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Researchers Test Space Beer

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the rocket-of-suds dept.

Australia 113

With space tourism becoming a real possibility in the near future, brewers are trying to figure out how to provide a good beer in space. To this end, a non-profit space research corporation Astronauts4Hire will begin testing an Australian brew created to be enjoyed in microgravity. From the article: "In the past, NASA has also sponsored studies on space beer, and whether or not the popular beverage can be brewed in space. Under current policies, however, alcohol remains forbidden on the International Space Station."

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0G beer (1)

tomhath (637240) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741434)

What do the bubbles do in zero-g?

Re:0G beer (4, Informative)

toastar (573882) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741494)

What do the bubbles do in zero-g?

You've seen this [youtube.com] right? the part your asking starts about a min in

Re:0G beer (1)

biryokumaru (822262) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741708)

Dude, learn how to link youtube videos [youtube.com] . Also, this [youtube.com] time is far more applicable.

Re:0G beer (2, Insightful)

milkmage (795746) | more than 3 years ago | (#33742294)

that's a blob of water with air blown into it.
beer is carbonated/under pressure - bottom line - you need a gizmo to drink it:

NASA did a couple experiments with carbonated beverages:

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2001/ast21sep_1/ [nasa.gov]

By dispensing the drink into a collapsible bag inside the bottle, the pressure around the fluid can be constantly controlled, thus preventing the carbonation from coming out of solution too quickly. The image on the right shows the dispenser being used aboard the space shuttle. Note the tape stuck to the top-right corner of the dispenser that reads "50" -- astronaut humor. Image courtesy BioServe.

Similar technology should prove effective for carbonated space beers. Unfortunately it doesn't lend itself to the traditional frosty glass mug! Instead, beverages are dispensed into a special bottle (pictured above) that screws onto the dispenser. The bottle itself, which contains a collapsible bag, is internally pressurized. The pressure around the bag is slowly released as the beverage enters, maintaining the drink under constant pressure and producing a palatable soda or beer.

here's a piece about a space keg:
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn276-beer-balls.html [newscientist.com]

Re:0G beer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33743028)

Note the tape stuck to the top-right corner of the dispenser that reads "50"

Read "50" as "50 cents", a common amount of money required to get an old coco-cola glass bottle out of a vending machine in america.

Re:0G beer (1)

philcheesesteak (1697792) | more than 3 years ago | (#33742658)

After about 6 minutes into this video [youtube.com] is a discussion of fizzing and a view of diamagnetically [wikipedia.org] levitated beer, for an earthbound simulation.

Re:0G beer (1)

mcneely.mike (927221) | more than 3 years ago | (#33742488)

Your beer would just coalesce into one big dominant bubble, like a game of Osmos?

Re:0G beer (1)

worx101 (1799560) | more than 3 years ago | (#33742660)

What a waste of time and money

Re:0G beer (1)

c6gunner (950153) | more than 3 years ago | (#33743616)

Why do you hate science?

So they do exists.... (1)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 3 years ago | (#33744558)

What a waste of time and money

Why do you hate science?

We seem to have a science fundie here!

Vodka (0, Offtopic)

odies (1869886) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741456)

Why not just make Vodka? It's a lot better and doesn't have the same problems. Also it's a lot less fattening.

Re:Vodka (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741604)

There are Russians on the space station.

Russians!

Ruskys!

That is why we don't want Vodka on the ISS.

Have you ever drunk with a Russian?

Re:Vodka (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33742764)

Have you ever seen a Russian drink a glass of water?

Re:Vodka (1)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 3 years ago | (#33744564)

Have you ever seen a Russian drink a glass of water?

Well ... since Vodka is Russian for water....

Re:Vodka (1)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741610)

Because vodka is more complicated to produce than beer.

Making vodka is like brewing beer, except you have the added step of distillation.

Although, if you're going to be transporting it in a gravity well, vodka's a better bet since you get more bang for your weight.

Re:Vodka (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33741676)

Yes, extremely complicated.
1) Take a bottle of ethanol.
2) Label it "vodka".
3) ???
4) Profit!

Re:Vodka (1)

Dahamma (304068) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741740)

As long as we're doing the overused meme thing...

In Soviet Russia, vodka makes you!

Re:Vodka (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741934)

Trick about that one is, it's probably true.

I bet most russkies were made because of vodka.

Re:Vodka (1)

Dahamma (304068) | more than 3 years ago | (#33743394)

And died, ironically.

Re:Vodka (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | more than 3 years ago | (#33743934)

Alcohol may lower calcium which may make a problem of losing calcium in space worse.

Are they hiring? (2, Funny)

Dthief (1700318) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741480)

I want to get free zero-g flights AND drink beer for my job

Re:Are they hiring? (1)

Megahard (1053072) | more than 3 years ago | (#33742040)

The next research project will be how to clean beer barf in zero G.

Re:Are they hiring? (1)

gagol (583737) | more than 3 years ago | (#33744136)

No problem I have an opening, only thing, you will have to pay is to work...

Abbey beer (1, Offtopic)

Lord Lode (1290856) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741484)

It better be some good abbey beer from Belgium.

Fermenting in space? (4, Informative)

pclminion (145572) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741510)

I thought the article would be about how to formulate a beer that drinks well in space. Instead it seems to be about actually brewing in space.

I really don't see why you would want to do that. Even a simple brewing setup involves several bulky pieces of equipment. And five gallons of beer fermenting will release somewhere around 200 liters of CO2 (number pulled from the depths of my memory, could be wrong) which is obviously not something you want an excess of in space.

However, the observation that the yeast seemed to be more "efficient" in space makes sense to me. Fermentation in beer basically consists of three phases. During the first phase, the yeast consumes oxygen (aerobic respiration) as it reproduces in the wort. Once the yeast population gets high enough, they switch their metabolism to anaerobic and commence the fermentation proper. Finally, the yeast begin to aggregate together (it's called "flocculation") and form large globules which drop out of suspension and form a "cake" on the bottom of the fermenter. In a zero-G environment, these globules will instead stay in suspension and the yeast will remain in an active state for a longer period of time.

Re:Fermenting in space? (1)

wiredlogic (135348) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741574)

Typical slashdotter here and haven't RTFA but I would guess that they are interested in using yeast for vitamin synthesis on long missions.

Re:Fermenting in space? (4, Funny)

Korin43 (881732) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741636)

I would guess that they are interested in using yeast for vitamin synthesis on long missions.

If it was me, I'd be more interested in beer for the long missions.

Re:Fermenting in space? (1)

DeathElk (883654) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741882)

Nope, just some beachy type dudes who want an excuse to drink beer in space.

Re:Fermenting in space? (1)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741646)

In a zero-G environment, these globules will instead stay in suspension and the yeast will remain in an active state for a longer period of time.

Centrifuges are wonderful appliances.

Not sure about the other issues, maybe starting with more yeast and figuring out a way to deplete the mash of oxygen?

Re:Fermenting in space? (3, Interesting)

compro01 (777531) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741728)

200L of CO2 wouldn't be a huge problem. An average human produces more than twice that every day.

Re:Fermenting in space? (1)

suomynonAyletamitlU (1618513) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741762)

And five gallons of beer fermenting will release somewhere around 200 liters of CO2 (number pulled from the depths of my memory, could be wrong) which is obviously not something you want an excess of in space.

It isn't the fact that it's exuding CO2, although that's probably a big thing; it's the fact that it has to consume a corresponding amount of oxygen to get there. Spaceships are VERY sensitive to weight and power consumption. If you have to bring extra supplies of oxygen for your brewing process, or one or more CO2 scrubbers per batch, you are going to seriously screw with that. I mean, okay, it's not a mission to mars, but every gram you send up--solid, liquid, or gas--has to be paid for in rocket fuel, and rocket fuel's expensive. Anyway, once the CO2 was there, if you captured it, you could probably use it as a reaction gas for maneuvering (assuming it was pure enough); the excess isn't a problem, it's what gets consumed.

Not to mention this is all so that people can get drunk in one of the most dangerous places mankind has gone, where if you break a window or a wall, everyone dies.

Re:Fermenting in space? (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741868)

, but every gram you send up--solid, liquid, or gas--has to be paid for in rocket fuel, and rocket fuel's expensive.

This is why we need a way to hang a pressurized straw from the surface of the earth up into the atmosphere where the shuttle is.

And once it's in place, pump CO2 or Oxygen up to the shuttle through the gigantic straw, as needed.

Re:Fermenting in space? (1)

zwarte piet (1023413) | more than 3 years ago | (#33744828)

Just oxygen and beer.

Re:Fermenting in space? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33741898)

What world do you live in where you can get drunk on any amount of alcohol? I thought drunk was something that happened after consuming a certain amount of alcohol and that there is a continuous spectrum between perfectly sober and falling down drunk.

Is the concept of drinking less foreign to you? Yea there are times when I want to drink alot and get drunk. But there are also times when I want to drink less and not get drunk. There are various reasons to do this. It might be to get a buzz. It might be to relax. It might be to be more social. Or, it might be because alcohol makes food taste better. Or it might just be because drinks can taste good all on their own. A proper drink can be as delicious as an ice cream cone.

I feel bad for you if you've never experienced the joys of drinking to not get drunk.

Re:Fermenting in space? (1)

eclectus (209883) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741916)

Fermentation is pretty much an anaerobic reaction - No oxygen required. The C02 is a byproduct of turning sugars into alcohol.

Re:Fermenting in space? (1)

dwywit (1109409) | more than 3 years ago | (#33742330)

Beer brewing starts off as an aerobic process - the yeast consumes all the dissolved oxygen, then it switches to the anaerobic phase, producing CO2 and alchohol from the fermentable sugars in the wort. So it does consume oxygen and generate CO2, and it all has to be accounted for - as well as the methane produced at the tail-end.

Re:Fermenting in space? (1)

dlgeek (1065796) | more than 3 years ago | (#33742514)

Keep in mind you're just removing the dissolved oxygen, not atmospheric oxygen, so it's not like you're taking it out of the air tanks. If you could find a way to extract that prior the the fermentation process, it could even be a net gain. The excess CO2 isn't atmospheric, so it wouldn't be a safety threat - you could either scrub it or find a way to utilize it - some kind of pressurized thruster or something or even just vent it into space. Eventually, we'll probably have full ecospheres in zero-g habitats so you'd just pipe it to your green house module and let the plants take care of it.

Re:Fermenting in space? (1)

volkerdi (9854) | more than 3 years ago | (#33742882)

Keep in mind you're just removing the dissolved oxygen, not atmospheric oxygen, so it's not like you're taking it out of the air tanks. If you could find a way to extract that prior the the fermentation process, it could even be a net gain.

You need that initial dissolved oxygen, as the aerobic phase is when the yeast cells multiply. Without it, you're liable to get a stuck batch.

Re:Fermenting in space? (3, Insightful)

pclminion (145572) | more than 3 years ago | (#33743158)

Keep in mind you're just removing the dissolved oxygen, not atmospheric oxygen, so it's not like you're taking it out of the air tanks. If you could find a way to extract that prior the the fermentation process, it could even be a net gain.

If there was no dissolved oxygen at the outset, you would have to pitch a LOT more yeast. In my experience the volume of yeast increases by a factor of 10 or more during the reproduction phase (although this is based on measuring the primary yeast cake, which admittedly isn't entirely composed of yeast).

I do like the idea of using it to grow plants. Perhaps barley? ;-)

Re:Fermenting in space? (1)

NotBornYesterday (1093817) | more than 3 years ago | (#33745712)

Keep in mind that the dissolved oxygen is not naturally present in the post-boil wort. It WAS atmospheric prior to being dissolved.

Re:Fermenting in space? (1)

MidnightBrewer (97195) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741808)

Easy: you have to brew in space to keep the bubbles. Can you imagine how flat your beer would be after being subjected to 3 g's of acceleration? You're not even supposed to shake the can; launching it into low earth orbit can't be good for it.

Re:Fermenting in space? (1)

atamido (1020905) | more than 3 years ago | (#33743514)

If you let the beer sit after shaking it, won't the liquid reabsorb the CO2 again because of the pressure it is under?

Re:Fermenting in space? (1)

gagol (583737) | more than 3 years ago | (#33744216)

Amen, btw, I am abusing the product as we speeek.

Re:Fermenting in space? (1)

Cadallin (863437) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741932)

Um, because beer is water, and water is HEAVY? Therefore its enormously easier if you can recycle water you already HAVE rather than shipping the stuff from sea level. Which also is another major problem for beer in space. Beer is unquestionably affected by water quality. And you're going to be producing the equivalent of beer made with distilled water. Which would probably be quite disappointing. To put it another way, Does anyone really think beer produced with last weeks urine that's been run through reverse osmosis or other adequate purification is going to be remotely drinkable? It might be up to bud light standards, but I'd rather do without. Something like vodka is a MUCH better target. Or another distilled spirit that could be (approximately) made from a grain extract. Or just give up and make grain alcohol to mix with your Tang.

Re:Fermenting in space? (1)

jonwil (467024) | more than 3 years ago | (#33742664)

Stuff Vodka, I wanana see someone try Whisky in space.

Although I dont know you would put the barrels whilst the whisky ages for a few years.

Re:Fermenting in space? (1)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 3 years ago | (#33743886)

To put it another way, Does anyone really think beer produced with last weeks urine that's been run through reverse osmosis or other adequate purification is going to be remotely drinkable?

I'm not sure I follow. Would it taste worse or better than Budweiser? Their process is essentially the same.

Re:Fermenting in space? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33743136)

Overkill again - why dont nasa just recycle the astronauts piss and call it american beer.

Re:Fermenting in space? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33743522)

No, the article is not about brewing in space, although others have researched it. This is about consuming beer in space.

Re:Fermenting in space? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33743524)

Actually it's about testing a beer brewed on earth that is formulated for microgravity environments.

Re:Fermenting in space? (1)

vegiVamp (518171) | more than 3 years ago | (#33744438)

My understanding is that flocculation occurs as the yeast goes into what is basically an alcohol-induced coma; thus flocculation would still occur and the yeast would stop fermenting, but it wouldn't settle on the bottom of the bottle. Space brewing would require extra filtering equipment.

Re:Fermenting in space? (1)

dargaud (518470) | more than 3 years ago | (#33744610)

I really don't see why you would want to do that

Because it would be a LOT cheaper to use recycled water to make beer than to bring it out of the gravity well. I've drunk recycled water for a year and by itself it's not that great. Turning it to beer is a great improvement.

In a zero-G environment, these globules will instead stay in suspension and the yeast will remain in an active state for a longer period of time.

Yes, and how do you filter it out then ? It's supposed to occur slowly thanks to gravity, either towards the bottom [wikimedia.org] or the top [wikimedia.org] . So we'd at least need a new name for it! And if they need anybody up there for trials, I'm available. [and I just brewed some stout yesterday]

Misread... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33741522)

At first I read the title as "Researchers Test Spacebar"...

The Question Is... (4, Funny)

Relic of the Future (118669) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741544)

The question is, if you brew a beer in microgravity, where there isn't really a sense of what's "up" and what's "down", how do you know if you've brewed an ale or a lager?

Re:The Question Is... (1)

wiredlogic (135348) | more than 3 years ago | (#33742426)

Just call it an American cream ale and call it a day.

Re:The Question Is... (1)

ExploHD (888637) | more than 3 years ago | (#33743330)

how do you know if you've brewed an ale or a lager?

Depends if lager yeast or ale yeast are used. From there you determine the proper fermenting time and temp.

Re:The Question Is... (1)

rabiddeity (941737) | more than 3 years ago | (#33743862)

Depends if lager yeast or ale yeast are used.

Actually this isn't as important as you think. You can make ale with a lager yeast and lager with an ale yeast, it will just take longer and probably won't taste right. The temperature, however, is very important, because different yeasts prefer different temperatures. As it was explained to me, if the wrong temperature for the yeast is chosen either they won't multiply quickly enough and bacteria will overwhelm them, or they will start to consume the wrong sugars and produce bad things like fusel alcohols. (Random trivia: the name "fusel" comes from the German word for a bad brew.)

Grandparent's post is accurate because certain simple sugars settle to either the top or bottom of a fermentation vessel. The yeasts will tend to congregate where the food is, and the food depends on the temperature. Ales multiply quickly and ferment in the top of the vessel, while lagers go nuts at the bottom. Interestingly enough, most major beers nowadays labeled "lager" are actually ales. My guess is that since the sugars are completely homogeneous in space, assuming you can keep the bacteria out you might wind up with a very smooth beer as everything ferments evenly... but it will take longer to brew. Or you might end up with a completely awful beer.

To answer the GP's question, I guess this means that if it ferments further toward the enemy's gate, it's a lager?

Get a 5-gallon glass jug (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33741602)

Being a homebrewer making beer isn't that hard, if they really wanted to know how well it works have NASA go to the local homebrewing store (yes they do exist) buy a basic kit, teach the astronauts how to make beer on Earth and then have them do it in space.

Also the yeast is fermenting in a liquid so I don't see how it would make fermentation difficult for the yeast.

Re:Get a 5-gallon glass jug (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741626)

Idiot.

Re:Get a 5-gallon glass jug (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 3 years ago | (#33745612)

His method for making beer in space is perfectly sound, he just mistook the International Space Station for the USS Enterprise.

Re:Get a 5-gallon glass jug (1)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 3 years ago | (#33744572)

Being a homebrewer making beer isn't that hard, if they really wanted to know how well it works have NASA go to the local homebrewing store (yes they do exist) buy a basic kit, teach the astronauts how to make beer on Earth and then have them do it in space.

Also the yeast is fermenting in a liquid so I don't see how it would make fermentation difficult for the yeast.

And why do they bother training them to space walk when most people can walk by the age of 18 months?

strange brew that's also good for you (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33741616)

That would be home made Kombucha. Available right here on earth, now, for free, as in you make it yourself.

Space DUI (1)

cosm (1072588) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741642)

I want to be the guy who gets a space DUI. Totally worth it. "But occifer I warrz just going to the neerest lagraaange points derp."

Great Idea! (1)

Codename Dutchess (1782238) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741678)

Then we can have drunk assholes in space too! Boy, that'll be great. We'll have drunk husbands beating their drunk wives. Hopefully this will cause some catastrophic events up in space too. I can't wait for the first head on collision. Fucking shit, why don't they bring some guns up there too, while they're at it? Nothing mixes better than guns and alcohol! Weeehawwww.

Re:Great Idea! (1)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741748)

We need beer in space because there might be woman there. To quote Jerry Seinfeld:

Men even went to the moon just to see if there were any women there. That's why we brought that little car. Why would you bring a car to the moon unless there was some chance of a date?"

Fosters? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33741746)

Trust us Aussies to be at the forefront of getting smashed/pissed/sh!t-faced (pick your colloquialism) in space.

Perhaps micro-gravity will make Fosters drinkable? Nah. That will never happen. There's a reason we export Fosters and don't drink it at home.

Re:Fosters? (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741838)

The Fosters we refuse to drink in the USA is actually made in Canada. (just like the pseudo 'King Fisher' we also don't drink).

The Canadians always add enough corn sugar to any beer recipe to raise the alcohol about 1%.

They also skip 'unimportant' (any step who's omission doesn't lower alcohol content) parts of recipe's. (Like the copper brew kettles in the Canadian 'King Fisher').

Re:Fosters? (1)

jonwil (467024) | more than 3 years ago | (#33742626)

Knowing Fosters, they would take the micro-gravity Fosters brew, stick it in bottles labeled "Fosters Extra" and charge double the price.

Typical Aussies (2, Interesting)

muphin (842524) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741768)

The beer was produced as a joint venture between Saber Astronautics Australia, a new space engineering firm, and the Australian 4 Pines Brewing Company, located in Manly, a suburb of northern Sydney.
Typical aussies :) i live near Manly and never seen or heard of Australian 4 Pines Brewing Company... publicity stunt?

Re:Typical Aussies (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#33743748)

The beer was produced as a joint venture between Saber Astronautics Australia, a new space engineering firm, and the Australian 4 Pines Brewing Company, located in Manly, a suburb of northern Sydney. Typical aussies :) i live near Manly and never seen or heard of Australian 4 Pines Brewing Company... publicity stunt?

Is Manly in space? Maybe 4 Pines Brewing has all it's production already contracted by space tourism cruise operators?

Re:Typical Aussies (1)

mollusc (746594) | more than 3 years ago | (#33743872)

It's a rather nice small pub/brewery near the ferry wharf.

In other news... (3, Funny)

countSudoku() (1047544) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741800)

NASA Scientists also mention that "Space Brownies were invented in the '60s by Earth-bound hippies and no further research is needed in this area. Thank you."

Synthehol (1)

w00tsauce (1482311) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741802)

Shouldn't we be spending our time developing Synthehol?

Re:Synthehol (1)

JonySuede (1908576) | more than 3 years ago | (#33742432)

in the 50's until the 80's the CIA tried and they failed.. or they kept all the good stuff for them self

to learn more about this, search for MK Ultra. The experiment on mental hospital patients conducted by Donald Ewen Cameron [wikipedia.org] were utterly disgusting.

"Packing for Mars" says no... (3, Interesting)

dpbsmith (263124) | more than 3 years ago | (#33741864)

I found Mary Roach's Packing for Mars to be fascinating, informative, and it made me ROFLMAO about every third page.

On page 296 she writes "Beer is a no-fly, because without gravity, carbonation bubbles don't rise to the surface. 'You just get a foamy froth,' says Bourland. He says Coke spent $450,000 developing a zero-gravity dispenser, only to be undone by biology. Since bubbles also don't rise to the top of a stomach, the astronauts had trouble burping. 'Often a burp is accompanied by a liquid spray,' Bourland adds."

So we must assume that Astronauts4Hire have either not read the book, or didn't want to let the facts spoil their publicity ploy.

Mary Roach described herself on NPR as "having the mind of a twelve-year-old boy." The book is indescribably marvelous to those of us who are similarly gifted with youthful imagination.

Re:"Packing for Mars" says no... (1)

zmaragdus (1686342) | more than 3 years ago | (#33742018)

Centrifuge.

Might not be so 'human-friendly,' but it might do the trick.

Re:"Packing for Mars" says no... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33742340)

Sounds like a book I should get. :)

As for burp-trouble, wouldn't the joys of beer be well worth a centrifuge ride?

Re:"Packing for Mars" says no... (1)

metrometro (1092237) | more than 3 years ago | (#33743822)

This is why I only pack whiskey for microgravity trips.

Re:"Packing for Mars" says no... (1)

mollusc (746594) | more than 3 years ago | (#33743842)

OK, I'm good mates with the guy who's behind this beer. Let me assure you that they have actually thought about the whole bubbles-in-zero-G thing. And the whole reduced-sense-of-taste-in-zero-G thing. The current version of the beer is a very low carbonation, strongly flavoured Irish stout.

Re:"Packing for Mars" says no... (1)

gagol (583737) | more than 3 years ago | (#33744272)

What is ROFLMAO? si possible in french....

Testminetooplease (1)

goodmanj (234846) | more than 3 years ago | (#33742048)

IwonderifIcangetNASAtotestminetoo,itseemstobebroken.

Oooooh, space *beer*. Nevermind.

Re:Testminetooplease (1)

FunkSoulBrother (140893) | more than 3 years ago | (#33744156)

Well, you get your space beer at the space bar, so...

Pot would be easier (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33742112)

Would you rather be the first person to view the earth from space with a nice high, or the first person to float around in your own piss and vomit? NASA has always been ahead of the curve. Maybe they could point the way toward sensible attitudes about drugs.

WTF (2, Insightful)

The Grim Reefer2 (1195989) | more than 3 years ago | (#33742266)

To this end, a non-profit space research corporation Astronauts4Hire will begin testing an Australian brew created to be enjoyed in microgravity. From the article: "In the past, NASA has also sponsored studies on space beer, and whether or not the popular beverage can be brewed in space.

Why does that make me feel that we're getting closer to this?:

"Clevon is lucky to be alive. He attempted to jump a jet ski from a lake into a swimming pool and impaled his crotch on an iron gate. But thanks to advances in stem cell research and the fine work of Doctors Krinsky and Altschuler, he should regain full reproductive function again."

Re:WTF (1)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 3 years ago | (#33742988)

That sounds like it would be worthy of at least an honorable mention for a Darwin Award.

Re:WTF (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | more than 3 years ago | (#33743068)

I feel for that Clevon.... there goes his chance to receive a Darwin award without having to die for it!

Re:WTF (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#33743806)

Unrelated to OP in content, but title of the post is applicable:

Other studies have examined the type of container that would be needed to maintain the drink's carbonation in spite of the extreme pressure and temperature changes that accompany a ride into space.

WTF? Are they going to store the beer cans close to the rocket nozzle?
Because otherwise, what happens to the beer would be the smallest problem to the aforementioned "space riders".

Alcohol forbidden? (1)

bunyip (17018) | more than 3 years ago | (#33742458)

How many of the astronauts would be considered flight crew? So long as they're "flying", it would seem they'd be covered by 14 CFR 91.17, which is the 0.04% and 8 hour bottle-to-throttle rule. Oh, IANAL, but IAAP and wondering how many of the FAA regulations apply.

Hmmm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33742672)

Doesn't add up to me

I'll fork up good money to be a space tourist, but I'll knock back a few brews to reduce my clarity.

Maybe if I was blasted off into space in a typical rocket, I wouldn't mind having a few BEFORE takeoff for nerves, but why would I want to muck up my memory and perception of my limited time in space when I get there?

 

Spacewhat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33742766)

ResearchersTestSpaceBar. Success.

Loyalty. Beer. Underpants. (2, Funny)

Stormie (708) | more than 3 years ago | (#33742776)

As a distinguished space captain once said, "All I need from a crew is their complete loyalty. If I had that then they could drink beer in their underpants for all I care."

Re:Loyalty. Beer. Underpants. (1)

gagol (583737) | more than 3 years ago | (#33744326)

I think I just qualified for being a cosmonaut... or I am drunk.

Rounds? (1)

kramulous (977841) | more than 3 years ago | (#33742958)

Just make sure you don't invite those muthafuckers that try and weasel their way out of their round.

Problem solved! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33743096)

Well christ I found out what your problem was. Using an Australian Beer! Good grief why not just drink your own piss? Go for a decent European beer and problem solved!

Not to start a beer brand war but.. (1)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 3 years ago | (#33743902)

Coopers is infinitely better than that popular Dutch crap in the green bottle.

Re:Not to start a beer brand war but.. (1)

gagol (583737) | more than 3 years ago | (#33744344)

Coopers is infinitely better than that popular Dutch crap in the green bottle.

Coopers is infinitely better than that overpriced Dutch crap in the green bottle.

corrected for you...

Re:Not to start a beer brand war but.. (1)

zwarte piet (1023413) | more than 3 years ago | (#33744864)

I assume you refer to Heineken. The last few years for some reason Grolsch (wich isn't half bad) goes in green bottles too.

You know they're just screwing around when... (1)

Lord_of_the_nerf (895604) | more than 3 years ago | (#33743388)

...they start testing 'space blackjack' and 'space hookers'.

In space... (1)

choongiri (840652) | more than 3 years ago | (#33743498)

...no one can hear you barf.

Oh Slashdot (1)

dugrrr (582161) | more than 3 years ago | (#33744114)

How sad when there's this many comments and not one mention of either the Vomit Comet OR Fizzy Lifting Drinks.

0g plane is the Vomit Comet (1)

SirLanse (625210) | more than 3 years ago | (#33745914)

They call the plane that does the 0g roller coaster the Vomit Comet. This is where they want to test the beer for drinkability? Will they use Ale or Lager yeast and how will they decant it? It will need a filter and wont be very clear. A couple cans of Foster's 5.1% will make the trip to Mars go faster.
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