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US Banks That Offer Transaction History?

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the cron-job-perhaps? dept.

The Almighty Buck 359

wirelessdreamer writes "I use a bank in the US that will only allow me to download transaction history in CSV for the previous three months. I have a hard time remembering to pull my transaction history down every three months, and would gladly jump ship to another bank if there is one that lets me download, say three years' worth of transaction history as one of the standard services. Then I can import my data into MySQL and run some reports on it, which is all I'm looking for." What banks out there do the best job at providing users with simple, downloadable data?

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What's worse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33705732)

When WaMu got bought out by Chase, we lost it all for good. Sure, they gave you some notice to back up what you could, but after that, poof, it was gone.

Bank of America (4, Informative)

Eleed (97915) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705746)

offers what seems to be unlimited download of transaction history. I pulled 2 years worth a few months ago.

Re:Bank of America (1, Funny)

Tinik (601154) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706436)

Yea, but then you have to deal with Bank of America, who charges a fee if you even think about your accounts.

DCU (4, Informative)

susehat (558997) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705758)

Digital Federal Credit Union seems to let one pull for as long as they have been a member. And they have multiple formats!

You might have to pay to get the records (3, Insightful)

failedlogic (627314) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705766)

I think the rule of thumb is most banks offer a few months' worth of records. My Canadian bank offers 3 months worth of records on line as well. I don't know what the practice is with other banks. But mine offers further records if I go to the branch and pay for the records. You may find that you will also need to pay for transaction records. These records may or may not be available on-line and you may only be able to get them at a branch.

Now, if you have enough money in your account (you're of sufficient high net worth) they may be able to give you better service. Then again, you wouldn't be posting the question on /. you'd already have a banking officer doing it for you!

Re:You might have to pay to get the records (2, Insightful)

mysidia (191772) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705938)

Now, if you have enough money in your account (you're of sufficient high net worth) they may be able to give you better service.

You wouldn't need to ask your bank for records, your personal accountant would already have collected all that information, prepared whichever reports you had wanted and uploaded everything to your private server.

Re:You might have to pay to get the records (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33706422)

I have enough in my account that my credit union give me good service, yet I don't have an accountant. Maybe it's because I saved my money instead of racking up credit card debt, car loans, and interest only mortgages on overpriced houses?

Eh, who am I kidding? I'm obviously a leach on society and should "pay my fair share", since it's obviously not fair for everyone else that I didn't buy a flatscreen tv for every room in my mcmansion.

Re:You might have to pay to get the records (2, Informative)

TheSpoom (715771) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705950)

My Canadian bank offers 3 months worth of records on line as well.

If you want a Canadian bank that offers full history records for free, PC Financial [pcfinancial.ca] will serve your needs (and almost never charge you a service fee, to boot!)

Re:You might have to pay to get the records (1)

Skapare (16644) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706072)

Given that overdraft and other such fees are a substantial part of a bank's income, you'd think they would consider such accounts to be "high net worth" ... for the bank's own net worth that is, and provide them good service for things like transaction reports.

Oh wait ... if they provided transaction reports, many of these account holders would not be overdrawing. N/M

Re:You might have to pay to get the records (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33706256)

I use CIBC, and they offer 13 months of transaction records online. And supposedly you can get some amount more in person, for some amount of fee. However, 13 months means you can download your records every New Year's, or something like that, and not forget.

Try your Credit Union (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33705768)

My credit union LFCU [lockheedfcu.org] lets you pull down up to 16 months of statements....

That's the wrong question (5, Insightful)

A nonymous Coward (7548) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705770)

The right question is, "What can I do to remember to download it every month?"

What if you find a bank that has a current policy of letting you download 5 years' of history, you forget for 4 years, and they change policy to three months?

Or what if you do nothing for four years, decide to switch banks for some other equally trivial reason, forget to download even then, and then a year later need it?

You need some idiotic little reminder, a cron job if nothing else, to do it once a month. That's the real solution.

Or maybe you need to decide the data isn't really very important after all, if you can't oblige yourself by downloading once a month and don't actually use it.

Re:That's the wrong question (1)

SilverHatHacker (1381259) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705842)

Even better would be a way to automatically download it and import it. If the file is at a constant URL, you should be able to use a little $scripting_lang and a little creativity to take care of this. If the URL is randomized or obfuscated, you might have a bit more fun with it.

Re:That's the wrong question (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705946)

because nothing could possibly go wrong putting your banking login credentials in something a script can access.

Of course microsoft money, quicken, etc do that so I guess it's not considered bad after all.

Re:That's the wrong question (1, Interesting)

darkpixel2k (623900) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706190)

because nothing could possibly go wrong putting your banking login credentials in something a script can access.

Of course microsoft money, quicken, etc do that so I guess it's not considered bad after all.

Microsoft money, quicken...those are windows programs. I can see why you'd think storing login credentials is a bad idea.

I actually have a cron job that uses CURL to connect to my bank, figure out which question they ask for their multi-factor authentication, login, and download the last 30 days of account history. I sleep quite well at night knowing that it's running from my linux server that only has SSH access.

Re:That's the wrong question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33706218)

Oh yes, because Linux and SSH prevent all problems.

Re:That's the wrong question (1)

SilverHatHacker (1381259) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706336)

That's the risk you take for convenience. Using a bank, using a debit card, using a credit card, and banking over the internet all represent some levels of risk, but we use them because it's easier.

Re:That's the wrong question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33706456)

As if everyone in the world knows how to program computers.

Re:That's the wrong question (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705912)

The right question is, "What can I do to remember to download it every month?"

Bullshit. That information is about you, it belongs to you, and it really ought to be available by law. The bank gets to set restrictions on how you may communicate with them, it is past time for us to set restrictions on them.

Re:That's the wrong question (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33705988)

The right question is, "What can I do to remember to download it every month?"

Bullshit. That information is about you, it belongs to you, and it really ought to be available by law. The bank gets to set restrictions on how you may communicate with them, it is past time for us to set restrictions on them.

No, that's bullshit. The bank provides him with a transaction history, for free, for the current period and going back two months. He's just too lazy to take advantage of it.

He needs to either get off his ass and do his own recordkeeping, or pay an accountant to do it for him.

Re:That's the wrong question (1)

Peeteriz (821290) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706074)

Banking account history is the basic proof about what/how much the bank owes to him; if they can't provide the history, then they have no claims that the balance is correct.

They may and do charge fees for older history though - but banks are mandated to keep, store and provide accurate info for quite a long time; practices vary between countries, but 5-7 years would be the minimum, if not simply the total life of the account (which might be, say, a 40 year mortgage).

Re:That's the wrong question (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706232)

One thing is having a bank history, another is providing it online for free.

I'd rather set up a cron script than having to drive to my bank's office every time I wanted check something.

Re:That's the wrong question (1)

Peeteriz (821290) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706468)

True, but it essentially turns it into essentially a service price issue.
If/when banks in USA start considering it as important to competition, they will offer it for free, but AFAIK it (and internet banking features in general) aren't considered as important as elsewhere. I have a feeling that in many countries in Europe or SE-Asia it wouldn't be a concern, as everyone offers it free of charge.

It makes economic sense as well (and I have spent some years in banking IT) - my full financial history, including all monies received, all bills paid and all card purchases is an order of magnitude smaller than my gmail archive even when counting number of entries, not their size; so it's not that expensive to get a database for fast querying to get full account history - if the bank wants to do it.

I'd actually guess that even the bank mentioned in the original question actually has the capability, but it's deliberately not offered, since they would lose some $$ in fee revenue if they provided the unlimited history online.

Re:That's the wrong question (1)

InfiniteWisdom (530090) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706088)

If you care so much about the "information about you", you can download it more than once every three months. They provide you a statement every month. There's no reason why they should be obligated to store this information for you indefinitely.

Some banks do that as an extra service but I think it's preposterous to claim that they should be required to do so by law.

Re:That's the wrong question (4, Insightful)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706292)

That information is about you but you have no right to have someone else store it for you indefinitely. Download it periodically and store it yourself if it's so important to you. By the way, as far as I know all banks will provide you with sufficient account history information for every normal purpose, such as when buying a house etc.

Re:That's the wrong question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33705964)

Is this Jeopardy?

also, please tell which banks make it easy (and insecure) to run an idiotic little cron job to fetch statement data.

Re:That's the wrong question (1)

Idarubicin (579475) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706038)

The right question is, "What can I do to remember to download it every month?"

Indeed. Do you do online banking at least once per month? I'm assuming that you're paying some of your recurring bills or transferring funds to your credit cards at least that often; make the download of transaction data a part of that monthly process.

Or set a recurring alarm on your cell phone's calendar, your email client, or what-have-you. If you can't set a three-month recurrence for new reminders, then set them as four annual events at quarterly intervals.

Go old school and make a note in your day planner, or create a tickler file [wikipedia.org] .

This isn't rocket science.

Re:That's the wrong question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33706106)

They're obligated by law to keep all those records for quite a few years. And no bank is working today without computers. Almost all banks I've come across will give you what you wanted if you pay or you have certain types of accounts with them.

happy to provide history to the Feds (5, Insightful)

Phantom Gremlin (161961) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705774)

All US banks are very happy to offer many years worth of transaction history to any Federal agency that desires this information. Too bad they won't do the same for their putative "customers".

Re:happy to provide history to the Feds (2, Funny)

line-bundle (235965) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706048)

All US banks are very happy to offer many years worth of transaction history to any Federal agency that desires this information. Too bad they won't do the same for their putative "customers".

It is Uncle Sam after all. Look how much he gave to the banks recently. How much did you give?

Re:happy to provide history to the Feds (1)

InfiniteWisdom (530090) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706130)

All US banks are required by law to offer many years worth of transaction history to any Federal agency that subpoenas this information.

There, fixed it for you.

ING Direct (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33705780)

I just tested it, and their download form let me put in my own start/ending ranges (tried three year's worth) and it worked. It's also just a great bank in general.

Re:ING Direct (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33706164)

It's also just a great bank in general.

i.e., hasn't screwed me yet.

ing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33705784)

I eventually got an account with Ing, they offer the entire history of your transactions, but you have to get a savings account first.

Scripts + cron job (1)

dandaman32 (1056054) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705794)

Like the "department" tag says... write a script that fetches and parses it automatically. Preferably stored on an encrypted medium on a reasonably secured box, so that your bank password isn't stored in plaintext and the chances of it getting out are minimal.

See if you can create a second user that has access to the same account, preferably with read only access - for example, up here at RIT the student financial website ("eServices") lets you create accounts for use by the benefactors of your education. I took advantage of this feature and wrote a simple two line bash script that logs in with a sub-account I made that only has enough access to read the balance of my food debit account. The purpose I plan to use it for is a little different (screenlets widget) but the methodology is the same: peek at the login form HTML (to figure out what form fields are required), play with curl until you get a proper response, and grep around for the information you need.

Use an online service (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33705800)

Move to a service such as Yodlee or mint

Yodlee.com (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33706352)

I've been using Yodlee for years and I love this free service.

Wells Fargo (2, Informative)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705802)

If you are stupid enough to bank with Wells Fargo, they offer up to 18 months of history in 2 Quicken formats, 3 Microsoft Money formats, and CSV.

My credit union offers indefinite date range in those 3 formats as well.

Re:Wells Fargo (3, Funny)

failedlogic (627314) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705918)

"If you are stupid enough to bank with Wells Fargo"

LOL! Thanks made my day.

Re:Wells Fargo (2, Informative)

Binary Boy (2407) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706366)

Care to expand on that? I've been with Wells Fargo for 14 years and, having also had accounts (along with my wife) at several other national banks, and a credit union, it's the one I've been consistently happiest with. Just curious what makes Wells Fargo the idiot's choice.

Re:Wells Fargo (1)

bitcastle (934210) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706420)

Its just a case of make fun of the big bank. I switched to wells fargo because they have their act together with online banking and lots of ATMs out west. local small bank tried to double ATM fees on my and they have only 2 ATMs in the world. sorry but no.

Credit Union (3, Informative)

DogDude (805747) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705804)

There's no reason for *anybody* except for the absolute wealthiest to use banks. Use a credit union. Most credit unions provide much better service (including more than 3 months' transaction history).

Re:Credit Union (1)

Totenglocke (1291680) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706216)

Except that if you move or travel, you're much less likely to have a branch / ATM for your credit union available. With larger banks, it's much easier to access your money when travelling or avoid having to change banks when moving to a new city.

Re:Credit Union (3, Informative)

Stiletto (12066) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706258)

Bank industry FUD. Lots of credit unions offer free ATM services to members of other credit unions. So during the time it takes to join a different credit union after you move, you can almost always find local ATMs that will accept transactions.

Another service (4, Informative)

Georules (655379) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705806)

Mint.com is pretty great for connecting to whatever bank you have and it'll download your reports and also automatic categorization. I have almost 2 years of data in it, and they let you download it all CSV. It also has me in the habit of checking all of my accounts once a week, by just logging onto one website. Nice way to be on top of anything that might be fraudulent.

my local bank (1)

ducomputergeek (595742) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705816)

Allows me to pull down statements including transaction histories for the past year in CSV, Quickbooks (on the merchant account), Quicken, txt, and XML. They use another company that handles their web portal, but its' pretty easy to use even if it does look like it was designed for Netscape 4. I download my statements monthly when emailed and review them. Regions also has a decent web portal as well, at least on the business side of things. I've never used them for personal banking.

That being said, I know there's a punchline there somewhere with "Transactional History" and MySQL.

BankAtlantic (1)

timkb4cq (761046) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705818)

BankAtlantic, a florida bank. I never tried to download more than a month's worth before, so I just tried it. Downloaded 4 years worth with no fuss. Had the choice of OFX, QFX, QBO & CSV

Hmmm... (2, Insightful)

pedantic bore (740196) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705822)

I have a hard time remembering to pull my transaction history down every three months

A suggestion:

1. Find a calendar program that will remind you when it's time to do things. For example, the google calendar.
2. Program it to nag you every few weeks to download the transaction info from your bank. Make the interval short enough so that you can afford to miss one or two if you're on vacation or utterly absent-minded.
3. When it nags you to do so, download the transaction info... and back it up, of course.

Problem solved, without changing banks, or breaking a sweat.

Script (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33705840)

Just write a perl script to scrape it, duh. Did you forget where you were submitting? :)

mint.com (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33705846)

See subject

Sounds like a job for cron. (1)

jcr (53032) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705854)

Why don't you just set up a script to read the transactions nightly?

-jcr

Why not solve the problem a different way? (1)

einhverfr (238914) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705860)

Set up a Perl script to jump through all their hoops, etc. Then set up cron or anacron to go through that once a month and validate the results.

Re:Why not solve the problem a different way? (1)

Bjecas (1753752) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706112)

Mark it on your calendar, then you'll be sure to remember to click that "Download" button three months from now.

It's simpler, faster and more cost effective, not to mention way easier to maintain and carries no additional security risks. Most of /. would probably still write a script though.

B of A (1)

Lehk228 (705449) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705862)

Bank of America offers 12 months of back data, and if you can't be bothered with it for a whole year, it just isn't important is it?

Re:B of A (1)

hex0D (1890162) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705990)

The only problem here being is this requires you to bank with B of A. Anecdotal evidence (as in everyone I know who has any experience with them) strongly suggests you avoid them, and I'll bet there's plenty of quantitative customer surveys to back it up.

I believe that's the obvious point (1)

sgt_doom (655561) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706068)

But obviously, this post is yet more free advertising for the likes of B of A, and since they happen to own the controlling interest in Monsanto, perhaps it's simply free advert for the overlords???

Re:B of A (1)

The Hatchet (1766306) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706320)

To be honest, I bank with Bank of America just because of the convenience of their online banking and locations around the many different places I live, have lived, and routinely pass through. I have never had any issues, I get quite a decent interest rate, and can easily send and receive funds securely, and the branch workers have been nothing but friendly. Even when I take out inordinately large numbers of quarters.

Re:B of A (1)

Lehk228 (705449) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706464)

you can get anecdotal evidence about any bank sucking. I never had any trouble with B of A. I have noticed a fairly strong correlation between people hating Bank of America and people who fuck up their finances regularly and in spectacular ways, like forgetting that there is a large rent check that hasn't posted, or having an account that can be drawn from by check, debit card, electronic debit and or ATM at the same time.

Re:B of A (1)

JeanBaptiste (537955) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706060)

and there's a link to download it in csv.

Behavioral problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33705882)

US banks are required to keep seven years of history, so it is available to you if you really want it. It seems to me that the solution lies within developing your own routine to fetch your statements more regularly.

Re:Behavioral problem (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706010)

US banks are required to keep seven years of history, so it is available to you if you really want it.

Yes, if you are willing to pay the fees. Usually an 'account research fee' and a fee per statement you want, this can be costly. These are provided to you in hard copy format, so good luck getting the information accurately back into a computer.

Or (maybe) some banks will provide you it electronically in some way, probably by mailing a CD. If you were a large enterprise, you may get your statements that way normally; it's in theory possible some banks may offer this to consumers for record retrieval.

However, even then you may have JPEGs or PDF scanned images that you will have fun OCR'ing to get into your accounting software

Why does Slashdot allow shit like this? (0, Flamebait)

metrix007 (200091) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705884)

A bit of research would have revealed a few banks that do this. Or, asking on a more generic answer/question site would have yielded faster replies.

This is not a techy thing in the least, it's a waste of space when real and interesting issues that the slashdot community would love to discuss disappear.

Fuck this site

Re:Why does Slashdot allow shit like this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33706002)

...

CSV! MySQL!

Are we happy now?

Re:Why does Slashdot allow shit like this? (1)

hex0D (1890162) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706122)

You did check firehose and mod this submission down, since you find it so bad right? no? well, there you have it.

Fuck your whining.

Most banks I've been with go back 1 year at least. (1)

wardred (602136) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705886)

& they offer at least Quicken and CSV. 'Course, I can't promise said bank won't go bankrupt, get absorbed into another bank, or change their back end system, in which case your history may be lost.

My suggestion is to not let 6+ months of transactions go unaccounted for. If you've your transactions for all but the last month or 3, then most banks will let you pull the rest of the transactions.

That way, if they get bought, change their back end, or whatever, you have all, or 99% of your data.

If you have your transactions saved locally and downloaded about once a month, then it shouldn't matter that you can only get 3-6 months of transaction data.

My 2c.

Chase Bank (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33705890)

I can download monthly statements going back 7 years.

Huntington (1)

SirRandom (170675) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705900)

I use Huntington and I just was able to download my entire transaction history since mid 2009 (When I opened the account). It took two date ranges to get it, but the information is there and available.

Security means inconvenience. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33705906)

Security is the reason why you can't have an automated script downloading your data like that. My bank has three layers of security on their website: multi-band authentication via password, personal knowledge question and verification by displaying the personalized image and keyphrase I chose.

ingdirect does (1)

eabell (398690) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705928)

I just downloaded 3 years of my savings account information on ingdirect to test. They offered it in CSV and two other formats (like Quicken probably, I forget specifically and already closed that tab out).

You clearly are willing to pay... (3, Funny)

notthepainter (759494) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705932)

You are clearly willing to pay a little bit for this, since you don't mention any extra fees. So this sounds like a service opportunity to me.

For only $3.99/month I'll deliver your csv records to you. Just send me you account and password information. Might as well give me your social, mother's maiden name, and favorite color.

No problemo...

US Bank (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33705942)

Keeps 90 days of history and offers a quicken format dump.

What about geek-friendly in general? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33705944)

I want a bank that lets me download my transaction history and view processed checks. And most importantly, can use a security token, smart card or some form of private key/two-factor authentication. I am sick of shitty screen keyboards. If anyone knows a place that has all three, that would be better yet.

Put your login credentials in a comment here (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705966)

We'll be sure to make sure to download the data every month and email it to you.

low tech solution (1)

doktorstop (725614) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705972)

Don't switch banks... get a calendar :)

USAA (1)

PenquinCoder (1431871) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705976)

Seriously... has everything you'll need, including finical reports, transaction details and you know.. great rates on just about everything.

Have Mint.com do the work for you (2, Informative)

g-doo (714869) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705978)

You could also import your transaction history into Mint.com. Once you have it linked to your bank's account, Mint will automatically grab the latest transactions any time you log in.

USAA (2, Interesting)

Wonko the Sane (25252) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705982)

I haven't had an account for long enough to test how far back they will let you download but there is no obvious limit.

USAA is pretty awesome in general so I'd recommend it anyway.

Re:USAA (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33706086)

I'll concur on USAA. USAA is an outgrowth of what used to be a set of support services for active and retired military personal and their families. They have turned into a full fledged financial & banking services company and most of their services are now available to the average non-military joe. It's branchless banking at its best.

Really excellent service, and if you need to talk with someone you can get them on the phone without having to wait more than 60 seconds... and you are talking to an American who speaks understandable english :-). USAA does very little, if any, outsourcing.

All the various account types are tied together into the web interface and very nicely integrated. Credit card, savings, checking, brokerage, bill pay, etc. They don't glitz up the interface... it works smoothly and it works well.

I personally put as many of my purchases as possible on my credit card, which I pay off every month, and get a paper record. That gives me a nearly full record for my spending.

-Me-

Re:USAA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33706198)

Military only though.

OK, so this isn't an answer, but (2, Interesting)

mschuyler (197441) | more than 3 years ago | (#33705994)

I can't imagine ever being put into this situation of having to download transaction data FROM a bank. I was taught to write down transactions as they happen and check the bank every month. Over the years I have caught them in several minor errors. I've had several hundred dollars of transactions that never posted, and even a deposit erroneously posted to my account. I rarely attempt to correct these errors on the theory that it would cost us both more to reconcile them than I got in "free" services. (What was with that Las Vegas trip, anyway?) But I did pursue that bad $300 deposit. I did a little invasion of privacy thing, found out who it was, google-earthed his address seeing it was no mansion and thought he might need that $300. It took forever to get through to a real person, but she bird-dogged it thru and got the guy's money back to him.

Today I have several years worth of transactions stored locally and backed up five ways against Sunday all reconciled against the bank records to no more than a month behind.

BOA Has the best online banking (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33706006)

Of course you have to be able to live with yourself for using them.

Not balancing your books often enough? (1)

Heebie (1163973) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706016)

You should be balancing your books at least once a month, so you should make downloading your history part of that. I'd also be wary of any third-party sites grabbing your info on your behalf... but I'm slightly paranoid about my data... I believe only I, and my bank, should have access to it.

Banking adverts, anyone??? (1, Interesting)

sgt_doom (655561) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706052)

Since when in the bloody hell did /. become an advertising blog for banks and the banksters?

WTF???????

Re:Banking adverts, anyone??? (1)

tfrayner (186362) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706236)

How true. This story could just as easily be from Good Housekeeping as far as I'm concerned (uh, not that I'm a reader, you understand).

News for Nerds, Stuff that Matters indeed.

<token attempt at relevance>
WWW::Mechanize (or Selenium, depending on requirements) FTW.
</token attempt at relevance>

Old Slashdot would have had people chiming in with genuinely useful ideas, not this echo chamber.

Transaction History (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33706070)

I spent a career in banking in IT. None of the banks I worked for ever kept that much history online for checking or savings accounts - cost too much in storage (multiple copies) and daily processing time to justify keeping it available for the (very) occasional request. Generally archived it offsite and deleted it onsite after three statement cycles. But, for a fee, we could research activity back further than that.

Lemme help ya out (1)

HunkirDowne (452422) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706076)

You only check every three months? You either don't have enough money to worry about in the first place or you have lots of money and so little time to spend it that you forget to check your balance. On the off chance it's the latter, howz about you don't need to remember anything but ol' HD here. I can do it for you on a monthly basis and handle all yer details.

Bank of America (3, Informative)

FadedTimes (581715) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706080)

Bank of America has 1 year of transactions available online. You can download in various formats.

WEB Connect for Quicken 2007 and above, Statement Download for Money 2007 and above, Managing Your Money - QIF file (2 digit)
, Quicken and Microsoft Money - QIF file (4 digit), Microsoft Excel Format, Printable Text Format.

In addition, some local banks may also offer up to 1 year worth of items online and various download formats. Just call them and ask for a demo or specifically ask about amount of months and what formats are available.

Services can help (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33706092)

Try http://www.mint.com/ or one of the other personal financial services.

NYCB: 6 Months (1)

dcollins (135727) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706104)

Good question. I'm old enough that I'm in the habit of downloading my info every month (i.e., part of my monthly former balance checkbook/ pay bills by hand process), so it hadn't occurred to wonder how far back it goes.

I use NYCB (New York Community Bank) here in NYC. Turns out I can download stuff from the past 6 months, and it's free. Things I'm not thrilled about with the system: (1) Got hung up when I first applied for online access because they demanded my mother's birthdate and I actually don't know it. (Friendly girls at bank laughed and said "make something up", but I'm aware of banking fine-print gotchas). (2) The online site demands a ridiculous amount of personal info, requiring a new trio of "security questions" every 3 months or so (Mom's name, dad's name, pet's name, street, college professor, best man, etc., etc. -- I just fill in random codes but now have a list 11 items long). (3) Message system spams me with sales pitch for online bill pay every 6 weeks or so.

Automated reminder (1)

Skapare (16644) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706134)

Let me have your email address and I can send you a MONTHLY reminder to download your transaction CSV data. To pay for this service, all the other days I'll send you some spam.

Better yet, just give me your bank web site, account number, and password, and I'll just download the CSV for you and email it to you. I'll still need your email address, and this extended service will require two spams each day.

Quicken corruption (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33706194)

See, the way evil big business cheats is to ensure that people don't have real option. Use Quicken or don't use banking software. This is the only way these incompetent rich kids can ever compete.

Uh, root cause? (5, Insightful)

geekmux (1040042) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706248)

So, let me get this straight. You would consider changing banks, and going through all the pain associated with changing direct deposits, ordering new checks or a debit card, going online to change any websites you had your bills tied to your old account, all because you can't seem to manage to put a reminder in one of your 17 electronic devices to remind you to do something once every three months?

Seriously?

Bank of America's 'my portfolio' or Mint.com (2, Informative)

MarcQuadra (129430) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706254)

I use both Bank of America's online 'my portfolio' and Mint.com to track my long-term finances. Both allow you to connect to different accounts, there are built-in reports, budgeting, cool charts and graphs, and 'net worth' features.

I think BoA's service doesn't seem to reach back in time as far as Mint.

Morgan Stanley Smith Barney (1)

rcb1974 (654474) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706268)

I can see back at least 2 years using Morgan Stanley Smith Barney. At the end of the year I just download everything in CSV format for my taxes. The last time I did it, it was kind of hard for me to find the CSV option on the website but I found it. I think it was called "Excel" format on the site, but it was actually CSV.

First Internet Bank, 4+ Years... (1)

patniemeyer (444913) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706282)

I just pulled my checking account to CSV going back to 03/2006. I'm not sure if transaction load affects how much they keep but I had 1572 transactions on that account.

I have been with FirstIB.com for over ten years and they've always been ahead of the curve.

- Pat Niemeyer

Wellsfargo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33706300)

18 months back and in csv, Quickbooks etc.

Only 3 months? (1)

leathered (780018) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706302)

Is there some reason why your bank offers such a poor history of your transactions? It's not like it's hard for them to implement, several years of history for the average customer should be no more than a few hundred KB using decent compression so storage and retrieval shouldn't be an issue.

My bank, Nat West (UK) provides me with 7 years of transactions online which I can easily copy and paste into a spreadsheet. They're obliged to keep 6 years' worth and even if your bank doesn't make them available online, you can demand that they send them to you if you make a request under the Data Protection Act and pay a fee of £10.

Talk About Lazy and Capricious (1)

Ozymandias_KoK (48811) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706342)

This is your make or break bank feature? Just don't be lazy and check it once a month. I do mine via Quicken about every weekend to two weeks, just 'cos. It takes about 5 minutes, and I have transactions going back to 2001. Easy peasy. (substitute your program of choice to do the same exact thing)

Alright, data pharming (1)

notanatheist (581086) | more than 3 years ago | (#33706452)

So now that we know where you all bank, onto the next set of questions...

1. What password scheme do you use?
2. What hobbies do you enjoy (so those extra transactions won't be questioned)
3. Profit!!!
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