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Ask.com To Shut Down Bloglines

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the you-have-reached-the-end dept.

The Internet 111

angry tapir writes "Bloglines, the venerable RSS reader, will cease to exist in a few weeks, according to its owner, Ask.com. Users should export their syndicated feeds to another RSS reader, as Bloglines will be shut down on Oct. 1, Ask.com said Friday in a blog post. Ask.com has posted instructions on the Bloglines home page for exporting feeds to another RSS management service."

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111 comments

Ha Ha! 20721 to shut down (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33557798)

Muh dick [slashdot.org]

Niggers (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33557852)

Niggers! niggers!

interesting (1, Insightful)

crawly (890914) | more than 3 years ago | (#33557820)

very interesting.

well not at all.

Re:interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33557972)

Interesting how this makes it to the front page, but the gigantic clusterfuck at Yahoo Groups doesn't...

Re:interesting (0, Offtopic)

RLiegh (247921) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558132)

Maybe because yahoo groups being a gigantic cluster-fuck is hardly news to anyone whose ever used them?

Seriously, what are you talking about?

Re:interesting (0, Offtopic)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558244)

This Yahoo [youtube.com] press release is contradictory and will undoubtably anger many a Slashdot reader.

Re:interesting (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33558478)

Your link is dead. This Yahoo Groups Blog entry [bit.ly] explains the situation pretty clearly however. Well and truly disgusting if you ask me!

Re:interesting (1)

Albert Sandberg (315235) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558850)

Well, if they (or some other service you care about) would shut it down without telling someone, you would be all over slashdot posting "WHY DIDN'T THEY TELL US?!? I LOST ALL MY STUFF"...

Props to them for at least telling in advance.

Re:interesting (0, Troll)

rinkswinks (1895512) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558938)

The Queen’s Baton 2010 Delhi arrived in the commercial capital of the country Mumbai amid cultural extravaganza and a grand welcome by the Western Naval Command at INS Viraat.Near the Gateway, the baton was welcomed by two Chetak helicopters which showered petals and two jet cannons which formed an arch, as the baton cruised forward to the Gateway. To know more click here http://bit.ly/cLso7o [bit.ly]

And Psychiatrists Around the World Do High-Fives (1)

RobotRunAmok (595286) | more than 3 years ago | (#33560796)

The fewer people who are writing blogs, the more people there are working out their issues the old-fashioned way at the Shrink's office.

Wait... (4, Insightful)

Frogbert (589961) | more than 3 years ago | (#33557822)

So now all ask.com does is push shitty spyware toolbars?

Its not a suprise for its users (5, Interesting)

DarkFencer (260473) | more than 3 years ago | (#33557848)

There was a time I LOVED Bloglines, but not for a few years. They kept having issues with feeds from common sites and certain aspects of their site returned the same error all the time (such as the error message whenever I tried to go to recommendations).

I switched to Google Reader earlier this year, and really haven't looked back.

Re:Its not a suprise for its users (5, Informative)

mukund (163654) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558204)

I had the same story, until Google started asking for my mobile phone number as verification to link to my Google account. IMO, this is over the edge, as in this country you have to use your real identity to get a mobile number.

Then, I switched to a self-hosted Tiny Tiny RSS [tt-rss.org] and never looked back. I don't use Google accounts anymore, and don't have cookies or javascript enabled for any of Google's websites.

Except search and maps, I self host everything (email, websites, Jabber, RSS reader, calendar, etc.) on a dedicated server. There's a small price to pay, but as an example, I have the same email address for the last 10 years. I have all my emails for the last 10 years. There's no worry about privacy. As a programmer, it's useful to run irssi from it under screen, host my own websites, pretty much run anything network oriented..

Re:Its not a suprise for its users (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33558954)

Heh, that's nothing. I type all my emails up on an Amiga 500 (which is not networked), print them out and send them via carrier pigeon to an undisclosed location. The printed documents are then converted by a chinaman in a box to electronic form and then sent to their intended recipient. I don't ever expect a response, too risky. (Don't bother to reply to this).

Re:Its not a suprise for its users (1, Funny)

Cwix (1671282) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558990)

I just use RFC 2549 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IP_over_Avian_Carriers [wikipedia.org]

Your safe unless its hunting season.

Re:Its not a suprise for its users (2, Funny)

Paradise Pete (33184) | more than 3 years ago | (#33559326)

Your safe unless its hunting season.

So if it's hunting season then it's somebody else's safe?

Re:Its not a suprise for its users (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33559170)

Why do you feel that running your own server is something to be considered funny? It's my experience that everyone skilled enough is doing it. It's pretty trivial after all if you understand something about networking, and text based stuff like email and irc don't ever require very much bandwidth.

Re:Its not a suprise for its users (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33558968)

It doesn't ask for YOUR phone number, it asks for *a* phone number. Someone's free Google Voice number would probably work fine. Likely the request accompanied a privacy policy which promised non-disclosure. Phone & CC verification are the two main ways to authenticate a human. Its appearance shouldn't be a surprise.

Re:Its not a suprise for its users (1)

MoriT (1747802) | more than 3 years ago | (#33560478)

It also doesn't require it, and specifically says it is optional. Given the concern of compromising accounts by impersonating the owners, this seems like a reasonable option to offer.

Re:Its not a suprise for its users (-1, Offtopic)

Ash Vince (602485) | more than 3 years ago | (#33559742)

I had the same story, until Google started asking for my mobile phone number as verification to link to my Google account. IMO, this is over the edge, as in this country you have to use your real identity to get a mobile number.

Well Google ask the rest of us for no such thing so maybe that is something that is legally required of them by your countries government.

Except search and maps, I self host everything (email, websites, Jabber, RSS reader, calendar, etc.) on a dedicated server. There's a small price to pay, but as an example, I have the same email address for the last 10 years. I have all my emails for the last 10 years. There's no worry about privacy. As a programmer, it's useful to run irssi from it under screen, host my own websites, pretty much run anything network oriented..

They better be damn secure as it sound like the place you live would certainly try hacking them. It may also be that by running these services you actually make yourself look like a target to you obviously fairly paranoid government. Is the server physically hosted outside your nation or in your basement as well to be sure the government can't just ask the ISP for physical access?

It sounds like you live in a pretty harsh place privacy wise, did you ever consider moving to the free world instead of blaming Google for following your countries somewhat harsh laws?

On another note why the hell is your country so paranoid? Even forcing people to use the real identity when they buy a mobile sounds a little harsh. Is there an active terrorist organisation trying to overthrow the government or is it just general government paranoia about not getting elected?

Re:Its not a suprise for its users (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33560198)

What free world are you referring to, specifically?

Proposed laws banning prepaid phones [securityarchitecture.com]

NY Daily News link [nydailynews.com]

Re:Its not a suprise for its users (1)

MoriT (1747802) | more than 3 years ago | (#33560544)

Um, the US government wants this, with the rational of "the war on drugs", but mostly because they hate any communication they can't track. I am somewhat surprised that cash is still printed.

Of course, the US government is also the best reason to not use email services. All your subject lines are considered "metadata", and they can access them without a warrant, or even telling you they are. http://news.cnet.com/8301-13578_3-9890761-38.html [cnet.com]

Bloglines shutting down! (0, Offtopic)

Daedalu (1726848) | more than 3 years ago | (#33557856)

This is just the first of a long line of sites that are going to shut down in the next year or so. In the last six months I have seen the addition of some of the most in your face adds from companys that I would not buy from for any amount of savings. The Internet is going to go through a major change like it did about ten years ago, but this time I think it is going to be just madding to users . Just here in the last few months the cable company we have has moved high speed users over to a single pipe, this is for a large City and the surrounding area and towns. But the price has stayed the same for much less service. They have halved the size of the space that they sell without warning and are upping the price. This is what happens when you let one company get a solid lock on an area. One good thing about this is a whole lot of what I call fly by night sites and video sites will go away. One can only hope that in the end it will get better for all the users. But if we do not stick together they the company's will just have there way with us.

Re:Bloglines shutting down! (3, Insightful)

pete6677 (681676) | more than 3 years ago | (#33557868)

Can you please post some of the long list of sites you claim are shutting down?

Re:Bloglines shutting down! (2, Insightful)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558046)

It sounds like you have a lot of interesting predictions, but not much to back them up. Maybe you're the next Nostradamus!

Re:Bloglines shutting down! (2, Funny)

Tridus (79566) | more than 3 years ago | (#33559726)

No, he just works for Gartner.

Re:Bloglines shutting down! (2, Funny)

CarpetShark (865376) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558744)

But if we do not stick together they the company's will just have there way with us.

Sounds good, but you only said "there", without saying where.

Re:Bloglines shutting down! (2, Funny)

xtracto (837672) | more than 3 years ago | (#33560090)

But if we do not stick together they the company's will just have there way with us.

Sounds good, but you only said "there", without saying where.

Man... your quoted sentence is wrong in so many ways it made my head hurt while trying to parse it:

- "they the company" (as opposed to we the people?)
- "The company's will" (so, because they died, they the companies are making a "will"
- "Have there way" ... as you said... have where??

I am really happy I did not learn English as a second language in Slashdot :(

Re:Bloglines shutting down! (1)

tehcyder (746570) | more than 3 years ago | (#33561880)

I am really happy I did not learn English as a second language in Slashdot :(

Well, at least it wouldn't have taken you long, you just have to memorise a couple of dozen memes and insert random filler in between.

Sad! :( (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33557870)

Jimmy O'Leary plays the bongo on my anus cheeks

.com (5, Funny)

spintriae (958955) | more than 3 years ago | (#33557886)

Would you please shut down Bloglines?

Re:.com (2, Informative)

bcat24 (914105) | more than 3 years ago | (#33557922)

Dear mods,

The parent post is funny, not offtopic.

Kthxbye,
Jonathan

Re:.com (2, Insightful)

228e2 (934443) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558554)

Dear mods,

The parent post is Informative, not offtopic.

Kthxbye,
O

Re:.com (2, Insightful)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558930)

Dear mods,

The parent post is Insightful, not just Karma-Bonus Modified.

Kthxbye,
Ihmhi

Re:.com (-1, Offtopic)

daveime (1253762) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558994)

Dear mods,

The parent post should have a better score than this one.

Oh, and Apple sucks ass.

Kthxbye
Daveime

Re:.com (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33559838)

So I see 3 is the limit for posting a recursive joke. /me jots some notes down.

Re:.com (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33560096)

No, you insulted someone's religion. Of course it got voted down.

It's a shame (4, Interesting)

jockm (233372) | more than 3 years ago | (#33557896)

The Beta version of Bloglines was my favorite reader, especially its mobile version. There is no other online reader I can find that will show fill posts by default in the mobile version. I was willing to put up with a lot of bugs and issues because I couldn't find a good alternative. Eventually it became too much and I moved to Fever [feedafever.com] -- which sadly doesn't support full posts in the mobile client and the developer seems singularly uninterested in supporting that feature. But I was able to force it to give the desktop version when on a mobile device, which works surprisingly well.

Still it is a shame about bloglines. I will miss it...

Re:It's a shame (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33558520)

I've been quite pleased with just browsing google reader in Opera Mini.

RIP (1)

Bryan Bytehead (9631) | more than 3 years ago | (#33557904)

The ASK blog talks about Twitter and Facebook. Who the hell reads their feeds via those two? Are people really hanging up on reading RSS feeds? I don't think so.

The problem I think was the fact that they just couldn't monetize it. When you're getting multiple Ask spams in just about every article, and then they switch to Google Adwords, then switch back. It's all about the Benjamins.

Re:RIP (2, Interesting)

Moridineas (213502) | more than 3 years ago | (#33557992)

? Are people really hanging up on reading RSS feeds? I don't think so

Have RSS feeds ever really been popular?

I have no idea how one would track usage, but I've always assumed that they are primarily used by niche users group. Power users. Geeks. Etc.

Re:RIP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33558112)

? Are people really hanging up on reading RSS feeds? I don't think so

Have RSS feeds ever really been popular?

I have no idea how one would track usage, but I've always assumed that they are primarily used by niche users group. Power users. Geeks. Etc.

I got my girlfriend, a relative non-techie, to use RSS feeds. Of course, she uses them for ICHC and its ilk, but I suppose I'll take any small victory.

Re:RIP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33559064)

Your girlfriend's a non-techie relative? Hey, I'm from Idaho too!

And another one bits the dust. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33557906)

Old cruft on the internet dies and fades away, forgotten, never to be remembered except perhaps in the archives of google and the wayback machine.

At least that's slightly more permanent than the old BBSes.

Perhaps it is for the best. Sometimes the past is excellent information, sometimes it teaches. But sometimes it's just useless.

What is RSS for anyway? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33557910)

I've always wondered what RSS is good for. Now that it is dead or dying, could someone enlighten me.

Re:What is RSS for anyway? (1)

vtcodger (957785) | more than 3 years ago | (#33557982)

***I've always wondered what RSS is good for.***

I've always wondered that myself. Apparently if there were just one format and everyone used it, RSS would be usable for announcing and automatically downloading entities called 'podcasts' and 'blogs' which sort of resemble broadcasts and magazine articles respectively -- if there were just one format for those and everyone used it. However, since everyone makes up their own format for all this stuff and none of it works quite right, the principle purpose of RSS may well be to consume excess societal resources and to keep at least one class of riff-raff off the streets where they would impede traffic and probably make a nuisance of themselves.

Seriously, I think we are supposed to find out what stuff like RSS is good for by some form of divine revelation. Maybe we (you and I) ought to do more drugs and we'd just wake up some morning RSS capable.

Re:What is RSS for anyway? (2, Interesting)

afabbro (33948) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558094)

***I've always wondered what RSS is good for.***

One nice thing was to bookmark an RSS feed in Firefox. Instead of just a bookmark, you'd get a menu of all the site's RSS entries (stories), which periodically refreshed (or could do so when you commanded). So you could look at your favorite sites and see all their headlines and then go directly to stories that interested you.

I say "nice thing" in the sense that, yeah, that's kinda nice...but not exactly rock-your-world revolutionary. RSS does make it easy to include feeds from other sites...but 9 times out of 10, who cares? If I wanted to read site X, I'd go to site X, without needing to see a list of headlines on another site.

RSS is far more available than used. 80% of Wordpress templates seem to have it as a default, as do many CMS systems. How often people actually use it is another matter.

Re:What is RSS for anyway? (2, Informative)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558134)

If I wanted to read site X, I'd go to site X, without needing to see a list of headlines on another site.

What if site X doesn't have any new items? RSS allows you not to waste the time opening all the sites to check if they have new content. Besides, the content is already loaded, hence it's faster to browse.

For me, with 48 subscriptions, some which only update once a week or less, it's very useful.

Re:What is RSS for anyway? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33558856)

"RSS allows you not to waste the time opening all the sites to check if they have new content."

Says a guy who posts on slashdot.

Re:What is RSS for anyway? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33558194)

Yeah this is basically it. Slashdot RSS allows me to check for new slashdot articles without going to the obnoxiously slow slashdot homepage. Same for youtube subscriptions.

Re:What is RSS for anyway? (1)

herojig (1625143) | more than 3 years ago | (#33561776)

I think that you nailed it. The only useful feature of RSS in my world is to create a fancy dynamic bookmark in FF. RSS buttons are almost like facebook and twitter buttons - put there 'cause everyone else has one on their website - a web page decoration more then anything else.

Re:What is RSS for anyway? (4, Informative)

oljanx (1318801) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558362)

RSS is not dead and dying. One particular RSS reader is dead and dying. An RSS reader aggregates and allows you to preview the content published to many different websites, all from one place. If your like me, and you read from dozens of websites every day, you understand why this might be useful.

Re:What is RSS for anyway? (0, Troll)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#33560580)

An RSS reader aggregates and allows you to preview the content published to many different websites, all from one place

Like Slashdot?

Re:What is RSS for anyway? (1)

Bigbutt (65939) | more than 3 years ago | (#33560264)

I manage a craft forum and use an RSS plug in to retrieve craft related blog posts and post them in a special forum for the membership. It works pretty well and other members who might not know about the blogs get exposed to new content.

[John]

Re:What is RSS for anyway? (3, Informative)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#33560554)

It's for announcing torrents in a machine readable format. Then your reader parses the XML, downloads torrents matching your criteria, and they appear in a network share ready to watch.

Future of RSS (3, Informative)

Z8 (1602647) | more than 3 years ago | (#33557936)

Anyone care to comment on the history or future of RSS? RSS seemed like a great idea: an open format that allowed users to scan sites (Blogs, news sites, web comics) for updates. Also the privacy issues were limited because the list of sites was only kept locally.

RSS seemed like a great idea but it seems it never reached mainstream popularity. Most (?) internet users have never heard of RSS. Instead people turned to third party aggregators and closed sites like Facebook. What happened?

What happened? Real life, commercial interests (3, Interesting)

syousef (465911) | more than 3 years ago | (#33557998)

Most (?) internet users have never heard of RSS. Instead people turned to third party aggregators and closed sites like Facebook. What happened?

Take podcasts.

As a podcaster, you can put up an RSS feed, or an iTunes link. Which do you think will get you more hits? Even people that hate Apple will use iTunes. Okay so you can put up both, but what does that get you that iTunes doesn't?

Now look at it from the point of view of a podcast consumer/user. You can use a different podcast app, and only get RSS feeds while missing out on some iTunes stuff, or you can just use iTunes and get 99% of the podcasts you want and a directory to boot with minimum fuss.

Tell me again why in either of the above cases you'd bother with RSS? So what happened? Real life and commercial interests. Companies like Apple are motivated to apply vendor lock in and make their apps as attractive as possible, effectively killing the open effort and corner the market. End users are motivated to use the most common and convenient solution.

Re:What happened? Real life, commercial interests (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33558042)

Tell me again why in either of the above cases you'd bother with RSS? So what happened? Real life and commercial interests. Companies like Apple are motivated to apply vendor lock in and make their apps as attractive as possible, effectively killing the open effort and corner the market. End users are motivated to use the most common and convenient solution.

Is that a statement that 'open' is missing something (direction, quality, ease of use, something else) that prevents it from competing successfully for acceptance/dominance?

Re:What happened? Real life, commercial interests (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558106)

As a podcaster, you can put up an RSS feed, or an iTunes link.

Unless you're thinking about writing the XML by hand, any decent feed generator (blog software or whatever) should be able to produce the two versions without any extra effort.
Most podcasts I've seen have both; but it may be because I only listen to technical ones.

Re:What happened? Real life, commercial interests (1)

nashv (1479253) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558296)

Okay so you can put up both, but what does that get you that iTunes doesn't?

Maybe you should read the post again...

Re:What happened? Real life, commercial interests (2, Insightful)

syousef (465911) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558418)

As a podcaster, you can put up an RSS feed, or an iTunes link.

Unless you're thinking about writing the XML by hand, any decent feed generator (blog software or whatever) should be able to produce the two versions without any extra effort.
Most podcasts I've seen have both; but it may be because I only listen to technical ones.

That's still one more file you have to manage, one more format you have to have hosted, one more link you must put up per episode, one more thing that can go wrong etc. If it gains you nothing, why do it?

Re:What happened? Real life, commercial interests (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 3 years ago | (#33559602)

If you use the web interface to create the item, the file is generated on demand or stored by the software.
And what link? The MP3/OGG/whatever file is the same. You only have to create an extra link once: on the main website to the RSS feed. Not per episode.

In total, using something like Wordpress you have to waste about two minutes once, to put the rss.gif file up and link it to the feed.

And I doubt it gains you nothing. I certainly won't use iTunes - and can you get iTunes podcasts for Linux, Android, Symbian, etc?

Re:What happened? Real life, commercial interests (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#33559768)

and can you get iTunes podcasts for Linux, Android, Symbian, etc?

Linux on the desktop is not popular in the United States. Nor is Symbian. As for Android, it's fine on cell phones, but there really isn't yet an Android MP3 player that matches the capability of iPod touch. (Speculation is that this is Google's fault.)

Re:What happened? Real life, commercial interests (5, Informative)

roju (193642) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558530)

As a podcaster, you can put up an RSS feed, or an iTunes link. Which do you think will get you more hits?

From Apple's iTunes podcast spec: "iTunes uses RSS 2.0 plus some additional tags." There is no iTunes or RSS option, they're the same option.

Re:Future of RSS (3, Insightful)

Hadlock (143607) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558092)

I think RSS was supposed to be a user generated, local, personal feed aggregator, a sort of "roll your own fark, digg, slashdot" - because face it, those sites really only pull highlighted stories from 10-25 other sites on a weekly basis.

RSS was really neat, and back in the heyday of online webcomics (what, 2001-2005?) RSS was a great tool for cartoonists trying to "spread the word".

Unfortunately, a) people are lazy, and few people want to collect, maintain, and prune their RSS feed list b) the internet can now load news stories faster than people can read them, and c) news aggregators like news.google.com, fark, digg, slashdot went mainstream, and a whole lot of niche blogs which act as news aggregators for more obscure collections of sites (boingboing specializes in scifi writing, steampunk, banannas, and DIY for example) -- why maintain your own RSS stuff when people are actively doing this for you, and probably a better job? A geek can cover 99% of their bases scanning boingboing, slashdot, digg, fark and google news in about 15 minutes, and get (mostly) interesting commentary about the stories, without having to register for the individual news website's forums everytime they want to leave a comment.

Re:Future of RSS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33558966)

A geek can cover 99% of their bases scanning boingboing, slashdot, digg, fark and google news in about 15 minutes

And a REAL geek can put the RSS feeds from those sites in his feed reader!

Re:Future of RSS (1)

glwtta (532858) | more than 3 years ago | (#33559066)

A geek can cover 99% of their bases scanning boingboing, slashdot, digg, fark and google news in about 15 minutes

Um, yeah, and I do that from Google Reader, using their RSS feeds.

Re:Future of RSS (1)

Ndkchk (893797) | more than 3 years ago | (#33559694)

You make RSS sound like it's some incredibly complicated enterprise. I use a decent web browser; in the address bar, it displays a little RSS icon if the site I'm visiting has an RSS feed. I click the icon and it subscribes to the feed and tells me, unobtrusively, when new stuff is posted to it. I don't know how I'm supposed to "maintain" it, but I'm pretty sure I've never done it.

If I wanted to use RSS as a way to get general news, it would probably be inadequate. I use RSS to keep track of cool projects [wordpress.com] or blogs. If they are updated infrequently and if their posts are not immediately spread through the whole of Web 2.0, RSS is a great way of keeping track.

Re:Future of RSS (2, Informative)

Remus Shepherd (32833) | more than 3 years ago | (#33560702)

A geek can cover 99% of their bases scanning boingboing, slashdot, digg, fark and google news in about 15 minutes,

If you're only scanning five news sites, you don't need an RSS aggregator. RSS readers are for power users who monitor dozens or hundreds of websites. You'd go mad trying to stay on top of that many sites yourself.

RSS readers are also very useful for getting news through firewalls. I can't read Fark or Digg from work, and I'm surprised they still allow Boingboing. Google reader allows me to get information that otherwise would be blocked off.

I used to have Bloglines, but for a while their site was broken and I couldn't stand it. Switched to Google last year, and I'm very comfortable.

Re:Future of RSS (1)

value_added (719364) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558412)

What happened?

Can't speak for all feeds, but one my favourite RSS feeds went empty one day. When I checked the website, the word "Censored" appeared. ;-)

Re:Future of RSS (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558480)

They must be good...

how long before ask.com goes away? (2, Insightful)

greymond (539980) | more than 3 years ago | (#33557988)

I suppose Ask.com will stick around to some extent like how Excite.com is still an active website, but no one will ever give it a real look, it's just "there" with the other legacy sites on the web.

Re:how long before ask.com goes away? (1)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558066)

Funny you should mention Excite, since the domain is now owned by Ask.com.

I think that's a case where a once-valuable domain and brand will sit around for a long time because some accountant still thinks it's worth something, even though everyone who once used Excite has forgotten about it and moved on to Google.

Re:how long before ask.com goes away? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33559080)

Yea, I dont trust them...

The browser you're using is not allowing you to sign in to Excite.

Right now, your browser's settings are configured to disable cookies and/or javascript. In order to access your account, you must change your browser's settings to accept both cookies AND javascript.

NOTE: You will also receive this error if you computer system time is off by more than a few hours, or is set to an incorrect day or year. To check your system time on your computer, please double-click the date and time in the bottom right of your screen, and confirm it is set correctly.

Re:how long before ask.com goes away? (1)

xtracto (837672) | more than 3 years ago | (#33560120)

aaah excite and altavista.digital.com

now *those* where the days (well... those and my toddler Gophering days :)

Re:how long before ask.com goes away? (1)

pipingguy (566974) | more than 3 years ago | (#33559038)

Yet it still gets enough ad or feed money to keep stumbling along, I've never been able to figure out this conundrum.

The sooner Ask.com disappears, the better... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33558168)

no other company has plagued me as much as Ask.com with uninvited, impossible to remove spyware and toolbars

Re:The sooner Ask.com disappears, the better... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33558500)

How can a site "plague" you with anything?

Re:The sooner Ask.com disappears, the better... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33558622)

By bundling toolbars?

Re:The sooner Ask.com disappears, the better... (1)

mikek2 (562884) | more than 3 years ago | (#33560782)

I worked at Ask for several years... total POS company with management to boot.

Not all RSS readers, Bloglines - just you (2, Insightful)

nashv (1479253) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558258)

From TFA : "Today RSS is the enabling technology – the infrastructure, the delivery system. RSS is a means to an end, not a consumer experience in and of itself. As a result, RSS aggregator usage has slowed significantly, and Bloglines isn’t the only service to feel the impact.. The writing is on the wall."

Obviously these guys have not heard of Google Reader...

Re:Not all RSS readers, Bloglines - just you (1)

u38cg (607297) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558620)

Indeed. It pleases me in a warm, fuzzy way that I read this article in an RSS feed - in Google Reader.

Re:Not all RSS readers, Bloglines - just you (1)

AudioEfex (637163) | more than 3 years ago | (#33559994)

Exactly. That was the most ridiculous PR post I have ever read.

Twitter and Facebook and other "instant" crap isn't replacing RSS haha. And, YES, RSS is a "consumer experience" for intelligent consumers who can figure it out. RSS Aggregators are genius - one webpage you can go to that tracks and reprints stories from all the webpages you keep up with. Bloglines had virtually eliminated my use of bookmarks for anything but archival purposes. Everything I wanted to read was either at, or linked from, my Bloglines page.

Of course, like everyone, I've just moved over to Google Reader. But Ask.com should have been happy to have someone regularly using their servers, since no one else I know has used that site since it was AskJeeves. It's a change, a change I prefer didn't happen, but I'll roll with it. I will just make sure in the future I don't unintentionally use an Ask.com product again.

Any good RSS readers out there? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33558280)

Everyone out there is always talking about Google Reader -- I've tried it and didn't really understand what all the fuss was about. Is Google Reader really all it's cracked up to be? Are there any good RSS readers out there that aren't Google-powered?

Re:Any good RSS readers out there? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33558710)

RSS Owl. That's what I use because of its powerful filtering capabilities.

Re:Any good RSS readers out there? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33558908)

tried that, but it kept eating my mouse.

Re:Any good RSS readers out there? (1)

AudioEfex (637163) | more than 3 years ago | (#33560006)

I haven't found a better one yet. It took about 30 seconds to move myself over (if you already have a google account). I'll keep looking for another alternative, but at the moment GoogleReader is where I am.

Rest in peace bloglines (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33558404)

I will miss it, as it came to be as best rss aggregator those days. I sent them mails to improve few things. Finally they are giving up. I got to take backup soon.

What to use next? (1)

emakinen (875208) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558624)

I've been using Bloglines for five years. It's a great tool for a journalist trying to follow 100+ blogs every day. The question is: what is the best available alternative nowadays?

Re:What to use next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33558696)

Google Reader

Re:What to use next? (1)

nashv (1479253) | more than 3 years ago | (#33558728)

Google Reader it is...

Re:What to use next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33558816)

Netvibes.com is awesome.

Re:What to use next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33559772)

I've been using http://blogtrottr.com a lot recently - it's an RSS to email service, and as I use an IMAP email account I can keep my feed read status in sync on my work PC, home PC, mobile etc, or use my webmail if I'm not on any of those devices.

Not fair! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33559304)

They never asked me what I thought about it!

Vox closing too (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33559482)

Vox is also closing this month.

Has there been some clamp-down on blogs?

Re:Vox closing too (1)

tehcyder (746570) | more than 3 years ago | (#33561812)

Has there been some clamp-down on blogs?

I am hunting down blogs and killing them, one at a time. I do this for the sake of my children and the future of humanity. It's a dirty job, but someone's got to do it.

And they are handling it in the most asshat way... (2, Interesting)

AudioEfex (637163) | more than 3 years ago | (#33559904)

I have been using Bloglines for the better half of a decade, and to see it end in such a crappy way just turned me anti-Ask.com so quick I couldn't believe it.

First, I had no idea Ask.com had anything to do with it - I just use the site to read my articles every day. I would have gladly paid a fee to use Bloglines (small fee, say $20/year) because I found it so helpful. Not only was it one single webpage I could go to and get all the news/articles I want, it was portable (I could continue/save reading at work or on my phone), and I loved that the interface just stayed the same. Bloglines I logged into in 2005 pretty much looks like it in 2010 - and that was A-OK with me.

What's irritating is how they dealt with this. They gave about 3-weeks notice, which granted, is adequate. They link on the main bloglines page to a "blog post" telling you about the closure - and that's where the asshat starts. Basically, they state that because "everyone" gets their news from Twitter and Facebook and "instant" services now, people don't need an aggregator. Uh, say what? I don't get my news from Facebook or Twitter - and anyone that does is really, really dumb.

Sure, I can get a few pithy links or quotes from them, but I have 100ish sites that I track on Bloglines that the content certainly isn't replicated there. Then they go on about what a wonderful thing Ask.com was and how asking questions is the future - but they fail because they don't realize that SURE I type questions into search engines all the time - GOOGLE. Why would I ever, ever go to Ask.com directly when I can ask the same question of Goggle, and get the Ask.com results, PLUS the results for the entire rest of the Internet? Back when it was "Askjeeves.com" I think I went there a few times, but I haven't even though of ask.com in probably the same half-decade I have been using Bloglines.

The kicker...they aren't approving ANY comments on the announcement. I submitted one three days ago and it never got moderated, and I find it impossible to believe that no one else has commented. They just want to brush it under the carpet and forget about it. Much like the rest of the world has forgotten about Ask.com.

So I moved everything over to Google Reader. It's OK, I actually like the "scrolling through marks it read" feature, but what I am not excited about is the relative instability of Google products - they are always tweaking, updating, etc. and I really just want something that works and stays that way, like Bloglines did.

Life will go on. But Ask.com just sent me over to their competitor - I'll be spending even more time at Google now. And now I've gone from neutral on ask.com, to negative on them. I'll think twice before clicking a link to them, and try to find the info elsewhere.

Used to use them (1)

amaiman (103647) | more than 3 years ago | (#33560308)

I used to use Bloglines years ago, but switched to Google Reader quite a while ago. I guess I wasn't the only one... I'm glad to see they're making it easy for remaining users to move their feeds to a new service instead of just quietly disappearing one day. (Although it's a good idea to back up your feed list to OPML periodically regardless of who your newsfeed provider is, just in case.)

I was having trouble deleting my account (1)

ElForesto (763160) | more than 3 years ago | (#33561914)

As in I could not find a way to delete a Bloglines account when I switched to Google Reader. Now it looks like they found a way to do it for me. Thanks, guys!
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