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CD Sales Continue To Plummet, Vinyl Records Soar

timothy posted about 4 years ago | from the warm-crackly-fidelity dept.

Music 431

Lucas123 writes "Over the past four years, vinyl record sales have been soaring, jumping almost 300% from 858,000 in 2006 to 2.5 million in 2009, and sales this year are on track to reach new peaks, according to Nielsen Entertainment. Meanwhile, as digital music sales are also continuing a steady rise, CD sales have been on a fast downward slope over the same period of time. In the first half of this year alone, CD album sales were down about 18% over the same period last year. David Bakula, senior vice president of analytics at Nielsen Entertainment, said it's not just audiophiles expanding their collections that is driving vinyl record sales but a whole new generation of young music aficionados who are digging the album art, liner notes and other features that records bring to the table. 'The trend sure does seem sustainable. And the record industry is really doing a lot of cool things to not only make the format come alive but to make it more exciting for consumers,' Bakula said."

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All well and good, until... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33693784)

People start making rips from the records :(

Re:All well and good, until... (1)

biryokumaru (822262) | about 4 years ago | (#33693842)

Easy day [thinkgeek.com] .

Re:All well and good, until... (0)

AndOne (815855) | about 4 years ago | (#33693882)

I have a record player with the built in capability to rip records to MP3... It cost 50 or 60$

Re:All well and good, until... (4, Insightful)

Peach Rings (1782482) | about 4 years ago | (#33694158)

What's the point of buying it on vinyl for great quality and ripping it to digital? You'll certainly get better quality by directly downloading FLACs from the internet. It's astonishing how clueless record companies are. Release lossless audio on data DVDs, or for digital download if you want quality.

I think the impetus behind vinyl sales is that they're a collector's item. They come in a big envelope with big art instead of a tacky plastic jewel case, and they usually come with inserts or collectibles. Everyone has albums on CD but it commands a lot more cred to say "I have that on vinyl." Some people collect records of great music they already own, and store them (playing vinyl reduces its quality and value).

Re:All well and good, until... (5, Interesting)

KiloByte (825081) | about 4 years ago | (#33693918)

Why the ":(" ? It's a damn good thing.

Of course, a properly mastered CD will be helluva better than any vinyl, but thanks to douches involved in the loudness war [wikipedia.org] , all currently sold CDs are of dog shit quality that makes it even worse than pops of vinyl.

Re:All well and good, until... (2, Informative)

Entropius (188861) | about 4 years ago | (#33693980)

Not "all currently sold CD's". Recordings of classical music and related genres seem just fine.

Re:All well and good, until... (1)

Martin Blank (154261) | about 4 years ago | (#33694022)

Thanks for this post. I was looking for information on this topic about a week ago, but couldn't remember the term.

Re:All well and good, until... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33694052)

A. First time playing it, there's no reason a top-notch vinyl record on a top-notch turntable couldn't beat a CD -- production ones don't, but there's no physical limits to blame, just practicality (and it's manifestly unpractical to produce something of incredible accuracy that will degrade immensely whenever you play it -- if you really want something better than CD, you just use a different lossless digital format with higher sampling frrequency and/or resolution).

Second, and this is by all means a serious question, are current vinyl releases any better than current CD releases? Or are they also compressed to avoid complaints about sounding quieter than the CD version?

Re:All well and good, until... (5, Interesting)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | about 4 years ago | (#33694218)

http://www.hydrogenaudio.org/forums/index.php?showtopic=35530 [hydrogenaudio.org]

Second, and this is by all means a serious question, are current vinyl releases any better than current CD releases? Or are they also compressed to avoid complaints about sounding quieter than the CD version?

Generally the vinyl is not over-compressed. But there are notable exceptions like the recent Metallica album - in that case the vinyl was exactly the same as CD because they were both mixed under the auspices of the same producer - I forget his name, but he's become ever more popular in the business and he brings the loudness war with him to every new project he takes on and this was his first metallica album. What's really interesting about the metallica case is that the guitar hero version was (apparently) mixed by the guitar hero sound engineers and they were not under the control of any of the loudness warriors. The result was that the people who really wanted the best sound quality from that album bootlegged the ripped guitar hero version.

Here's a video comparing CD mix to guitar hero mix - you don't even need headphones to tell the difference.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DRyIACDCc1I [youtube.com]

Re:All well and good, until... (1)

couchslug (175151) | about 4 years ago | (#33693946)

"People start making rips from the records :("

"Start"?

Back in The Day, a reel-to-reel tape deck was a "server", and ripping to that and to cassette was the way to exchange music. Sneakernet works fine.

Re:All well and good, until... (4, Funny)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 4 years ago | (#33694014)

We called it "Dubbing" instead of "making rips|ripping". We wore an onion on our belts while we did this, which was the style at the time.

Re:All well and good, until... (2, Interesting)

Dunbal (464142) | about 4 years ago | (#33694068)

And we didn't go to jail or risk losing our livelyhoods because of it, either.

Ripping/dubbing not really comparable (1)

perpenso (1613749) | about 4 years ago | (#33694212)

And we didn't go to jail or risk losing our livelyhoods because of it, either.

And dubbing was a one-to-one transaction not a one-to-many transaction like ripping.
And dubbing was a lossy process that limited multi-generation copying unlike ripping.

Ripping and dubbing are not really comparable. Dubbing was like a subset of ripping where one person rips a cd, puts the file on a USB drive, lets a friend copy the files, and it ends there. Ripping cases like this are not what seems to be winding up in court. What seems to be ending up in court is where someone makes the rips available on the internet. If you want to use the dubbing comparison you would have to have one person make many dubs and start providing them to many people. When people did this the record companies and the law did get involved. Now there is an important distinction for these people who made many dubs, they tended to be involved in commercial piracy and were out to make a profit unlike the person who person who runs the website (or is seeking fame or approval equivalent to seeking a profit?). Again, we have a poor comparison between dubbing and ripping. Its probably best not to compare physical and digital goods.

Re:All well and good, until... (1)

imthesponge (621107) | about 4 years ago | (#33694044)

What was that software that could extract music from a high-quality photo of a record?

I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (4, Insightful)

echucker (570962) | about 4 years ago | (#33693788)

Nice lossy format to prevent clean ripping, too.

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (0)

Ynot_82 (1023749) | about 4 years ago | (#33693810)

the sort of vinyl records that typically sell are not the manufactured pop that studios are trying to save
Often times, the artists who release stuff on record are not signed to a major label, but to independent labels
Trust me, no n-sync song has ever been pressed to vinyl

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (4, Informative)

biryokumaru (822262) | about 4 years ago | (#33693828)

I get 15 [amazon.com] results...

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (0, Redundant)

Ynot_82 (1023749) | about 4 years ago | (#33693868)

maybe I didn't mean nsync
Boyzone, or something
I don't know

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33693924)

Did you mean cognitive dissonance?

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33694152)

I don't know

You're right about one thing.

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33693832)

I hate you for making me google this.
http://gemm.com/c/search.pl?artist=N--Sync&title=I&list_begin_prev=1&list_end_prev=50&low_limit_prev=118&low_limit=98&list_howmany_str=NEXT+50&page_on=2

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33693864)

huh? Vinyl records are lossless...

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (0)

Volante3192 (953645) | about 4 years ago | (#33693926)

Well, until the stylus starts wearing down and the grooves start smoothing out...

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33694012)

This John Cage record will get better with age !

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about 4 years ago | (#33694096)

what a mixed bag that guy's works were - some are amazing, some I'd say the total loss occurred before the sound ever was cut into the vinyl

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (1)

Artifakt (700173) | about 4 years ago | (#33694172)

Suppose someone claimed that they were the performer on a recording of John Cage's 4'33", and not the person credited for it. How on Earth could you prove it one way or another?

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 4 years ago | (#33694036)

Which is why you Dub it to reel-to-reel or tape the first time you play it. Then you play the Dub. Kids these days.

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33694106)

Then it incurs *more* loss of quality. It was not lossless to begin with in that the dynamics had to be compressed to get it on the record, especially in the bass. Heard of RIAA equalization?

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 4 years ago | (#33694276)

Not more than a ruined record.

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (1)

nine-times (778537) | about 4 years ago | (#33694112)

And then you copy that reel-to-reel tape to CD, and then rip the CD to MP3.

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (4, Informative)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about 4 years ago | (#33694160)

> Well, until the stylus starts wearing down and the grooves start smoothing out...

Uh, there ARE laser turn tables ...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laser_turntable [wikipedia.org]

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (1)

cgenman (325138) | about 4 years ago | (#33694304)

...which start at about 15 grand. At that point, buy the DVD-A.

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (4, Interesting)

Waffle Iron (339739) | about 4 years ago | (#33694192)

Well, until the stylus starts wearing down and the grooves start smoothing out...

An extreme example of that was the all-mechanical antique Victrola that my parents had when I was a kid (along with a big stack of 78-rpm shellac records). All the sound energy was created by the action of the grooves on the needle.

The tone arm was a hollow horn with a big diaphragm on it, and it probably put more than 100 grams of force on the record. The steel needles it used only lasted for about a dozen plays before they became visibly worn and had to be tossed. The mechanical force from playing a record often caused a bunch of white residue to slough off the surface of the disk, which couldn't have been very good for the longevity of the recording. Needless to say, we didn't operate that thing very often.

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (2, Interesting)

Khyber (864651) | about 4 years ago | (#33694266)

"until the stylus starts wearing down and the grooves start smoothing out"

Not a problem if you'd keep Moh's hardness scale in mind.

Got old 60s vinyls that still sound great because I use a softer-than-vinyl stylus. Yea it does futz with the sound just a bit but I prefer my happy vinyls.

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33694064)

Ever hear a needle scratching a blank track on a record? All that racket you're hearing is noise, i.e., signal you don't want. That noise level is present on every track on the record as well. The music covers it up.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analog_recording_vs._digital_recording
Note that the theoretical quality max based on quantization noise achievable by a standard CD is almost 30db better than a vinyl record. Full quality is not, of course, necessarily achieved in practice, but anyone telling you a record stores a perfect signal--or even a better signal than a CD--is way off.

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (2, Informative)

rubycodez (864176) | about 4 years ago | (#33694140)

The real world always has noise too.

The digitizing process is lossy by the limited bit resolution per sample (even if we agree the sample rate is sufficient).

As to sample rate, most real instruments make ultrasonics and infrasonics, those are left behind by a CD, and might be important even if not registered consciously.

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33694270)

Nice lossy format to prevent clean ripping, too.

Not everything is about ripping and file sharing. You do realize that the CDs and Vinyl records have music on them? I'm saying this not as a troll but out of frustration that the music has taken a backseat to ripping and file sharing. Those concerns seem to dwarf the content in many people's eyes. If your first reaction is how easily can I rip it and upload it you really can't care that much about the music.

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (1)

oldhack (1037484) | about 4 years ago | (#33694280)

It's analog, it's not lossy.

This is an old tip: make a quality digital copy once you played about half a dozen times. The vinyl wears down and the sound quality will degrade.

Re:I bet "The Industry" loves it.... (1)

timeOday (582209) | about 4 years ago | (#33694294)

I doubt the industry cares much either way. 2.5 million records in a year? The Thriller album - alone - has sold approximately 100 million copies since its release, including 1.27 million in 2009 alone (yes, a spike due to Jackson's death). [wikipedia.org]

Second, the vinyl "resurgence" is based on fad rather than utility, so it won't last.

damn hipsters (1)

dontuhatepants (949530) | about 4 years ago | (#33693800)

damn those hipsters and their love for ironic nostalgia.

Re:damn hipsters (1)

garcia (6573) | about 4 years ago | (#33693878)

For me it's about a ready supply for music which is dirt fucking cheap. I can buy entire boxes of vinyl for .25 at most flea markets and garage sales which generally include some pretty decent stuff. The rest I can sell back to used stores for store credit which nets me a few more records.

No, I don't have a record player anymore but have thought about buying one.

Re:damn hipsters (1)

SailorSpork (1080153) | about 4 years ago | (#33693972)

At this point, the "Nostalgia" may almost be for CD's. THe last one I bought was in line to get it signed by the band, everything else is (legal purchased) mp3.

Re:damn hipsters (0, Troll)

Rogerborg (306625) | about 4 years ago | (#33694108)

I was just thinking that vinyl is like Scott Pilgrim vs The World: adored by a statistically insignificant number of smug hipster douches, ignored by everyone else.

Re:damn hipsters (1)

Kristopeit, Mike Da. (1905342) | about 4 years ago | (#33694282)

i don't think you know what ironic means... did you mean iconic?

i have turn tables set up in my studio... technics 1200s with a bunch of different needles... i appreciate pushing the envelopes of analog mediums. every play is unique and the product of an observable physical action.

I can see why this is popular (5, Insightful)

mlawrence (1094477) | about 4 years ago | (#33693816)

Smell is the sense that is tied to memory the strongest. I remember the smells of those records as much as I remember the sounds and the artwork. :)

Re:I can see why this is popular (2, Interesting)

MrBandersnatch (544818) | about 4 years ago | (#33693884)

Its a good point but there is also the issue or touch and the physical presence that vinyl and its packaging brings. Its possible to put a decent sized poster in vinyl, to use it as wall art - to actually have a presence in a room via your collection....CD still seems like "just a bunch or plastic".

Personally though I still morn videodisc as a format, much for the same reasons but there I hold out little hope QQ

Re:I can see why this is popular (2, Insightful)

Martin Blank (154261) | about 4 years ago | (#33694038)

I think the fragility of vinyl lends some perceived value to it as well. I can toss a CD on the desk without much thought, but I would never do that with vinyl because of the risk of damaging it even with a tiny scratch.

Re:I can see why this is popular (4, Insightful)

nine-times (778537) | about 4 years ago | (#33694148)

Nice observation. This is the kind of stuff that the dry analytics and reductionism of geeks/businessmen/economists sometimes miss. There are psychological aspects of value that can be very hard to quantify and run contrary to practical utility.

In fact, I think one of the things that have lead to the decline in value of music overall is its ready availability and the immense practicality of the players. You don't have to take time out of your day to listen. You don't have to spend time thinking about music, choosing what to listen to. You aren't bound to stay in one place while you listen. You can stick your headphones in and hit "shuffle", and you're done.

People don't value things that come easily.

big freakin cds... (3, Funny)

mevets (322601) | about 4 years ago | (#33693850)

A 12" CD could hold about a dozen regular ones. Not only could you have big album art, but the spinning patterns would complement the bong quite nicely.

Re:big freakin cds... (1)

tagno25 (1518033) | about 4 years ago | (#33693932)

It was called LaserDisk. Of course they were 11.81 inches (30cm), not 12 inches, but that .19 inches shouldn't matter.

Re:big freakin cds... (1)

MoonBuggy (611105) | about 4 years ago | (#33694060)

Also they were analog...

Re:big freakin cds... (2, Informative)

Pentium100 (1240090) | about 4 years ago | (#33694226)

The later ones had digital sound, stereo, 16bit, 44.1kHz. NTSC LDs could have both analog and digital audio tracks at the same time, while PAL LDs could have analog or digital sound, but not both at the same time. A few even later LDs had Dolby AC3 sound instead of one analog track or DTS instead of both digital tracks.

Re:big freakin cds... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33694288)

but that .19 inches shouldn't matter.

That's what I told my girlfriend, but she's all like 'just over 3 inches still makes it tiny, you freak'.

Vinyl, a proven durable format, and free of DRM (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33693862)

I wonder if Birmingham Sound Reproducers is still around making their crappy turntables

Re:Vinyl, a proven durable format, and free of DRM (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33694164)

At one point, CBS wanted to install DRM into vinyl records. They had planned to get Congress to require their DRM plan. CBS wanted to run all the music on albums through a steep notch filter. CBS claimed the effects of the notch filter were inaudible, a laughable premise. CBS wanted Congress to require that all recording equipment would go into "pause" if music appeared within the frequencies that the notch filter suppressed.

.

Fortunately, sanity prevailed as CBS was roundly laughed at by others in the music industry.

Disco record sales (4, Insightful)

dbolger (161340) | about 4 years ago | (#33693870)

Did you know that disco record sales were up 400% for the year ending 1976? If these trends continues... Aaay!

Re:Disco record sales (1)

slacknatcher (1902820) | about 4 years ago | (#33693988)

i lold

CDs seem obsolete (1)

AndOne (815855) | about 4 years ago | (#33693872)

I just bought a CD the other day while on vacation. As I was walking back to my hotel all I could think was "Now how the hell am I going to listen to this..." Of course I have a CD player in my laptop but that thought didn't occur to me as a way to actually listen to the CD, just as a way to rip it into a digital format so I could listen to it in a more convenient manner. Hell the only reason I even bought the CD was because it was a regional exclusive release... [/anecdote]

Re:CDs seem obsolete (1)

shimage (954282) | about 4 years ago | (#33694188)

I assume you are not trying to explain the resurgence of vinyl?

multi-track please (2, Interesting)

StripedCow (776465) | about 4 years ago | (#33693876)

What I'd personally love to see (or hear) is: multi-track audio... so that songs can be remixed more easily... I mean wouldn't it be cool if it were possible to mute a say trumpet track, and replace it by something else (human voice for example), or the other way around?

Re:multi-track please (1, Interesting)

Planesdragon (210349) | about 4 years ago | (#33693958)

I mean wouldn't it be cool if it were possible to mute a say trumpet track, and replace it by something else (human voice for example), or the other way around?

No. Mixing a song is a professional art, and wanting to take out of part of it is like taking out one parts of speech from a novel, or removing one color from a painting.

In the instance that someone wants to setup a "mix playground", the end-user medium is NOT the right format. A multilayer data DVD would be a far better choice, although it would be best if targeted to a specific software mixer's format.

Re:multi-track please (3, Interesting)

Rogerborg (306625) | about 4 years ago | (#33694098)

Mixing a song is a professional art

That's what They said about writing operating systems, and yet here I am happily compiling kernel modules for an OS developed largely by enthusiastic amateurs who learned by doing. Take my point?

Re:multi-track please (2, Interesting)

Artifakt (700173) | about 4 years ago | (#33694256)

There was a fellow on Usenet who posted using the nym "Mirror Spock". He took several recordings of Simon and Garfunkel's 'Sounds of Silence', including both separate tape tracks and premixed versions, and remixed from them all somehow or other. it seems that one version, Art Garfunkel was recovering from a cold and they shifted the harmony down a fifth or something like that so he could hit the notes, but like the basic release it had all of Bob Dylan's band including Glen Campbell as the studio musicians. Another version had what several industry pros thought was really the best Art Garfunkel performance, but was never released because there were some problems with the backup performers. Some other sources included bootleg live performance tapes or something like that. Word was that the original performers heard this and loved it even though the studio was annoyed about it all, although I can't prove that part's true. I'd assume this person knew pro recording techniques to get a decent mix from everything, but it sort of proves there are (rare) people who can take 'one speech from a novel' or 'one color from a painting', and put something back in its place, and actually improve it.

Re:multi-track please (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | about 4 years ago | (#33693960)

The trumpet was better than the guy trying to sound like a trumpet.

OTOH some tunes are clearly written for the kazoo.

Re:multi-track please (1)

Farmer Tim (530755) | about 4 years ago | (#33693994)

OTOH some tunes are clearly written for the kazoo.

Indeed [youtube.com] .

Few problem (3, Interesting)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | about 4 years ago | (#33694086)

The minor technical, but a real consideration, is space. Say you have a pretty simple recording, just a jazz quartet. That is a minimum of 5 tracks, one for each instrument2 for the drums (stereo track). In reality if you wanted full control like at the studio, the drums would probably be anywhere between 6 and 15 tracks. This of course only increases with larger ensembles, and with the more fine grained control you want. You could easily have a song that is 32 mono and 32 stereo tracks. That would take 450MB per minute of audio. Storing all the data in a cheap format could be a real issue.

A more major technical problem is all the processing needed. Mixes aren't just a bunch of tracks summed together. They have extensive processing done. While some of it is things done per track, and thus things that could be committed to the tracks on the medium, some of it is things done to the whole song. All of that would have to be done by the playback device. So in addition to heavy mixing hardware, it'd have to have a wide battery of effects that could be called on. OF course various musicians/producers wouldn't like it, because it would limit options. You'd have only the included effects as options and it wouldn't be upgraded.

However the most major is that the industry doesn't want it. They don't want you able to easily remix their music. Such a thing would make it so much easier for someone to use parts of existing material for new uses, and they wouldn't want that, at least not without you contacting them for permission.

Neat idea but never happen.

Re:Few problem (1)

Rinikusu (28164) | about 4 years ago | (#33694284)

/* Such a thing would make it so much easier for someone to use parts of existing material for new uses, and they wouldn't want that, at least not without you contacting them for permission.

Neat idea but never happen. */

Unless your name is Trent Reznor. Like him or hate him, he's got some very interesting ideas regarding the future of music.

Re:multi-track please (2, Funny)

Rod Beauvex (832040) | about 4 years ago | (#33694298)

Fuck no it doesn't need to be easier to remix songs. No one wants to hear the shitty drum beat you added to Tainted Love.

Missing from the summary... (5, Informative)

14erCleaner (745600) | about 4 years ago | (#33693890)

CD sales are still roughly 100 times vinyl album sales; 110 million units for the first half of 2010.

Re:Missing from the summary... (4, Funny)

carlzum (832868) | about 4 years ago | (#33694116)

Don't be such a downer. My 401k dropped from $100,000 to $1, but now it's up to $5. I have to assume it will continue to grow at a 500% rate, so I'm going to retire a millionaire and vinyl will be the dominant music format again.

BSA ads on slashdot? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33693906)

thats it this place truly is dead now.....

Re:BSA ads on slashdot? (1)

MrEricSir (398214) | about 4 years ago | (#33694300)

Slashdot has ads?

Will we see any new record presses made? (2, Interesting)

Y-Crate (540566) | about 4 years ago | (#33693912)

I read an article in the past year or two saying the last one was manufactured in Russia around 1984.

Re:Will we see any new record presses made? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33694008)

millions of indie and electronic singles still get pressed. From a DJ's perspective, the vinyl market has been growing immensely over the past 3-5 years (although it never really died to begin with).

This, of course, sucks since Technics is no longer manufacturing the 1200s in the way that it used it up until a couple years ago, without argument the best turntables ever to grace the planet.

Re:Will we see any new record presses made? (1)

GuruBuckaroo (833982) | about 4 years ago | (#33694214)

The question wasn't about pressing records, it was about building the presses themselves.

And they called me crazy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33693938)

When I bought a used Telefunken lathe... It cost almost as much as the lathe to get a boom truck to lift it up to 3rd floor condo. Got some guff from the association for taking the windows out but the hell with them! Thank God for renovated warehouses and their massive concrete floors!

Next thing you know (1)

twoears (1514043) | about 4 years ago | (#33693942)

Next thing you know they'll be listening to tube equipment. Horrors!

Not exactly smashing numbers... (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | about 4 years ago | (#33693950)

If we say those numbers are for the US, and consider that the US population is on the order of 300 million, that makes for around 1 record sold for every 333 people (or 3 for every 1,000 people). They then roughly tripled these numbers, to around 1 per 110 people, or maybe 10 per 1,000 people.

That still isn't really a ton of albums. I don't really know 110 people personally, so it is not statistically likely that I know someone in this country who bought a new album on vinyl this year.

It's the Chinese (1)

NemoinSpace (1118137) | about 4 years ago | (#33693954)

They must have figured out some secretly horrible use for them we overlooked.

# Must check drywall.

Does this prove that entropy can be reversed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33693990)

No more second law of themodynamics.

Meanwhile, I'll just wait here for the mess on my kitchen floor to tidy itself up.

Just further proves it's piracy (4, Funny)

noidentity (188756) | about 4 years ago | (#33693998)

This just further proves it's piracy as the cause. Every audiophile knows that vinyl records are far higher quality than CDs. Pirates can only make inferior digital recordings of vinyl, so they don't bother. Thus, they are forced to buy the vinyl records. Since we see many-fold increase in vinyl sales, we have a glimpse of what CD sales would be like without piracy. So, vinyl is literally a natural DRM that both protects the artists and ensures superior sound quality. Now, would you like to buy some Monster USB cables? Guaranteed to improve your typing and mouse speed.

Cassette vs. CD (3, Insightful)

Ceiynt (993620) | about 4 years ago | (#33694024)

How did the industery react when cassette sales started to slip and CDs soared? Or when 8-track started to slip and cassette soared? Or, or, what ever came before whatever and the older format started slipping to the new format? Oh no, the old way to buy and listen to music is being replaced by the new was to buy and listen to music. I'm sure in 10-15 years they will be complaining because online sales are slipping to, something. *Gets my tin foil hat ready.*

Re:Cassette vs. CD (2, Funny)

antifoidulus (807088) | about 4 years ago | (#33694048)

are slipping to, something. *Gets my tin foil hat ready.*

Maybe beaming music directly into your tin foil hat?

weird part is my Records seem to last longer (4, Interesting)

grapeape (137008) | about 4 years ago | (#33694028)

I have CD's that i picked up less than 15 years ago that are unplayable, I had heard of laserdisc rot but didnt know it would happen to prerecorded cd's. On the other hand, I have vinyl that belonged to my father that still sounds great. I baby my collection but in a noticeable portion of my collection it seems that simply handling with care didnt matter.

Re:weird part is my Records seem to last longer (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | about 4 years ago | (#33694180)

Did you leave them in a hot car? No one does that with vinyl - plenty of people do that with CDs left in a CD changer.
My first - or at least early - pressing of Brothers in Arms from 1985 is still top notch.

Re:weird part is my Records seem to last longer (1)

gman003 (1693318) | about 4 years ago | (#33694262)

Well, people tend to think of vinyl as "more expensive" than CDs. Thus, they take care with handling them, storing them, whereas CDs just get tossed into the player, left sitting on a table, etc. That, and look at the RPM. A record spins at what, a few dozen RPM? CDs spin at a few thousand, easy. At that speed, even dust is going to do some level of damage.

The reason is? (3, Interesting)

mikeiver1 (1630021) | about 4 years ago | (#33694032)

The reasons are many for this. One reason is that though the CD cost of production has fallen the cost to the consumer has stayed the same or even risen. I for one refuse to pay that much for a CD when the majority of it goes to the record company and not the artist. Considering that DVDs are going for around $5-10 US and the cost of producing a movie is orders of magnitude greater I find the difference in prices hard to fathom. A second reason, Vinyl just plain sounds better most of the time. Save your technical BS for those that have not listened to the same track on both using good equipment. This is fact. SHUT IT! Third, downloaded digital music is fine but the quality sucks and the cost is even higher than that for the CD if you want the whole album/CD. Add in that some DL sites are using DRM and the smart people don't buy. DRM is a pain in the ass and only hurts the larger segment of the populace that just wants to listen to the music they have legally purchased. Very few share with others. Hay assholes, did you ever think that if you were not trying to RAPE the customer at every turn of their heads and sell the content at a reasonable price that more would be willing to pay for it? When the cost is less than the effort to steal the content then you will have a license to print money wholesale. Until then, people will work hard to circumvent any mechanisms you put in place if for nothing more than pure spite.

Re:The reason is? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33694110)

Can I interest you in a couple $200 volume knobs? Real maple!

Re:The reason is? (1)

Falkentyne (760418) | about 4 years ago | (#33694136)

I agree, I paid around $40 to allofmp3.com when it was near the end because it was easy to use and download music in the format I wanted and the music was very reasonably priced. I buy maybe 1 cd a year and tend to not bother with online digital music stores unless i get some sort of discount towards my purchase.

Re:The reason is? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33694208)

I for one refuse to pay that much for a CD when the majority of it goes to the record company and not the artist.

And this is different from vinyl how, exactly? If a company releases both, are there different royalty agreements for CD vs. vinyl?

A second reason, Vinyl just plain sounds better most of the time....This is fact.

No, this is opinion. Please look up fact and opinion in a dictionary. An unqualified "better" is factually meaninless without criteria to back it up.

...downloaded digital music is fine but the quality sucks...

256kbps mp3 is very close to CD quality. On truly top of the line equipment you (and by you, I mean an audiophile, not a ranting idiot) might be able to tell the difference.

...and the cost is even higher than that for the CD if you want the whole album/CD.

[citation needed] eMusic is absolutely cheaper, and Amazon is often cheaper as well.

DRM is a pain in the ass and only hurts the larger segment of the populace that just wants to listen to the music they have legally purchased.

Absolutely, but neither vinyl, nor many eMusic/Amazon downloads, nor cds have it (with the exception of the infamous Sony rootkit), so I'm not sure what you're trying to say.

Hay assholes, did you ever think that if you were not trying to RAPE the customer at every turn of their heads and sell the content at a reasonable price that more would be willing to pay for it? When the cost is less than the effort to steal the content then you will have a license to print money wholesale. Until then, people will work hard to circumvent any mechanisms you put in place if for nothing more than pure spite.

Dude, chill out... Take a walk, have a beer, get laid, watch a sunset.... Until then, please pipe down. You've made one or two reasonable points, but the nasty tone and slipshod logic of your post undermines both you and other, more emotionally stable people

If I were to guess (1)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | about 4 years ago | (#33694258)

It would be hipsters. Retro is "ironically cool" these days. Fixed gear bikes, fedoras, records, all that kind of shit. You will in fact find hipsters that have a large record collection but no record player. Owning the records is the cool part, they don't want to actually bother to use them.

I really doubt DRM is the reason.

In-Car Tunes!!! (1)

helbent (1244274) | about 4 years ago | (#33694120)

Wonderful news!

I just installed the 12-disc record changer in the trunk, which connects to the 8-track head unit!

And it's cool to wear sideburns, boot-cut jeans and long, ratty hair again! What could possibly go wrong?

Best of both worlds (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33694122)

I buy the vast majority of my albums on vinyl, even at a 5 or 10 dollar premium mainly because I love having a permanent physical copy, but the switch to almost a vinyl-only collection was when the record companies got wise to offering a digital download with the record. With the alternative usually being to just pirate it online and get the CD later and transcode, selling a vinyl with a digital download solves all my problems and the band usually gets a great deal more with record sales than CD sales. So it's a no brainer really, along with the other swag that goes along with it.

Coo3k (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33694170)

overly morbid and for 8embership. demise. You doNn't

See what's next: grammophones with an iron stylus! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33694224)

Geeez... so what's the next technological wonder to come??? Grammophone with iron stylus?? What surprises me the most is that many so called 'audiophiles' really believe this ridiculous thing about vynils being better than digital recordings... They believe so strongly in this that the vynil ends up playing better to their ears... It's true... believing is power. I played some vynil when I was a kid and even then they sounded awful. I can't believe they can sound better than a CD even with superior hi-fi components. The funny thing about it is that when the CD first came out audiophiles said that the vynil couldn't even compare to it, and they would go on listing all the phonic properties which made the CD superior. Now the CD has being fully exploited the so called audiophiles have changed their minds... 'sounds' like a fashion thing to me... nothing to take seriously anyway...

Of course... (1)

ameoba (173803) | about 4 years ago | (#33694234)

If you're going to purchase a physical artifact, a record is far more satisfying than a CD. If you just want the music for your MP3 player, why bother ripping it yourself when you can download it (legally or illegally)?

Don't compare sound quality of... (4, Informative)

astro (20275) | about 4 years ago | (#33694236)

...vinyl records to CDs - compare vinyl vs. digital downloads thru i.e. iTunes. I recently mail-ordered Wilderness Heart by Black mountain (as an aside, GREAT record), which came with an immediate digital download of the record. I couldn't wait for the vinyl to arrive because I expected it to sound superior to the high-bitrate mp3s. It does. It's noticeable even to my far-from-audiophile wife.

I'm admittedly a fetishist for packaging - double LPs with great gatefold art, colored / clear / marbled vinyl, large-format insert books, all the way to crazy triple and quadruple LPs with all of the above (i.e. Altar, by Boris and Sunn O))) ).

If I can help it I buy nothing but vinyl now. And yes, I do have a USB turntable so (admittedly quite a bit more labor than with a CD) I can make properly tagged copies for listening to on my iPhone.

Wait for it... (2, Funny)

stealth_finger (1809752) | about 4 years ago | (#33694254)

RIAA claims vinyl killing music industry!
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