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Soviet Shuttle Buran Found In a Junk Heap

CmdrTaco posted about 4 years ago | from the wipe-away-a-single-tear dept.

Space 226

gruenz noted the somewhat sad photo slideshow showing what appears to be the Soviet Space Shuttle Buran, lying in a Moscow suburb junk heap. Of course I don't read Russian, so it might also be a carnival ride rusting.

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

They should be thankful (2, Insightful)

Danathar (267989) | about 4 years ago | (#33721270)

That they did not spend a crazy amount of money on what ended up in the U.S. as a net negative to what we COULD of had. The shuttle had some success and worked but it was way more expensive than it was sold to be and ended up tethering the U.S. to low earth orbit for decades instead of moving on like we should have to a permanent moon settlement and Mars.

Not News (4, Interesting)

WED Fan (911325) | about 4 years ago | (#33721280)

I remember seeing pictures of Buran on the junk heap about 10 years ago. Why is this news today?

Re:Not News (4, Funny)

Rogerborg (306625) | about 4 years ago | (#33721342)

I remember seeing pictures of Buran on the junk heap about 10 years ago. Why is this news today?

THIS. IS. SLASHDOT!

Re:Not News (1, Funny)

smallfries (601545) | about 4 years ago | (#33721356)

I can read Russian just fine thanks. For your information this IS news because it is a carnival ride rusting. Sheesh even Taco pointed that one out for you.

Re:Not News (1)

interval1066 (668936) | about 4 years ago | (#33722074)

"I can read Russian just fine thanks.

Yeah, we commentators should have known YOU read Russian. Silly us.

Re:Not News (4, Informative)

arivanov (12034) | about 4 years ago | (#33722372)

I have some doubts about you being able to read russian.

The original article (which is mostly pics) does not refer to any carnival rides. However it is in Moskovskij Komsomolec which is pretty much the Russian equivalent of the UK Sun or the German Build. Classic tabloid stuff.

As far as seeing a rusting hulk of a spaceship on ax Soviet Block scrapyard. Well really - nothing new there. Quite a few other examples come to mind. For example if you drive around Sofia on the ring road there is a fighter jet in a reasonably good condition (much better than the Buran on the picture) parked in one of the laybuys. It is nowdays prime location on the ring road for "truck stop and servicing" by practicioners of the oldest human profession. I can think of at least a couple of examples where there are serviceable tanks, missile launchers and other gear located in similar locations. As the saying goes - welcome to the wild east...

Re:Not News (4, Funny)

craash420 (884493) | about 4 years ago | (#33722748)

For example if you drive around Sofia on the ring road there is a fighter jet in a reasonably good condition (much better than the Buran on the picture) parked in one of the laybuys. It is nowdays prime location on the ring road for "truck stop and servicing" by practicioners of the oldest human profession.

Great, I discover this after I spent all of my time in Burgas!

Re:Not News (0, Troll)

Danathar (267989) | about 4 years ago | (#33721380)

Because CmdrTaco says so..that's why

Re:They should be thankful (4, Insightful)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | about 4 years ago | (#33721378)

...ended up tethering the U.S. to low earth orbit for decades instead of moving on like we should have to a permanent moon settlement and Mars.

I'll take the Hubble Space Telescope and the myriad of other LEO scientific/communication satellites over your pie-in-the-sky Buck Rogers fantasies any day of the week.

Re:They should be thankful (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33721614)

We would have had all of that and a lot more without the shuttle.

At some point, someone will mention the shuttle mission to fix Hubble's focus, without mentioning that we could have built and launched another five Hubbles for the cost of that mission alone.

Face it: the shuttle was pure PR; they wanted something that looked like a plane. Re-usability looked good on paper but it cost more per launch than using disposable vehicles, and that's without even taking the massive manufacturing cost into account.

Re:They should be thankful (2, Interesting)

GooberToo (74388) | about 4 years ago | (#33722062)

We would have had all of that and a lot more without Congress.

Fix that for you. The shuttle that flies today is not the shuttle that was originally designed. In fact, the design criteria and requirements changes numerous times because of congressional mandate. When Congress was done, we suddenly had a pig on a fuel tank and dual boosters which could only service lower orbits. The original craft was much more utilitarian, capable of servicing much higher orbits, albeit with a smaller payload area.

Realistically, the shuttle, at inception, did have potential to meet some level of desired service criteria but Congress ensured that was never going to be possible.

"could of had" (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33721406)

That's "could HAVE had" you imbecile.

Re:They should be thankful (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33721480)

No, the laws of physics, reality, chemistry,biology and engineering "tethered" us to LEO. There's nothing out there, and it's hard to get there. Who cares? The South Pole is millions of times more hospitable to humans than LEO, but no one gets bent out of shape that we haven't colonized it. You Space Nutters are sad. Get over it. Oh, and it's "COULD *HAVE* HAD", not "of". This is elementary.

Re:They should be thankful (2, Funny)

elrous0 (869638) | about 4 years ago | (#33721636)

"Space Nutters," now THAT'S a show name! We'll get Ron Moore to produce, Scott Bakula to star, and Syfy to air. Quick, Jimmy, get me Hollywood on the phone!

Re:They should be thankful (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33721906)

Great idea, we can pinpoint the revisionist history and every single one of the delusions and lies that Space Nutters believe in. It's a religion with its beliefs and "end of the world" scenario. Sad, really. They *think* they're rational and scientific, but Space Nuttery is one of the most irrational beliefs to come out of the XXth century.

Re:They should be thankful (3, Insightful)

countertrolling (1585477) | about 4 years ago | (#33722250)

...Space Nuttery is one of the most irrational beliefs to come out of the XXth century.

:-) Yep, damn near as crazy as Flying Machine and Horseless Carriage Nuttery from all the previous centuries..

Re:They should be thankful (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33722702)

That's not the point.

making a horseless carriages and flying machine happened in almost the same decade, and just after the invention of the essential piece, the combustion engine.

Anyway the first planes and cars were made with not too expensive parts and machinery and did work and start doing something useful in a few years.

On the other hand even going ti LEO is expensive and only governaments(or big corporation...which are scarily becoming more powerful than governaments) can reach it. It is quite useful though. Even governaments have difficulties finding money to go above LEO.

So the situation is quite different. When you talk about previous century nuttery you talk about things people could invent and experiment with in their backyard, when you talk about space you talk about something that even the richest countries have a difficult time with.

Re:They should be thankful (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33721986)

""Space Nutters," now THAT'S a show name! We'll get Ron Moore to produce, Scott Bakula to star, and Syfy to air. Quick, Jimmy, get me Hollywood on the phone!"

SyFy wouldn't air something like that. Your show idea has too much science fiction. Try the History Channel.

Re:They should be thankful (5, Informative)

samkass (174571) | about 4 years ago | (#33721606)

That they did not spend a crazy amount of money on what ended up in the U.S. as a net negative to what we COULD of had

In many ways, Buran was what the US could have had. It had no SSMEs, which remain one of the most complex engine systems ever built. It had no solid rocket boosters, which caused Challenger's demise and severely limited the failure modes of the vehicle. And it could be operated entirely by computer and remote control, meaning for many missions no crew or their equipment need consume launch weight.

It lacked capabilities that Shuttle had, but it was a pretty reasonable compromise that would have probably had significantly higher return on investment.

Re:They should be thankful (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33721798)

Actually failure modes are basically the same. A result of having a vehicle attached to the side of the booster that you can't easily eject at lower speeds and altitudes and expect it to glide anywhere. BTW, the boosters never need to be replaced (they still use parts from the first shuttle missions, just with better 'O' rings)

The SSME's, while complex, saved money in the long run. Building new rocket engines is not cheap. Having a set of re-usable engines made perfect sense for a re-usable vehicle, and the complex throttling ability was needed for Astronaut comfort/safety.

Re:They should be thankful (1)

GooberToo (74388) | about 4 years ago | (#33722184)

and the complex throttling ability was needed for Astronaut comfort/safety.

I read this has to do with cargo capacity and altitude of orbit more so than anything else. Is this not true?

Re:They should be thankful (1)

dunkelfalke (91624) | about 4 years ago | (#33722914)

Energia engines were also supposed to be reusable.

Re:They should be thankful (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33721844)

You meant to say "...what we could HAVE had" there, correct? Because, well, saying "could of" makes no sense.

Re:They should be thankful (0, Offtopic)

manicbutt (162342) | about 4 years ago | (#33722160)

+2 for having some vision and ambition for us to have a permanent moon settlement.

- 15 for saying "could of," even though you correctly said "should have" in the next sentence.

Re:They should be thankful (1)

rickb928 (945187) | about 4 years ago | (#33722852)

Actually, Buran probably cost 20B Rubles, and the expenditure was unsupportable. Some would say that this alone precipitated the economic collapse of the Soviet Union, but I think we can give their military and good ol' Ronnie some credit.

Don't think so (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33721274)

Given that the Buran was destroyed by a hangar collapse: http://www.buran.ru/images/jpg/bbur90.jpg

Re:Don't think so (3, Informative)

Vectormatic (1759674) | about 4 years ago | (#33721464)

wikipedia lists 5 russian orbiters at least partially constructed:

- Buran, destroyed in hangar collapse
- Ptichka, 95% completed, stored at the baikonur facility in kazachstan
- Baikal, incomplete, located at baikonur
- 11F35K4, partially dismantled, located outside the Tushino machine building plant near Moscow
- 11F35K5, dismantled

i'd say this might be 11F35K4

i didnt know about Buran being destroyed though, such a shame

Re:Don't think so (1)

Vicarius (1093097) | about 4 years ago | (#33721742)

They might have rebuilt it after it was destroyed. I vividly remember seeing it with my own eyes in Gorky park in Moscow [spacedaily.com] .

Re:Don't think so (1)

Vectormatic (1759674) | about 4 years ago | (#33721918)

wikipedia lists the craft in gorky park as the OK-TVA, a static full scale test model built for load/heat/stress/vibration testing

Re:Don't think so (2, Interesting)

acedotcom (998378) | about 4 years ago | (#33721994)

i have to agree after doing some reading that this is k4 and not Buran. i was confused by the headline as well because i knew that Buran was destroyed. i guess when you come across a FREAKING SPACE SHUTTLE and you know that Russia only had one successful one then its the first thing to think.

Wikipedia says that it is "Partially dismantled, remains outside Tushino Machine Building Plant, near Moscow." It is sad to know that something pretty much as awesome as that is just sitting outside, but if thats how things are then i guess the only thing i could hope for would be to get to Russia so i can crawl around inside of it.

Re:Don't think so (2, Informative)

Vectormatic (1759674) | about 4 years ago | (#33722440)

yup, i knew they had two (buran and ptichka), but i just found out they had three more orbiters in various stages on construction (among which this K4), and about a dozen static full scale models for structural testing etc...

So yeah, if i had tripped over that thing in moscow, i would have screamed "buran" too (and crawled inside to pretend to be a cosmonaut)

It is a bleeding shame to see these historical artifacts left in the junk-yard like they are, Ptichka apparently is stored at baikonur together with K3, i wonder if they are tourist-viewable (although i dont really like the idea of a trip to kazachstan)

Re:Don't think so (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33722166)

    The Buran was squished quite a while ago. It's a shame, but shit happens.

    There were other things that they built that looked like orbiters. There were several aerodynamic mockups (like the US orbiter "Enterprise"). I wouldn't be terribly surprised to find that the pieces shown in the photo weren't necessarily even a named or numbered shuttle. The US orbiter "Endeavor" was built from spare parts for the "Discovery" and "Atlantis". Before it was constructed, they would have just been spare parts. When the US space shuttle program is finished, either the end of 2010, or sometime in 2011, I wouldn't be totally surprised to hear about spare orbiter parts laying about in odd places. The US gov't is kind of pissy about hiding their secrets away. I'm confident that the named and complete units will end up at museums, but the unnamed "spare parts" will end up somewhere like this [google.com] or this [mentalfloss.com] . There are plenty of other facilities to dispose of old parts at too.

We know why this was posted... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33721282)

so let's get this out the way.

In Soviet Russia, Buran shuttles YOU!

Translation (1)

Ltap (1572175) | about 4 years ago | (#33721284)

It looks authentic, but does anyone have a translation of the article?

Re:Translation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33721390)

Here is the Translation

And unprecedented case. Seemingly abandoned spaceship on the streets of Moscow - it is something from the realm of fantasy. But alas, this is the true reality. Correspondent "MK" discovered orbiting Soviet "Buran" play like garbage on the outskirts of the capital. Nobody cares what was once a symbol of cosmic power of our country.

Re:Translation (4, Funny)

AaxelB (1034884) | about 4 years ago | (#33721412)

I've heard good things about this small, obscure start-up that's done a lot of work on machine translation and has a pretty good site available. Maybe you should give them a shot [google.com] ;)

Re:Translation (1)

Animaether (411575) | about 4 years ago | (#33721558)

I started this small, unknown, a good thing to hear, many people are in machine translation is complete, there is a very good place. You May Have on the fire [google.com] ;)

Re:Translation (1)

Anonymusing (1450747) | about 4 years ago | (#33721858)

I do not know how much is a good thing, a town full of listening machine translation, there is a great place. You [google.com] ;)

Re:Translation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33722198)

"The impossible can happen. One could say that abandoned space ship on a Moscow street is sometinh in the realm of fiction. But, sadly, this is the very true reality. Correspondent of “” found the Soviet orbital "Buran" lying about in the capital suburbs. Nobody cares about what was once the symbol of the space power of our country."

Re:Translation (1)

Cyberax (705495) | about 4 years ago | (#33722318)

Basically translation is: "Authentic Buran lying in a junk heap. That's a shame, because no one cares about what had been a symbol of country's space might".

Re:Translation (1)

Penguinisto (415985) | about 4 years ago | (#33722630)

Chrome asked me if I wanted it translated automatically - did a fairly decent job of it.

The caption says it is Buran. (3, Informative)

chfriley (160627) | about 4 years ago | (#33721286)

I did take a year of Russian in college, and it is a bit (well, very, very rusty), but it seems to say that it is Buran and it has been "sacrificed" and it laments the fact that it was once a symbol of the Soviet power in space but is now junk. That is no where near an exact translation, but a rough translation of parts of the caption.

"" is buran in Russian
"" is essentially "Soviet" (some variation)

Re:The caption says it is Buran. (1)

Chrisq (894406) | about 4 years ago | (#33721292)

Google translate [google.com] says And unprecedented case. Seemingly abandoned spaceship on the streets of Moscow - it is something from the realm of fantasy. But alas, this is the true reality. Correspondent "MK" discovered orbiting Soviet "Buran" play like garbage on the outskirts of the capital. Nobody cares what was once a symbol of cosmic power of our country.

Re:The caption says it is Buran. (1)

ebuck (585470) | about 4 years ago | (#33722728)

Except that it isn't. The original poster is full of bull. Look at the photos to the rear, no space shuttle takes off with scaffolding welded to it's posterior. This must be a training / simulation mock-up of the real thing.

There's other hints to it being a mock-up, like the lack of full tiling.

Re:The caption says it is Buran. (1)

hondo77 (324058) | about 4 years ago | (#33722930)

Looks like they put power lines on that scaffolding, too. ;-)

Re:The caption says it is Buran. (0, Redundant)

Chrisq (894406) | about 4 years ago | (#33721304)

Google translate [google.com] says: And unprecedented case. Seemingly abandoned spaceship on the streets of Moscow - it is something from the realm of fantasy. But alas, this is the true reality. Correspondent "MK" discovered orbiting Soviet "Buran" play like garbage on the outskirts of the capital. Nobody cares what was once a symbol of cosmic power of our country.

Re:The caption says it is Buran. (0, Offtopic)

Chrisq (894406) | about 4 years ago | (#33721306)

apologies for duplicate post - I got the "original context lost" message and posted again!

Re:The caption says it is Buran. (5, Informative)

Em Ellel (523581) | about 4 years ago | (#33721470)

Google translate says:

And unprecedented case. Seemingly abandoned spaceship on the streets of Moscow - it is something from the realm of fantasy. But alas, this is the true reality. Correspondent "MK" discovered orbiting Soviet "Buran" play like garbage on the outskirts of the capital. Nobody cares what was once a symbol of cosmic power of our country.

Surprisingly close to accurate.

Actual translation:

"Sometimes impossible is possible. You would think that an abandoned spaceship lying on the streets of Moscow is something out of science fiction, but unfortunately this is reality. A Correspondent of "MK" discovered a soviet orbiter "Buran" lying like trash in the capital's suburbs. Nobody cares about what once was a symbol of the space might of our country"

(And yes, "Buran" is not a name of a ship, its a type of ship.)

Re:The caption says it is Buran. (1)

powerlord (28156) | about 4 years ago | (#33722042)

Pity the Smithsonian air and space doesn't pick it up to showcase next to their orbiter. Yeah, its not "american", but it does symbolize the Space Race/Arms Race between the US and USSR.

Re:The caption says it is Buran. (1)

TheStatsMan (1763322) | about 4 years ago | (#33722538)

I like "cosmic power" a little more than "space might." +1 google.

Re:The caption says it is Buran. (1)

chfriley (160627) | about 4 years ago | (#33721392)

I guess unicode didn't make it.
The five letter word in quotations (looks like an upside-down "g" then "ypah" is Buran. (5th line, 4th word in the first photo caption)
Then the "cobetckNN" (backwards NN) is essentially "Soviet" (right before Buran).

There are a few other words about it being in the outskirts of Moscow.

Re:The caption says it is Buran. (1)

morgaen (1896818) | about 4 years ago | (#33721966)

Well "" you too, you insensitive clod!

well (0, Troll)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 4 years ago | (#33721288)

If we had done the same and gone back to the Apollo program, 14 people would still be alive.

Re:well (4, Insightful)

JoshuaZ (1134087) | about 4 years ago | (#33721574)

If we had done the same and gone back to the Apollo program, 14 people would still be alive.

Right, because no one died in the Apollo 1 fire http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_1 [wikipedia.org] . And because no one almost died on Apollo 13. And because no Soviets died in craft similar to the Apollo http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soyuz_11 [wikipedia.org] .

If we had stayed with Apollo type craft there would have almost certainly been more fatalities. Space travel is very dangerous. This isn't going to change anytime soon and wouldn't be different if we had used Apollo-like vehicles. Indeed, I'd tentatively guess that the reduced expense of such vehicles might mean many more launches and thus likely even more fatalities.

Re:well (1)

Sir_Lewk (967686) | about 4 years ago | (#33721604)

And to think how many people would still be alive if we gave up on building ships a few thousand years ago!

Re:well (1)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | about 4 years ago | (#33722682)

If we had done the same and gone back to the Apollo program, 14 people would still be alive.

Unlikely. Hard as it may be to believe, Shuttle's safety record (two disasters in 132 flights) was better than Apollo (one disaster in twelve flights) or even Soyuz (two disasters in 106 flights).

Most likely result if we hadn't gone with Shuttle would have been more, smaller disasters (killing people two or three at a time rather than seven at a shot).

The caption says it is Buran. (0, Redundant)

chfriley (160627) | about 4 years ago | (#33721290)

I did take a year of Russian in college, and it is a bit (well, very, very rusty), but it seems to say that it is Buran and it has been "sacrificed" and it laments the fact that it was once a symbol of the Soviet power in space but is now junk. That is no where near an exact translation, but a rough translation of parts of the caption.

"" is buran
"" is essentially "Soviet" (some variation)

Re:The caption says it is Buran. (1)

Abstrackt (609015) | about 4 years ago | (#33721326)

"" is buran "" is essentially "Soviet" (some variation)

So when someone accidentally the whole thing they're actually trying to use unicode on Slashdot?

Which one is it? (4, Interesting)

hcdejong (561314) | about 4 years ago | (#33721294)

This page [aerospaceweb.org] contains a list of the Buran airframes and their locations. This page [aerospaceweb.org] has a photo of the OK-1K2 unfinished orbiter, this is the closest match to the photos shown in TFA. Aerospaceweb lists this orbiter as having been sold to the Technikmuseum Speyer in 2004, but I've recently been there and they have the OK-GLI atmospheric test bed on display, not OK-1K2.

Re:Which one is it? (5, Informative)

hcdejong (561314) | about 4 years ago | (#33721314)

Wikipedia has a better list, it seems. Most likely candidate is orbiter 2.02 [k26.com] :

At the time of the halting of the Buran-Energia program, Buran 2.02 was under construction on the factory floor at the Tushino Machine Building Plant just outside of Moscow. Her level of completion was estimated between 10-20 percent.

With funding gone, Buran 2.02 remained unfinished on the factory floor for a number of years. Recently she has been dismantled and moved outside to the back of the premises. She now lies exposed to the elements. Many of her tiles have since been stripped, such as those shown below can now be bought on the internet.

Re:Which one is it? (1)

wgibson (1345509) | about 4 years ago | (#33721364)

Mod parent up ..

Re:Which one is it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33721638)

I'd like to buy a Buran tile! Any ideas of where one might do that?

Re:Which one is it? (2, Interesting)

MacGyver2210 (1053110) | about 4 years ago | (#33722194)

Looking for it at the site via Google Maps, I came across something interesting in a nearby river.

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=moscow&ie=UTF8&t=k&om=0&hl=en&hq=&hnear=Moscow,+Russia&ll=55.851752,37.456099&spn=0.002803,0.008256&z=18&iwloc=A [google.com]

Is that a plane in midair, or is that a huge plane-shaped boat? Perhaps a huge seajet of some sort?

Re:Which one is it? (1)

MoonBuggy (611105) | about 4 years ago | (#33722700)

Google's scary data gathering skills to the rescue! I clicked on the little 'street view' icon, fully expecting to see nothing, but it popped up with a whole bunch of geotagged photos. Found one with a descriptive title and it's then just a short hop to the Wikipedia page [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Which one is it? (1)

ebuck (585470) | about 4 years ago | (#33722798)

A plane in midair, the plane is listing slightly to the port (making the tail section appear to be slanting to the bottom of the screen). That said, it's an excellent shot if you wanted to start your own "Soviet super secret giant seaplane conspiracy theory"

Re:Which one is it? (1)

FluffyBob (589615) | about 4 years ago | (#33722882)

It is an Ekranoplan. 'Huge sea jet of some' sort is pretty close.

It is real, its not THE buran (1)

voss (52565) | about 4 years ago | (#33721298)

Its either part of an incomplete buran-class ship or a static test model.
There were several of them partially built when the program was canceled
in addition to several static test models.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buran_program [wikipedia.org]

The caption says it is Buran. (0, Redundant)

chfriley (160627) | about 4 years ago | (#33721302)

I did take a year of Russian in college, and it is a bit (well, very, very rusty), but it seems to say that it is Buran and it has been "sacrificed" and it laments the fact that it was once a symbol of the Soviet power in space but is now junk. That is no where near an exact translation, but a rough translation of parts of the caption.

"" is buran
"" is essentially "Soviet" (some variation)

(Slashdot seems to be having issues at the moment with pages failing to load and not submitting so hopefully it does not submit multiple times)

Re:The caption says it is Buran. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33721322)

Perhaps it is the training module version for the ground crews and was not an actual flying craft?

Re:The caption says it is Buran. (4, Informative)

voss (52565) | about 4 years ago | (#33721324)

Buran is not just one ship but an entire class of ships, there was one finished (destroyed), one partially finished (in Kazakhstan)
and several more in various states of unfinishedness.

This one is possibly 2.02
http://www.buran-energia.com/bourane-buran/bourane-modele-202.php [buran-energia.com]

military operating craft just like this (1)

peter303 (12292) | about 4 years ago | (#33722896)

There were several articles [abc.net.au] about a secretive "mini-shuttle" being tested by the US military. Its supposed to be maneuverable in orbit, and perhaps landable.

Amazing... (5, Funny)

advocate_one (662832) | about 4 years ago | (#33721316)

slashdot having problems... target website holding fine... "In Soviet Russia, Buran slashdots you..."

Kudos to advocate_one (1)

Zontar_Thing_From_Ve (949321) | about 4 years ago | (#33721532)

I know that Soviet Russia meme gets overdone, but that is one of the funniest things I've seen here in a long time. Well done, advocate_one!

Re:Amazing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33721646)

Excellent Soviet Russia joke. I snorted coffee out my nose.

From Google Translator (1)

casals (885017) | about 4 years ago | (#33721336)

"And unprecedented case. Seemingly abandoned spaceship on the streets of Moscow - it is something from the realm of fantasy. But alas, this is the true reality. Correspondent "MK" discovered orbiting Soviet "Buran" play like garbage on the outskirts of the capital. Nobody cares what was once a symbol of cosmic power of our country.
Natalia Muschinkina"

Ah, it is MK... (2, Informative)

Jade_Wayfarer (1741180) | about 4 years ago | (#33721352)

Well, it's not newspaper analogue of Fox News, but still very close - well-known "yellow paper" tabloid. So it's not _the_ "Buran", it's just some model / unfinished project, as it was said above. Still, it's not much worse than fate of original "Buran", which now just serves as a cheap attraction in local theme park.

Re:Ah, it is MK... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33722134)

Buran is not the name of a single ship but of a class of ships. This probably is Buran 2.02 and is correctly identified when called just Buran.

Burn a Buran Day (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33721398)

Oh no, my secret got out!

I was collecting them for the Burn a Buran Day. Anyone wanna contribute?

Re:Burn a Buran Day (1)

tverbeek (457094) | about 4 years ago | (#33721930)

I have no mod points, but I must laugh.

That's not a junkyard (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33721562)

That's the backyard of the Russian Museum of National Science.

-s

Exact translation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33721580)

As a native Russian speaker - here is my attempt at literary English translation:

Sometimes unimaginable happens. You would think that abandoned space ship on the streets of Moscow is realm of science fiction.
But unfortunately - this is a sad reality. Our correspondent found Soviet spaceship "Buran" abandoned in a heap of garbage on the
outskirts of the capital. Nobody cares about what used to be a symbol of space ambitions and achievements of our country.

Buran in Germany- (1)

gatzke (2977) | about 4 years ago | (#33721612)

There is a Buran in Germany at the Speyer Technik museum.

http://blog.flightstory.net/681/russian-space-shuttle-buran-transported-to-german-museum/ [flightstory.net]
http://sinsheim.technik-museum.de/node/1327 [technik-museum.de]
http://sinsheim.technik-museum.de/en [technik-museum.de]

They have two awesome sister technical museums near Frankfurt/Stuttgart. Sinsheim has planes (both supersonic passenger planes) and the Buran is at the Speyer along with more space stuff. Both have a good amount of military stuff and tons of autos. Trains. Model trains. Chainsaws. Sewing machines. Steam Engines. Automatic organs. Motorcycles. A lot of the planes are set up so you can crawl around in them, and you can get very close to a lot of the cars.

Also, they are simple museums, not a lot of glitz or reading. Here is a car, model, year. Here are some more.

However, the best part may be the rides. Germans have a different sense of liability. They have crazy rides that are not supervised, very much buyer beware. Six story steel tube slides. Self loading roller coasters and go-carts. The best was a boat jump thing that winches you up a include, then drops you down a rail into a pool. Awesome fun.

I love reading about the Buran (1)

mdm-adph (1030332) | about 4 years ago | (#33721648)

...and it's fully automated first flight. As I recall, it did the whole thing under independent computer control -- was this an incredible achievement for the time?

Why is it sad? (1)

digitalhermit (113459) | about 4 years ago | (#33721672)

I understand that there's a memory associated with the object and certainly the shuttle played a role in Earth history. But ultimately, it's just an object. As I'm gearing and girding up for another hurricane season, I keep on thinking how much *stuff* I have. I admire those people -- and in Russia it seems to be a cultural thing -- who can easily give up objects. Maybe it's years of living under the USSR, or maybe it's the bleak landscape (in some areas), but my Russian friends seem not to fret about throwing things away. Me? I have a ticket stub from a U2 concert that I'm keeping. I have a cigarette lighter from my crashed 3000GT. I have a couple cartridges from an Atari 2600. They're just junk, but I have not been able to throw them away.

Hell, maybe it's the crappy cars they keep on telling me about. All of them were just a moment away from the trash heap anyway.

Re:Why is it sad? (1)

JustNiz (692889) | about 4 years ago | (#33722030)

>> maybe it's the crappy cars they keep on telling me about. All of them were just a moment away from the trash heap anyway.\

Boy those Russians really did copy *everything* from America.

Re:Why is it sad? (2, Insightful)

OmniGeek (72743) | about 4 years ago | (#33722128)

For me, as a space enthusiast and aerospace professional, the sad part is that *anyone* would get a shuttle orbiter project so close to operational that they could launch, orbit, and land a fully-automated prototype -- and then just lose that entire program. The physical remnant is, as you say, just "stuff," and not really important in itself. What I (and, I believe, others) mourn is the loss of a manned space-launch program that came THAT close to being operational, regardless of just whose program it was. I, for one, still believe that the more different parties we have with active space programs, the better it is for humanity as a whole; there's a big solar system out there, with both resources and hazards aplenty, and the long-term benefit of the species definitely includes being active in space.

Re:Why is it sad? (1)

interval1066 (668936) | about 4 years ago | (#33722346)

"I admire those people -- and in Russia it seems to be a cultural thing -- who can easily give up objects. Maybe it's years of living under the USSR, or maybe it's the bleak landscape (in some areas), but my Russian friends seem not to fret about throwing things away. Me? I have a ticket stub from a U2 concert that I'm keeping. I have a cigarette lighter from my crashed 3000GT."

I think your over-generalizing in your grand self-psychoanalysis of this story. People keep things, from Russia to, apparently, your house. I suggest that rather than draw parallels between your own rather nutty para psychological profile to Soviet times, you instead look to more practical matters such as the costs involved in housing and upkeep of a huge spacecraft like the Buran. As a symbol of Soviet technical achievement having made one un-manned space flight, it ranks with the Sputnik. Compared with your self-absorbed proclivity to pack rat junk, its not even in the same ballpark. Not even on the same planet. End of discussion.

Ozymandias if ever there was one (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33721686)

My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings. Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair.

translation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33721834)

Translation:
Impossible is possible. It would seem, that space ship on the street of Moscow - it's from science fiction. But no, this is very real. Correspondent of "" found soviet orbital "Buran" laying around, just like garbage in the suburbs of capital. No one cares, that it was symbol of cosmic might of our country.

Symbol of Soviet Power? (1)

PowerVegetable (725053) | about 4 years ago | (#33721840)

I'm not sure I'd call Buran a symbol of Soviet power. If i remember correctly, it never had a manned flight and the only fully completed orbiter got just one unmanned flight.

Sure, a complete unmanned demonstration of a return-to-earth spaceship is impressive, but I'd hardly call this thing a "symbol" of anything outside of the Soviet Union's passion for the me-too copycat Space Race.

If I were nominating symbols of the Soviet space program, I'd go with Mir, Sputnik, Venera, Soyuz, Progress, the Proton rocket - all groundbreaking projects and far more important than Buran.

Re:Symbol of Soviet Power? (1)

interval1066 (668936) | about 4 years ago | (#33722152)

"If i remember correctly, it never had a manned flight and the only fully completed orbiter got just one unmanned flight."

THAT is the question I was wondering about; was a Buran ever launched? I remember when they trotted that thing out. My first reaction was "Oh yeah, they copied the shuttle." Except bigger. But then, nothing. I in fact distinctly recall wondering in the late 90's wtf ever happened to it. I guess the Soviets couldn't afford to fill the gas tanks.

Translated Russian Page Article (1)

PyrousLavawalker (1716674) | about 4 years ago | (#33721952)

Here is the Russian translation according to google translate. And unprecedented case. Seemingly abandoned spaceship on the streets of Moscow - it is something from the realm of fantasy. But alas, this is the true reality. Correspondent "MK" discovered orbiting Soviet "Buran" play like garbage on the outskirts of the capital. Nobody cares what was once a symbol of cosmic power of our country. Natalia Muschinkina Views: 41,285

Slashfic? (1)

dragonhunter21 (1815102) | about 4 years ago | (#33722174)

From the pictures, the Buran looks like the Space Shuttle screwed a Concorde.

duh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33722200)

http://englishrussia.com/index.php/2008/07/30/where-do-shuttles-go/#more-2006 that wasn't so hard to google, was it?

Dear Sir/Madam.. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33722304)

I'm Mikhael Afrcanvsky. I'm for the former administrator of the Russian Space Agency. I have in my possession in the outskirts of Moscow a fully functional Buran spaceship. I'm able to sell it for 419 MILLION DOLLARS for foregin investors. Unfortunately, due to my country currency crises I have currently no money. A common friend refered you as being an honest and hardworking person. If you're willing to help me covering initial transaction costs and shipping, I'll glad share with you 10% of the amount received from the investors: no less than FORTY MILLION DOLLARS.

Yours,
Mikhael Afrcanvsky.

Come on (1)

radioid (1801172) | about 4 years ago | (#33722352)

This is Slashdot, not English Russia.

Russia looks like fun! (1)

F34nor (321515) | about 4 years ago | (#33722390)

Naked chicks, booze, flipping over cars, and rusting aerospace; fucking awesome.

Didn't they sell it on Ebay? (1)

scharkalvin (72228) | about 4 years ago | (#33722606)

I seem to remember a slashdot story from a few years ago that the Russians had put the shuttle up for sale on Ebay.

Um, Google Translate? (1)

gravis777 (123605) | about 4 years ago | (#33722836)

Of course I don't read russian, so it might also be a carnival ride rusting.

http://translate.google.com/translate?js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&sl=auto&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mk.ru%2Fphoto%2Fsocial%2F1090-buran-prinesennyiy-v-zhertvu.html [google.com]

Seriously, how hard is that?

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