Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Google Publishes Censorship Map

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the finger-pointing-is-fun dept.

Censorship 154

Entropy98 writes "Google has released a censorship map showing how often countries around the world request user information and censor services such as Youtube. The US government asked Google for user information 4,287 times during the first six months of 2010. Information on China is conspicuously absent."

cancel ×

154 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Dupe? (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 3 years ago | (#33655926)

I Remember hearing about this months ago, but I can't imagine hearing it anywhere else but here...

Re:Dupe? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33656162)

I heard you have a tiny penis. Will you let me suck it?

Graphing the slant.dot. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33655932)

The US government asked Google for user information 4,287 times during the first six months of 2010. Information on China is conspicuously absent."

So is "/." moderation.

Dupe (2, Informative)

Dynedain (141758) | more than 3 years ago | (#33655936)

Where have I seen this before? Oh yeah, on slashdot almost exactly 5 months ago [slashdot.org] .

Re:Dupe (5, Informative)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656040)

Yes and no. This looks like a new report, of the same kind, for a different time period. Five months ago, the report covered the second half of 2009, this report covers the first half of 2010.

Re:Dupe (0, Redundant)

slshwtw (1903272) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656044)

What's new is that there is now more detailed information available through the tool (see the BBC article [bbc.co.uk] for a better run-down).
For instance clicking on the USA results in:

United States
4287 data requests
128 removal requests, for a total of 678 items
82.8% of removal requests fully or partially complied with

* AdWords

o 1 court orders to remove content
o 1 items requested to be removed

* Blogger

o 8 court orders to remove content
o 45 items requested to be removed

* Geo (except Street View)

o 2 court orders to remove content
o 2 items requested to be removed

* Video

o 1 court orders to remove content
o 1 items requested to be removed

* Groups

o 7 court orders to remove content
o 394 items requested to be removed

* Web Search

o 30 court orders to remove content
o 2 non-court order requests to remove content
o 66 items requested to be removed

* YouTube

o 31 court orders to remove content
o 46 non-court order requests to remove content
o 169 items requested to be removed

Re:Dupe (4, Interesting)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656144)

>>>United States
>>>4287 data requests

I'd like to see this same information broken-down State-by-State, so we can see which states are most censoring. I'm betting New York and California and Pennsylvania are near the top, given their previous activities.

As for China, I wonder how long it will be until someplace like Australia or Canada decide "Hey that's a good idea" and declare takedown request to be state secrets.

Re:Dupe (5, Interesting)

grub (11606) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656222)


As for China, I wonder how long it will be until someplace like Australia or Canada decide "Hey that's a good idea" and declare takedown request to be state secrets.

I checked the map, interesting Canada has less than 10 (!)

World of difference the border between the US and Canada makes.

Re:Dupe (4, Funny)

Abstrackt (609015) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656264)

World of difference the border between the US and Canada makes.

Yeah, the temperature is like 50 degrees lower.

Re:Dupe (2, Funny)

kikito (971480) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656478)

Temperature's 50 degrees lower just like IQ is 50 points higher.

Re:Dupe (1)

Abstrackt (609015) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657346)

Temperature's 50 degrees lower just like IQ is 50 points higher.

Of course, that's how I managed to make such a clever comment eh!

Re:Dupe (5, Funny)

treeves (963993) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657010)

That's only true on occasion, when it happens to be 72.5 at the US side of the border and 22.5 right over the border in Canada.

Re:Dupe (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657176)

That's our Privacy Office. It's against the law to violate someone's privacy up here. (You can look up details if you care, it's a close-enough 10-word summary.)

Our ISPs don't log where you've been, but they do log what IP they gave you at a given time. They can't snoop in your files.

Re:Dupe (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33656436)

There are probably many more U.S. demands than are reported by this tool.

As for China, I wonder how long it will be until someplace like Australia or Canada decide "Hey that's a good idea" and declare takedown request to be state secrets.

Read about National Security Letters. Since 9/11, these have been a popular method for American government agencies to evade public and judicial scrutiny during investigations. The very existence of a particular NSL cannot be disclosed legally.

NSLs are not reported by Google. They are our very own homegrown version of China's "state secret" demands. If you are served an NSL, and you tell someone of that fact, you can face jail time (merely for discussing its existence).

Re:Dupe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33656582)

Wouldn't New York & California naturally be at/near the top, simply because they've got large populations. What's important is the ratio of population to requests.

Re:Dupe (1)

amRadioHed (463061) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657366)

I'm betting New York, California, and Pennsylvania are near the top because they're among the most highly populated states. I would be interested in seeing the per capita numbers, those numbers would make comparisons much more revealing. For instance while the US has the highest total number of take-down requests, per million people the US has about 14 requests compared to the UK which has about 22 request per million people.

Re:Dupe (1)

slshwtw (1903272) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656178)

Another interesting feature is the traffic graphs by country and service.

For instance, check out the usage of 'Google Groups' in China here [google.com] (set the zoom to "Max"). I'm guessing the usage spike was due to the 10th anniversary of the banning of the Falun Gong [wikipedia.org] belief system.

Re:Dupe (2, Insightful)

vux984 (928602) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656046)

5 months ago it didn't have data for the first six months of 2010. ;)

Really, editors? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33655940)

You link to an article talking about it, but not the source link? http://www.google.com/transparencyreport/governmentrequests/ [google.com]

Re:Really, editors? (1)

Grizzley9 (1407005) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656430)

That was irritating, neither the summary or the linked article had actual links to the map itself. Can't let them click away from the site and all...

Re:Really, editors? (1)

amRadioHed (463061) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657386)

The BBC article had a link to the map beneath the article, but yeah the link wasn't as prominent as it should have been.

Re:Really, editors? (2, Funny)

KlomDark (6370) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656488)

Weird, the pin for the US is point almost exactly to where I grew up. Almost creepy!

I wonder what they know now that I used to know then, before they erased parts of my memory back in 1989?

Re:Really, editors? (1)

TheDarkNose (1613701) | more than 3 years ago | (#33658068)

You lived on the border between Kansas and Nebraska? You must have ASKED for the memory erasure! ;)

for the impatient (0, Redundant)

fringd (120235) | more than 3 years ago | (#33655942)

http://www.google.com/transparencyreport/governmentrequests/

Re:for the impatient (4, Informative)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 3 years ago | (#33655962)

For the super-impatient, a link you can click! [google.com]

Maybe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33655946)

Perhaps the Chinese don't bother asking Google for information, and just check their huge database of every Chinese citizen's Internets traffic for all time. ;)

Map link missing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33655948)

Too bad the article does not contain a link to the actual map.

Re:Map link missing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33656580)

Unless it was added later, there is a Related Links section below the article. Doesn't jump out and bite you though.

Interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33655954)

China just uses cctv in your house to look at what ur doing

Re:Interesting (3, Funny)

amRadioHed (463061) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657456)

While it's true a government operated CCTV can be found in the homes of most Chinese people, I don't think it [wikipedia.org] is what you think it is.

Yo dawg (4, Funny)

selven (1556643) | more than 3 years ago | (#33655960)

I heard you like censorship so I censored your censorship map...

Re:Yo dawg (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33655980)

I heard you like posting so I put a post in your post so you can post while you post.

Re:Yo dawg (1)

Un pobre guey (593801) | more than 3 years ago | (#33655990)

And I'll raise you: In Soviet Russia censorship censors.. um...

Re:Yo dawg (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33656786)

In Soviet Russia, Censorship is Data!

I mean, in Google.

Re:Yo dawg (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656056)

So you can Bleep while you bleep?

Re:Yo dawg (1)

suomynonAyletamitlU (1618513) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657372)

I heard you like [CENSORED] so I [CENSORED] your [CENSORED]...

[CENSORED] that for you.

I wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33655998)

Does it have street view too?

The new part... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33656008)

...is the traffic tracking. See usage per country per service. Pretty neat.

http://www.google.com/transparencyreport/traffic/

Trust? (3, Insightful)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656034)

Chinese officials consider censorship demands to be state secrets so we cannot disclose that information at this time," said Google.

So tell me why we should believe anything they say?

Re:Trust? (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656092)

Who is they? Google, or China? ...

Ah, trust, the foundation of Knowledge... Have you ever been to Kahzakstan? Can you confirm it's existance?

It could all be a clever ruse, you know. Everyone you've ever known could be lieing to you.

Re:Trust? (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656196)

>>>Everyone you've ever known could be lieing to you.

I still don't believe the United States of Europe exists. http://www.amazon.com/United-States-Europe-Superpower-Supremacy/ [amazon.com]

Re:Trust? (1)

lordmetroid (708723) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656270)

I can only conclude from your hyperlink that the United States of Europe does not exists as your hyperlink simply returns a 404 Not Found HTTP status code.

Re:Trust? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33656306)

Worse: it's not only China.

According to other sources, National Security Letters (NSLs) from the U.S. government are not reported by Google.

NSLs are issued with gag orders preventing their disclosure. They're essentially a method of bypassing the standard judicial process, instead using a system more closely resembling the Chinese government's secrecy. For Americans, they should be much more of a concern than the Chinese officials' "state secrets."

Source:
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/09/google-government-requests-rise/ [wired.com]

Re:Trust? (1)

number17 (952777) | more than 3 years ago | (#33658072)

Why do they even bother putting a question mark beside China when they only report one country in Africa? I could have sworn they had the internet in South Africa. Maybe im wrong.

This doesn't make sense at all. (3, Insightful)

d474 (695126) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656072)

When the Government asks Google for information about a user, how is that "censorship"? It may be a violation of privacy, but it's not censorship unless Google admits that the government then used that information about the user to censor their online activities. Of course, I did not RTFA. I prefer to censor myself ;P

Re:This doesn't make sense at all. (1)

Americano (920576) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656170)

It's a tally of government requests that they've received - some of those requests were for the removal of data, so I guess that part (the minority, incidentally - 128 requests for data removal, versus ~4300 requests for user information) is censorship, but the vast majority of these requests is for user data, probably largely for police investigations.

Slashdot likes to use big purple conspiracy words to generate a few more clicks on the link. "Google updates Transparency Report with 1H-2010 government request data" just isn't as sexy and provocative a title.

Re:This doesn't make sense at all. (1)

YA_Python_dev (885173) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656200)

When the Government asks Google for information about a user, how is that "censorship"? It may be a violation of privacy, but it's not censorship unless Google admits that the government then used that information about the user to censor their online activities.

The user now lives in a very small room with no windows and no internet access. Does that counts as "censoring their online activities"?

And you are correct (2, Funny)

wsanders (114993) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656472)

In their FAQ, Google states "the statistics primarily cover requests in criminal matters".

However, we don't let that interfere with our paranoia, or else the Terrorists win.

Re:This doesn't make sense at all. (1)

Entropy98 (1340659) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657730)

The map also includes information like Iran blocking Youtube.
 
--
  windows codec pack [cnet.com]

Re:This doesn't make sense at all. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33658032)

They use the access to the data as a way to threaten people. If I knew google is giving out information about me to my government (i.e. Iran government), I might not be able to post a single critic of the shit happening there.

Map of evil (1)

edxwelch (600979) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656074)

they should colour-code it so we can see a world snapshot of evil ;)

My first thoughts (3, Interesting)

Ishkibble (581826) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656096)

My first thoughts are 'this is great'. Google claims "don't be evil" so it better live up to it. Money corrupts a corporation and since they have gone public that has been called into question. I have an android phone and i happily let Google track me, i let them keep my email, my photos, my digital life, the least they can do is put out something like this. This map is not for me though, its for the average Googler who doesn't fully understand how Google collects and keeps and uses personal data.

US aked for user information 4,287 times (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656104)

We have met the enemy.

He is us. (Or rather our leaders.)

Re:US aked for user information 4,287 times (1)

poity (465672) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656252)

"Le mieux est l'ennemi du bien."

Where are the percentages? (4, Interesting)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656134)

They give the map with actual numbers, apparently, right?

I'd be more interested in what percentage of data that Google COULD get asked about is actually asked about.

Otherwise, it's like saying that I killed 300 cows whereas my neighbor only killed 1. Well, it just so happens that my herd is 300x as big, too... a more understandable reading would be the percentage of cows killed per herd.

Re:Where are the percentages? (1)

ADRA (37398) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656416)

Pardon Me? Does Google segment data based on nationality? The origin of the individual(s) being investigated have no bearing as to their nation of origin, or are you more interested in just the raw population numbers of the country? Exactly what type of correlation are you trying to build? A given nation's government officials are probably don't limit their requests to simply inner-nationals, so wouldn't that make the proportion of people / size of community / etc.. numbers irrelevant compared to information requests as a whole? The raw number in itself tells us how motivated a given government is in policing or investigating the actions of individuals on or using the internet.

Re:Where are the percentages? (1)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656608)

These are requests to Google for information to either remove content or for disclosure of "user data."

There is no correlation between what, say, the US can actually ask for/receive and how many requests Google gets.

Assume, for example, DMCA. Raw numbers aren't as useful as DMCA vs. "Copyright Holdings" percentages/correlations. If you have one copyright and I have two, you might expect me to issue twice as many DMCAs as you do because I have more holdings.

Perhaps I'm misunderstanding just what a given country CAN request of Google.

Re:Where are the percentages? (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656628)

They give the map with actual numbers, apparently, right?

I'd be more interested in what percentage of data that Google COULD get asked about is actually asked about.

I'm not sure Data would really work like that. How many times do you think google COULD be probed for information? Wouldn't that number be somewhere in the high googols?

you know what would have been great? (1)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656142)

If you had linked to the map and not just an article about the map. The article doesn't even have a link to the map.

Re:you know what would have been great? (1)

owlnation (858981) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656426)

If you had linked to the map and not just an article about the map. The article doesn't even have a link to the map.

TFA does actually have a link to the map -- however, you'd easily miss it. It's at the bottom of the article, as a related link. The BBC's layout for stuff like this is appalling. What the actual point of the map image accompanying the article is, is also hard to figure out, since it's illegible and incomplete.

There's also considerable irony in a State-run Broadcasting corporation reporting on censorship. Considering it is something the BBC has been known to do itself.

It is also interesting that the BBC, as the World's largest news organization, is so on the ball that it is reporting something 5 months late. But then... it very, very rarely ever breaks a story, or has an exclusive (unless it's from another BBC investigative documentary team who don't work for BBC News). Does make you wonder where all that UK public money is being spent, and why it is being spent, when mostly all BBC News does is just recycle press releases.

Re:you know what would have been great? (1)

moortak (1273582) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657312)

This news isn't five months old, the data isn't even that old. You may be thinking of the last time Google updated the transparency report.

What happened on Feb 25 2010 ? (3, Interesting)

equex (747231) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656168)

Look at the Traffic chart ( http://www.google.com/transparencyreport/traffic/ [google.com] ) Seems to be a huge peak and after that general activity falls quite a bit compared to before that date ?

Re:What happened on Feb 25 2010 ? (1)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656356)

I actually found that more interesting for Canada. See you have lots of traffic here until the first holiday in May. Once that happens, and it's the May 24 weekend, summer officially starts even if there is snow on the ground still. Ah winter, how you drive us indoors when you don't make us free outdoors.

Re:What happened on Feb 25 2010 ? (1)

equex (747231) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656492)

I see your point but if you look at the data with Max zoom (forgot to mention that), it's a completely different world after 02/25 (for US, Google Search). It's not nearly that clear for Canada.

Biggest democracies, biggest culprits (3, Informative)

losttoy (558557) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656172)

United States 4287 Brazil 2435 India 1430 United Kingdom 1343 France 1017 Germany 668 Italy 651 Spain 372 Australia 200

Re:Biggest democracies, biggest culprits (1)

poity (465672) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656290)

And how many non-democracies allow Youtube (or even internet access) at all?

Re:Biggest democracies, biggest culprits (4, Interesting)

h00manist (800926) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656322)

Not all of them
Canada ............. 10

Re:Biggest democracies, biggest culprits (4, Funny)

glwtta (532858) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656452)

Canada ............. 10

Yeah, but that's like 1 for every 10 Canadians.

Re:Biggest democracies, biggest culprits (1)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657180)

ah, so they're spying on the sober ones....

Re:Biggest democracies, biggest culprits (1)

T Murphy (1054674) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657014)

They were probably waiting for Google to translate their services to Canadian before filing too many complaints.

Re:Biggest democracies, biggest culprits (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33658018)

Mod this guy up! Everyone knows that Canadians really do speak another language.

Re:Biggest democracies, biggest culprits (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33657332)

It says "10" for me. Details state that "87.5%" of requests were full/partially complied with. So I'd say the exact figure is 8 total requests, 7 of which were complied with.

However, if you skip back to "July 2009 to December 2009" (the default timeframe is january to june of this year) the numbers are a little different:

        41 data requests
        16 removal requests
        43.8% of removal requests fully or partially complied with
        Blogger
        1 non-court order requests to remove content
        Groups
        2 court orders to remove content
        Web Search
        1 non-court order requests to remove content
        YouTube
        12 non-court order requests to remove content

Re:Biggest democracies, biggest culprits (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33657430)

Not all of them

Canada ............. 10

That's just because the rest of their requests went to googleh.com

Re:Biggest democracies, biggest culprits (1)

Scrameustache (459504) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657686)

Not all of them

Canada ............. 10

U.S.A. 128

There's about ten times as many people in the U.S. as in Canada, so they have comparable removal requests. The spying on citizens numbers are many to none though.

Re:Biggest democracies, biggest culprits (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33656368)

Democracy does not always equal freedom, or vice versa. Democracy can at best be freedom for the majority, or for _independent_ (i.e. non-governmental) money interests. Freedom comes from the laws on the books and the vigilance of the general public. Democracy is only teh way to get those laws.

Re:Biggest democracies, biggest culprits (4, Insightful)

Experiment 626 (698257) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656474)

If a democratic government doesn't like what you are looking at online, they take it down.
If a totalitarian government doesn't like what you are looking at online, they take YOU down.

Re:Biggest democracies, biggest culprits (1)

Capsaicin (412918) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657800)

Biggest democracies, biggest culprits

Yes I was just looking at the map [google.com] and thinking, the places that have no markers on the you wouldn't want to live. Not that all of the places marked (eg. China) you would want to either.

As far as the raw numbers you quote, how to they pan out when expresses as a meaningful metric such as take-down request per 100,000 population. Or some metric that also takes general internet access into account? I somehow doubt the biggest democracies would still emerge as the biggest culprits.

Even more interesting, would be to see the latter compared to some index of how liveable to particular country is. Not that I would want to suggest that there might be some optimum level of government censorship. That would be heresy and would no doubt see me censored, err modded, into oblivion. ;)

State Secrets (4, Interesting)

hondo77 (324058) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656210)

"Chinese officials consider censorship demands to be state secrets so we cannot disclose that information at this time," said Google.

Somewhere in Washington, D.C. or nearby Virginia, someone in a cubicle just said, "Ooh, good idea!"

Re:State Secrets (1)

T Murphy (1054674) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657104)

...and hopefully someone who knows that person will read a slashdot post about hitting people on the head with a sledgehammer and say "Ooh, good idea!"

Re:State Secrets (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33657808)

Already done.

Google: Internet freedom is declining (1)

h00manist (800926) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656250)

http://edition.cnn.com/2010/TECH/web/09/21/google.transparency/ [cnn.com] Its's only going to get worse. Fully free speech is not really supported anywhere. Society is full of injustice, and those forces are coming to bear on the InterWebs as it starts to affect them in real terms. In Brazil the government is starting to issue digital certificates for all companies and persons, so far compulsory only for certain companies. With widespread biometrics and certificates, things can certainly become very controlled and difficult to even hack, which in any case isn't really openness and democracy. Using of anonymity to do not-too-smart and decent things doesn't help very much. The countries which do constitutionally allow anonymity help a lot.

China goes "meta" (1)

hessian (467078) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656276)

We censored the information about our censorship, therefore we do not censor.

***

I thought it was interesting that democracies are the ones asking most frequently. It's possible that's because non-democratic states already know via other means. It's also possible that democracies are less stable.

***

Another thought is that this is only one view of the situation. If the USA asked for censorship information 4,287 times and that enabled them to catch pedophiles/terrorists/enslavers 4,214 times, we're all doing pretty well by that outcome.

Re:China goes "meta" (1)

h00manist (800926) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656386)

USA asked for censorship information 4,287 times and that enabled them to catch pedophiles/terrorists/enslavers 4,214 times, we're all doing pretty well by that outcome.

Washington DC is just bursting with joyful smiling good guys in shining armor on a white horse galloping to save you and your family from the bad guys.

Re:China goes "meta" (4, Insightful)

Dan667 (564390) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656476)

they generally yell "think of the children" when they are taking away your rights so how can you tell?

Re:China goes "meta" (1)

Cimexus (1355033) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657160)

I think it's actually because democracies are MORE stable. Most democracies are first-world countries and hence are more 'organised'. They have established processes and institutions to deal with this kind of stuff. Whereas if you are a less developed country, your government probably has bigger concerns on its plate - e.g. 'how do we prevent ourselves getting thrown out in a coup next week?' or 'why is everyone starving?' or 'why haven't I received as many bribes this year?'. They probably don't even have a government department that really cares about what's on the Internet ... it's just not as much of a priority.

That covers the 'non-democratic, but not really 'evil'' countries. As for the real dictatorships, as you say, they already know via other means ;)

Why China is missing (2, Funny)

bob8766 (1075053) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656648)

Chaina is missing due to a Google bug. They coded it with an INT32, but they really needed an INT64 for China

Inaccurate article title (1)

Caerdwyn (829058) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656734)

Requests for user information is not censorship, as speech is not being blocked. It is being traced to its origin. The map is a "spy on your citizens" map, NOT a censorship map. Different thing.

Potentially every bit as bad, but let's use accurate terminology. The "scare you into accepting draconian laws" people use distortions and bad use of emotionally loaded terms; it's one of the things that makes them evil. Journalists calling information requests (lawful or otherwise) "censorship" shows the journalist to be, shall we say, uneducated about what they say they are qualified to report upon. And people coming up with article titles on Slashdot really, really need to RTFA and get their titles right.

Re:Inaccurate article title (1)

moortak (1273582) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657330)

The map also has an information removal listing for each country. That pretty clearly falls under censorship.

Traffic report for Singapore end of May 2010? (1)

wyoung76 (764124) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656972)

Looking at the 6 month traffic report for Singapore, what happened towards the end of May and onwards? There's a precipitous drop in traffic for the unencrypted Google Search traffic down to less than half the pre-June traffic levels.

Three China Policy (1)

fibonacci8 (260615) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656988)

I like that Mainland China holds state secret status, but both Taiwan and Hong Kong are listed in the 2010 update of the report. Gratuitous addition of the keywords reunification, Tibet, and "grass mud horse" added for seasoning.

For Flash Sites Add iOS Users (0, Offtopic)

wrightrocket (1664871) | more than 3 years ago | (#33656998)

Flash sites should be included as censored, as far as iOS users are concerned.

Re:For Flash Sites Add iOS Users (1)

wrightrocket (1664871) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657060)

Flash sites should be included as censored, as far as iOS users are concerned.

Oops, jumped to add this comment, and wish I could delete it, since it has nothing to do with a country's request for censorship.

Why China is missing (1)

dhyanesh (961116) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657342)

"Chinese officials consider censorship demands to be state secrets, so we cannot disclose that information at this time."

Source: Click on China in the map here [google.com] .

Singapore search traffic halved in June (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33657578)

But no such trend appears in other countries' traffic. Wonder if its a difference in normalization or censorship?
Link [google.com]

Re:Singapore search traffic halved in June (1)

Psaakyrn (838406) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657828)

I don't believe Singapore censors search results, though the resultant linked pages may be. Might just be a coincidence.

I immediately think of Google... (1)

dtmancom (925636) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657790)

...when I think "internet censorship." Interesting.

So information about China is Censored? (1)

Psaakyrn (838406) | more than 3 years ago | (#33657838)

n/t

So much is missing (1)

geomark (932537) | more than 3 years ago | (#33658000)

The map hardly tells the story. They acknowledge that it contains no data for China, but other countries like Thailand are right up there. Thailand is rather notorious for blocking websites, over 100,000 at present and counting according to some anti-censorship groups who are keeping track. And draconian prosecution and jail time for anything deemed illegal published on forums. Google has cred so would really like to see something comprehensive published by them.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>