fixed routines.

It is also worth remembering that the Mac is 25 years old and is what I consider to be the third major revision of the OS. To me we have the initial System, which evolved from 1984-1990. Then we had the Mac OS which started with System 7 in 1991 and ran to the turn of the century. We are now in the Mac OS X era, which really started big around late 2002. We may be in an overlap time. Versions of the Apple ][ persisted to 1990, even though the Lisa was introduced ten years prior and most people were buying Macs. I don't like the idea of iOS for general pupose computers, it is too closed, but maybe Apple is planning on leaving the GPC business.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33356022)

Sure he would. He can then charge extra for a complete "Development Environment".

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33355264)

iOS is on their every other line of devices and the walled garden apps economy is a significant money maker for Apple.

Stop lying. App Store makes very little money [appleinsider.com] for Apple. sopssa, I don't recall how many times you have to be reminded that Apple expects App Store to barely be even, profit wise. That's not where they make their money. But I guess getting first post and trolling is more important that checking facts.

Keep on trolling boyo!

Captcha: Inform.
Ahhh ... the irony!

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355764)

Well, they'd be making more money if they weren't inventing reasons to turn down Apps and looking to keep the store the Disneyland of smartphones.

Re:Apple slowly replacing OS X with iOS (2, Insightful)

alen (225700) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356200)

Apple has been doing this before iOS

few years ago you has OS X, Apple TV and Time Machine. only thing now is that Apple seems to be going to iOS which has more lock in and runs on ARM CPU's so that they can control the entire hardware and software experience. people have run OS X on non-apple hardware but not iOS

since apple is a hardware company they are trying to sell you 20 devices each with the same OS but gimped software that is dumbed down for a few tasks. instead of general purpose software like OS X

i guess apple hasn't learned from MS and IBM (2, Insightful)

alen (225700) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355186)

Apple trying to dumb down the computer and to vertically integrate the entire experience to lock everyone in will probably fail. Right about at the peak of Microsoft's power is when the company saw they had to support other technologies. IBM's peak in the mainframe age vanished when PC's came along and freed people from the tyranny of the mainframe.

i like my iphone and think it's the right experience for a mobile device, but not the computer.

Re:i guess apple hasn't learned from MS and IBM (2, Funny)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355368)

You're comparing apples to car analogies. Microsoft and IBM both represent(ed) the default provider, the one you had to find an excuse to switch away from. Apple's customers are almost entirely voluntary.

Put it this way, when Ballmer said "Vista is just fine - you're using it wrong", a preponderance of Windows users said "Noooo, no, I don't think so. I'll stick with XP or wait for 7". But when Steve said "You're holding it wrong", the preponderance of iPhone 4 owners said "Yes! YES! I am holding it wrong! It's my fault! Thank you sir, may I have another?"

Re:i guess apple hasn't learned from MS and IBM (1)

pushing-robot (1037830) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355472)

If I could have fixed Vista with half an inch of duct tape, I wouldn't have minded it so much.

Re:i guess apple hasn't learned from MS and IBM (1)

AndrewNeo (979708) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355696)

You didn't know? You put the half-inch of duct tape on the install DVD, therefore preventing you from getting to most of Vista's problems!

Re:i guess apple hasn't learned from MS and IBM (1)

alen (225700) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355694)

there was a huge outcry in the iSucker community when SJ said that

at one point MS was the excuse to switch from IBM and Novell. When Windows 95 came out people lined up to buy it and upgrade computers. it was just like the iSuckers lining up at Apple Stores. By Vista no one wanted to upgrade a computer for an OS upgrade. especially because PC's became so cheap the price to upgrade wasn't worth it.

original iPhone was like Windows 95 in the 1990's. Apple is using iOS to lock everyone in and it probably won't work in the long run

Re:i guess apple hasn't learned from MS and IBM (2, Interesting)

Samalie (1016193) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355864)

Sorry, but I'm getting fucking sick of the:

"But when Steve said "You're holding it wrong", the preponderance of iPhone 4 owners said "Yes! YES! I am holding it wrong! It's my fault! Thank you sir, may I have another?""

type bullshit around here.

All but the absolute "Steve Jobs is God" wackjobs realize that Apple humped the dog HARD on the antenna design of the iPhone4.

Yet I still bought and have my iPhone4...and my decision was made post-antennagate.

Why? Because corporately I have two choices based on my organization's security principles...I can use a blackberry, which I once did, and which does, in actuality, lick balls. Yes, the "phone" part is excellent, and its a great email tool, but beyond that I find BB to be a giant steaming turd. Or I can use an iPhone. I had a iP3g, and the fucker lacked some features I needed that are present in the iP4. So I bought one.

Yes, antennagate is VERY real. I can kill the signal to my phone at home with one light finger touch. And I absolutely think that Apple fucked the dog, hard. But the case I got for free solves the issue in a pratical using-my-phone sense...and compared to using a BB, I'll gladly give Jobs & co my money.

Android, while having great potential, doesn't meat our corporate security policies yet. Once it does, I'll probably switch, mostly because of Antennagate and Apple fucking up. But until they get their security shit in order...its just not an option for me. (And, I'll also add, I'm in Canada...there are NO good Android based phones up here yet...they're all 2 year old turds).

But really...all us iPhone users aren't fucking sheep waiting for the next time for Jobs & co to fuck us in the ass. But I guess you get a nice big stiffy every time you think about us getting fucked by Jobs, and have to spout this same tired shit in every iPhone related discussion.

Re:i guess apple hasn't learned from MS and IBM (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33356094)

Only on /. can a person speaking truth about Apple for once be modded "Troll" when the parent is the obvious troll of the thread.

Well done mods.

To make sure I don't get modded troll too....APPLE SUCKS!! SO DOES MICROSOFT!!! GO LINUX!!!!

Re:i guess apple hasn't learned from MS and IBM (1)

havokca (1864454) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355400)

Right about at the peak of Microsoft's power is when the company saw they had to [change].

You may have a solid point there

I mean, it's one thing for a company with a stable market-share to pull the kinds of shenanigans that Apple has been called out for (repeatedly on this site). But they're gaining market-share. Pretty rapidly too. There was that one story on here that mentioned how most students going into university are doing so with iMacs and MacBooks [slashdot.org] . There was yet another story in Fortune that mentioned how government procurement of Apple has recently surged. [cnn.com]

Right now, they're riding a pretty huge wave of profit increases. No investor in their right mind is going to demand that Jobs change his tactics.

But what happens when their market-share plateaus and people start to give the company flak, in the same way that they did for Microsoft back in the late 90s? Once the quarterly numbers start to look a little less incredible, public sentiment is going to mean quite a bit.

The only question is, how long will it be before the voices of the irked consumer are no longer drowned out by fantastic quarterly reports? [apple.com]

Disclaimer: Written using a MacBook Pro

Re:i guess apple hasn't learned from MS and IBM (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355878)

To be fair, no investor in there right mind would be buying shares in Apple. While it is hugely profitable, there's a lot of fluff to it and companies that run like Apple does are far too risky for investment. Same goes for Google, you see people throwing larger and larger sums of money at them, but it strikes me as a bit bizarre that Apple would be worth more than MS when MS has already taken most of its antitrust lumps and is more profitable than either of the other two. Combine that with a much more durable market position and it's difficult in my mind to justify the price people are willing to pay for the other two. I don't like MS, don't get me wrong about that, but even with the mistakes of the last decade, they're still doing better than the competition is. Let's just see how Apple does when the inevitable antitrust investigations start coming.

Re:i guess apple hasn't learned from MS and IBM (1)

jbolden (176878) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356520)

Steve Jobs has a long history of telling consumers, partners and boards of directors "my way or the highway". When he was just an inventor/exec and not yet a business god he stood up to the Apple board twice in huge ways. The first time they sent him off to work on a niche product called the Macintosh and the second time they fired him and he founded NeXT. Now, getting into a public fight with Steve Jobs, much less firing him would send the stock crashing.

Jobs is going to do things his way. They might be successful they might not but no he's running Apple until he leaves. Then public sentiment will matter.

Re:i guess apple hasn't learned from MS and IBM (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355540)

There are applications that a touch screen would make better. Ever played a MegaTouch game? They're in a lot of bars. Personally, if I'm in a keyboard-based app like a spreadsheet or word processor, I think it would be a lot easier to do mouse stuff with a finger on the screen than getting "mouse elbow" from switching from the keyboard to the mouse.

Of course, better yet would be if these programs had better keyboard support. Hell, we didn't used to even have mice.

Don't care for Apple, but makes sense to me (1)

h00manist (800926) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356036)

Getting all their apps rewritten by hand, to run on low-memory, low-power devices. Getting all their distribution and supply controlled by keys. Don't make money on the app store, just keep it as the portal everyone must access, let developers and customers get totally addicted to it, and just keep it controlled, with good quality, PR, prices, statistics, tracking, everything under control. Institute many penalties and disadvantages for breaking the walled garden. Fixes piracy, security, badware apps, hacker apps, poor-quality-ware, lots of problems. Further integrates computer and cellphone. Control the supply of software and hardware for music, apps, movies, cellphones, computers. The only part I don't care for is the total-one-corporation-control who I trust just as any corporation, to make money above all and comply with government demands and pressures. Too bad such integration and cooperation is so hard to get, by nature, for uber-rebellious open source hackers. We could build great things. To me, the discussion should center around standards, which after implemented generally everyone accepts, and how to encourage and integrate the activity of everyone, developers, users more, something like these apps-store, music-store, movie-store, forums, etc.

Re:i guess apple hasn't learned from MS and IBM (1)

adonoman (624929) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356558)

So get one of these [hp.com] . Touch screens for PCs have been around for years, it's just that a Minority-Report style interface is going to destroy your shoulders a whole lot faster than a mouse will hurt your elbow.

Re:i guess apple hasn't learned from MS and IBM (2, Insightful)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355584)

That's because Apple is the new AOL. For people who think that anything more complicated than turning a computer on and off is for "those command-line gurus". Just look at their ads. It's a far cry from the days when Apple was a premium brand.

Re:i guess apple hasn't learned from MS and IBM (1)

jbolden (176878) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356666)

First off Apple is still the choice of tech geeks. I assume (given you slashdot number) you remember "Macintosh, the computer people really use". Mac from day 1 catered to the "I hate PCs" crowd.

Re:i guess apple hasn't learned from MS and IBM (1)

shadowrat (1069614) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356252)

the mainframe age vanished because PC's were cheaper and almost as good. At least they let people accomplish most of the tasks they wanted to in a simpler manner. That sounds a lot like the edge the ipad has. It's cheap and it lets you browse your photos and stream a netflix with relative ease.

Apple patent (4, Interesting)

gumbi west (610122) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355202)

By the time a patent becomes public the inventor has sent it in about three or more years prior. If we haven't already seen this, it isn't likely to happen soon. go to appleinsider and checkout all the "apple patent points to" things you've never seen. Obviously, they don't report on the patents that you have seen (who would read, "Apple patent points to phone with touch screen and accelerometer.") so it is a little hard to know the time to market versus time to patent delay, but I've never seen anything an "Apple patent points to".

Re:Apple patent (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355436)

but I've never seen anything an "Apple patent points to".

Me neither, but I read the entire article and the only thing popping into my head was

"Yeah, I guess its been a while since a Macrumour was around or a prototype phone was leaked"

Re:Apple patent (1)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355566)

Apple's UI patents (the pinch-to-zoom gesture springs to mind) neatly presaged the iPhone's announcement, although in that case they were likely filed back when it was a tablet project. To emphasise and confoundyour point, it's not something that'll ship this year, but that doesn't mean it'll never happen.

Re:Apple patent (1)

havokca (1864454) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355674)

Apple's UI patents (the pinch-to-zoom gesture springs to mind)

They patented that?

Did the TED talk not count as prior art there? [google.com] (See 6 minutes in for some pinch to zoom)

Re:Apple patent (3, Informative)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356494)

Given that Apple filed the patent in 2004, and that talk was in 2006, I shouldn't think so.

Re:Apple patent (1)

jez9999 (618189) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355730)

You mean pinch-to-expand? Pinch-to-zoom would be unintuative.

Re:Apple patent (1)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356112)

Semantic mismatch. I've always thought that, unqualified, "zoom" could mean "zoom in" or "zoom out". I don't think of "zoom (in)" and "expand" as opposites.

Cisco (0, Offtopic)

delirium of disorder (701392) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355274)

Can we please call the iPhone OS something different? Cisco sold the original IOS years before Apple. Capitalization doesn't create a strong enough distinction. It just looks wrong.

Re:Cisco (3, Informative)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355346)

Re:Cisco (1)

havokca (1864454) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355508)

I wonder how much that cost Apple...

Re:Cisco (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33355372)

Yea, it's really confusing. I definitely thought Apple was going to make a combination touch screen iMac and Cisco router.

iPad + Time Capsule (2, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356384)

I definitely thought Apple was going to make a combination touch screen iMac and Cisco router.

I wouldn't put a touch screen router beyond Apple, seeing as how Apple did popularize 802.11b with AirPort. Imagine a Time Capsule with a built-in iPad.

Re:Cisco (1)

WilyCoder (736280) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355412)

I bet you're mad that 'gay' used to mean 'happy'.

Being mad is pretty gay, dude...

Re:Cisco (1)

tyrione (134248) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355454)

I bet you're mad that 'gay' used to mean 'happy'.

Being mad is pretty gay, dude...

Gay stay means `happy.' There is a reason words have multiple definitions for the same word, in English. It's all in the context.

Re:Cisco (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33356316)

Well said. Most gay people I know are fairly gay. And yes, the meaning works both ways.

Finally, proof of what we've been saying for years (0, Flamebait)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355342)

iMac Touch with a flex base that switches from iOS to OS X based on orientation.

So if you're straight, it runs one OS, and if you're gay, it runs the other.

Does this mean Apple is trying to patent device-based gaydar?

iMac running iOS (0, Flamebait)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355370)

Jobs #&@%ing told you. He told you that iOS was the way his computers were going to shift, but you said "not on the desktop, that's what Mac OS X is for". In five years time, he'll be running iOS on xserves and calling it a revolution in server security "never run untested code! Turn daemons on and off with the flick of a finger on your dedicated iPad (dedication license fees per iPad/xserve connection apply).

Re:iMac running iOS (2, Informative)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355426)

Nothing in this patent application says they are getting rid of desktop OS X.

Re:iMac running iOS (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33355502)

Nothing in this patent application says they're doing anything. It's a patent application, not a business plan.

Re:iMac running iOS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33356070)

The application doesn't even say that this tech would be use for switching OSes. It's about changing the UI - even just the interface mode - which (as any geek should understand if he has ever used the snide term WinDOS, or chosen between KDE and GNOME, or toggled vi between input and command mode) is not the same thing. It's more like doing things with the mouse vs. doing things with the keyboard; laying the device flat would simply give you a third set of input methods. Upright, you point and click and even interact with ye olde Flash apps; downlow, you tap and pinch and make 8-finger gestures. There's no reason you couldn't do all of that with an app running on a future version of OS X.

heehee (1)

Steauengeglase (512315) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355522)

While touch-based input is well suited to many applications, conventional styles of input, such as a mouse/keyboard input may be preferred in other applications. Therefore it may be desirable for some devices to provide for touch-based input as well as mouse/keyboard input. However, a UI being displayed by the display device during a touch-based input mode might not be suited for use during a mouse/keyboard input mode, and vice versa.

I certainly hope you have to hit the escape key to switch modes. It would be vi/emacs all over again.

Re:heehee (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33355926)

So much for keeping a freeprint-free screen.

sigh.

Can I share files and cut/paste between OSs? (1)

RevWaldo (1186281) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355668)

Otherwise I would hate it with a firey hate.

.

I don't really see this as useful. (1)

bhartman34 (886109) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355724)

Why would you want iOS on an iMac? I could see going in the other direction, and putting OSX on an iPad, This doesn't make sense to me unless iOS kicks in when it's taken off its base and used as a tablet.

Re:I don't really see this as useful. (1)

cowscows (103644) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355824)

Maybe I just want to play my iOS games on a larger screen. Maybe my kids wants to use a "fingerpaint" app on the computer. There are things that a touchscreen interface is better for than a keyboard/mouse. Why not have a machine that can switch between the two interfaces depending on what you want to do?

Re:I don't really see this as useful. (1)

bhartman34 (886109) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356154)

Maybe I just want to play my iOS games on a larger screen. Maybe my kids wants to use a "fingerpaint" app on the computer. There are things that a touchscreen interface is better for than a keyboard/mouse. Why not have a machine that can switch between the two interfaces depending on what you want to do?

Just to be clear here, we're talking about an iMac with a screen that doesn't detach from its base, right? It's hard to picture playing the same kinds of games on an iMac Touch (as this is envisioned) as on an iPad or iPod Touch. With the latter two, you pick up the display and hold it. With the iMac Touch display, you reach out and touch it. It's a different animal.

I have no issue with a iMac with a touchscreen. It just seems like putting an OS for portable devices on an iMac (other than in emulation for testing) doesn't sound like a step forward. If they're going to go in this direction, they should go all the way and let the display be detachable from the base, giving you an iMac/iPad hybrid.

Like it or not (2, Interesting)

hsmith (818216) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355796)

Apple and Andorid are reinventing the way we look at software, "Apps" to be specific. Who knows where it will really take us - sure desktop software is a different ballgame than mobile, but what are people using more of? Our main "Software" of use has been the web browser as of late (For a majority of people) as well as word processors. Beyond those, what percentage of people use 2-3 other desktop applications?

How many mobile apps do they use?

As someone that writes mobile apps, the process is frustrating. We are seeing a mass dumbing down of the already dumb consumer. Everyone now expects all software to cost $0.99 - be feature packed, and work flawlessly. As anyone that develops software knows, "pick two of those."

Re:Like it or not (1)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356078)

As someone that writes mobile apps, the process is frustrating. We are seeing a mass dumbing down of the already dumb consumer. Everyone now expects all software to cost $0.99 - be feature packed, and work flawlessly. As anyone that develops software knows, "pick two of those."

While I agree that consumers are expecting more for less -- what they're really looking for is an app that is stripped down to do the core functionality without the "kitchen sink" scope creep that has beset most software. It's amazing what people are cramming into a 1-2MB application as compared to a desktop application.

I actually prefer working with some of the minimalist apps that I've gotten on my iPad. And, unfortunately for you, there's tons of free apps that have been able to meet my needs so far -- the two I've chosen are "free" and "enough functionality for my needs without being bloated". In some cases, one app can be used to feed into another app, making both more useful (I can use dropbox to push a PDF into iBooks for instance).

If anything, I see this as a throwback to the good old days of nice freeware/shareware utilities that did exactly one thing, and did it exceedingly well. Though, I still see the odd app in the iTunes app store that goes for $189.99 or something like that. A $0.99 app might have the opportunity to sell a far larger number of copies and offset the lower purchase price.

Re:Like it or not (2, Insightful)

cowscows (103644) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356338)

I think that the evolution of iOS will follow a similar path as the desktop MacOS did. More and more capabilities will be added, the interface designers will come up with satisfactory ways to accomplish more tasks, and consumers will build their touch-interface "skillset", allowing more more complicated interactions, and eventually more complicated applications.

Despite all the talk about "intuitive" interfaces, that won't actually get you very far, everything is learned. What's important is some consistency and a gentler learning curve. I think that Apple is aware of this, and is very deliberate as to increase the capability of iOS without making it intimidating to a new user.

Re:Like it or not (1)

lerxstz (692089) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356250)

Good points. I think it could possibly, in the long run, be better for "desktop software" programmers.

The masses (and all their former pirate-like predilections) would be drawn to using "cheap" software (because the average user doesn't use more than a few basic apps, and tend not to be willing/able to pay a lot for it). And that software is now easier to buy than pirate, with the app store right in front of you. This will make the desktop app more of a professional/specialist type application, with a price to match. And the users of the desktop software will be more likely to be willing/able/forced to pay.

So your average user will *buy* their software cheaply, and the user with specialist/pro level needs will *buy* it. This is great news for software developers!

(at least that's how it works in my little world anyway).

Angry Birds (1)

drumcat (1659893) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355880)

I wouldn't mind being able to run Angry Birds HD on my home computer. For 99c, my kids get a great experience kinda thing? Not bad at all.

Interesting to see where this is going... (2, Interesting)

Anderson Council (1096781) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355958)

Avoiding the meaningless baiting and religious zealotry that brings nothing to this conversation...

I'm a long-time linux user (since pre-1.0 Slackware), but have presentation needs that I personally prefer some software support for. Thus I use a presentation package --- PowerPoint typically. For a long time I would run linux on my laptop and dual-boot windows when I needed to do presentations. The nature of my work and personal preference requires the use of a Unix-based OS to get anything meaningful done.

I first migrated to the Mac when I noticed times had changed and they had built something I had always thought they should do every since they bought the NeXT properties --- tart it up to look sufficiently as they want it to, but leave the Unix underpinnings for the developer/power user crowd (NeXT was great for that --- all the Humanities people I knew that used it had no idea there was a terminal on the machine and loved it...the fact there was a terminal meant I loved it too =). With office available on the Mac, giddy-up - I get the machine I want without dual-booting. Great!

I've always had a worry in the back of my head that my happiness with Macs would be transient --- that as the platform regained traction they would start screwing with it in ways that are unfriendly to the unix crowd. So far, so good, but ever since the iPad I have been concerned they would push toward that being their OS rather than the full-blown OSX we have currently. I do understand the points people make about how developers need a development environment so the desktop OS won't be going anywhere, but that clearly isn't necessarily the case: no reason they can't build a suitable development environment for the more restricted OS, or simply leave it to developers to cross-compile. Bottom line is my utopian "main-stream unix-based OS that is friendly to the non-power user" may well be at risk.

So fine - it's their company, they'll do what they want and probably make oodles of money doing it. But it will ultimately push me back onto linux full-time, and I'll probably just suck it up and learn to live with PDF presentations or OpenOffice as I have no interest in going back to a dual-boot solution...I'm getting too old I guess :).

It will sadden me a little though as in spite of some of the vendor lock-in that Apple tries to encourage, I have been happy using their products and have built up a bit of an ecosystem I enjoy using. I realize I (we?) are not really the market they are concerned with dominating, but it's a shame they jettison the "win-win" product I feel they had in keeping both the unwashed masses and the developer/power user happy with what is available.

Maybe good for Linux longer-term though. We are light years from where we were a decade ago in terms of user-friendliness of the system. Maybe this can be a tipping point and we'll end up with a "win-win" free OS which would be very liberating for everyone involved =).

--
~AC

Enough of Apple already. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33355968)

Sounds like Apple is sticking its toe in the water. I've loved Mac from the beginning. Lately, I've been moving away from it. I just hate the way they seem to be focusing on selling songs and movies. Apple computers are just going to be disposable gizmos to log into your .mac account to buy songs and movies. Designed to be thrown away in a few years. How green is that?

Seems like I'm working more and more in Linux and Windows XP. Just built my first PC. It was fun. It felt like the Apple IIE days.

From now on, I am keeping better track of my important files and data, and am trying to remember that platform is not important. Data is.

I've also been using Boot Camp and Visual Studio, and put the Objective C and Cocoa Books away.

Did you know that there is a Windows version of Filemaker?
Firefox runs great!
OpenOffice works fine.
Microsoft Word and Excel are Okay - not GOOD - but just Okay.

Sent from my Imac (Currently running XP)

Walled garden for content providers... (1)

thestudio_bob (894258) | more than 3 years ago | (#33355972)

My best guess is that Apple is trying to create a nice "walled-garden" for content providers. Apple has been trying for years to get all the big content providers from TV, Film, etc on the Mac, but these guys saw what happened to the music industry so they have been slow to move. When the iPhone came out you finally had a operating system that the normal user (i.e. not people who are JailBreaking there stuff) couldn't access.

Now they have the iPod, iPad, and the soon to be released iTV (rumor). If they want to get the content, they have to prove to these guys that they have a "safe" environment. It makes sense that Apple is going to try and spread this to the desktop.

I don't like it, but I understand why they are doing it.

UI patents (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33355982)

Patents are crap, but UI patents are totally crap. It is like being able to patent language. Now that would be useful.

app store lock in will kill macs and the law may f (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 3 years ago | (#33356034)

app store lock in will kill macs and the law may even force apple to open ios to any store / app.

Not only will apple hardware cost more then pc with way less choice. The app choice will just as bad and lot's of free software will go away as well for the mac.

$99 /year just to have free apps in the store and if you want to sell apps pay 30% of the sales as well?

or makeing windows software where it's free for free apps with no Nazi like censorship and if you want to sell stuff you don't have to pay M$ 30% of the sale.

Re:app store lock in will kill macs and the law ma (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33356400)

Funny how you compare $99/year to "free" on Windows. Nothing is free my friend.

Plenty of people spends hundreds of dollars a year on Visual Studio just to program for Windows. $99/year for all the toolsets and support you need for OS X (actually the software is free) and the ability to publish apps in a captive market with an easy to buy interface rich with impulse buying opportunities isn't such a bad thing.

Re:app store lock in will kill macs and the law ma (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33356618)

the 30% cut covers a lot of services Apple provides. Good luck delivering your app to millions of potential customers at less than 30% cost to you. Hell, for a $0.99 app webhosting/bandwidth will probably cost you more than 30%. Plus you still need to find a way to drive customers to your site.

Apple also tracks all your sales and gives you nice reports to look at (useful for businessy types) and will handle all your tax paperwork.

Macs already run iOS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33356086)

Apple just has to free the emulator from the SDK.

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