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Microsoft's Chief Exec For Latin America Says 'Open' Means 'Incompetent'

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the deseo-suscribirme-a-su-boletan-de-noticias dept.

Microsoft 340

An anonymous reader writes "The President of Microsoft Latin America, in criticizing the Brazilian government for its support of open source software, claimed that declaring something open is how you 'mask incompetence.' That seems especially funny coming from Microsoft, who has used 'closed' to mask incompetence for years. I thought 'open' meant that people could find and fix (or ignore) incompetence, whereas closed meant you were stuck with the incompetence."

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340 comments

not long for his job (4, Insightful)

yagu (721525) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604596)

Even microsoft will distance themselves from this thesis. They've come too far "embracing" open. My guess, this guy gets cut loose, and if microsoft can make a PR coup of it at the same time, they will.

Re:not long for his job (4, Insightful)

MoonBuggy (611105) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604636)

I don't know if it'll lose him his job but yeah, this isn't even within the realms of MS's PR strategy, this is just some exec talking like an idiot.

Re:not long for his job (4, Insightful)

click2005 (921437) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604734)

Open does mean incompetent. Microsoft are trying to hide that by keeping it closed.
I'd rather trust the people saying 'its not perfect so help us make it better'
than the ones saying 'we make perfect software' and being proved wrong time after time.

Re:not long for his job (3, Informative)

homey of my owney (975234) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604874)

I am NOT by any means defending this guy, but I think he was probably referring to the somewhat obtuse way that open source projects are documented which can give the appearance of incompetence, which has been a long time complaint of mine.

Everybody hates documentation if you're a coder, but having an attitude of RTFC helps no one if you are looking to compare an OS project to a paid alternative.

I'm not suggesting that this is for all projects, but it is far to common and must change to really enter the mainstream.

Re:not long for his job (3, Insightful)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604966)

If you look through all the open source projects, say on sourceforge (all 250,000 of them), a few are great, many are average and by far the largest part are abandoned, half-finished and/or complete garbage. It doesn't mean that open source means incompetent but it doesn't automatically mean competent either, you have to look at the specific project. Probably on the whole commercial products are better if only because people have money invested in them and they are less likely to get bored with them half way through.

Re:not long for his job (4, Insightful)

0123456 (636235) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604994)

Probably on the whole commercial products are better if only because people have money invested in them and they are less likely to get bored with them half way through.

I suspect most people developing commercial products get bored with them by the time they're half-way through, but they have to be shipped in order to keep beer and pizza on the table.

Re:not long for his job (4, Insightful)

lewiscr (3314) | more than 3 years ago | (#33605042)

Probably on the whole commercial products are better if only because people have money invested in them and they are less likely to get bored with them half way through.

No, not really. We can't browse a large archive of commercial projects that never shipped, so we can't really compare. I am willing to bet that there are more abandoned open source projects, but I don't think it's as skewed as you suggest.

Re:not long for his job (1)

HermMunster (972336) | more than 3 years ago | (#33605092)

With all the closed source code we see every day we can judge their competency in documenting their code.

Open source won't advance without others being able to read and modify the code. They must be doing something right if the good packages keep getting better.

Re:not long for his job (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33605216)

Incompetent was too strong of a word. I'll bet he meant more along the lines of amateurish, or less serious. The spirit of volunteerism is in general a much weaker motivator of people than money. So the outcomes will tend to be as witnessed.

Re:not long for his job (1)

youngone (975102) | more than 3 years ago | (#33605012)

In my experience an awful lot of Execs are idiots. Some of the statements made in meetings at the company I work at would cause our shareprice to plummet like a sheep if they were made public.

Re:not long for his job (1, Interesting)

tgatliff (311583) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604868)

My guess is that it shows the level of frustration Microsoft is having with OSS.

OSS is never on the edge of innovation. In fact, it is almost universally behind the times. However, it forces the industry to innovate to survive, which is great for technology as a whole.

Re:not long for his job (4, Informative)

dch24 (904899) | more than 3 years ago | (#33605096)

We have to be patient with the big dinosaurs. Word travels slowly inside such a large company.

1 June 2001, Ballmer's legendary comment, "Linux is a cancer that attaches itself in an intellectual property sense to everything it touches. That's the way that the license works." [linux.org]

From the comments in TFA, 8 April 2002 - FUD from Juan Gonzalez, General Manager of Microsoft Peru gets shot down in flames by Congressman Edgar David Villanueva Nuñez [gnuwin.epfl.ch]

20 February 2003, David Stutz, retiring group program manager, "delivered a kick in the pants to his former employer" saying "Microsoft is in danger of being swept away by open source" [cnn.com]

12 May 2004, Windows Template Library (and Windows Installer XML) posted to sourceforge [eweek.com] . The blogosphere reels in shock [hanselman.com] . Even slashdot [slashdot.org] isn't sure what to think.

I got bored at this point, but there's lots more popcorn-hour fun and games as this large corporation tries to deal with a rapidly changing industry.

Re:not long for his job (1)

AnonymousClown (1788472) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604936)

It was code. He talking about the Mask of Incompetence - like the Mask of Zorro!

He's the inside guy for El Incompetentito! The masked one who fights for truth, justice, and the Open Source way!

Re:not long for his job (4, Insightful)

postbigbang (761081) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604988)

This *IS* Microsoft with a thesis. It's also a sales guy that's losing ground, just as has happened in many countries of the world. He's losing his grip. There's little way for Microsoft to make a PR coup out of this, which makes me wonder why you'd even bring this up.

IMHO, Microsoft's embrace of 'open' is similar to the other embraces that they've made, called The Black Widow Effect. It goes back to things like SQL Server, OS/2-LAN Manager, and other 'partnered' programs that turned into outrageous divorces with big name organizations.

Microsoft serves Microsoft. Make no mistake about this. If it's not invented here, then it needs to be embraced and squeezed to death.

Re:not long for his job (1)

DrugCheese (266151) | more than 3 years ago | (#33605224)

If it's not invented here, then it needs to be embraced and squeezed to death.

Let me fix it for you:

If it's not invented here, then it needs to be bought out so we can claim we invented it. Or embraced and squeezed to death.

Re:not long for his job (1)

HermMunster (972336) | more than 3 years ago | (#33605066)

The man's tasked with selling to Latin America. Don't you think all of Latin America knows how to take this guy? I'm sure now he seems more incompetent than Open Source to them, and probably more or less impotent.

Re:not long for his job (1)

aintnostranger (1811098) | more than 3 years ago | (#33605230)

Latin America is pretty strong about free software and open source these days. He's saying it because some governments, like Brazil are adopting free software en masse. Worse, much worse for the company image here in latin america, he stated that "goverments should stay out of the software business and make things better for people" source:http://www.elespectador.com/imagen-224529-hernan-rincon-habla-del-software-libre . We really don't like a representative from a U.S. company telling us which things lie within the scope of our governments. That should be obvious to anyone who has a slight clue about latin american history on the last 50 years. And this man is from a latin american country, and that startles me most.

Fedora 13 (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33604602)

Just tried installing Fedora 13 and got no network connection until I disabled NetworkManager. Then DHCP worked fine. This is the same result I've had with previous versions of Fedora. The guy has a point.

Re:Fedora 13 (2, Interesting)

NiceGeek (126629) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604630)

Installed Ubuntu Netbook Edition and my wired and wireless connections worked out of the box. No he doesn't have a point.

Re:Fedora 13 (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33604680)

I bought a pair of open-toed sandals but only one of them fell apart so you're both wrong!

Re:Fedora 13 (2, Insightful)

calskin (1902692) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604840)

Exactly. I loaded Ubuntu Desktop and same thing. No drivers needed. Haven't had a crash yet which is much more than I can say about Vista or 7 which kept giving me blue screens.

Re:Fedora 13 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33604898)

Exactly. This.

"I bought X closed-source product and it was a complete POS. Therefore all closed source is crap!"

I'm going to appeal to the Oswald Effect and call the gp a Nazi.

"A person who is did something horrible to me. Therefore all 's are horrible!"

Open or closed makes no difference. Good software is good. Bad software is bad. Period.

Re:Fedora 13 (1)

armanox (826486) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604678)

Guess you didn't try to see if your device was set to activate on boot.

Re:Fedora 13 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33604796)

I did. It was. Using DHCP. Died with error in org.freedesktop.networkManager. Commented out the UUID in network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0, disabled notworkManager and rebooted. Network came up fine.

Re:Fedora 13 (1)

HermMunster (972336) | more than 3 years ago | (#33605142)

Amazingly quick fix. Sounds like those guys were doing a good job. Tiny change and it worked.

My last two wireless issues on Windows based laptops took me hours to fix. My job is to repair computers and I have done so for 25 years or so.

I think your solution is fantastic. I can't imagine what you would have done if you had to figure out those types of issues by yourself.

And, this isn't the first time in the past week that someone's said that Fedora 13 was not to their liking.

Re:Fedora 13 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33604722)

And meanwhile every single piece of closed source software I've ever used has worked perfectly right out of the box.

Re:Fedora 13 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33604830)

Oh, so no hunting down elusive network drivers on your Windows box? That amazes me. Troll fail.

Re:Fedora 13 (1)

cynyr (703126) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604924)

same here, especially that adobe flash stuff... ohh and some sort of window manager made by some small company based in Washington state.

Re:Fedora 13 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33604794)

Just tried installing Fedora 13 and got no network connection until I disabled NetworkManager. Then DHCP worked fine. This is the same result I've had with previous versions of Fedora. The guy has a point.

Assuming this isn't yet another screwed up /. news summary and that this guy wasn't quoted out of context. I'm sure that there are incompetent people in the FOSS community but a phrase like: "When you can not compete, you are declaring open. This masks incompetence." coming from a major Microsoft PHB, and remember that these are the people who thought it was a good idea for users be given admin rights by default, is like the pot calling the kettle black.

Re:Fedora 13 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33604802)

What network adapter is in your machine? Is it possible that either the driver or the firmware for it is closed? If so, I hope the irony in context of your statement here isn't lost on you.

Re:Fedora 13 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33604928)

This box has an ancient D-Link RTL8139 Ethernet card. The driver is fine. It originally had Win98 installed on it and I switched it to Linux around Fedora Core 4. I've had to disable NetworkManager on every release. No idea why.

Re:Fedora 13 (4, Insightful)

similar_name (1164087) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604922)

Yeah because Windows always works right out of the box.

Let's see, did a factory restore of a Dell with Windows XP and it wouldn't boot with the Nvidia card that came with it. Had to take the card out, do the restore, then install the latest drivers and then put the card back in. Considering that everything is made and tested for Windows that's just sad.

Recently did the same with an Acer. Acer drivers wouldn't detect the broadcom wireless, because it has to be initialized by the driver, but the drivers won't install if they don't detect. Had to install the drivers from Dell's site.

So no, the guy doesn't have a point and neither does your anecdote.

You could make the argument that many hardware companies do not support OSS but you can hardly make the argument that OSS is incompetent.

Now if you consider that almost all hardware is specifically designed for proprietary software and it still doesn't work all of the time, one could make the argument that proprietary software is incompetent.

Re:Fedora 13 (1)

daem0n1x (748565) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604974)

I used to use Fedora on my home PC. It worked almost as bad as my Windows Mobile PDA. Now I use Ubuntu in the PC and I'm fine. The PDA still sucks, though.

Open after all (1)

Stratoukos (1446161) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604614)

http://www.microsoft.com/opensource/ [microsoft.com]

Wow. I guess Microsoft is open after all.

Re:Open after all (2, Interesting)

froggymana (1896008) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604744)

Perhaps they figured that if you go on both sides of an argument you are bound to win atleast 50% of the argument. Or, perhaps it just truly shows their incompetence.

Re:Open after all (1)

drpimp (900837) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604948)

You can't spell incompetent without open, but you can spell open without incompetent. Not sure how that translates into one meaning the other.
Is it merely coincidence or are they simply altering their current status of "Embracing s/Openness/Incompetence/"?

Re:Open after all (1)

HermMunster (972336) | more than 3 years ago | (#33605168)

Damn, that site is lame. They released 20,000 lines of code because if they didn't they'd have been sued.

Is it opposite day in Latin America? (4, Insightful)

node 3 (115640) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604632)

The way you mask something is to put it out in the open?

/cue Inigo Montoya...

Maybe... (1)

EnsilZah (575600) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604812)

They've instituted an In Soviet Russia Day or something over there?
I mean this is some Orwellian "War is peace, freedom is slavery" shit right there.

In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33604642)

War = Peace

Re:In other news... (1)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604956)

More like War = Tomato

I've seen a lot of competent closed source applications, and a lot of incompetent open source solutions.

Your particular ideology doesn't dictate when, how, or why your executable will crash.

Lost in (1)

NetNed (955141) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604652)

Is this why latin is a dead language? Can't even translate right!

Re:Lost in (1)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604716)

"When you can not compete, you are declaring open. This masks incompetence." (translated)

What the hell kind of "My hovercraft is full of eels" translation is that? Anybody have what he really said?

Re:Lost in (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33604838)

Don't you love how translations get passed along without any verification? I don't speak Portuguese, but the original article is here: www1.folha.uol.com.br/tec/798606-microsoft-critica-posicao-do-governo-brasileiro-sobre-o-software-livre.shtml.
From my own experience with google translate with Japanese, I'm certainly hesitant to trust it without verification.

Re:Lost in (4, Informative)

Haffner (1349071) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604910)

As someone who speaks competent spanish, "Quando você não pode competir, você se declara aberto. Isso mascara a incompetência". Translates to "When you can't compete, you declare it open. It masks the incompetence."

Re:Lost in (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33605234)

"Quando você não pode competir, você se declara aberto. Isso mascara a incompetência".

That is not spanish. I thought you guys were smarter.

Re:Lost in (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33605240)

As someone who speaks competent spanish, "Quando você não pode competir, você se declara aberto. Isso mascara a incompetência". Translates to "When you can't compete, you declare it open. It masks the incompetence."

From someone who is portuguese. You're translation is correct

Re:Lost in (3, Insightful)

apow (412294) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604962)

It needs to be put in context. What he meant was: when a company cannot compete (inferior product), they scream at the top of their lungs BUT IT'S OPEN! in order to masquerade their incompetence. He may have a point.

However, and I'd be preaching to the choir, we all know that it doesn't also mean that when a company has an "open" product, it sucks by default. He may have tried to pull this false correlation.
He also said in an earlier paragraph that the Brazillian government is wasting time with open-source, since inovation is in the private industry.

Stupid probably doesn't even know they ripped their sockets implementation from BSD...

Incompetent? (5, Funny)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604654)

Open means Incompetent?

That can't be right. I thought it meant not quite finished and don't expect documentation.

Put the flame throwers down... it's a joke.

Re:Incompetent? (4, Funny)

LifesABeach (234436) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604858)

It could be a translation error, in Brazil, Portuguese is the main language. Maybe he meant to say "In Compliance", which is something of a challenge for the arrogant among us.

Re:Incompetent? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33605038)

No they got it right. He said those things.

Re:Incompetent? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33605170)

No, he said ``incompetência''

Re:Incompetent? (1)

AnonymousClown (1788472) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604892)

Open means Incompetent?

That can't be right. I thought it meant not quite finished and don't expect documentation.

Put the flame throwers down... it's a joke.

*swinging noose*

You ain't said nut'in 'bout nooses and we don't take kindly to that kind'a talk, boy!

"open" means MS sends an incompetent (1)

swschrad (312009) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604658)

so, theoretically, the dimbulb exec is partially correct. and MS will fix the problem by shifting this incompetent exec to someplace where he can't do any damage. like maybe mobile, or Vista phone support.

Re:"open" means MS sends an incompetent (1)

mark72005 (1233572) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604770)

Mobile would certainly be a place where he could get a good look at incompetence.

Don't feed the troll (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33604700)

This article is only feeding this troll.

It's idiotic to make any kind of religious argument about open vs closed.

There are scores of terrible closed projects as well as terrible open projects. I would argue that there is very little (or no) correlation between open/closed status and quality.

Instead, the correlation that really matters is the ability, ingenuity, experience, and team dynamics of the developers working on the project, whether it be open or closed.
Beyond that, for closed projects, you also have to factor in all sorts of additional overhead correlation, such as project managers, customer requirements, marketing, and more.

In short, nothing to see here. Move along.

That's the pot calling the kettle black (2, Insightful)

kawabago (551139) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604710)

That the pot calling the kettle black if ever I've heard it!

Re:That's the pot calling the kettle black (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33604804)

The pot is racist...

Re:That's the pot calling the kettle black (4, Funny)

sco08y (615665) | more than 3 years ago | (#33605088)

That the pot calling the kettle black if ever I've heard it!

Thank God. I don't know what we would have done if you hadn't shown up, Captain Obvious.

Why editorialize the article? (2, Insightful)

immakiku (777365) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604712)

I thought the summary is supposed to just be a preview of the article. Why not separate news from opinion? A bit of light joking is fine here and there, since after all Slashdot is not a formal news site, but about half the summary was just MS bashing.

Re:Why editorialize the article? (1, Funny)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604778)

...but about half the summary was just MS bashing.

1) You say that like it's a bad thing.
2) Well yeah, what's your point?
3) You must be new here.

Re:Why editorialize the article? (1)

immakiku (777365) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604856)

1. Yes summaries containing the opinions of some AC is bad. 2. My point is readers should have the brains to decide for themselves that the MS statement is disingenuous. 3. Compare your user ID with mine.

well he has a point... but wrong choice of wording (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33604742)

Even though the comments in the article is funny and somewhat true. truth to be told. open source software is almost always low quality and most of (if not all) MS products can beat their open source counterparts in quality. The most obvious two examples would be in OS (Windows vs GNU/Linux) arena and Office (MS Office vs OpenOffice) arena. If you disagree on which one is higher quality, you are a linux fanboy.

Cheers.

Re:well he has a point... but wrong choice of word (2, Informative)

mldi (1598123) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604864)

Windows servers vs. Linux servers, Apache vs. IIS, XBMC vs. Windows Media Center, etc. Welp, I guess your argument just went straight out the Window!

Re:well he has a point... but wrong choice of word (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33604876)

If you disagree on which one is higher quality, you are a linux fanboy.

Heh, I have no need to argue with you about what my needs for an OS are and how some specific operating systems fill those requirements... I'll just point out that if you cannot imagine people having different requirements, you are a tool.

Well... (4, Insightful)

brit74 (831798) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604746)

Yeah, I know I won't be beloved by slashdot commenters for this. It's true that "open" doesn't necessarily mean incompetent (e.g. Firefox is still better than IE), but there's plenty of cases where open-source is the strategy used when a company doesn't have the money to property develop a product. I sometimes use open-source software not because it's better, but because it's cheaper. I'm under no illusion that it's often not as good as paid, closed software that does the same thing.

Causation or Correlation (1)

sugarmotor (621907) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604982)

Getting confused here. Is it causation or correlation? Does incompetent imply open?

Stephan

Re:Well... (1)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 3 years ago | (#33605006)

Yes quality vary, but opening its code is clearly not how you "mask incompetence". Quite the contrary.
But I'm alright with MS making nonsensical claims to keep users. OSS is gaining users every day and if microsoft is willing to act as a fools magnet, it will mean that we will only get the most competent users, that usually helps development.

Can you give some examples? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33605026)

>I'm under no illusion that it's often not as good as paid, closed software that does the same thing.

As a linux user for 13 years, I'm really curious to know what closed software do you use that does the same thing as open source software, but does it better? I'm trying to get from where you're coming from. I don't use Free(dom) software just because it's $0, I use it because it doesn't bite me on the ass like proprietary software has (Nvidia's binary blobs being my #1 suspect. I hate them for the kernel panics they caused me. I gave up on OpenGL for 3 years until Nouveau was good enough that I could use it with the remaining Nvidia cards I have left. I had 5 nvidia cards. Now I'm down to 3 machines with Nvidia cards, and when each dies, I'll switch them over to AMD.)

It's been my experience that with proprietary products I had flakey binary products (Nvidia) that chained me to a particular linux kernel or glibc (wordperfect 8). I hate the eula crap that treats me like criminal scum (you may not use this product. please type in this random 40 digit crap to activate. Please install our spyware, etc.).

So what I would like to know is what kind of proprietary software have you used that is either barely better (?) or does something so much better that you're willing to put up with the headaches of eulas/flakey behavior/etc.?

He followed up with... (1)

thewebsiteisdown (1397957) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604748)

And by 'mask incompetence' I mean 'severly undercut's our ability to sell you stuff. And that makes me scared and confused, and I say shit like this when I'm scared and confused. I hope Joran Van der Sloot asks you out for a drink, Linus Torvalds'.

Why you question el Jefe? (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604756)

El Jefe does not like for you to question him.

He has said that Open Source is not good, and yet you question him?

No mas.

The giant writhes (1)

Dystopian Rebel (714995) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604772)

Declaring FOSS "unAmerican" is how Monoposoft used to mask its own incompetence.

Re:The giant writhes (2, Insightful)

Infonaut (96956) | more than 3 years ago | (#33605144)

Where "unAmerican" is shorthand for "unLatinAmerican". ;-)

If you ever want to get into an argument with someone from South America, use the word "America" when you mean "the United States".

The key word is "compete" (5, Insightful)

DontLickJesus (1141027) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604784)

Not all open source software is written by businesses. Not all open source software is written for profit. As most governments realize they need to tighten their belts, it's important to remember that the the basic idea of public service is a) to support your community and b) to efficiently manage public resources, perhaps this government realizes it is not their job to support companies.
  • Open source can be reviewed for problems, both from technical issues and human (corrupt) issues.
  • When free open source software used by governments, they are accepting as real the public service so many developers have provided
  • When open source software fails to deliver features that users truly need, companies who do stand out and shine for their innovation
  • Open source software is a form of public intellectual property that not only provides a service, but a sort of baseline for what is truly worth paying for.

The basic truth is when companies are forced to provide superior products instead of costly attempts, citizens win. Neither the government nor it's people are here to compete with you, that's a business game.

wow (1)

jschmitz (607083) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604800)

Well that's one of the dumber comments I have heard lately - especially since MS has been platinum sponsors of most OSS conferences I have been to in the last few years -

all parties 'masking' stock markup FraUD (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33604886)

so now it's 'free', (open) as in billions of disappeared dollars. many of them are rich as nazis now. as for competence; as we ?know? there's one born every minute, & if one can get them to buy their invention back from you, or invest in your phony stock payper, issued on future impossibilities, one being that the supply of suckers is endless. now that's fauxking novell. ahhaha

Linux on the desktop FTW! (1)

elsurexiste (1758620) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604912)

I'll translate you these lines from the original, because the one from that link sucks: "95% of computers run Windows in Latin America. Apple has 1.3%, and Linux from 2% to 3%" And THAT is from a Microsoft's executive. Linux-on-the-desktop is more than wishful thinking in LA. Cool!

Open Can Be Last Refuge Of The Incompetant (4, Insightful)

Ukab the Great (87152) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604932)

Open doesn't necessarily mean incompetent and closed doesn't necessarily mean competant. But "open" can sometimes be a last refuge for the incompetent. As if no one who has ever banged into a serious, irrefutable FLOSS usability problem has been told "quit whining, learn how to code and fix it yourself. It's open!"

You remember all those PDA's that the Taiwanese/Japanese couldn't sell because they sucked so much and their last ditch strategy was to bill them as open source PDA's and create FLOSS projects around them (e.g. Zaurus)? Open sourcing of Symbian after it got its ass handed to it by iOS? That's the kind of stuff I'm talking about.

It appears that his brain is masking (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33604934)

the brain cells he doesnt have. well. a lot of things mask a lot of things, in this world.

Lost in Translation (2, Informative)

Keith111 (1862190) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604942)

Considering this is translated and considering it is an exec talking, I think it is far more likely to mean: If your company cannot provide an end to end solution, you declare it open source to make yourselves look not so lazy.

Amazing... and a reminder (1)

jejones (115979) | more than 3 years ago | (#33604968)

Guess he didn't hear the current party line.... and I think nossos amigos portuguêses would appreciate the appropriate choice of language for the department.

Perfect!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33605034)

It's hard to imagine a more flamebait title for a post on Slashdot than that!!

Excellent news (4, Insightful)

aBaldrich (1692238) | more than 3 years ago | (#33605050)

“First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.”
This was exactly what latin american free software needed. FSF - LA [fsfla.org] successfully "converted" many Brazilian trade unions to Free Software. Uruguay adopted Linux for OLPC, Argentina was going to adopt Linux but then Ballmer paid a visit to the president and now they use dual-boot. Ubuntu is already more popular than Mac, and Microsoft is the paradigm of "colonialist foreign corporation" that all the leftists despise. (See this article [venezuela.net.ve] (spanish) from Venezuela: "Free Software vs. Privative Software: freedom vs. slavery")
I recall the last time Stallman visited Argentina, he spent more time with politicians than with programmers. I really hope this is our chance. OLPC is like Gramsci: if the kids learn linux there's no way to bring them to Windows once they grow up.

EULA (4, Insightful)

Guppy06 (410832) | more than 3 years ago | (#33605122)

If closed-source is so competent, why does every EULA I ever read disclaim any warranty?

That's not what the guy said (2, Informative)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 3 years ago | (#33605212)

I don't know Spanish, so I had to go with the translation [freepascal.org] (which, by the way, is 2 links away from TFS - why not link to it directly?). Here's what the guy actually said:

The executive, however, said that the two models - open source and closed - will continue to coexist.

...

Rincon also needled competition betting on open standards and free of charge, such as Google. "When you do not can compete, you are declaring open. This masks incompetence."

The executive added: "When convenient, the companies say they are open. They use it for your own benefit."

It's fairly clear from this that he is not saying that "open means incompetent" here, but rather than some "incompetent" companies that shall remain un-named *cough* are playing the "openness" card to mask their deficiencies in other departments. Which is quite a different thing.

There are other things in that (translated) speech that could be picked apart in typical /. fashion, which might even make a decent article. But, it seems, the chase for flamebaiting headlines stimulates editors' imagination yet again...

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