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Panasonic's 16-Finger, Hair-Washing Robot

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the now-with-even-more-fingers dept.

Japan 181

angry tapir writes "Panasonic has developed a hair-washing robot that uses 16 electronically controlled fingers to give a perfect wash and rinse. The robot, images of which were distributed by Panasonic, appears to be about the size of a washing machine. Users sit in a reclining chair and lean back to place their head in the machine's open top. Two robot arms guide the 16 fingers, which have the same dexterity as human fingers, the company claims."

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181 comments

Luckily for us... (4, Funny)

Fluffeh (1273756) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708476)

These robots obey the three laws, so one won't ever go bezerk and crush the skull of a human...

Re:Luckily for us... (2, Insightful)

angry tapir (1463043) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708506)

The first time one of them removes a cranium, it's all over for Panasonic.

Re:Luckily for us... (4, Funny)

jamesh (87723) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708580)

Yup, here's your problem. Someone set this thing to "Evil".

Re:Luckily for us... (1)

angry tapir (1463043) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708616)

I'm imagining a "fingers in a rotten watermelon" scenario...

Re:Luckily for us... (2, Funny)

camperslo (704715) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708672)

Actually the fingers could have multiple uses. They could be used as electrodes for picking up brainwaves, or if you're handled in the right places, for indirect Body Mass Index determination. And maybe more...

0) Administer knockout gas while doing hair

1) Run an low level signal, say 1 kHz, through you

2) Sense the ratio and the phase of the voltage and resulting current

3) The phase angle (arctangent of reactance over resistance) correlates to a B.M.I. value

4) automatic liposuction mode enabled if B.M.I. threshold met

5) sell lard.... Profit!

6) seek another human... rinse lather repeat...

Re:Luckily for us... (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | more than 3 years ago | (#33709146)

4) automatic liposuction mode enabled if B.M.I. threshold met

At last, a cure for fatheads.

Re:Luckily for us... (1)

Optikal (462280) | more than 3 years ago | (#33709294)

You forget the step for somehow introducing an attachment for one's genitals to the mass market.

Re:Luckily for us... (1)

CarpetShark (865376) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708890)

The first time one of them removes a noble's... I mean, a celebrity's cranium, it's all over for Panasonic.

Re:Luckily for us... (1)

khchung (462899) | more than 3 years ago | (#33709104)

Yeah, the first time a lift fell and killed someone, everyone would go back to taking stairs.... didn't happen.

The first time a car runs over a kid, it's all over for Ford... didn't happen either.

The first time a plane crashes, it's all over for .... didn't happen.

Come on! This is /., aren't we supposed to be excited about new gadgets?

Re:Luckily for us... (1)

Jedi Alec (258881) | more than 3 years ago | (#33709220)

We all reach a point where "enough is enough" and we can't be bothered to keep up anymore. That's when we start complaining about new stuff instead of calling it awesome, reminisce about how much better things were back in the day, even though they involved going uphill both ways in the snow, and start voting conservative.

Now if you'll excuse me, there's some kids outside that seem to be enjoying themselves, I'd better go and cut up their ball.

Re:Luckily for us... (1)

Rollgunner (630808) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708630)

Just as long as they don't re-use the program code designed for the 16-fingered pickle jar opener...

Re:Luckily for us... (1)

DarwinSurvivor (1752106) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708730)

I googled that and couldn't find anything. I'm not doubting your reference, I just REALLY want to see this thing :(

Re:Luckily for us... (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | more than 3 years ago | (#33709222)

Just as long as they don't re-use the program code designed for the 16-fingered pickle jar opener...

known in Upstate New York as Powerful Katrina.

Re:Luckily for us... (2, Interesting)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708718)

TFA:

Panasonic hasn't provided a launch date for any of the robots. An obstacle to their commercialization likes in the lack of safety standards and liability laws concerning robots that interact with humans.

Also, if you read between the lines of the title of TFA:

Panasonic unleashes 16-finger, hair washing robot

one may get quite scared (not very far from: "unleash a security-trained doberman dog").

Re:Luckily for us... (2, Insightful)

hairyfeet (841228) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708918)

I think the bigger question would be why would anybody want this in the first place? Is the girl that does your hair at the local place REALLY costing you so much you'd think of replacing her with a bot? Every time I've seen humans replaced with bots it has been in jobs where the hazards and risk for injury make humans more of a risk than the cost of the bots, like welding cars. Where is the danger in washing someone's hair? I think just like those pole dancing bots we saw awhile back somebody in Japan has waaay too much time and money on their hands to be dreaming up this crazy crap.

The only way I think this might be useful is if they are taking the knowledge they learn with these worthless bots as baby steps on the goal of making the ultimate sexbot. If that is the case....I'll take one Alyson Hannigan please, and I'll gladly pay an extra 5k if you have her delivered in the Season 2 Buffy "vamp willow" outfit and have her wake me up with the "what's my name bitch?" bit from American pie. sure my GF will be more than a little POed, but hey, what can ya do?

Re:Luckily for us... (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#33709014)

I think the bigger question would be why would anybody want this in the first place?

Their declared purpose (read TFA, as non-customary as it is): for the health-care/aged-care domain.

May not make any sense or may make a lot of sense, all depends on how many people would be qualified to work in the industry (the supply) vs how many would need their hair washed by 16-robotic-fingers-because-no-other-fingers-are-available (the demand).
Until I don't know the situation in Japan (and, possible, the trends in the next 5-10 years), I abstain from saying "It's stupid" or "It's a clever move".

Re:Luckily for us... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33709068)

There's a reason Japan is doing robots for everything. You're probably aware there's an inverse correlation between affluence and reproduction -- the native population of all Westernized nations is declining, but because the reproduction rate has fallen over time, the population isn't just dropping, it also skews older. Most societies replace the "missing" younger, working generation with immigrants from less affluent, more populous societies; eventually you get enough of them that you start having trouble with brown scares, etc.(see US) if you're lucky, and riots, etc. (see France) if you're not.

The Japanese, whether through racism, cultural pride, or good sense, have managed to avoid much immigration -- good side is no racial/cultural tension, bad side is an aging population with a shortage of young people to keep things running for the retirees. So the logical solution is robot labor.

Re:Luckily for us... (3, Informative)

arivanov (12034) | more than 3 years ago | (#33709142)

This is probably for the domestic market in Japan.

There is no "girl who does your hair" left there. Japan's living standard, life expectancy and birth rate make the "girl who does your hair" an extinct species. As a result Sony, Panasonic and the like keep demonstrating robots and augmentations which do these jobs.

Article title (1)

a_claudiu (814111) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708978)

For once the summary of the article on /. is less sensational than article itself. From the article title "Panasonic unleashes 16-finger, hair washing robot" you'll expect Panasonic released a horde of 16 finger robots wandering on the streets looking to hair wash innocent victims in a "Thing" manner.

Re:Luckily for us... (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708830)

Probably the single best way to prevent that from happening would be to make the robot physically incapable of applying enough pressure to hurt someone, no matter what the program says.

Then as long as the fingers can't pinch skin or grab a bundle of hair and pull hard...

Re:Luckily for us... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33708964)

sheesh, haven't they seen logan's run

That's the point (2, Interesting)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 3 years ago | (#33709092)

These robots obey the three laws, so one won't ever go bezerk and crush the skull of a human...

I think that's precisely the point. It must be relatively easy to just not give the robot enough strength to harm a skull. So, you get a almost completely safe robot that handle's people's heads.

Five years later, the population becomes ready to accept robots in their homes. This is but a stepping stone to make people feel safe:

Head wash -> back massage -> chiropraxis -> open heart operations -> brain tumor removal -> handjob.

Not the same (1)

Beached (52204) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708478)

But does it talk to you about the weather or other small talk like stuff that the hair was (usually girl) does at the hair cut place? At least have it say stuff like "wow, that's really funny" or "yup yup"...

Re:Not the same (3, Funny)

socsoc (1116769) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708502)

The annoying small talk is why people first buy a flowbee and then later a regular razor. My gas pump doesn't ask stupid questions, neither does the self-checkout at the supermarket. I welcome these new robot hairoverlords and their lack of idle chit chat.

Re:Not the same (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33708542)

This is where you learn to interact with other human beings.

cashiers aren't human beings (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33708548)

dumbass!!!

Re:Not the same (1)

Klinky (636952) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708858)

Vapid meaningless small talk is about is the old timey version of twitter...

Re:Not the same (4, Insightful)

gmhowell (26755) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708896)

Difference is that twitter doesn't hang it's boobs in my face when she's washing my hair.

Re:Not the same (2, Insightful)

mikerubin (449692) | more than 3 years ago | (#33709116)

your gas pump doesn't pop up the "Do You Want a Car wash Today?" question?

I know its suggestive selling, but if I'd wanted a car wash I would have driven to the car wash, not the fuel pump.

Now, if I was asked if I wanted a car wash yesterday I would buy it just to see the results.

Re:Not the same (1)

nospam007 (722110) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708720)

But that girl gets 3 bucks an hour, it makes sense to develop a robot to save all that dough.

Re:Not the same (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33708848)

She can make more if she wears lose fitting low cut shirts.... just saying.

Re:Not the same (1)

oiron (697563) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708980)

What's the electricity and maintenance cost of the thing, though? Initial investment? Expected lifetime?

The girl may actually turn out to be cheaper in the long run...

Re:Not the same (1)

CarpetShark (865376) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708898)

But does it talk to you...like...(usually girl) does at the hair cut place?

No, but if there's no one around to stop it, it'll go to town on your genitals.

Can you look down it's shirt? (1)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 3 years ago | (#33709022)

... or admire the figure-hugging white coat as it fusses over you. If not, I'm not interested.

Heights (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33708486)

This is called Heights of laziness. Or it should be used for a person who don't have hands.

-V

Re:Heights (3, Informative)

BeefMcHuge (1594193) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708504)

This is called Heights of laziness. Or it should be used for a person who don't have hands.

-V

From TFA

"The robot was developed to assist caregivers in hospitals and health-care facilities and is the product of a Panasonic program that is developing robotic technology for health care and welfare services."

"Panasonic said the robots are designed to provide a more comfortable life for the elderly and people with limited mobility while reducing the burden on caregivers."

Re:Heights (1)

Undead Waffle (1447615) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708790)

"The robot was developed to assist caregivers in hospitals and health-care facilities and is the product of a Panasonic program that is developing robotic technology for health care and welfare services."

Ah! Brilliant plan! Give them to the poor so when we find out the robots make your hair fall out they can sue and cease being poor!

Re:Heights (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33708878)

"Panasonic said the robots are designed to provide a more comfortable life for the elderly and people with limited mobility while reducing the burden on caregivers."

Isn't personal care like this exactly what they're getting paid for?

Re:Heights (1)

CarpetShark (865376) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708916)

This is called Heights of laziness.

I tend to agree. I cut my own hair (it's quicker, easier, and more reliable, and I get better at it, unlike my last barber). However, one of the few nice things I remember about going somewhere to get a haircut was the element of service. Sometimes it's just nice to have another person groom you and look after you. I guess that's why some people still go to barbers for a proper shave.

Although I suppose they've had machines for massage for a while, but people still use a real masseur/masseuse.

more lies in slashdot story summaries: (1)

Kristopeit, Mike (1905452) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708494)

which have THE SAME dexterity as human fingers

human finger dexterity is aided by human thumbs, human wrists, human arms, and all under the control of the very same human, complete with intimate knowledge of the systems maintaining the hair production.

oh the humanity (1)

poptones (653660) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708558)

Not to mention the human boobs, which get in our face and make the whole trip worthwhile.

Re:oh the humanity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33708788)

ah the boobs ... of the 30 year old 300 pounder who's sweat you can't remove later even after bathing ...

best just stay at home and watch some videos at http://www.hotsex.com/

now if they give these hands to a real doll!

deja vu look (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33708498)

it looks so 1950s!

I for one... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33708520)

welcome our new hair washing overlords.

Re:I for one... (1)

zrbyte (1666979) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708596)

and dandruff will be a thing of the past

Re:I for one... (1)

Mitsoid (837831) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708808)

along with your hair.... I don't see an "OH S**T MY HAIR IS CAUGHT IN YOUR FINGERS" button on the chair... so one would probably assume if the robo-fingers hit a knot, its bye bye to that bit of hair ;-)

Finally! (4, Funny)

definate (876684) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708522)

Finally we have developed hair washing technology. I have struggled with this all my life, and Panasonic feels my pain. It is so confusing to was your hair, sometimes I use all 10 fingers (and thumbs), while other times I only use 6. I am unable to maintain consistency, and I'm never sure how much I should wash and rinse. Sometimes I don't rinse, other times I spend the rest of the day rinsing. The portability of this machine will make it practical in every day life, I could take it to work with me, take it on a holiday, and wash my hair to the machines content. Luckily the two robot arms have the same dexterity as human fingers, because my fingers have the same dexterity as robot fingers. In this way, we will be a perfect match.

THANKS PANASONIC, YOU'VE SOLVED ALL MY PROBLEMS!

What could possibly go wrong? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33708560)

If there is an electrical spike or software crash that causes the hands to accidentally give their client a lobotomy?

I think these things should be more appropriately called Death Machines. And NO, I didn't read the article; I don't have too. Pure logical deduction on my part demonstrates the danger of these machines.

I am never going to trust mechanical, computerized hands around my head and neck. Even shaking hands with one of these mechanical Monsters can be dangerous [cbsnews.com] .

Re:What could possibly go wrong? (2, Insightful)

DarwinSurvivor (1752106) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708742)

Right, because I'm sure they spent extra money on motors with that amount of power in them. Seriously, do people worry that the little electric wheeled toys from McDonald's will go flying accross the room and put a hole in someone's leg???

Re:What could possibly go wrong? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33708774)

...aaand this is how you know that you must stop watching Robocop reruns

Re:What could possibly go wrong? (0, Troll)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708904)

Someone could mod it for short repetitive, vertical 'washing'
If it runs MS, it could get the next get "Stuxnet" and wash too much.
A trip to the ER for "reattachment".

Look at the size of that thing! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33708588)

If you lack the dexterity to wash your own hair, how would you go about moving a garbage can sized robot on wheels with a matching steel framed solid based chair?

This would probably be more useful in hair dressing salons ... u know, 1 less wage, 1 expensive robot.

Problem solved? (3, Interesting)

cbope (130292) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708590)

One has to wonder... exactly what problem does this solve? In order for this to be successful commercially, it will have to cost less than the equivalent of paying someone to do the washing by hand. If you look at automatic hair driers which are fairly common in hair salons, it makes sense, because the cost of the machine is low compared to paying someone to do the job. This on the other hand I can't see ever being cost effective; the cost of the robotics, software and safety considerations are too high to make it commercially viable. Neat idea but hardly a successful, sellable product.

Re:Problem solved? (4, Insightful)

jackbird (721605) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708656)

Healthcare/rehabilitation settings. People with limited mobility or missing limbs.

Re:Problem solved? (2, Insightful)

CrashandDie (1114135) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708850)

Indeed. We heard the same kind of critics when the electric wheelchairs came out, saying that they would cost more than hiring someone to push the person around.

Truth is that if this means a carer can take care of another patient during the 20-40 minutes this machine is massaging disabled person A, then that's 40-80 minutes gained; or some 10-20GBP. If this machine is installed in a home or institute, that would conservatively account for some 60GBP a day.

Not so ludicrous after all.

Re:Problem solved? (3, Insightful)

Luckyo (1726890) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708988)

The total sum is probably much higher, because this is aimed at Japanese market, where people are aging rapidly, while immigration laws are some tightest in the world.

As a result, there simply aren't enough workers to deal with the aged, typically at least partially disabled people. So the money has been thrown at robotics to do most of the carer's work instead. This is one of the examples.

Re:Problem solved? (1)

vlad30 (44644) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708680)

This only applies when you can get cheap labour i.e. a teenager that wants this job and has dropped out of school, these days they are all to good for that or at least smart enough to realise while still in school the parents are willing to pay the bills. In the caregiver scenario this would need to occur during school hours, limiting available workforce.

Re:Problem solved? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33708752)

Dude, it's got 16 fingers! Do you know how hard it is sourcing hairdressers with those credentials outside the immediate vicinity of Chernobyl and Pripyat?

Re:Problem solved? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33708828)

"One has to wonder... exactly what problem does this solve?"

Japan has an aging population. Soon there will be more people requiring a carer than the number of available carers.

Re:Problem solved? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33708966)

The problem it solves is potentially avoiding hiring foreigners with Japan's declining birth rate.

Wallace and Gromit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33708598)

The reason you don't see Wallace with one of these is that the guy doesn't have any hair.

I want 16 robotic fingers to rub/tickle my back (1)

mykos (1627575) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708646)

Do you hear me panasonic? I like the hair washing machine, but I'd love relaxing instasleep more...ahhh...

A hair-washing robot... (1)

bob5972 (693297) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708674)

...because washing your own hair is just too hard.

Re:A hair-washing robot... (4, Insightful)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708764)

Try do it with a missing limb. Or with atrocious artritical pains.
Then read carefuly the TFA. Actually, contrary to the /. customes, you may start reading the TFA until you hit: "to assist caregivers in hospitals and health-care facilities".

Re:A hair-washing robot... (2, Insightful)

ecorona (953223) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708880)

It is if you have musculary dsytrophy. Besides, robotics research will definitely help society in general in the future. Think big picture.

This is progress (4, Insightful)

vidnet (580068) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708684)

What's with all the comments saying that this is a silly/stupid/worthless invention? Panasonic has automated a dull task previously reserved exclusively for unskilled human labourers! This is /., when did we start longing for the manual human elements of mindless, repetitive work?

I, for one, wish Panasonic all the best in automating everyday tasks. I don't think I've seen a new machine to help with day-to-day life since the post office got an electronic stamp dispenser ten years ago. This is supposed to be the future!

When this thing has been field tested and gone down in price, you can probably find them at your local hairdresser's. Am I the only who'd like a two hour head massage for a handful of quarters?

Maybe it's also about gaining xperience (1)

Acetylane_Rain (1894120) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708912)

When this thing has been field tested and gone down in price...

I think this is the point of a lot of non-portable high-technology. You manufacture them to gain experience because maybe, just maybe, there'll soon be a market for robot servers. I mean, look at electric cars. There are a lot of companies trying to make one, and yet it's less profitable (if at all) than the standard gas/diesel models.

Japan has a rapidly aging population, so having a significant, if not exactly huge market, for service industry robots is by no means a long shot. Perhaps the future will be one robot to do them all, cut and wash your hair, give you a massage and perhaps, uhm, other things. But who knows, maybe specialist robots will be the rule. One robot to wash you hair, another to cut it, still another to give you a mani/pedicure.

Re:This is progress (1)

Luckyo (1726890) | more than 3 years ago | (#33709028)

There is another angle in this. To many lonely elderly, things like these are their primary human contact. Think about it for a moment - do you really want to spend your retirement after your spouse dies in solitude, cared only by machines?

Because this is where this kind of progress is openly headed. It essentially ignores your psychological needs, and focuses on just taking care of the body.

Xenophobic society full of retirees (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33709232)

The reasons why Japanese build all these robots to deal with everyday stuff are two-fold: 1: the population is getting older, more people needed for elderly care, 2: reluctance to hire in foreign people to do that work, basically a xenophobic society getting more and more full of retired people.

This makes robot solutions bloom.

And note: I'm not saying it's a bad thing. Let's get more robots to do manufacturing, so we can do it locally and don't need to ship inferior junk from China.

its a cover... (1)

ckeo (220727) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708708)

They are really doing research for the sex toy industry... and testing the technology on body parts that are less easily injured.

Re:its a cover... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33708826)

my first thought. Then came robotic masseuses and physical therapists, in that order.

The Big Bang Theory... (5, Informative)

ekran (79740) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708712)

This, and its usage, was pretty much covered in the latest episode of The Big Bang Theory.

Somebody's gotta say it... (5, Funny)

hyades1 (1149581) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708766)

Within 10 minutes of this thing going on sale to the public, somebody's gonna have their dick in it.

Re:Somebody's gotta say it... (1)

ckeo (220727) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708778)

Then sue because there was no warning label. :/

Re:Somebody's gotta say it... (1)

hyades1 (1149581) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708820)

LOL...really. Thanks for a good laugh. You nailed it. And realistically, what company wouldn't think it's going to happen sooner rather than later?

Re:Somebody's gotta say it... (3, Funny)

mysidia (191772) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708814)

They can re-use the chatroulette genitalia detection algorithms, with some touch sensors added, to prevent that dangerous use, perhaps?

Re:Somebody's gotta say it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33708846)

Or write a program and add some accessories to make it really work? ;)

Re:Somebody's gotta say it... (1)

gmhowell (26755) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708906)

They can re-use the chatroulette genitalia detection algorithms, with some touch sensors added, to prevent that dangerous use, perhaps?

Not if they want to sell to the slashdot crowd.

A Million Prostates Cry Out At Once.. BEN! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33708870)

imagine the possibilities for this invention for prostate cancer screenings!

Do you expect me to get my hair washed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33708894)

No mister Bond... I expect you to die.

A failure to understand the buying process (1)

mbstone (457308) | more than 3 years ago | (#33708924)

Your wife or GF doesn't go to the salon just to get clean hair. She goes to get out of the house. She goes to interact and gossip with the other people there. This device will sit unused no matter how effective it is in deterging oil and dirt from hair.

I wonder ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33709134)

If this thing will beat my stunningly looking hair dresser who massages my head while washing it, asks me whether it's not too hot and says that my hair is so beautiful while she plays through it with her hands looking at me in the mirror with those big bambi eyes of her.

Malware on this thing could get really nasty .. (1)

Qbertino (265505) | more than 3 years ago | (#33709162)

Whenever I see fairly powerful human-interaction-robots like these I can't help myself but think of the possibilities of malice with one of those.
Take this one for instance: Imagine this one with a virus on it that reprograms it to crush your skull instead of gently massaging it.
I wouldn't want to use one, not only because of this, but for reasons I'll mention in another comment as well.

Please let it have a web interface (1)

zentext (1470769) | more than 3 years ago | (#33709214)

A web interface, a sensible OS, scriptable application code, and a few security holes. Endless potential for laughs. Meanwhile, I'm still waiting for a back scratching AI. Never mind chatting through a terminal Mr Turing, when I can't tell if it's a machine or human giving me a back scratch, I'll accept that AI is really here.

I don't want no robot washing my hair. (1)

Qbertino (265505) | more than 3 years ago | (#33709236)

I don't want a robot washing my hair. I'll either do it myself or - as a viable alternative - I'll have that cute hairdresser with that sexy grundge outfit and the punky rasta hairdo with scissors and comb tattooed on to her arm (!) wash my hair after cutting it. I bet I could get like 10 000 haircuts + washing from her for the price of that robot. ... This robot must be a insanely expensive maintenance nightmare - and it's no where nearly as attractive as aforementioned hairdresser.

Seeing this reminds me of the fact that it's not only always software developers endeavoring on notably harebrained (no pun intended) ideas.

My 2 cents.

You are all ignoring the most important question (2, Funny)

Michael_gr (1066324) | more than 3 years ago | (#33709260)

Will we have to tip the robot, and if so, how? Does it accept batteries?
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