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Making Ubuntu Look Like Windows 7

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the ok-fine-click-on-the-blue-e dept.

GNOME 473

DeviceGuru writes "Although it won't help Linux run Windows-specific software applications, this easy hack produces an Ubuntu desktop that looks and feels a lot like Windows 7. It's particularly suitable for reviving older PCs or laptops on which the main activities will be web-browsing, email, document writing, and streaming music and videos from from the web. The process installs a Windows 7-like GNOME theme on an otherwise standard Ubuntu 10.04 installation, although it might work on other Linux distros with GNOME and appropriate other packages installed. Naturally all this begs the question: why would anybody want to do this? Why indeed!" People have been doing this sort of look-and-feel swap-out for years; it seems best to me as a practical joke.

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begs the question (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33384654)


Naturally all this begs the question

No, it doesn't. Proper use of "begging the question. [wikipedia.org]

Re:begs the question (0, Redundant)

vux984 (928602) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384760)

It would be helpful to provide a correct construct rather than just pointing out its wrong.

i.e...

Naturally all this should raise the question...

or

Naturally, this situation begs that we ask the question...

Re:begs the question (1)

gandhi_2 (1108023) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385030)

Hence the link?

Re:begs the question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33384776)

That's one of my pet peeves as well.

[and that philosphy professor thought I wasn't paying attention in his class on logic and rhetoric 30 years ago.]

Re:begs the question (1, Offtopic)

clone53421 (1310749) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384942)

One of my pet peeves is the number of people who appear to believe that “ ‘begs the question’ is always incorrect” and “everything not proven is hereby false because of Occam’s razor”.

Re:begs the question (4, Informative)

zill (1690130) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384778)

The "improper" way is so widespread it has become acceptable [answers.com] usage [thefreedictionary.com] now [wiktionary.org] , perhaps even the standard usage.

Re:begs the question (0, Offtopic)

Jeng (926980) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384890)

I agree with you, but I think perhaps "it asks the question" might be a bit better?

Re:begs the question (2, Insightful)

zill (1690130) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385052)

Of course there are better alternatives, but I don't think any alternative is good enough to warrant an off-topic post attacking the so-called "grammar mistake".

Re:begs the question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33385210)

I think you meant:

It begs the question of whether "it asks the question" might be better.

Re:begs the question (1, Offtopic)

MozeeToby (1163751) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384926)

You've got to admit, it's pretty frustrating when there are two meanings for a phrase and the meanings are contradictory. I suppose it's happened before (for example, there was a time when a foregone conclusion was one that was so unlikely you may as well not think about it, now it is a one that is so likely you may as well not fight against it) but I still cringe whenever I hear it said this way.

Re:begs the question (1)

clone53421 (1310749) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385032)

You've got to admit, it's pretty frustrating when there are two meanings for a phrase and the meanings are contradictory.

They’re not contradictory. It is possible to simultaneously raise an obvious question and assume an answer that doesn’t follow from your facts. Rare, perhaps, but possible. TFA actually managed it pretty well.

Re:begs the question (3, Insightful)

MozeeToby (1163751) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385126)

That seems pretty contradictory to me. If someone raises a question, they are inviting you to think about the possible answers. If someone begs the question, they are trying to get you to assume the answer that supports your argument. It might be possible to raise the question and then assume the answer, but to me those are two separate actions not something you can do in a single statement.

Re:begs the question (0, Offtopic)

clone53421 (1310749) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385228)

Usually they’ll not raise the question; it’ll raise itself on its own because their assumed answer is so obviously wrong. Hence, begging the question.

Look at TFA again:

Although it won’t help Linux run Windows-specific software applications, this easy hack produces an Ubuntu desktop that looks and feels a lot like Windows 7.

It’s particularly suitable for reviving older PCs or laptops on which the main activities will be web-browsing, email, document writing, and streaming music and videos from Pandora, YouTube, and elsewhere on the web.

The first part raises the question (implicitly) of “why?” and the second part pretends to answer that question but in fact it really just tries to get me to assume the answer that the author already wanted (that I do want to make it look like Windows 7).

The only case that the second part really makes is that installing Ubuntu on older equipment could be a good way to revitalize it. That making it look like Windows 7 is a good thing is once again assumed, and once again I’m left wondering: Why?

Re:begs the question (1, Offtopic)

Necreia (954727) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385042)

Tell me about it. "I couldn't care less" and "I could care less" is a perfect example of this. It sounds simply moronic to use "I could care less" at the times that people do, but people do so often and don't even realize what's wrong.

Re:begs the question (0, Offtopic)

clone53421 (1310749) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385110)

It sounds simply moronic to use "I could care less" at the times that people do

You don’t say!

Re:begs the question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33385204)

What about "I could give a shit"?

Re:begs the question (0, Offtopic)

jeffmeden (135043) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385082)

The frustration is that at this point almost no one knows what begging the question (in the fallacious sense) is, and instead insist it has a very dumbed down meaning that is little more than the sum of the words ("begs the question" simply must mean that the question wants to be asked... right? amiright?)

Ah hell, these days I am just grateful if someone knows what a fallacy is at all. God, how it hurts to be smart.

Re:begs the question (3, Interesting)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385260)

for example, there was a time when a foregone conclusion was one that was so unlikely you may as well not think about it

When was that? AFAIK, "Foregone conclusion" comes from Othello, where it means not "unlikely conclusion" but a conclusion that already happened. Not quite the modern sense of "predetermined conclusion", but pretty close.

Re:begs the question (0, Flamebait)

gandhi_2 (1108023) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385086)

This angers me to no end.

The other day I had a huge argument over the use of the phrase: "if I do say so myself".

It seems people have become so stupid that all actual meaning is lost, and any phrase can be used in any way.

Re:begs the question (5, Funny)

Critical Facilities (850111) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385294)

The other day I had a huge argument over the use of the phrase: "if I do say so myself".

You must be a delight at parties.

Re:begs the question (2, Insightful)

clone53421 (1310749) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384868)

Actually, Wikipedia gave an example of improper use of begging the question:

More recently, “to beg the question” has been used by some to mean the same as “to raise the question”: for example, “This year’s budget deficit is half a trillion dollars. This begs the question- how are we ever going to balance the budget?” Using the term in this way has been deemed to be incorrect by usage commentators.

Proper use of begging the question:

Begging or assuming the point at issue consists (to take the expression in its widest sense) [of] failing to demonstrate the required proposition.

The article appears to be written from the assumption that I want to make Ubuntu look like Windows 7.

Now, the obvious question is, why would I want to do that? TFA tries to answer that: I would want to, because, (according to TFA)

It’s particularly suitable for reviving older PCs or laptops on which the main activities will be web-browsing, email, document writing, and streaming music and videos from from the web.

That doesn’t explain why I’d want it to look like Windows 7, though – it explains why I would want to use Ubuntu, and (once again) assumes that I want it to look like Windows 7.

Thus, it begs the question: Even supposing I wanted to use Ubuntu, why would I want it to look like Windows 7?

Re:begs the question (1)

jeffmeden (135043) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385144)

Thus, it begs the question: Even supposing I wanted to use Ubuntu, why would I want it to look like Windows 7?

You're messing with us, right? If you were to *properly* invoke "begging the question" here your counter argument would need to be along the lines of "it is not proven that potential users of Ubuntu ever want for a UI that looks like Windows 7"...

Re:begs the question (1)

clone53421 (1310749) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385270)

it is not proven that potential users of Ubuntu ever want for a UI that looks like Windows 7

That was exactly what my question asked. If I was a potential user of Ubuntu, why would I ever want it to look like Windows 7?

There are plenty of decent answers to the question, but TFA didn’t give any. It just assumed that I would.

Re:begs the question (1)

MozeeToby (1163751) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385224)

Actually, the project kind of does beg the question "why would anyone want this". The project assumes the answer to the question is that people are afraid of migrating to Linux because it is unfamiliar or that people prefer the windows UI to the available Linux UIs. Without that assumption the project is worthless and wouldn't have been done, so it is safe to say that those who did the work did beg the question after all.

Well... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33384656)

You do want to make your distro look good? Also helps to not have to train someone where stuff is.

Might the some of the "elitists" up at arms tho. God forbid "your" linux distro goes against "your" likes.

Re:Well... (5, Interesting)

techcodie (1140645) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384740)

Actually, I sort of like it. My friend, and her 4 year old can now both use her windows 7 machine, or my linux machine equally as easy. Win - win.

Re:Well... (1)

AvitarX (172628) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384844)

Really?

I would think things like the starkly different taskbar would make it not as smooth a transition at all.

Why use a sub-standard Desktop? (1, Interesting)

gweihir (88907) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384664)

There are far better alternatives on Linux. In fact most Linux window managers are significantly superior to Win7. Personally, I find that the pager already makes fvwm (now decades old, although diligently maintained) a lot superiour in usability, speed and features to the Win7 window manager.

Re:Why use a sub-standard Desktop? (2, Insightful)

wfstanle (1188751) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384848)

I agree that the Windows 7 GUI is abysmal, but I have to use it.

The alternate GUI for Linux is not for experienced Linux users but new converts from Windows might find it useful. Certainly it helps to lessen the learning curve. Once the newcomer becomes experienced with Linux he might learn that there are better GIUs out there.

Re:Why use a sub-standard Desktop? (2, Insightful)

natehoy (1608657) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385068)

Because if you want to ask someone to try out Linux, you are better off showing them something like what they are used to. And, increasingly, that's Windows Seven.

Ubuntu (and its variant, Mint) were what got Linux in my household, and I suspect that is true of many people. Ubuntu made an experience that is similar enough to Windows XP that my wife could easily switch to it. It has a start-ish sort of button, a notification-ish sort of tray, a favorite-ish sort of quicklaunchy area, boxes that show what windows you have open that allow you to click on them to go to them, and even a clock in approximately the right place and (up until recently), an underscore, minimize/restore, and "Big X" in the right places. It made it a lot easier to transition my wife to Linux when I could just install Mint and have her do very basic operations pretty much the same way she used to in XP. Later, I showed her the package manager so she could "add/remove programs", etc.

The layout, while by no means identical to Windows XP, is similar enough that people won't have their brains go boom. Try them out in KDE, IceWM, or XFCE, and their brains asplode. And I don't blame them. You can also easily configure Gnome to be all but unrecognizable to a Windows XP user, and for advanced users who want things to work a certain way, that's marvelous. But for someone who has used Windows for years, it's good to minimize the changes they'll need to go through to accept Linux as a substitute.

When I show Mint to people running Windows Seven, especially those for whom Seven is most of their Windows exposure, they get confused. Probably about as confused as I get trying to figure out how to help people do things in Windows Seven, since I use Windows XP when I use Windows. It takes me a bit longer to do things in Seven. Not that Seven is bad, it's just not what I use daily, and I'm not used to it.

I, for one, welcome a "Windows Seven"-ish variant of Ubuntu. Ubuntu is "training wheels for Linux", even though it's still a serious and solid distro that is well-supported. It's arguably the one that most people will tend to recommend to a newbie at the moment. If there's an easy way to make it look like what your newbie has already used, I'm all for it.

Re:Why use a sub-standard Desktop? (5, Insightful)

war4peace (1628283) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385134)

Roughly 2% of computer users might agree with you. The others don't.
OK, I just threw in some numbers, but the reality remains: a much larger percentage of people prefer Windows-like Desktop Manager looks over the (wide area of) available Linux Desktop manager(s).
Question is: Why?
If you simply go ahead and say "Because they don't know any better" - then you already lost the war with Windows. For years and years, the Linux community members have assumed that Average Joes are simply mis- and uninformed about the alternative. Not once did they take into consideration that maybe, and I say maybe Windows Desktop manager simply looks better. More polish, better paint, nicer fonts (oh yes, that again!), ease of use, perhaps a mix of all the above, can't really say. But it works. It's something that people got accustomed to, and if you want them to switch, then you need to offer them similar appearance , at least.
Out of all this pile of computer users, a very low percentage are technical enough or interested enough to care about the Linux Window Manager's superiority. Roughly, they don't give a rat's ass on that. They don't want more efficient guts, they want the pretty. And Linux window managers rarely provide "the pretty" - they provide the "not unbearably ugly" interface instead.
Tell you what. Get a few screenshots of default desktops that appear right after an OS finishes installing. Say, for Windows 7, Vista, XP, 2000, Ubuntu, RHEL, Slackware, Debian, MacOS X, Solaris, etc., etc. and make a webpage where people can sort them in order (drag and drop would rule!) from most attractive to least attractive. Ithink we all expect no surprises in what would be on top of the preferences.
Now getting back to your comment, you mentioned usability, speed and features. They are important. To you and a very small community (weighted in size against the mass of regular users). They don't matter AT ALL to anyone else. What matters to them is design. That's exactly why Apple products sell like... well, Apple products :)
I'd say a Windows 7-like interface will only bring advantages to Linux. Maybe convince some undecided people to switch? Maybe convince me to use my now retired secondary desktop for basic tasks (browsing, music, movies) and give my gaming rig a rest every now and then?

Re:Why use a sub-standard Desktop? (2, Insightful)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385200)

Because a user who has used Windows all their professional life won't whine as much if they know where crap is to click on.

Re:Why use a sub-standard Desktop? (1)

dave420 (699308) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385250)

In your opinion. In the opinion of others, however, you are wrong. I've used every Linux desktop I could get my hands on, and they all don't do what I want, how I want. Windows 7 is the best I've used so far - it makes sense, and looks good doing it. If you were right, then the market share of Linux would look resoundingly different to how it looks now, as people would make do with using OSS-equivalents of their usual Windows-only software, if they can at least do it in an environment that helps their productivity.

My windows (0)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384672)

Does it come with one of these [imibo.com] too?

Dual boot... (4, Funny)

PmanAce (1679902) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384674)

So one one partition, boot Ubuntu that looks like Windows 7, and on the other partion, boot Windows with an Ubuntu theme? Ah, those would be the days...

That is dumb... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33384676)

I'm sure it's better to have something behaving differently actually look different.

I see you are running Windows 7... (3, Funny)

swanzilla (1458281) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384692)

...Gnome I'm not.

Re:I see you are running Windows 7... (3, Informative)

Neil Watson (60859) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384906)

Mmm Kay [kde-look.org]

I don't get it (4, Funny)

zill (1690130) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384698)

Why couldn't they just switch back to the default theme [xkcd.com] ?

idea 105 anyone? (3, Interesting)

linhares (1241614) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384702)

export look and feel [ubuntu.com] anyone?

I think a more interesting thing here would be to share desktops in (hopefully) a one-click magical and revolutionary solution. Idea 105's time has come.

Re:idea 105 anyone? (1)

retchdog (1319261) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384850)

I'd be happy if I only didn't occasionally have to go into the "Appearance" preference, just to make Ubuntu remember that it's supposed to be using a theme.

Re:idea 105 anyone? (1)

linhares (1241614) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384884)

oh, and if anyone out there is interested in this idea, be sure to check out project epidermis [launchpad.net]

because... (2, Insightful)

polle404 (727386) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384718)

it could be to ease the transition from windows to *nix for those that are unaccustomed to the rapid OS changes we /. users are.

Re:because... (2, Insightful)

rndmtim (664101) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384982)

Bingo. One word: Parents. Think it's ridiculous to take the worst computer users and give them Ubuntu? Consider a 75 year old dad who seems to want to click on every pr0n site or anything else that loads up windows with massive amounts of malware. I didn't make him root, didn't give him java, and I'm sure it's not airtight... but he hasn't been able to break it. It's about as fast as it ever was years later. But he complained in the difference that it looked different... so with this... why, he'd just never know.

Re:because... (2, Insightful)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385220)

Office drones is another word.

Its easier to train someone with "it's right there, just like Windows", rather than "well on Windows it was there, but now it's going to be up here and behind this there and see, click."

Transitions (4, Insightful)

sv_libertarian (1317837) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384728)

One problem I've had with showing some people (especially older folks, or folks who are very set in their ways) a linux desktop is that they get bogged down fairly quick when they see something that doesn't look "right." Having a Windows-esque desktop could be helpful in transitioning people over.

Re:Transitions (1)

cptdondo (59460) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385048)

My wife uses XFCE; she's not a techie. In her words: "I don't see the difference".

For most people a computer consists of a browser and possibly an email client, although that's less and less.

Add an mp3 downloader app and you've got about 99% of home users covered.

Re:Transitions (1)

sv_libertarian (1317837) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385176)

Indeed. Still, I let a friend use my laptop with Fedora 12 and Gnome, and first they looked for a start menu-esque feature in the usual place, then poked around some more until they found the applications toolbar, and then couldn't figure out the network manager...

Nearly all people will pick it up fairly quickly, but if you are moving someone into a new system anything you can do to set them at ease will make it better.

Re:Transitions (1)

natehoy (1608657) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385300)

Right.

For the absolute and utter basic user, there's no difference at all. Even if they've been using Windows for years, all you have to do is give them three icons and spend 5 minutes telling them which is the email and which is the web browser and which one plays music, and they're good. Their experience has almost nothing to do with the launching of programs and everything to do with finding programs that work similarly enough that they can operate the new software.

For the geek, there's lots of difference, but it doesn't matter - they have some comprehension of what is going on behind the scenes and are willing to invest time in learning the new way of doing things.

It's the "semi-experienced" user that this is shooting for. The ones who do a lot with their computing appliances. My wife maintains a couple of websites, does newsletters, edits graphics, etc. For her, the transition to XFCE would probably have been too much while at the same time transitioning her FTP software, her web page maintenance software, her music player, etc all to new things that worked "just a little differently" from what she used in XP. So I installed most of the tools she was going to transition to in XP (where a Windows version was available), picked similar tools where it wasn't, got her used to those, then when I switched the main house computer to Linux I picked Mint because it was very XP-like. That prevented any one moment where everything changed all at once.

Now that she's used to Mint and all the software she uses, she could probably accept XFCE or KDE or pretty much any windows manager, though there's not really all that much point to doing so now.

Acting "wrong" worse than looking "wrong" ... (3, Insightful)

perpenso (1613749) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385164)

One problem I've had with showing some people (especially older folks, or folks who are very set in their ways) a linux desktop is that they get bogged down fairly quick when they see something that doesn't look "right." Having a Windows-esque desktop could be helpful in transitioning people over.

I'm not sure. Once they get past the initial superficial impression of "looking right" they may quickly fall into this "acts wrong". Acting wrong is probably a greater negative than looking wrong. Especially since the words "right" and "wrong" are being overloaded here. Looking wrong is more synonymous with looking different but acting wrong is more synonymous with being defective.

There is also a "false advertising" aspect, the look gave the expectation of certain behavior. With a different look the different behavior is far more acceptable.

If the only way... (2, Interesting)

mandelbr0t (1015855) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384742)

...people will use Linux is if it looks like Windows, I don't think we'll be seeing the Year of the Linux Desktop anytime soon.

Re:If the only way... (4, Funny)

badboy_tw2002 (524611) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384822)

Wait...we're still doing that one?

Re:If the only way... (1)

Steauengeglase (512315) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385104)

Whats the difference? We have had year of the Linux wireless router for almost a half decade (WRT54GL) and year of the Linux cell phone (Android) and almost no one noticed that Linux was under the hood. It was good for the consumer, good for the tinker and good for the manufacturer.

As for this, I'm seriously tempted to buy my mom "a new computer", just to see what happens.

Still has all that gnome wasted space (1, Insightful)

gauauu (649169) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384746)

Unfortunately, if you look at the picture of the explorer windows (particularly, the "icon view" dropdown), it still has the ridiculous amount huge UI widgets and wasted space that the default gnome does. Why do they insist on wasting so much screen real estate? I never understood this.

Re:Still has all that gnome wasted space (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384898)

Why? What semi-naked celebrity are you going to have to scrunch into the empty part of the screen?

"But look! You can make it look like Windows 7!" (3, Insightful)

Em Emalb (452530) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384754)

"Why wouldn't I just use Windows 7 then?"

Re:"But look! You can make it look like Windows 7! (4, Funny)

linhares (1241614) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384940)

for a hundred bucks I'll answer your question

Re:"But look! You can make it look like Windows 7! (1, Insightful)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384968)

A real CLI? One with regular expressions, proper tokenizing, proper program flow constructs, pipelines (backtics results too) and redirection, etc., etc.?

Re:"But look! You can make it look like Windows 7! (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33385186)

use Microsoft powershell then, once you get to know it's oo model, it is stronger than bash

Re:"But look! You can make it look like Windows 7! (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385202)

For the same reason I have a mac-esque desktop on my Ubuntu system (well, if OSX had frosted glass window borders and buttons that meant something) ... I want to run Linux, but I find the Mac desktop attractive. (And yes, my launch menu wandering around does get confusing, but I have launchers for my favorites.)

Obvious comment (2, Insightful)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384756)

I'd really rather have a Windows 7 theme that works like standard Gnome on Ubuntu 10.04, please. Cue (perhaps) irate responses, but I work with both and I prefer Gnome. Add a proper terminal and sudo rather than uac, and my life as a developer would be significantly easier. Oh, and a decent package manager. I have one on my phone, it shouldn't be too hard.

Re:Obvious comment (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384932)

Not for nothing, but I kind of dislike Gnome. Too much irrelevant junk in the right-click menus, not enough relevant stuff there. But my installation here is a good piece of a decade old, so yours may be newer and improveder.

this is new how ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33384758)

cmon this has been going on for awhile now, ffs google it . One company even got taken to court over it and killed the distro. You can search /. for that too. How ist this news again ? more like a bad flashback . Wait , its Ubuntu, sry forgot the fad is in.

Re:this is new how ? (-1, Redundant)

mark72005 (1233572) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384880)

No, no, no. You shall be modded down for not expressing allegiance to ubuntu.

The way to get modded up is to snort about how Ubuntu's native interface is 500 times better, and only an idiot would want otherwise.

Or if you want to be more avant-garde about being modded down, rant about how Ubuntu is vastly inferior to your favored microdistro.

Then again, maybe you are even ahead of the avant-garde in the first place.

Re:this is new how ? (1)

linhares (1241614) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385040)

Or if you want to be more avant-garde about being modded down, rant about how Ubuntu is vastly inferior to your favored microdistro.

Ubuntu is for noobs; Microsoft Linux [mslinux.org] is vastly superior for those that know what they're doing.

Re:this is new how ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33385184)

Your post is bad and you should feel bad!

The best part is (5, Insightful)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384784)

The window buttons are on the top right again. Yay!

Coming up: (5, Funny)

Thraxy (1782662) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384802)

Next week we feature: Make your Ferrari look like a Ford Escort.

Re:Coming up: (-1, Troll)

Midnight's Shadow (1517137) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384830)

Next week we feature: Make your Ferrari look like a Ford Escort.

Oh that isn't fair... to the Ford Escorts.

Re:Coming up: (-1, Troll)

Desler (1608317) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385266)

Exactly. It's quite rude to compare a Ford Escort to something as low quality as Linux. That would be an insult to even a Yugo.

Re:Coming up: (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33384866)

Make your Ford Escort look like a Ferrari.

-- There I fixed that for ya.

Re:Coming up: (4, Funny)

SleazyRidr (1563649) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384996)

I think you missed the joke in the most complete way possible.

Put it in a library or lobby (5, Insightful)

odin84gk (1162545) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384804)

The end user just needs to Feel comfortable. Once a user gets into a web browser, they don't really care about the OS. Something like this would be great for hotel lobbies (with free internet), libraries, and other public access sites.

My wife (a linux hater) used it in a hotel lobby to print out some airline tickets. She had no idea it was Linux, but I noticed the differences. She had a great experience (managed to get her items printed out without an issue), and just assumed it was a windows machine.

Her view of the hotel improved because of a simple amenity that helped her out. The hotel had a PC without a costly OS, saving them money. I can easily see the value in something like this.

Re:Put it in a library or lobby (1)

war4peace (1628283) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385240)

Parent ghost-modded "Insightful" by me. :) - the least I can do!

Who else is disappointed? (1)

valeo.de (1853046) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384836)

Am I the only one who was disappointed upon visiting the linked "story" only to find a desktop that doesn't look anything like Windows 7? Windows 7 doesn't (by default) use dark UI elements, there's no transparency for the task/menu bar, I could go on... I use Windows way more that I'd like, alas, and to me that just looks like Gnome with an (admittedly quite nice) gtk-engine theme.

Slow news day?

Re:Who else is disappointed? (1)

valeo.de (1853046) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384874)

Err, forget what I said. I just refreshed the page to find a whole bunch of images that do actually resembly Windows.The shame... :(

Re:Who else is disappointed? (2, Informative)

Steauengeglase (512315) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385182)

Windows 7 doesn't (by default) use dark UI elements, there's no transparency for the task/menu bar,

Win7 Grue edition?

Windows wouldn't be my first choice but (1)

Cro Magnon (467622) | more than 3 years ago | (#33384842)

it does look better than Ubuntu's default desktop (even Ubuntu's old brown looked better).

Really slow news day (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33384876)

Seriously - a new ubuntu theme is front-page news on /.?

Copyright Lawsuit waiting to happen. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33384912)

I think its a good idea to help ease people into using Ubuntu by making the desktop work the same sort of way as Windows. They're already going to have to relearn a lot of the applications (except the applications that are cross platform like Firefox) without having to learn a new desktop too.

Actually putting Microsoft icons, wallpapers, registered trademark logos on is probably going to kill this though. (Not a lawyer but) it looks like the pure intent is to make people think this is Microsoft Windows which is misrepresentation.

It may sound stupid, but here's why (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33384914)

Having worked in an open source friendly company with non-tech savvy users, management gave us to go-ahead to replace Windows 98/2000 on the sales PC's if it wouldn't impact their productivity. Our first attempt failed. We received several email complaints from users about how the new systems broke email, slowed them down etc. This was before we even rolled out the first new desktop! Even though all the user needed was access to the web form to take orders and quote prices and webmail (no PC's ran Outlook) we received dozens of complaints from the users after the initial roll-out. Clearly we needed more than to drop in a Linux desktop and provide them with the two icons that they needed on their desktop. We spent about 2 weeks tweaking the systems to look EXACTLY like Windows 98/2000. We then rolled them out one by one at night without telling the users. I left the company about 4 months later, but I'd venture to guess that most of those users still don't realize that they are on Linux :)

Step one: Create themed Ubuntu virtual image. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33384988)

Step two: Haul-ass to Best Buy.
Step three: Boot-up VM on all laptops; make full screen, autostart on reboot.
Step four: Watch the Geek Squad earn their commission.

Gnome should look like gnome. (1)

Murdoch5 (1563847) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385000)

Why are people always wanting to change the way the desktop looks, add pointless effects or even make transparents bars. The point is why not just have your desktop look the way it shipped, sure put a new background on it and maybe change the icons but then leave it. Even the default gnome icons are great, really I can't see any practical reason for screwing around with what already works.

Re:Gnome should look like gnome. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33385174)

Why are people always wanting to change the way their house looks, add pointless plants or even make additions. The point is why not just have your home look the way it was built, sure put a new coat of paint on it and maybe change the drapes but then leave it. Even the default cabinets are great, really I can't see any practical reason for screwing around with what already works.

logo? (1)

AffidavitDonda (1736752) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385014)

At least they could have omitted the windows logo.
And why did they exchange the FF logo with the one from IE?

Oh for the love of Linus... (3, Insightful)

supersloshy (1273442) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385026)

Ubuntu is not Linux. Ubuntu is not GNOME. This is not Ubuntu specific and it should not be posted as such.

Also, scripts like this have existed for months and even years. I remember a recent story about getting GNOME to look like Windows XP [omgubuntu.co.uk] as well. Exactly how is this news, and even if it is news, how is it Slashdot-worthy?

It's particularly suitable for reviving older PCs or laptops on which the main activities will be web-browsing, email, document writing, and streaming music and videos from from the web.

Exactly how is Windows more usable than GNOME? Yes, more people are used to Windows than GNOME and GNOME-based operating systems, but I find GNOME to be much, much, much more usable than Windows has ever been to me for various reasons. Also, how exactly do these activities benefit from a windows-like visual environment? They're just as easy to do in vanilla GNOME (if not easier) compared to Windows. As the great Wikipedia has often said, [citation needed], and I'm saying this to the original article, not the poster himself.

Dock (5, Interesting)

steveha (103154) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385036)

The basic idea of a theme isn't new. A friend of mine had an XP theme on his desktop, and had a guest at his home using his computer for over half an hour without noticing anything. He asked "Do you find my Linux computer easy to use?" and the guest hadn't even realized it wasn't Windows XP.

That sort of thing is mainly useful as evidence to counter the idea that a Linux desktop is "hard to use".

The major new thing with Windows 7 is its dock. I have never much been interested in docks but it seems like they are popular. Do you use a dock in Linux? If so, could you please answer these questions:

0) Which dock do you use?

1) Why do you prefer your dock to others you have tried?

2) Is your dock similar to the one in Windows 7?

I know someone who uses Gnome Do and Docky [davebsd.com] , so I'm interested in those, but I know there are others around.

steveha

That's appropriate (2, Insightful)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385054)

Because with lucid, Ubuntu's interface is already on the way to looking like Windows Vista.

I am amazed that this was approved as an article. (5, Interesting)

ourcraft (874165) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385074)

Move to linux if you like freedom and privacy, don't if you don't. But "it looks like windows" ???? sheesh, how 1995 can you get.

look and feel of ubuntu? (3, Funny)

macbeth66 (204889) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385094)

Is there something that I can load on a Windows box that will make it look like Ubuntu?

Re:look and feel of ubuntu? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33385304)

Ubuntu.

Hiding from the corporate network police (2, Interesting)

inshreds (1813596) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385102)

One really great use for a theme like this is hiding your "frowned upon" use of non-standard software if you work in a corporate environment with locked-down computers. Thankfully, hacking Window$ permissions locally is easier than quieting a toddler with tranquilizer laced candy. Once through MS$ tissue security, VirtualBox , a lot of ram, and one of these theme packages will allow running the Nix flavor of choice without alerting passers by. Best of all, all the corporate installed default software can stay intact.

Can Linux snobs be more arrogant? (1)

Jakobud (224147) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385106)

Can you Linux snobs possibly be more arrogant or are you really just this short-sighted?

Giving people a familiar-feeling interface is 100% always going to be one of the best first steps you can take to convince someone to move from Windows to Linux. If someone is taken from Windows straight into a unfamiliar Gnome interface can be very daunting and scary (not matter how much better Gnome behaves). The user will most likely feel unsure, insecure and not confident in exploring the operating system. All of this will usually lead to the user simply giving up and going back to familiar old Windows.

I use Linux on a daily basis. The more people that use Linux the better it will be for them and everyone else out there. But when the Slashdot crowd comes across with comments and posts like this, you are simply reassuring any Windows users out there that Linux is a playground for the big boys and if they can't handle it then go home. You will not win over any potential converts with that attitude. Simple as that. If this is what snobby Linux users want, fine. You'll get it. But stop complaining about why more people don't switch from what is familiar to them to a better operating system.

Re:Can Linux snobs be more arrogant? (2, Insightful)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385232)

Or, like how Apple made such an effort to have Mac OS X look and feel like Windows, they hyped that as a sell-point in their switch campaign... or not.

I know you'll just make some remark about how snobby Apple users are, but honestly I think that attempting to emulate the user experience of another product beyond instances where form follows function is just asinine. It lulls people into a false sense of security, and then when things don't work the way they expect, then all of a sudden its "X's fault that it doesn't do Y like Z," rather than "X isn't Z, so Y probably works differently."

It's not about being a snob. It's about acknowledging reality. But then again, I don't really have any political Free Software motivations and don't give a crap if people use Linux or not. I barely use Linux, but when I do, I'm not going to spend my time trying to make it look like Windows. Why bother?

Re:Can Linux snobs be more arrogant? (1)

AmonTheMetalhead (1277044) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385276)

It took me 5 minutes to get 3 kids using Ubuntu after they had only known Windows, the kids were 9 & 15 years old...
Making the OS look like something it isn't raises expectations that the system might work the same as well.

Ugh (4, Insightful)

mewsenews (251487) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385206)

After reading Slashdot for a decade I've finally got Linux on my home desktop and I'm very happy with it, I have it playing my movies and songs, interfacing with my iPhone, and playing World of Warcraft under Wine and connecting to Ventrilo with Mangler. I just installed a native version of Google Chrome a couple of days ago! None of this requiring text editing, and I got a default desktop that looks very pretty with the nVidia proprietary drivers. I'm running legal when there was no way I was going to pay for a Windows retail package.

So.. 2010 is my year of the Linux desktop, and someone is saying "hey here's how to hose your system so that it looks like Microsoft fucked a penguin". I'll pass on that one..

On the other hand, if anyone wants to point me to how to move the minimize/maximize/close buttons to the top right hand side of windows I'd appreciate it

Boo (0, Flamebait)

slashfoxi (610738) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385222)

To Hell with that.

Windows 7? (2, Insightful)

rgo (986711) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385242)

Looking at the screenshots, it seems they made Gnome look like KDE 4!!

That's all well and good, but... (1)

insnprsn (1202137) | more than 3 years ago | (#33385312)

Why cant someone do something more constructive? Like make a working (read:functional) LCARS theme!!!
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