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Simple (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33699542)

You get a built-in tool that makes it easier to masturbate.

Re:Simple (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699560)

A third hand? Sweet!

Re:Simple (2, Funny)

c6gunner (950153) | more than 3 years ago | (#33701382)

If you needed three hands to masturbate .... you wouldn't need to masturbate!

Re:Simple (2, Funny)

Ssherby (1429933) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699986)

"What happens if you put your hand in the beam of the Large Hadron Collider?"

You become famous for about 2.48154 nano seconds as the origin of the end of the universe.

Re:Simple (1)

BrokenHalo (565198) | more than 3 years ago | (#33701106)

Funny, it looks like the sort of thing the Mythbusters would be into. I'm sort of surprised those physicists hadn't really thought about the effect on the human body - in a way, it's actually more interesting than the real purpose of the collider.

Re:Simple (1)

shadowbearer (554144) | more than 3 years ago | (#33701136)

... earn yourself a permanent spot in the Darwin Awards category, right alongside people who lay down in front of 100+ car trains, people who put their hands in front of oxy-acetylene torches (just to see if it hurts, y'know) and many of the other idiots out there.

  Next question... why is this even a question? There are two types of people, dead extremist masochists, and the rest of us...

  SB

Re:Simple (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33700030)

Like this? [subgenius.com]

Re:Simple (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700166)

Like this?

Christine O'Donnell clicked that link and now she's catatonic.

I hope you're happy now, you...you...animal.

Anyway, Granny Cuyler says Jesus is actually quite a bit thicker at the base. If you were the Son of God, wouldn't you be?

NSFW link in parent post! (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700764)

Getting caught looking at it will absolutely get you a one-way ticket out the front door, even if your boss isn't a Christian.

Re:NSFW link in parent post! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33700890)

And we should be browsing /. at work because...?

Re:NSFW link in parent post! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33701392)

Because I spend a lot of time thinking about work-related issues while I'm relaxing at home. You don't want to drop a Chinese wall between work and leisure time in my case, or you will lose about 75% of my (considerable) productivity.

Simple enough?

Don't know about the hand (0)

santax (1541065) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699572)

But when I put my bottom in front of it I ended up with a huge black hole.

Re:Don't know about the hand (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33699620)

You sure that wasn't the n_gger cock you accepted last night? Don't cry, the word is "nagger".

Sounds like a job for the Mythbusters (4, Funny)

John Jorsett (171560) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699576)

They'd just stick a pig foot in there.

Re:Sounds like a job for the Mythbusters (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33699956)

Agreed. Send Jamie and Adam over tomorrow and we'll have this figured out by next months episode.

Re:Sounds like a job for the Mythbusters (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700770)

Just don't let Tori ride his bike in there 8-(

Re:Sounds like a job for the Mythbusters (2, Funny)

slider2800 (1058930) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700782)

Prolly not such a good idea.
They'd blow the whole thing up in the end.

Already happened before (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33699580)

"So it was in 1978 that when the proton beam entered Anatoli Bugorski's skull it measured about 200,000 rads, and when it exited, having collided with the inside of his head, it weighed in at about 300,000 rads. Bugorski, a 36-year-old researcher at the Institute for High Energy Physics in Protvino, was checking a piece of accelerator equipment that had malfunctioned - as had, apparently, the several safety mechanisms. Leaning over the piece of equipment, Bugorski stuck his head in the space through which the beam passes on its way from one part of the accelerator tube to the next and saw a flash brighter than a thousand suns. He felt no pain.

http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/5.12/science.html [wired.com]

Re:Already happened before (2, Informative)

wisnoskij (1206448) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699852)

That quote makes it sound like he died.
Apparently he lived with no major disabilities.
it sounded like he was just very ungly afterwards and had seizors, but retained similar mental capabilities.

Re:Already happened before (2, Informative)

durrr (1316311) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699902)

Apparently he's still alive, atleast wikipedia doesn't state he have died of any causes.

Re:Already happened before (1)

Klinky (636952) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700536)

Nor does the actual article that was linked!

Re:Already happened before (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33699866)

Did he get any super powers?

Re:Already happened before (4, Funny)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700212)

Did he get any super powers?

Yes, but in a different dimension.

But it's a pretty lousy superpower. I understand that he can now guess anyone's weight just by talking to them on the phone.

That's my worst nightmare: I get a superpower, but it's something completely lame and useless, even for picking up chicks.

"After his mishap with the LHC, he was able to perform extreme card tricks!"

That would be my luck.

Re:Already happened before (1)

twidarkling (1537077) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700690)

Hey, extreme card tricks can pick up chicks. After all, girls love a guy good with his hands.

Re:Already happened before (1)

gijoel (628142) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700790)

Why does everyone hate Gambit?

Re:Already happened before (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33700862)

"After his mishap with the LHC, he was able to perform extreme card tricks!"

An extreme card trick sounds as something dirty and surely illegal in Britain.

Re:Already happened before (1)

Brad1138 (590148) | more than 3 years ago | (#33701056)

That's my worst nightmare: I get a superpower, but it's something completely lame and useless, even for picking up chicks.

Maybe you would end up with the super amazing ability to grow your fingernails.

Re:Already happened before (1)

Chris Snook (872473) | more than 3 years ago | (#33701090)

No superpower is useless for picking up chicks.

Re:Already happened before (1)

Velorium (1068080) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699886)

You missed the part about his brain deteriorating. Cool article.

Re:Already happened before (5, Insightful)

bcmm (768152) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699894)

(though we don't know of anyone else who has been exposed to radiation in the form of a proton beam moving at about the speed of sound) [My emphasis]

This was where I stopped reading and just read Anatoli Bugorski [wikipedia.org] 's Wikipedia article instead.

Re:Already happened before (0)

Annymouse Cowherd (1037080) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700156)

Protons don't move at the speed of light.

Re:Already happened before (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33700454)

Well, technically, they could, or get very close.

But they're not required to do so, like photons.

Re:Already happened before (2, Insightful)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700498)

The protons in an accelerator move a hell of a lot closer to the speed of light than they do to the speed of sound (in any imaginable substance).

Re:Already happened before (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33700920)

There's an argument that the speed of sound in this case can be slightly closer to the speed of light than the protons themselves. Slightly slower too, but we'll save that one.

Consider this: sound can be propagating in a bullet in the direction the bullet is traveling, thus moving slightly faster than a bullet.

Protons in a beam constitute a material. They interact with each other over significant distance due to their positive charge. Start a ripple in the back of the stream and it will propagate forward. For all intents and purposes, that's sound. Now you have a sound wave propagating forward in a stream of protons traveling near the speed of light. What's its speed? Use the same reference you used to measure the protons and you get a speed greater than the protons (i.e. closer to the speed of light).

Re:Already happened before (4, Insightful)

atomicthumbs (824207) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700446)

When I wrote that Wikipedia article, I used the Wired article as a source. Other people added more. Decide for yourself.

Re:Already happened before (1)

ldj (726828) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700974)

Heh. Reminds me of a late-'80s story in one of the Seattle newspapers, reporting on plans to use an earth-orbiting satellite to measure the precise height of Mt. Rainier using SONAR.

Re:Already happened before (3, Funny)

baegucb (18706) | more than 3 years ago | (#33701296)

To be fair, you obviously haven't visited the Pacific Northwest. Sonar is the appropriate measuring method 10 months of the year.

Re:Already happened before (1)

ISoldat53 (977164) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699908)

Sounds like the time two Texas A&M vet students in the late 70s who were smart enough to overcome the interlocks on the cyclotron but not smart enough not to look upstream at the beam they were aiming at an animal. They thought it would look like a fluoroscope without the screen. They were expelled.

Re:Already happened before (2, Insightful)

Anne Honime (828246) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700532)

[citation needed]

Re:Already happened before (2, Interesting)

vlueboy (1799360) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700658)

That man's survival due to head/brain injury in the face of certain death reminds me of another "believe it or not" jewel duscussed OT on /. few weeks back [wikipedia.org] .

A XIX century miner named Phineas Gage long survived a mining explosion that put a 13 pound metal rod of 3.5 feet [brightbytes.com] across a room, after leaving a vertical hole in his head.

Wikipedia's mention of seizures for both, and the related links citing auras and other pre-seizure electrical phenomena sound like a sobering human depiction of how power lines in movies keep crackling with current after being torn appart. The odd part is that after the original wounds "heal" (as far as a big hole in your head can be healed) the symptoms are few. Unlike your story, though, Mr. Gage did have the expected behavioral changes that IIRC head trauma patients are usually related to, at least in Cog Sci courses :)

Re:Already happened before (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33700682)

Ooops. s/miner/road worker/
Sorry.

It's already happened once. (4, Informative)

Kagura (843695) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699582)

This is a man who looked into a proton beam accelerator [sonicbomb.com] that he thought was non-operational. It's already happened once before.

Re:It's already happened once. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33699686)

Yeap. The result is you *die* a shitty death.

Any particle accelerator can kill you.

There was another case in 1950s when some janitor to get his cleaning bucket. He ducked under a bar and got his hand in the beam. Died within 2 weeks. After that incident the door is automatically locked closes when beam is on.

Re:It's already happened once. (1)

dcollins (135727) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699764)

[citation needed]

Re:It's already happened once. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33700514)

Sorry mate! I read it in an old book about radiation sickness that was in my Physics lab. The book had pictures documenting the progress or regress of that chap. In that case it was an electron accelerator.

And yes, you die a slow and shitty death. Not because protons or electrons nuke immediate exposure area. Heck, that are can be removed most of the time. In the other case, the beam hit the guy's wrist. But secondary radiation from the exposure area (wrist) irradiated the rest of his body. The arm would need to be amputated, but because he received a lethal dose to the other areas, he died. Lived about 2 weeks. The case was in the US.

As to your "citatation needed", I think it shows the lack of understanding or common sense. If you survive, you are damn lucky (or unlucky?). In case of Anatoli, his entire clearly body did not get secondary radiation burns. Only the head area, which tends to be less "vital". If his vital organs received anywhere close to lethal dose, he would be dead. Period. If burnt a little bit more of his brain, or in a different area, perhaps he would be dead too.

Getting exposed by a particle beam and surviving is akin to getting hit by a 100mph train and living to tell the story.

Re:It's already happened once. (4, Informative)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699790)

If you read the link in the comment that you're replying to, you'd see that the guy took "500 times the presumed lethal dose" of particle spunk to the face/brain, and survived with nothing more than all the nerves in the left side of his face dying. Even completed his PhD.

Re:It's already happened once. (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700374)

all the nerves in the left side of his face dying. Even completed his PhD.

With his right brain?

Re:It's already happened once. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33701092)

You keep your brain on your face?

Re:It's already happened once. (4, Informative)

celtic_hackr (579828) | more than 3 years ago | (#33701032)

Actually, if you read it, his face swelled up so much it was not recognizable, his skin fell off, revealing the path of the beam though his skull and brain, and he now has epilepsy.

He lived and can function because the path of the beam was pure luck. Had the beam passed through a different part of his brain he may have died, or become a vegetable. There was a case of a man in the 1800s, working on a railroad who had a steel rod shoot through his head, and took a large section of his brain with it. He was not expected to live. But he did, but his personality was altered by the loss. He still retained much of his memory and abilities.

Alzheimer's is a slowly progressive disease, which takes away parts of the brain over time, yet many of these people can still function for years.

The fact is there are several factors involved, but it's fairly likely any living tissue subjected to a beam from the LHC is going have many cells destroyed. Think of something like laser surgery, but with a much bigger beam.

Re:It's already happened once. (1)

Iamthecheese (1264298) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699708)

It says those protons were going about speed of sound. That doesn't sound right to me...

Re:It's already happened once. (1)

Kagura (843695) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699730)

It says those protons were going about speed of sound. That doesn't sound right to me...

You replied to the wrong poster by mistake. The OP you are replying to correctly states "speed of light" in the article.

Re:It's already happened once. (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699798)

Huh? Says speed of light.. maybe someone corrected it after seeing your comment.

for the record (1)

Iamthecheese (1264298) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700800)

The article changed after I posted this.

Re:It's already happened once. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33699738)

Absolutely [wikipedia.org] amazing [forgetomori.com] . He survived and is apparently still alive today.

Queue the "In Soviet Russia..." jokes.

Re:It's already happened once. (1)

DarwinSurvivor (1752106) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700482)

The dividing line of his life goes down the middle of his face: the right side has aged, while the left froze 19 years ago. When he concentrates, he wrinkles only half his forehead.

Can't believe some "skin-care" company hasn't tried marketing this as an anti-aging solution

Re:It's already happened once. (1)

visgoth (613861) | more than 3 years ago | (#33701414)

While not as spectacular as a proton beam to the face, doesn't botox do a similar job of paralyzing the face, and thus reducing wrinkle formation?

Cure for aging? (1)

PmanAce (1679902) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700844)

What I find interesting in his case is that the left side of his face did not age since the accident, nearly 19 years ago. Yes it is paralyzed, but it hasn't aged. I wonder if since the nerves and other parts of his brain were damaged, it affected the aging mechanism on that side of the face?

It would be bad (1)

uxbn_kuribo (1146975) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699596)

Glad to know I'm not the only one fuzzy on the whole good / bad thing.

Re:It would be bad (2, Funny)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#33701174)

Glad to know I'm not the only one fuzzy on the whole good / bad thing.

Somebody tell him about the twinkie.

Don't cross any high-energy streams, definitely. (3, Informative)

siddesu (698447) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699632)

Someone I know had the small child of a neighbor flash him in the eye with a cheap Chinese red laser pointer some time ago, and got a permanent scar on his retina and a second "blind spot" in one of his eyes. Apparently, the pointer was a little bit too powerful in the IR region than it should have been.

Moral of the story - avoid high energy beams regardless of the wavelength or the particle kind because you never know what will slip by even in a supposedly "safe" circumstances.

Odd (5, Informative)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699838)

I don't know of any red lasers that have IR components. Lasers are, by definition, monochromatic. That's the idea after all. The reason some have IR as well is they are DPSS. They produce IR radiation directly, a frequency doubler then takes it up to the visual range. That's a lossy process, so the IR is much higher than the final output, hence an IR filter is needed. Green lasers work this way, at least all the ones I've seen. However red laser pointers are all direct drive, the diode outputs the frequency you want. That's why they are used for CDs and so on, keeps the cost down.

That is also the big deal with Blu-ray lasers (actually quite violet, not blue). Again, direct diode lasers. Means they cost less, use less space and so on, and of course being violet have a higher wavelength.

I've never heard of a red DPSS laser pointer.

Re:Odd (1)

siddesu (698447) | more than 3 years ago | (#33701078)

Well, I thought it odd too, but that is the explanation he got from the people who treated him and he swears the laser was red, so it probably was.

Anyway, my point was it is dangerous to get in the way of any beam, including the supposedly safe and low-powered laser pointers.

Re:Don't cross any high-energy streams, definitely (4, Funny)

Arthur Grumbine (1086397) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699934)

Moral of the story - avoid high energy beams regardless of the wavelength or the particle kind because you never know what will slip by even in a supposedly "safe" circumstances.

Incorrect. Moral of the story: Do not look into laser with remaining eye.

Re:Don't cross any high-energy streams, definitely (3, Informative)

celtic_hackr (579828) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700970)

Incorrect. Lasers use a highly focused parallel high energy beam. Because it's high energy, it can burn. By projecting the focused parallel beam through a convex lens (the eye's lens) you refocus the beam and all the parallel high-energy photons focus on a point. This point light then burns the back of the cornea. Like looking directly at the Sun. Or focusing a magnifying glass on a leaf on a sunny day. Has nothing to do with IR and everything to do with optics and energy levels.

Can it answer.... (0, Offtopic)

mark-t (151149) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699642)

Why does anything exist at all, instead of nothing?

Re:Can it answer.... (1)

ModernGeek (601932) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699688)

It's working on that.

Re:Can it answer.... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33699960)


Why does anything exist at all, instead of nothing?

I see your "why does anything exist instead of nothing" and raise it "why does anything exist instead of two of everything?"

Re:Can it answer.... (1)

Gerafix (1028986) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700122)

Because for nothing to exist something has to exist.

Re:Can it answer.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33700136)

The idea that "nothing" is the default state is only your personal prejudice.

Acrylic... (5, Interesting)

Freddybear (1805256) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699646)

An artist makes unusual "sculptures" by putting acrylic blocks into the beam path of a relatively small electron accelerator:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1232908/Captured-lightning-The-artist-traps-fossilised-bolts-electricity-inside-acrylic-blocks.html [dailymail.co.uk]

Re:Acrylic... (4, Informative)

XiaoMing (1574363) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700108)

Slightly different, as what the artist does is actually charge up the acrylic block with excess electrons (like a supersaturated chemical solution) that have nowhere to go because of the acrylic and surrounding air acting as an insulator. Then he takes a nail to the start of the "lightning", and hammers it in which creates a ground (just like what happens in charged thunderclouds when lightning strikes), creating the effect so reminiscent of lightning.

You can see it in this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-X5QAV0Rtk [youtube.com]

They start with a charged up piece of acrylic, and it's obvious that the effect is not from the beam itself but from the geometry of the piece of acrylic and the grounding path they introduce.

Re:Acrylic... (1)

Freddybear (1805256) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700426)

Ah, yes, you're right. I got him confused with a different type of "art" which was acrylic blocks used as a "beam dump" in an accelerator lab.

Google isn't being helpful on that one.

Mythbusters (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33699856)

I'm sure Jamie and Adam are already working on a LMC (Large Mythdron Collider) and will be dropping some poor unsuspecting pig carcass in it any day now.

Re:Mythbusters (2, Funny)

daveime (1253762) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699916)

And then when nothing happens, they'll repeat the experiment with 10kg of TNT strapped to the pig.

Come on, it's what they do in *every* episode.

Re:Mythbusters (3, Funny)

twidarkling (1537077) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700710)

Come on, it's what they do in *every* episode.

You almost say it like it's a bad thing.

Re:Mythbusters (1)

shadowbearer (554144) | more than 3 years ago | (#33701230)

  Mythbusters in general is a bad thing. They don't teach physics.

SB

Re:Mythbusters (1)

twidarkling (1537077) | more than 3 years ago | (#33701336)

I fail to see your point. It's not like it's Bill Nye the Science Guy. It's guys who blow shit up. If you learn anything by accident, it's your own damn fault.

Re:Mythbusters (1)

shadowbearer (554144) | more than 3 years ago | (#33701368)

    I think you got it.

SB

Re:Mythbusters (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33700588)

I was thinking ballistics gel, myself.

Sounds like a idea for a sci-fi channel b movie! (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699880)

Sounds like a idea for a sci-fi channel b movie!

From the comments below the article... (2, Interesting)

PeterM from Berkeley (15510) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699882)

Someone calculated that about 4 joules of energy would be deposited. I assume that is in a single pass of the beam. However, if the beam recirculates (does it?), then the hypothetical hand will get hit by the beam many times. Then a huge amount of energy will end up in the hand in a short time and it'd probably be cut by the beam as you inserted it.

What also intrigues me is whether a fatal does of radiation would occur from the 4 joules/pass that you would get. I think it would be about 8 Gray of radiation dose into the hand. A 5 Gray whole-body dose of radiation is usually fatal. The hand is less vulnerable to radiation than the body in general, however, this cannot be a good thing.

Here's my take:
multiple passes: either hand is sliced as it is inserted into the beam, or the hand explodes
single pass: might lose the hand, owner of hand might get pretty sick

--PM

Re:From the comments below the article... (5, Informative)

caffeinated_bunsen (179721) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700046)

I think this is the comment you're referring to:
12. Bethany Says:
September 21st, 2010 at 8:20 am

Alright, here's what I calculated:
The protons are high energy with lorentz factor of gamma=7500, kinetic energy is about K=7×10^6 eV. The paper cited below says that the stopping power of a proton going 10^6 eV is about 2.5×10^8 eV cm^2 g^-1. Using the density of muscular tissue rho=1g cm^3 and the thickness of my hand of 1 cm, the energy deposited is 2.5×10^8 eV. In other units its 1.07×10^-11 calories, 4.49×10^-11 Joules, and 1×10^-14 grams of TNT. If there are hundred billion protons per bunch in the beam (as the video said) then for every bunch you get 4.49 Joules or 0.001 grams of TNT of energy.
(emphasis mine)

There are two beams, each of which contains 2808 bunches. Don't worry about the effect of multiple passes, though, since there won't be any tissue left in the beam's path by the time the first pass is over.

A more informative comment showed up later:
31. Xerxes Says:
September 21st, 2010 at 10:45 am

I think the hand-beam question is best answered by this document: http://lsag.web.cern.ch/lsag/BeamdumpInteraction.pdf [web.cern.ch]

Granted, a carbon block isn't an exact model of the human hand, but it's probably close enough. The key points are:

1) "this energy deposit over 85 s is long enough to change the density of the target material. The density decreases at the inner part of the beam heated region because of the outgoing shock waves in the transverse direction. As an example, after the impact of 200 bunches with a size of = 0.2 mm, a maximum temperature of 7000K and a density decrease by a factor of 4 is expected." The results of heating your hand to 7000K and increasing its volume by a factor of 4 are probably best not imagined. Since a full beam is 2808 bunches instead of 200, you might want to scale that by a factor of 10 too.

2) But on the other hand (hehe): "The beam tunnels through the target and deposits the energy with a penetration depth of 10 m to 15 m" Since your hand is not 10m thick, you won't pick up the full effect. This paper goes into some detail of the spatial distribution of the energy dump: http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/972357/files/lhc-project-report-930.pdf [cdsweb.cern.ch] So at hand-thickness of 2ish cm, you'd only get maybe an eighth of the effects of #1, so your hand will only reach the more modest temperature of 1000K (times 10 for a full 2808 bunches?). The shockwave from the blast will extend several cm in the transverse direction; translation, the rest of your hand will be blown off by the middle of your hand exploding. Probably the part of the accelerator apparatus downstream of your hand picks up the rest of the energy. The rest of you probably wouldn't want to be standing next to it when it blows.

Cool pictures of the effects of a low-energy (450-GeV) beam on copper plates are in http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/PAC.2005.1590851 [doi.org]

(I spent so much time looking up references, several other people made the same points. Oh well.)


Note particularly the fact that if one beam hit the solid graphite beam dump without being swept around during the pass, the surface would be at 7000 C, and would be well in the process of exploding, by the time the first 200 bunches had hit. Your hand, having a lower boiling point than graphite, would begin to remove itself from the path of the beam somewhat sooner, and would therefore probably absorb rather less energy. That may be small consolation, though, since it pretty much means that the splattered remnants of your hand wouldn't be as intensely radioactive as the carbon in the beam dump would be.

Acute radiation poisoning (1)

zrbyte (1666979) | more than 3 years ago | (#33699914)

I suppose the effects would be similar to being exposed to very large doses of particles resulting from alpha and beta decay, added a huge dose of X-rays (more precisely synchrotron radiation). I don't think the speed of the particles makes much difference in this case.

the discovery of hot water (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33699918)

The LHC is currently running with 10^13 protons per beam, which at 3.5 TeV amount to 5.6 megajoule of energy.

Which would be more than enough to vaporize 2 liters of water !

total energy in the beam equals 173 kilograms TNT (3, Informative)

viking80 (697716) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700026)

The total energy in the beam is 724 MJ (173 kilograms of TNT) (energy stored in magnets are 10x this) That is a bomb big enough to take out a school.

It would be hard to get your hand into vacuum, but imagine a space suit arm attached to a sandblast cabinet.

The beams energy would hit your hand in a spot d1mm. It would most certainly deposit all its energy there until that part of your hand became a vacuum. Probably similar to a laser knife. In addition, your flesh that obstructed the beam would give off a lot of radiation as it burned away. Imagine Hiroshima 1km away x10^8 on that part of your body.

Every proton would not hit something in your hand on first encounter, but if it missed, it would just loop around, and hit on a later time. The result would be the same. In a short time, your hand and your space glove would have a hole through it. More likely a straight cut from where you put it in. Anything nearby would be exposed to a good dose of radiation as these collisions would be quite "dirty".

Re:total energy in the beam equals 173 kilograms T (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700508)

> It would be hard to get your hand into vacuum...

The only "practical" way to do it would be to modify the line running to the beam dump by inserting an air gap (the windows would have to be tungsten or something). You'd place the hand in the gap and then divert the beam into the dump line.

> ...imagine a space suit arm attached to a sandblast cabinet.

As you swung your arm into position the beam would blow a hole in the edge of the glove. Hitting the glove would disrupt it enough that it would scatter into the walls of the tube before making it around again. You'd get a bad burn on the side of your hand and perhaps a notch. You might not lose the hand.

Re:total energy in the beam equals 173 kilograms T (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700914)

Having read the Fermilab report I see that there is no point in making the windows tungsten. I also see that if they really wanted to know what the beam would do to a slab of meat they could model it pretty accurately.

Re:total energy in the beam equals 173 kilograms T (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33700620)

That's bad. OK, all right, important safety tip. Thanks, Egon!

Re:total energy in the beam equals 173 kilograms T (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33701276)

Every proton would not hit something in your hand on first encounter, but if it missed, it would just loop around, and hit on a later time.

You are forgetting about the minimum ionizing radiation that is induced by every charged particle at that energy that is passing through your hand. According to the Bethe-Block equation, that will be about 2 MeV, (assuming that your hand is made of water and is about one cm thick.)

One entire passage of the beam around the ring will then deposit:

2808 bunches * 1.15 10^11 protons * 2 MeV * 1.6*10^-13 Joule/MeV = 103 Joules

At the speed of light, the beam orbits 300000 km/sec / 27 km (LHC circumference) = 11,100 times per second.

So the energy deposition, without counting ANY hard (nuclear) interactions or ANY synchrotron radiation, is already > 1 MJ per second.

You're hand is going to get cooked in no time even without any nuclear collisions. .

Still waiting on the gamma bomb... (1)

Nyder (754090) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700126)

You can look into you LHC & lasers and what not.

me, i'm waiting for the test of a gamma bomb, so I can sneak out on the test range.

Just don't make me angry.

Re:Still waiting on the gamma bomb... (1)

shadowbearer (554144) | more than 3 years ago | (#33701202)

  Just make sure to put your expensive uv grade sunglasses on. Wouldn't want you to get hurt.

SB

Fermi Lab had a beam loss event in 2003... (4, Interesting)

Myrv (305480) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700306)

Fermilab had a beam loss event in 2003 (beam came into contact with part of the ring). The beam drilled a 2.8 mm hole through a 5mm tungsten support. It also etched a groove 25 cm long and 1.5 mm deep into a stainless steel collimator (after passing through the tungsten). Apparently this took about 8.3 ms (over several turns of the beam) before the beam dissipated.

I'm guessing if you could insert your hand fast enough (not possible, even if there wasn't a vacuum tube) you would end up with a nice small hole drilled through your hand.

This is the report from the Fermi incident:

http://beamdocs.fnal.gov/DocDB/0011/001185/001/FN-751.pdf [fnal.gov]

It'll cut like a waterjet cutter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33700392)

In the event they need to dismiss the beam, a dump block is used.

The dump block is a cylinder of graphite and the beam is deflected with small oscillations
to disperse it and not have it all bore though a tiny spot in the center.

Other materials apparently are no good and sustain damage. Run the LHC beam straight
into copper and it'll bore a hole the length of which is measured in meters.

If the beam was deflected at a not too shallow angle, it could perhaps penetrate
the mass of earth atmosphere, and be usable in knocking out satellites.

ps. a bit of googling and http://spectrum.ieee.org/aerospace/astrophysics/cern-to-start-up-the-large-hadron-collider-now-heres-how-it-plans-to-stop-it [ieee.org] says the dump block 10 tons and 8 meters long.

Reminds me of a joke... (4, Funny)

snspdaarf (1314399) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700406)

A man comes home from his work at the deli, and tells his wife, "I have a strong desire to put my penis in the pickle slicer."
"That's sick!" replies his wife. "You need help."
"I don't see any reason it would be sick", retorts the man, "I think it would be fun!"
Two days later, his wife comes home from an errand, and her husbands car is in the driveway. "You're home early", she says.
"Yes, I put my penis in the pickle slicer!" he smiles.
"Oh my God!", gasps his wife, "What happened?"
"I got fired! So did she!"

Took me a while to get it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33700678)

...after re-reading I see the guy worked at a deli, not at Dell...

Was that the New Delhi down the street? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33700750)

Was that the New Delhi down the street? or the old one?

You never studied... (1)

confused one (671304) | more than 3 years ago | (#33700516)

I haven't read the article... here's my semi-educated guess: It would feel like you stuck your hand in the path of a lightning bolt. Then you'd die an unpleasant death from the massive radiation overdose resulting from the interaction of the high energy particles with the nuclei in your hand. I'm not recommending anyone try it.

Good for you "Lozza" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33700692)

I often flick through Slashdot, and as a scientist, I always find these kinds of links interesting

http://science.slashdot.org/story/10/09/25/2150228/Dont-Cross-the-LHC-Stream-Maybe

In particular, they discuss what would happen if you put your hand in the beam of the LHC, they linked to this page
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2010/09/21/dont-cross-the-lhc-stream/

and bloody hell, if its not one of my old professor chums! The very very nice chap with glasses and the welsh accent is none other than Laurence Eaves who was (is?) at Nottingham University, we used to work with him a lot, he is big pals with my supervisor who was Maurice Skolnick up in Sheffield. I always knew "Lozza" ( as we called him, in reference to "Mozza" Skolnick) had way too much personality to be hidden away from the TV cameras, so it was very nice to see him there as one of the experts, even though he wasn't into the particle physics, at least not in the early and mid 90s when I liaised with him

Good on you Lozza!

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