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Bing Crosby, Television Sports Preservationist

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the way-before-tivo dept.

Media 148

Hugh Pickens submits news first gleaned from a now-paywalled article at the New York Times (and, happily, widely reported) that "The hunt for a copy of the seventh and deciding game of the 1960 World Series, considered one of the greatest games ever played and long believed to be lost forever, has come to an end in the home of Bing Crosby, a canny preservationist of his own legacy, who kept a half-century's worth of records, tapes and films in the wine cellar turned vault in his Hillsborough, California home. Crosby loved baseball, but as a part owner of the Pittsburgh Pirates he was too nervous to watch the Series against the Yankees, so he and his wife went to Paris, where they listened by radio. Crosby knew he would want to watch the game later — if his Pirates won — so he hired a company to record Game 7 by kinescope, an early relative of the DVR, filming off a television monitor. The five-reel set, found in December in Crosby's home, is the only known complete copy of the game, in which Pirates second baseman Bill Mazeroski hit a game-ending home run to beat the Yankees, 10-9."

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Now, (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33694678)

Get him for piracy...

Damn screen-cap (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694848)

I just hope the guy stood still and no-one got up for candy.

Re:Now, (5, Informative)

camperslo (704715) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695040)

Bing Crosby deserves recognition for his place in history as the investor that stepped in with a $50,000 investment in Ampex Corporation [wikipedia.org] for development of the reel to reel tape recorder. Ampex was a small company with six employees prior to that. During WWII Germany developed wire recorders with improved quality as a result of a high frequency (above audio range) signal added to the record current. That overcame non-linear magnetic behavior greatly reducing distortion.
Ampex used the same A.C. bias current technique with magnetic tape, and Bing Crosby was a major influence in the quick adoption by broadcasters.

Re:Now, (2, Interesting)

rxmd (205533) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695432)

Bing Crosby deserves recognition for his place in history as the investor that stepped in with a $50,000 investment in Ampex Corporation [wikipedia.org] for development of the reel to reel tape recorder. Ampex was a small company with six employees prior to that. During WWII Germany developed wire recorders with improved quality as a result of a high frequency (above audio range) signal added to the record current. That overcame non-linear magnetic behavior greatly reducing distortion.
Ampex used the same A.C. bias current technique with magnetic tape, and Bing Crosby was a major influence in the quick adoption by broadcasters.

Actually the Germans had been using magnetic tape recorders since about 1935. The AC bias technique you mentioned was developed for the AEG Magnetophon [wikipedia.org] , which was a series of tape recorders, not wire recorders.

Towards 1943 or so it was pretty much a high-end system, with stereo and everything. There are a few surviving recordings that were later reissued in LP and CD form.

Re:Now, (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33695894)

So, what you're saying is, not only was he pirating televised baseball games without the expressed written consent of Major League Baseball, he was sponsoring the creation of piracy-enabling recording technology too?

He's lucky he's not around anymore, or the FBI/MPAA copyright police would be roasting his chestnuts on an open fire.

He got sued by the *IAA. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33694684)

As soon as it was found, lawyers pounced on his estate and slapped him with a suit.

Crosby's estate is screwed (4, Funny)

eln (21727) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694690)

As soon as they figure out that this recording was made without the express written consent of Major League Baseball, Crosby's estate is going to be totally hosed.

Re:Crosby's estate is screwed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33694720)

He was a part owner, he wrote himself a permission slip.

Re:Crosby's estate is screwed (4, Interesting)

yotto (590067) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695596)

You joke (and it's funny) but when it comes down to it, piracy preserved this game.

The irony is, now that they've got it back they'll probably sell it on DRM'd blu-rays.

Re:Crosby's estate is screwed (1)

Urkki (668283) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695832)

You joke (and it's funny) but when it comes down to it, piracy preserved this game.

It was for personal use, and I'm sure it was covered by "fair use" even back then.

Naturally this means, that the game is not really preserved until a permission is gained for use or distribution of the material... Until then, any act of preservation not covered by fair use is piracy of course, traditionally an offense punishable by immediate hanging without a trial.

Re:Crosby's estate is screwed (2, Funny)

CrashandDie (1114135) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695702)

Crosby would be proud. 33 years after his death, he's finally made the Pirate team.

@timothy (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33694694)

unfortunately, I just had an enema, so I can't give a shit

I can say as a modern Pirates fan (1)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694696)

I am so worried about ALL their games that I don't watch, it's just too painful :P

Re:I can say as a modern Pirates fan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33694966)

My favourite team is Razor 1911. What's yours?

Bing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33694698)

Am I the only one who was confused by the title?

Re:Bing (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695228)

You should just bing bing crosby [bing.com] .

Any World Series where ther Yankees lose (5, Insightful)

winkydink (650484) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694702)

is one of the all time great World Series.

Re:Any World Series where ther Yankees lose (4, Insightful)

PFritz21 (766949) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694812)

Better yet, a World Series where they don't even appear.

Exhibit A: 1991. Minnesota Twins and Atlanta Braves. Five one-run games, three that went to extra innings, including the crown jewels: Game 6, single-handedly won by Hall of Fame Twins center fielder Kirby Puckett, with his leaping catch against the left-center Plexiglas to rob Ron Gant of an extra-base hit and a game-winning home run on a 2-1 changeup from Charlie Leibrandt in the bottom of the 11th. Game 7, a masterful ten-inning shutout pitching performance by Jack Morris, and a game-winning single by pinch hitter Gene Larkin with the bases loaded. I've got both games on VHS. Some say THE greatest World Series ever, and I agree (disclaimer: I am a Minnesota Twins fan). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1991_World_Series [wikipedia.org]

The defense rests.

Re:Any World Series where ther Yankees lose (1)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695062)

I was going to school in Minnesota for that series, it was insane on campus.

Re:Any World Series where ther Yankees lose (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33695070)

I still have to explain to people that CLEARLY Ron Gant fell off the base from his own momentum when Hrbek put the tag on in game 2, 20 years later. It is clear as day but my friends from the South East didn't see it that way, biased fans are the worst.

Re:Any World Series where ther Yankees lose (2, Insightful)

CRC'99 (96526) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695528)

I've never understood why its a World Series when it is only ever featuring American teams... On the same level as Miss Universe etc...

Interestingly, the only examples I can think of where things are grossly exaggerated have their roots in America. High School education fail?

Re:Any World Series where ther Yankees lose (3, Informative)

pedantic bore (740196) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695684)

Despite rumors to the contrary, Toronto is not part of the USA, and they have some sort of baseball team there [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Any World Series where ther Yankees lose (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33695866)

I believe - but can't be bothered to check - that it was named after a newspaper.

The Fall Classic and 2" quad (4, Interesting)

schmidt349 (690948) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694726)

1960 was a classic Series. It's right up there with 1955-6, 1986, 1996, and 2001 on my list for the all-time best.

It's amazing to realize how different program preservation policy was in the prime of 2" Ampex quad videotape. So much of historic significance has been lost -- and not just Doctor Who and the moon landings, either. British TV before 1978 is a Swiss cheese. American programming suffered as well -- there are huge chunks of The Tonight Show that just plain don't exist anymore. For a long time, possibly the greatest baseball game of all time (1956 WS game 5) was thought to be gone forever.

What with Google pushing something like 20 PB of data every day it kind of makes you wonder what's being done to ensure the long-term survival of the digital patrimony. I mean, I don't particularly give a damn whether the wingnuts' blogs and every video of a dog pooping on a baby makes it to the 22nd century, but isn't there some stuff worth saving? Who's taking that responsibility?

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33694730)

archive.org

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33694912)

they are the archivist of the net
archive.org please take à look

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (1)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694772)

Don't forget, 89, Gibson's limping 3-run homerun.

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (1)

PFritz21 (766949) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694822)

That was '88. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1988_World_Series [wikipedia.org]

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (2, Funny)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694882)

Get off my lawn.

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (1)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695080)

I liked '87 4-3 Twins, home team won every game.

We had a farm and two of the farm hands were big Twins fans, no FM out there and AM would cut out at night, so I'd give the score updates to them over the fixed frequency simplex base station the farm had (we had a 50 foot tower so about 30 mile range)

As noted, it was 88. (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695012)

Also, 2002 called with Scott Spezio's home run in Game 6.

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (3, Interesting)

grapeape (137008) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694808)

I grew up a few houses away from Smokey Burgess, he used to tell all kinds of baseball stories but the 60 series was definitely something that meant more to him than anything else in his career. I've been thinking about him all day now, when I was a kid I didn't really appreciate and I guess took for granted his taking time to talk to we neighborhood kids. I just wish I could have known him when I was an adult rather than a snot nosed kid who half paid attention, still I heard so much about it I feel like I was a witness to the series...but it would be great to really see it.

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33695400)

Omg, I had to read through half the comments, to find out the game everyone was talking about is baseball.

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (1)

houghi (78078) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694820)

What is it with people wanting to keep everything? People seem to be almost obsessed to register everything and I am seriously curious why. (and why I am not interested in doing it.)

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (4, Interesting)

schmidt349 (690948) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694884)

Well, bear me out, I have a pretty interesting perspective on this. I'm a classical philologist, which means my job is to read and ponder texts written in Greek and Latin between the 8th century BCE and the fourth century CE. The difference between what was actually written and what's come down to us is colossal. A lot of people have heard of the Iliad and the Odyssey -- but most don't know names like the Cypria and the Margites, epics also thought in antiquity to have been created by Homer (whoever or whatever he was). Sophocles may have written more than a hundred plays in his career; we're incredibly lucky to have seven. Sure, some of these selections were made on the basis of quality, but I sure wish that I had been the arbiter of "quality" rather than some asshole monk sitting in a cloister in 10th century Greece looking to crib lines for a passion play.

It may be impossible, but we should try to convey as much of our data to our posterity as we can. Folks in my line of work have a long list of texts that they would quite literally give an arm and a leg to get back. Let's not leave our descendants with the same sense of loss.

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (2, Funny)

TheLink (130905) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694894)

Let's not leave our descendants with the same sense of loss.

Easy, just lose all the records of the loss as well ;).

There's often lots of data loss but the records of data loss are also lost (or not recorded in the first place)...

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (1)

Reziac (43301) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695064)

That's a good point -- often we don't know what was lost. Which means we don't even know to look for it. Sucks that the ancients abandoned the durability of stone tablets and switched all their data onto ephemeral media like vellum and papyrus.

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (1)

Arthur Grumbine (1086397) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695828)

There's often lots of data loss but the records of data loss are also lost (or not recorded in the first place)...

[citation needed]

:-P

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (1)

elwinc (663074) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694906)

Actually, the Iliad and the Odyssey were not authored by Homer. The true author was another blind bard of the same name... (:-)

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33694922)

Euripides' Andromeda, Telephos, Phaethon, and Bellerophon. Just enough left to piss you off that there isn't more.

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (1)

schmidt349 (690948) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694932)

The most painful loss can be summed up in just two words: Ovid's Medea.

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (1)

DrNASA (849379) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695048)

There - fixed that for ya - Tyler Perry's Medea
Greek goddess goes to jail ya'll

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (1)

damienl451 (841528) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695698)

At the risk of sounding like a philistine, I wonder to what extent this loss is "painful". What exactly would have changed for 99.999999% of people if Ovid's Medea had not been lost? If you lose historical works, it does actually have an impact as it limits our understanding of the past and can distort our view of history. But is it such a big deal to lose a work of fiction?

How many people today have read Ovid's works that are still extant of their own volition? How many people go to a bookshop and say "I so want to read the Metamorphoses!"?

There are already much more works of fiction than could ever be read in a lifetime. I'm not convinced that one more ancient book gathering dust on a shelf would be such a great improvement. Not to say that *some* people would not be happy to read it, but it's really a marginal phenomenon. To me, the loss of Medea is on par with, say, losing an episode of a popular TV show. Maybe the world would be a marginally better place with it, but it's really no big deal.

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (1)

Reziac (43301) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695104)

...the Library at Alexandria...

And that's merely one we KNOW about. As someone else implies, who knows what else was lost that we don't even know ever existed??

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (1)

houghi (78078) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695234)

As someone else implies, who knows what else was lost that we don't even know ever existed??

Do we miss it?

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (1)

Reziac (43301) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695408)

If you're born blind, do you miss sight?

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (1)

KingAlanI (1270538) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695256)

That was my first thought - so much ancient literature burned in the Great Library.
Guessing that helps explain the relative paucity of source son Socrates, amongst other things.

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (1)

Reziac (43301) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695428)

And when you only have "selected sources" (those few that survived) it limits your perspective, as well as your objective knowledge.

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (1)

Polo (30659) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695242)

People preserve what they have a personal attachment to.

From my seat here in the future, I found this video of San Francisco *super* fascinating:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nHqpHf_Znzs [youtube.com]

But people living in the past tend to preserve things like this:
http://www.google.com/images?q=old+family+photos [google.com]

So, in the future, 99% of what we'll have preserved from the past is people's photos of their kids, and only by chance will we find "important" stuff.

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (1)

adolf (21054) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695610)

It may be impossible, but we should try to convey as much of our data to our posterity as we can.

That's a nice sentiment and all, but as someone who is completely bored with ancient history simply due to its veracity and unbelievable nature, I guess I don't really care.

I see ancient texts as ancient, unverifiable fiction. And fiction, while it often has a basis in reality and is sometimes a great, insight-filled pleasure to read, is still fiction. And I, myself, am mostly bored with fiction.

So, presume for a moment that we can, from this point onward, forever record all data (or damn near [archive.org] ). Who will read it? Who will sort out the sordid fiction from the genuine truths? No one man can do so by himself, if his own lifespan is finite.

I mean, honestly: Is it important for this very comment to be preserved? Will the works of adolf, #21054 [slashdot.org] some millennia from now, actually be useful or thought-provoking? I've got a big enough ego to say that I'd certainly hope that folks will study my written banter forever, but I'm enough of a realist to recognize that this simply won't occur.

So, then: Who's banter will be preserved and studied, instead?

I propose that it's impossible to predict what information will be deemed important or truthful ages from now. And that preserving all data instead of just some portion thereof really does does help any. I further propose that whatever we think is important or factual, today, may well be fictitious in a few thousand years. And that some legitimate fictions, as presented today, will be regarded as facts later.

"Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" (George Santayana) is a lovely catchphrase, but it assumes accuracy in the remembrance.

I prefer the following:

"Give any one species too much rope, and they'll fuck it up." (Roger Waters), which makes no such assumption.

Good question: why do they want to keep copyright (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33695496)

Good question: why do they want to keep copyright for so long on everything? It makes no sense, it's not as if they're going to make money off something they don't have any copies any more is it? And even if they still do have copies, if they're not selling, they're still not going to make any money off it, so why do people want to keep copyright on everything forever?

As the captca says "Absurd".

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33694846)

Don't worry, the NSA is saving their copy.

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33694898)

It's a stupid baseball game, a game played by children with sticks. Grow up.

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (1)

pgmrdlm (1642279) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695022)

What, you trying to prove your a real geek and don't like any sports? Bet your in the minority here. But wait, the NAACP will protect you.

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33695516)

Real geeks think that 'World' series should include more than 1 of 194 countries.

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (2, Funny)

pugugly (152978) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695150)

I'm not a sports fan myself, but in the interests of fairness my main objection is the ego's of sportsfans.

I'll forgive them when they get to see "Because of the extended Sci Fi Marathon going into triple overtime, we are now joining Super Bowl 56, already in progress . . . 'And it's 4th and ten!!!'"

{G} - Pug

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33695292)

I mean, I don't particularly give a damn whether the wingnuts' blogs and every video of a dog pooping on a baby makes it to the 22nd century, but isn't there some stuff worth saving? Who's taking that responsibility?

Um, Bing Crosby?

Re:The Fall Classic and 2" quad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33695738)

Don't want to rain on your parade, but could it be these games have acquired mythical qualities because no-one has been able to see they're as boring as any other cricket game?

Keep it preserved as a torrent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33694734)

Upload a copy of the recording as a torrent, share with anyone who wants a copy, keep the torrent alive and the copy will not be lost again.

The upside to letting people copy media (3, Interesting)

dmadzak (997352) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694754)

Just think about all the culture that would still be available to us today, if the technology to copy was wider spread and available when TV first appeared. We would have a complete collection of all the old Dr. Who episodes.

Re:The upside to letting people copy media (2, Funny)

eyebum (952909) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694840)

Sure...except nobody's SEEDING. frickin' leechers.

Re:The upside to letting people copy media (4, Funny)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694864)

Just think about all the culture that would still be available to us today, if the technology to copy was wider spread and available when TV first appeared. We would have a complete collection of all the old Dr. Who episodes.

And hopefully some positive effects, too!

Re:The upside to letting people copy media (4, Interesting)

westlake (615356) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695166)

Just think about all the culture that would still be available to us today, if the technology to copy was wider spread and available when TV first appeared. We would have a complete collection of all the old Dr. Who episodes.

Some 280 rolls of film survive of Berlin television broadcasts ca. 1934-1944.

The kinescope was in broad commercial use in the states in 1947.

NBC, CBS, and DuMont set up their main kinescope recording facilities in New York City, while ABC chose Chicago. By 1951, NBC and CBS were each shipping out some 1,000 16mm kinescope prints each week to their affiliates across the United States, and by 1955 that number had increased to 2,500 per week for CBS. By 1954 the television industry's film consumption surpassed that of all of the Hollywood studios combined. Kinescope [wikipedia.org]

Network kinescopes were often 35mm and can be of strikingly good quality.

It has even become possible to recover the chroma - color - signal - that was occasionally recorded on the B/W kinescope of a color production.

The problem was never the technology. The technology was always there. What was lacking was the desire, the will, the commitment and the money to maintain an archive.

 

Re:The upside to letting people copy media (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695310)

We would have a complete collection of all the old Dr. Who episodes.

That would be sweet. The older episodes are basically slide shows of production stills with poor quality audio dubbed over it. Where there is video, it is of very poor quality. Sadly, there are many episodes which are lost forever, unless they turn up in a collection like this.

are you ready for 2012? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33694768)

the sun is shining, it will shine even brighter,
where is the super intelligent barclay of our day,
to stave off our planet,
I don't care for the ravings,
of wheelchair bound robot sounding people,
bring us someone with solutions,
it is true, there is only one,
Jesus Christ
Amen

He could sing (4, Interesting)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694780)

Man, I love those old Crosby recordings, like "I Remember Dear" and "Moonlight Becomes You". And the "Road to..." pictures he did with Hope were some of the funniest, hippest movies of the era (especially "Road to Bali"). But as as person, he was a piece of shit. Worse as he got older.

That he saved some old recordings doesn't make him a pioneer of media preservationism as much as someone who wanted to have what other people couldn't have.

A "preservationist" is someone like Martin Scorsese who has worked tirelessly to make sure old celluloid films aren't lost. He's doing it to make sure others can get the kind of exposure to the history of our culture as shown in cinema.

When I was growing up, the local TV station, WGN-TV, had an amazing library of films and played at least two of them every day. There would be one a 9am and another after the evening news. Sometimes another after midnight. Everything from film noir to Busby Berkeley to Fellini (both dubbed and subbed). Howard Hawks, King Vidor, Walter Huston, Welles, Michael Powell, Billy Wilder, the Marx Bros, Kurosawa, Vittorio Di Sica. Even modern masterpieces like "Joe" or "Little Murders". Everything. Sometime in the early '80s, there must have been some change in the way they were licensed or something because those movies were replaced by back-to-back episodes of some lame TV show like Dallas or even worse. I got a remarkable education in cinema just from my local TV station. Now that's all gone. The cable stations that are dedicated to "classic" films aren't nearly so eclectic or comprehensive. When they went to commercial, the bumper music they used was "Take Five" by Dave Brubeck. Whenever I hear that song today all those images flood into my mind's eye. I'll always associate that 5/4 melody with the excitement of being exposed to another nugget of cinema greatness, curled up in a comfy chair in my parents' basement, watching an old Sylvania console TV.

When I was in college, I had campus job in the film school's archive. It was always slow, so I could project 16mm versions of foreign and avant-garde films, such as the work of Kenneth Anger, Michael Snow, Maya Deren, Bunuel, and my favorite Joseph Cornell (if you ever get a chance, see the film "Rose Hobard" actually projected on a screen. It's a mind-bender.

Sometimes I wonder about some young kid out there using the Internet to search out these films and to be exposed to cinema in the way I did, without effort, almost accidentally. With luck, Scorsese's foundation got to these works before the masters disintegrated beyond saving.

Re:He could sing (2, Informative)

e9th (652576) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694954)

A "preservationist" is someone like Martin Scorsese who has worked tirelessly to make sure old celluloid films aren't lost. He's doing it to make sure others can get the kind of exposure to the history of our culture as shown in cinema.

Thanks for mentioning Scorsese. Besides working to preserve old films through his Film Foundation [film-foundation.org] and as the DGA representative to the National Film Preservation Board [loc.gov] ), he has spoken eloquently and often on such evils as "pan-and-scan" and time compression, and how profoundly they can alter a director's work. I have great respect for that man.

Re:He could sing (1)

DrEasy (559739) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695202)

There's also Langlois' work at the Cinematheque in Paris. He started collecting and preserving reels even earlier than Scorsese.

Re:He could sing (2, Interesting)

unitron (5733) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695086)

That he saved some old recordings doesn't make him a pioneer of media preservationism...

Actually it was more his desire to be able to record his shows, first radio on audio tape, and later his television shows on videotape, instead of having to do them live that got him the pioneer status. That, and putting the cost of several average homes into Ampex in the early days.

WGN was on cable down here by the early '80s, so I remember those morning movies. The change of format may have been due to Ted Turner buying up the MGM library.

As for his singing, it was the epitome of being mellow but never bland, and perhaps only Dean Martin had him beat at being relaxed in a supremely self-confident way.

Bing Crosby jump-started Ampex (2, Interesting)

Animats (122034) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695116)

A "preservationist" is someone like Martin Scorsese who has worked tirelessly to make sure old celluloid films aren't lost.

Crosby was a major figure in the early days of magnetic tape recording. He wanted better audio for his Bing Crosby show, and used some early tape recorders [mixonline.com] based on the German Magnetophon. The engineers involved with the early recorders started Ampex, Crosby put in $50,000, and pro audio rapidly moved to tape. The Bing Crosby Show was the first show to be edited before broadcast, which tightened up the pacing and made it a hit show.

Ampex later went on to build the first videotape recorder in 1950, which was simply called "Crosby Video".

So Crosby definitely had a major role in the preservation of audio and video.

ESPN Classic (1)

grapeape (137008) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694784)

So how long till its repeated weekly on ESPN Classic? I usually dont understand the appeal of watching old sports but the idea of seeing something before my time and before the era of recording and highlight reels is intriguing.

Huh... (1)

sweffymo (1760622) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694786)

Saw this on the front page today... First time I got news before most other people in a newspaper instead of online... :-P

Alert! (5, Funny)

JustOK (667959) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694796)

Couldn't we have had a spoiler alert?

As the years going by - Bing the Singer (2, Insightful)

gadlaw (562280) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694798)

That's certainly a sad state of affairs when kids thing of Bing and they think of a search engine. Bing Crosby one of the greatest singers of all time playing second to a search engine. A nice Bing Crosby story out of the blue and a bit of sports history recovered. Reminds me of the recent discovery of the lost footage of Metropolis. Treasures are still out there it's nice to know.

Re:As the years going by - Bing the Singer (1)

harley78 (746436) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695300)

Is that really the case? What's your evidence that kids think of MS bing before Bing Crosby? The Storm/bing won the wnba champ...no one calls them "the bing" around here... This part of your post is pointless: "That's certainly a sad state of affairs when kids thing of Bing and they think of a search engine. Bing Crosby one of the greatest singers of all time playing second to a search engine."

Re:As the years going by - Bing the Singer (1)

harley78 (746436) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695316)

To cover my ....bases.... bing will never eclipse Bing Crosby. Just like every other non-OS product by MS, bing will fail.

Re:As the years going by - Bing the Singer (1)

JimmytheGeek (180805) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695452)

Huh. People think of a search engine when they hear the word 'bing' ? Why? What search engine? /googles

Huh. /shrugs

Re:As the years going by - Bing the Singer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33695540)

I thought bing was what the phonetically-challenged wore around there neck?
Seriously, though, if this is a great tale of Pirates, there's really only one website worthy of giving it to the world. [thepiratebay.org]

Re:As the years going by - Bing the Singer (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33695848)

Yes, we should retire the word "Bing" from the English language unless it's in relation to Bing Crosby.

[/sarc]

You're a fucking troll.

News for Nerds? Stuff that Matters? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33694834)

We are supposed to give a shit about some dumb jocks who were paid extraordinary sums of money for whacking a ball with a stick?

50 years ago?

Really, slashdot?

Really?

Re:News for Nerds? Stuff that Matters? (1)

The Second Horseman (121958) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694860)

In 1960 they weren't getting paid extraordinary sums. Well, but no extraordinary. In 2002 dollars, it would be equivalent to $100,000 a year on average, with a team franchise value of a bit under $34 million, again, in 2002 adjusted dollars.

In 2001, the average was over $2 million, and the average franchise value was about $289 million.

http://eh.net/encyclopedia/article/haupert.mlb [eh.net]

Re:News for Nerds? Stuff that Matters? (2, Insightful)

jamesh (87723) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694938)

It doesn't really matter what a dick like you might think about it, it's something worth preserving because a lot of people at the time cared about it.

And it's news for nerds because it's amazing that a copy exists at all.

Re:News for Nerds? Stuff that Matters? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33694956)

It's amazing?

So if long-lost footage of Mike Smith of Omaha, Nebraska jerking off and drinking Schlitz in his basement suddenly resurfaces, by your logic, that would also be slashdot worthy?

Slashdot is the proper forum for random people finding shit they thought was lost?

Really?

Re:News for Nerds? Stuff that Matters? (3, Insightful)

jamesh (87723) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694996)

It's amazing?

So if long-lost footage of Mike Smith of Omaha, Nebraska jerking off and drinking Schlitz in his basement suddenly resurfaces, by your logic, that would also be slashdot worthy?

Your interest in such an event doesn't constitute a lot of people caring about it, so no.

Slashdot is the proper forum for random people finding shit they thought was lost?

Really?

Bing Crosby is hardly a random person. And a sports event that a lot of people cared about is hardly 'shit'. They way he recorded it is also rather novel.

Re:News for Nerds? Stuff that Matters? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33695036)

To bad you couldn't get fucking lost. Permanently.

Re:News for Nerds? Stuff that Matters? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33695158)

Whatever it takes to justify wasting your life away watching neanderthals hit spheres with a stick.

What the fuck are you knuckle-draggers doing on this site anyway? Shouldn't you be out shotgunning bud light at a frat party or slapping each other on the ass?

This site is for people who contribute to the advancement of modern society, not people who spend their entire adult lives reminiscing on high school while they bag my fucking groceries.

God, I hate jocks.

Re:News for Nerds? Stuff that Matters? (1)

JrGrouch0 (778235) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695152)

Wait, the Mike Smith of Omaha, NE? I thought that footage was lost for the ages.

Re:News for Nerds? Stuff that Matters? (1)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695094)

They weren't paid alot of money back then, and of all the sports, the statistics involved in Baseball make it the geekiest.

hii (0, Offtopic)

claudia25 (1908566) | more than 3 years ago | (#33694888)

American programming suffered as well -- there are huge chunks of The Tonight Show that just plain don't exist anymore. For a long time, possibly the greatest baseball game of all time (1956 WS game 5) was thought to be gone forever. Nice post.this is my first time i visit here. http://www.worldpixelmile.com/ [worldpixelmile.com]

Arrrggghh....me croooning matey (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33695032)

so - the Pirates were pirated?
Although - technically since he was the owner of the content - he shouldn't receive a take down notice - those bastard lawyers would trudge down to hell to bleed money out of him - but Bing is clearly in the sunny place so they won't be able to get to him -

The rich are very different from you and I... (3, Insightful)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695124)

He was too nervous to watch the game - so he took a trip to Paris? Must be nice to have that kind of disposable income...

As a side note - although Fitzgerald originally wrote the line I used as the subject of this post, I always remember Hemingway's adaptation instead: "The rich are very different from you and I." "Yes - they have more money."

Re:The rich are very different from you and I... (1)

Ubergrendle (531719) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695212)

Bing Crosby was a movie star and the world's biggest recording artist. Its like saying Michael Jackson made small Brad Pitt $s on the side via his movie career. He was very wealthy relative to the rest of the population.

Re:The rich are very different from you and I... (1)

zmollusc (763634) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695582)

Weird. I have not the slightest interest in american football, but I would certainly choose to watch the new york red mets v ohio dolphins or whatever rather than have to go to paris.

article not paywalled (3, Informative)

matsuva (1042924) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695126)

The article is not paywalled, you just have to register to read it.

Re:article not paywalled (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33695500)

yeah, people get mental about having to register, especially with the NY Times for some reason. they'll spew their IP address all over the internet in a bukkake-like fashion, but OH NOES!!!! i canna get a fake email address and spend half a minute to register a bogus ID for the fucking new york times.

Responsible for technology (1)

Casandro (751346) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695178)

He's also responsible for getting the recording technology in the US up to international standards, even experimentation with early video tape recording.

Copyright implications (5, Insightful)

kanweg (771128) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695192)

I think it is relevant because it is an example of the usefulness of recording by the public as part of the deal between a creator and society. A copyright holder has the right to stop anyone from using the material for a (ridiculous long) period of time. The reward for society of giving a copyright holder this power, is that in the end the work enters the public domain. What you see here, is that the copyright holder got his end of the bargain from society (it is not relevant whether he actually ever sued over it; he had the right to), society doesn't get anything once the copyright holder loses interest (or trashes the recording).

People should make a mental note of this when it comes to arguing the duration of copyright, and also when it comes to DRM. I don't think that copyright should apply to DRM material because there obviously is no guarantee that the work could end up in the public domain. More likely the DRM technique used is likely to be abandoned before the copyright expires.

Bert
Who refuses to buy anything Blue-ray because of this.

If anyone is interested ... (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 3 years ago | (#33695286)

... I have archived the 2004 Superbowl halftime show video.

Bummer for Bing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33695488)

Bummer for Bing. He can't let anyone else copy it without being a pirate and, if his timing is off, he's in breech of copyright law (if the home recording act came in later) already.

And if someone DOES want to make copies, they'll have to track down the copyright owners (ALL of them) and, in current clime, get the agreement of ALL of them (even the dead ones or the ones that cannot be found) to have the copies made.

And pay through the nose for them (Despite the copyright owners not making a cent, if someone ELSE does, they're a PIRATE!!!!).

If I was him, I'd delete it now and apologise before the police kick down his door.

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