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New York To Spend $27.5 Million Uncapitalizing Street Signs

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the beware-the-big-letters dept.

Government 322

250,000 street signs in New York City feature street names in capital letters only, which is not the national standard. Having no other issues on the table, The New York City Department of Transportation has decided to fix the problem and put up proper signs featuring both capital and lower-case letters at a cost of $27.5 million. The Transportation Department hopes to have the job completed by 2018 with 11,000 of the most important improperly capitaled signs fixed by the end of the year. Catastrophe averted.

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322 comments

Budget? (0)

Niris (1443675) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761082)

I thought New York was one of the states with a budget problem recently. Good job, paper pushers.

Re:Budget? (1)

canajin56 (660655) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761166)

It's not the New York State government doing this, it's the New York City government.

Re:Budget? (1)

blizz017 (1617063) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761318)

It's not the New York State government doing this, it's the New York City government.

But it begs the question.. how much of the city's transportation budget is coming from the State and Federal government and how much of it is from locally generated taxes? I'd bet money that a large portion of that budget like most localities is funded off State & Federal taxes.

Re:Budget? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33761390)

I don't know, new york city pays the lion's share of new york state taxes anyway, it's our cash cow.

Re:Budget? (5, Insightful)

canajin56 (660655) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761810)

Oh, you're right, 100% of that money is coming from the State's fund for road sign replacement. NYC already has to replace 8000 signs a year due to wear and tear, or theft. They have elected to replace them with new signs, instead of identical signs. So while 100% of that is state money, 0% of it is new money. The Slashdot summary is actually another lie, like 99% of all Slashdot summaries. It's like if I decide "diet time" and so declare to my cat that next time we're out of frozen hamburger patties, I will buy the $10 box of extra lean patties, instead of the $9 box of medium patties. My decision cost me $1, not $10! In this instance, it doesn't even cost NYC more money for mixed-case signs, so their decision cost them $0, and Slashdot took $0 and turned it into millions, because outrage at government spending gives Slashbots a hard-on.

Re:Budget? (1)

residieu (577863) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761776)

With the MTA reducing service and jacking up fare prices, NYC has better places to spend transportation dollars too.

Re:Budget? (1)

Austerity Empowers (669817) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761304)

If it were the south I'd say they should just fix it when they repair signs with bullet holes in them. But since it's NY maybe they'll just replace them when they get urinated on.

Re:Budget? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33761684)

Looks like NYC is several thousand signs behind.

Re:Budget? (1)

JWSmythe (446288) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761314)

There's a mention of the Federal Highway Administration being involved. It's probably a national rule, and I suspect the fed gov't may be able to refuse road funds for failure to comply to minimum safety standards. blah, blah, blah.

  $27 million is nothing in the big picture of transportation funds. The 2010 MTA operating budget was $13.4 billion. You could add or remove $27 million from that, and it wouldn't be noticeable.

  On the other hand, I'm sure they'd prefer to do other things than install 250,000 new street signs.

Re:Budget? (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761782)

There's a mention of the Federal Highway Administration being involved. It's probably a national rule,

Yes, yes, it's a rule, so it must be done. Period.

That just points up the stupidity of the rules. Here's a novel idea: save $27 million by changing the rules.

$27 million is nothing ...

Alright then, carry on.

Re:Budget? (1)

lionchild (581331) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761888)

While I don't disagree that not changing working signs seems to be a waste of a LOT of money in a tight budget, but I guess my question would be, just how big is the NYC budget overall? In a budget where $25M is less than 1%, it would be easy to see how something could slide through like this.

Besides, the reality is that high-level budget makers aren't involved in how departments spend their money. If the Transportation took budget cuts and this was the only project they were doing in the coming fiscal year ...well, it seems to me that I'd question priorities of the folks leading Transportation, but not necessarily the money given to the department for projects.

I Think.... (5, Funny)

DIplomatic (1759914) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761106)

...it's a CAPITAL idea!

Re:I Think.... (1)

Syberz (1170343) | more than 3 years ago | (#33762126)

...it's a CAPITAL idea!

Looks like all the signs where in upper case so they decided to spend 27 mil to fix it.
*puts on sunglasses*
I think it's a capital idea.

YEEEEEEEEAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

- There, fixed it for ya.

Yeah... (2, Funny)

Sedated2000 (1716470) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761122)

Because with the economic woes, war in Afghanistan going poorly... we need to rush to uncapitalize the signs in New York. Or the terrorists win.

Re:Yeah... (2, Insightful)

Swarley (1795754) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761232)

As far as the economic woes, seems like as good a way to create jobs as any. It's basically just stimulus money that happens to be taking care of a long term issue at the same time.

Re:Yeah... (3, Insightful)

JonySuede (1908576) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761870)

I don't agree with you, it is not a good a way to create jobs as any. Replacing working sings is really much a textbook example of the Broken window fallacy

Re:Yeah... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33761320)

Because New York City contributes money to the war in Afghanistan. And $27.5 million is really a difference maker there.

Awesome (3, Funny)

jonnythan (79727) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761136)

This is a great initiative to implement when facing massive, crippling budget deficits.

Re:Awesome (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33761198)

It amounts to about $9k per day over the next 8 years. It's peanuts. You have any idea the rate of flow of money through the New York government?

People love to sensationalize these "big" numbers which are actually very, very tiny. They think these are big numbers because if THEY had that much cash, they'd be loaded. But no. It's peanuts.

Re:Awesome (1)

djrosen (265939) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761350)

Yeah! and its not like those peanuts could be used to feed homeless people, clothe the needy or help the elderly.

Re:Awesome (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33762040)

Yeah! and its not like those peanuts could be used to feed homeless people, clothe the needy or help the elderly.

27.5 million / 8 years / 100000 homeless = $34 per year per person, or about ten cents per day. Yeah, that will certainly put a dent in the problem. Oh wait, you homeless AND elderly. Then reduce that number by about 80%.

It's hilarious to watch people struggle with the quantities involved in daily life. Seriously, man, buy a fucking calculator.

Re:Awesome (1)

sycodon (149926) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761616)

It's dickheads like you that lead to giant government deficients.

It's "only" 27 million. How many other "only" this million dollars are there out there? And for something a STUPID as this.

Re:Awesome (2, Insightful)

Volante3192 (953645) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761814)

It's called perspective.

People have no qualms whining about the $50 billion the Department of Education is budgeted.
But dare to say the $650 billion Department of Defence budget could get cut a little, you're suddenly weakening the country, giving in to the terrorists and a very very bad man.

Cutting $50 billion out of a $1,000 billion deficit is peanuts, though.

Re:Awesome (1)

sycodon (149926) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761916)

The problem is that the Feds have a warehouse of bags full of 50 billion dollar peanuts.

Re:Awesome (1)

Volante3192 (953645) | more than 3 years ago | (#33762120)

Not really.

If you look at the budget allocations, four programs get around 70% ($2,500 billion in 2010): Defense, Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security.

That means every other department fights over the rest (which in 2010 totalled $1,000 billion). Education, Health and Human Services (FDA/CDC), Commerce (NOAA), Interior, Homeland Security (note: not part of Defense, and this includes Border Patrol and Customs), State Dept, NASA, Energy, Transportation, Justice, all have to divy up the remaining 30%.

Incidentally, the US brought in $2,500 billion in. So we can either cut everything the government does except social programs and Defense, or we can realize that the entitlement programs and multi-billion fighter jet contracts are tightning the belt on everything else that we actually do depend on the gov't to do. (Or maybe you'd just like us to close Supermax?)

Auction the old ones (5, Insightful)

Spiflicator (64611) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761140)

Certainly wont pull in anywhere close to the cost of replacements, but I imagine authentic street signs for particular streets would sell for a decent price.

Re:Auction the old ones (1)

rsborg (111459) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761532)

Awesome idea. You could bring in real $$ for the more famous streets (Wall St, Broadway, etc).

I've got a better idea. (1, Insightful)

jcr (53032) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761142)

Leave the signs as they are, and refund that money to the taxpayers.

-jcr

Re:I've got a better idea. (1)

pclminion (145572) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761268)

Yeah, that will be awesome! $27.5 million / 8 years / 8.4 million = a big fat check of $0.41 per year that you'll be getting back! Whoot! That's fucking large!

It would probably cost the city more than that just to organize the refund. People ought to learn to use a calculator. These numbers are microscopic.

Re:I've got a better idea. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33761342)

FYI, you don't actually refund the money. You simply don't take it in the first place. Sheesh.

Re:I've got a better idea. (1)

Volante3192 (953645) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761838)

OK, then,

Woot! I'm saved $0.41 cents a year!!

Honestly, you could probably find that in change on the ground.

Penny wise, dollar foolish. (4, Insightful)

markdowling (448297) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761370)

Because who cares if an ageing driver population can quickly scan signs and return their eyes to the road in an urban area, right?

Re:Penny wise, dollar foolish. (1)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761482)

Er, since when are all-capital signs hard to read?

Re:Penny wise, dollar foolish. (3, Informative)

VGPowerlord (621254) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761618)

I DON'T KNOW. YOU TELL ME WHICH OF THESE IS HARDER TO READ.

I don't know. You tell me which of these is harder to read.

Oh, and of course, to post this, I have to type extra paragraphs because /. has a "lameness filter."

Re:Penny wise, dollar foolish. (0, Offtopic)

SleazyRidr (1563649) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761694)

Well, for quickly picking out a street name I'd say the first one....

Re:Penny wise, dollar foolish. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33761942)

RTFA - they've done studies, and you are wrong.

Re:Penny wise, dollar foolish. (1)

mooingyak (720677) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761642)

TFA said so. Apparently that's why all caps is not the standard. I wasn't able to find a study to cite in 20 seconds, and then I lost interest in the topic.

Re:Penny wise, dollar foolish. (1)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761820)

Er, since when are all-capital signs hard to read?

Since forever.

That's why things that need to be easy to read (and that are prepared by people that know what they are doing) are written in mixed case, and have been for centuries.

All-caps are used to grab and focus attention, but are harder to read.

Re:Penny wise, dollar foolish. (1)

Damek (515688) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761578)

Aging driver populations should have to re-qualify for driver's exams every year.

And the DOT should be working with the MTA to re-design our city's streets for rapid busses and greater pedestrian and cycling improvements, not wasting time on piddly junk like this.

Re:Penny wise, dollar foolish. (1)

smooth wombat (796938) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761960)

re-design our city's streets for rapid busses and greater pedestrian and cycling improvements

Really? And just how do you propose to make thse changes? Are you going to make the sidewalks more narrow, thus giving New Yorkers more ammunition to whine about all the slow-moving tourists who bring billions to their economy each year?

Or perhaps you will knock down some buildings so streets can be widened. Maybe start with the Pan Am Building just north of Grand Central Terminal.

Considering I've been visiting The Big Apple for over half my life and stop by twice a year, the grid pattern of Manhattan is perfectly suited for both buses and bikes with the only thing that needs to be done is make specific lanes for each. Oh wait, that's what Bloomberg is doing [nyc.gov] as I speak.

Re:Penny wise, dollar foolish. (1)

slysithesuperspy (919764) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761868)

The same people who are bankrupting the previous generation? If it's so important maybe they could take the money out of their 401ks or something.

Re:Penny wise, dollar foolish. (1)

alvinrod (889928) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761968)

Anecdotal but I know an older gentleman who I used to help use a computer to scan in old photographs so that he could digitize them for his great-grandchildren. He always named the files and folders using capital letters because he said it made it easier for him to read them.

I wouldn't want to read a full paragraph of capital letters, mostly because my brain isn't trained to parse them very well, but for older people, it may be easier for them to read if all of the letters are capitalized. If I were to move far enough away from my monitor, I suspect that I would still be able to read words in all capitals whereas I would have a more difficult time reading the same sentence if it were properly using lowercase letters.

A good thought and it may be correct for the general population, but in my experience it may not be true for older folks. Older people might actually do better with the capital letters. Might make an interesting study for the transportation department.

Re:I've got a better idea. (2, Informative)

McGruber (1417641) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761842)

Leave the signs as they are

Signs are sheet metal with some paint on them.

Paint fades over time.

Ergo, the signs would have to be replaced anyway.

The article says that NYC is replacing 11,000 of their 250,000 street signs this year -- those are signs they would be replacing anyway, as part of routine maintenance.

Re:I've got a better idea. (3, Informative)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761978)

Leave the signs as they are, and refund that money to the taxpayers.

But the signs are going to need to be replaced anyway, so not changing them to lowercase as they are replaced wouldn't actually save the cost of replacement. There's a reason that the 2003 federal regulation at issue that requires that this be done gave until 2018 for it to be complete.

Mixed case? (1)

FrankSchwab (675585) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761160)

All that will do is cause the UNIX guys to froth at the mouth.

Capitals are the work of the devil!

Re:Mixed case? (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761510)

The my work here is done.

OTOH, it's not exactly hard to get them to froth at the mouth. Just a few quick ways:
1) How stupid is it I have to watch me casing
2) Why can't this have a good input like windows
3) You should have
4) Here is a new keyboard.
5) we cleaned the boxes out of your cube.

umm (1)

AxemRed (755470) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761176)

Does this have something to do with economic stimulus money that needs to be used or lost? I wouldn't be surprised with an idea this unusual and seemingly trivial...

Re:umm (1)

Volante3192 (953645) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761222)

Meh, for all we know they just didn't do enough construction.

Welcome to the world of budgets: if you don't spend it this year, you don't get it next year.

And you may actually *need* it next year.

Finally! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33761192)

I was getting tired of having street signs yelling at me. Damn all-caps street signs being rude!

What a waste (1)

youn (1516637) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761196)

and I know someone will have a very sophisticated argument for explaining why this is a good thing... I still think it's a waste now that it's done and things already work that way... why don't they give the $27 million in college financial aid or small business encouragement measure (yeah it encourages specifically paint industry, but that'snot the point)

Re:What a waste (1)

Sonny Yatsen (603655) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761250)

The only possible reason I can think of is that some readability studies found that mix case text is easier and faster to read than uppercase letters. Maybe there's an argument for reducing wear on roads for missing turns or something, although I can't imagine that the effect overall would amount to 27 million dollars.

Re:What a waste (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761444)

Government signs are actual interesting. There is a lot of thought and science in their design.

It was road signs designers who first understood that people don't need to actually read the whole word. If they have a standard design, and are recognizable, most of the time that's all people needs. If you change the standard people will take the extra moments to read ad register the name.

ok, maybe it's only interesting to me and a handful of others, but the amount of intelligence and smart design that's around road design is pretty cool.

27million dollars int; a lot of money when talking about a big city. a 1% reduction in traffic accidents would save that a lot quicker then you would imagine.

Re:What a waste (1)

Dragooner (1808336) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761722)

It's true, they even did research on things like font size and how visible you want/need them to be from certain distances. They also look at how many characters and text are too much information.

There is some fairly extensive research on signage. I am part of the small handful of others that are interested in things like this.

Bad Summary - Lowercase is easier to read (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33761238)

The summary doesn't mention why they are changing the signs:

The Federal Highway Administration said the new sign standards improve safety because they allow drivers to identify words more quickly, allowing them to swiftly bring their eyes back to the road.

This is a complete non-issue (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33761274)

If you RTFA, you'll notice that street signs have a life of about 10 years. You'll also notice that most of the funding is from the feds.

So basically, this is a complete non-story. The signs will have to be replaced anyway, and the mixed-case signs are easier to read, leading to an increase in safety (though marginal, I'm sure).

But yeah, this is surely a waste of money, let's forget any investment in infrastructure, massive budget deficit means we shouldn't repair anything... That's some quality thinking!

Re:This is a complete non-issue (1)

sycodon (149926) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761670)

We all know that ACs don't pay Federal Income taxes, so WTF to they care eh?

Re:This is a complete non-issue (1)

schwit1 (797399) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761748)

"You'll also notice that most of the funding is from the feds."

'the feds' don't fund, they spend. Taxpayers fund.

Drive the public mad ... (1)

Specks (798579) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761276)

lets replace the signs with leet speak. WALL st. will henceforth be named \/\/4LL 57!

ALL CAPS is like Yelling! (1)

nharmon (97591) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761284)

Don't you know, ALL CAPS is like yelling at someone! So they are working to make these signs more net-friendly. So when I tell you to go to 5TH STREET and BROADWAY, you won't have to ask me to quit yelling and I won't have to explain that I wasn't yelling and that is how the street names are actually spelled.

Hyperbole, much? (1, Insightful)

Guppy06 (410832) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761292)

FTFA:

"The Federal Highway Administration said the new sign standards improve safety because they allow drivers to identify words more quickly, allowing them to swiftly bring their eyes back to the road."

Yeah, pointless government waste.

Money well spent (5, Interesting)

bobdotorg (598873) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761328)

This is money well spent, at least on busier intersections, and exits from limited access highways.

Drivers can read / recognize mixed case from further distance than all caps.

It's not a great leap to conclude that with this change, drivers will make fewer last second swerves, or stop short less often. TFA alludes to this.

Safety increases ever so slightly, but for millions of people, and for many years.

Though if I were a NY tax payer I would prefer that they replace them through attrition. The fact that it will take until 2018 makes this seem to be partially the case.

Money well spent? (1)

pastafazou (648001) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761592)

$27.5 million because they claim your eyes will return to the road a split second faster, making the roads safer? Please provide some fact to back up that claim. How many accidents are officially recognized as being caused by the driver not being able to read a street sign fast enough?

Re:Money well spent? (1)

drumcat (1659893) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761700)

Headline grabbing. The signs have to be replaced over time anyhow. It's not the signs themselves that cost millions, but the people doing the work. All said, this money would probably be spent anyway, but now it's not in all caps.

Re:Money well spent? (1)

spazdor (902907) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761920)

Please provide some standards to back up your demand. Under what circumstances would a car accident be "officially recognized" as having been caused by too-slow reading speed, even if it was?

The answer, obviously, is none. Illegible signs only contribute to car accidents as a confounding factor which exacerbates other factors. In order for the sign to distract you, there has to have been an unexpected hazard to distract you from, and that hazard is what gets written down on the accident report.

Re:Money well spent (1)

Amouth (879122) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761656)

given average worked days a year is ~250 (5 days a week 50 weeks a year) over 8 years.. they need to replace 125 signs a day to hit 250,000. i'm not sure how many man hours it takes to replace a street sign - i know some are harder than others and some can could allow you to replace 2 or more at once.. but ... i'd say for a 2 man crew i would be surprised if they could replace more than 4 an hour.. given the average work time in a work day ~4-5 hours (8 -lunch -breaks -travel time) a 2 man crew lets say gets ~16 a day.. 125/16 = ~7.8

so you need roughly 8, 2 man crews working day in and out for 8 years to do this.. 16 people full time for 8 years to replace street signs... somehow i don't see that as being done through attrition.. yea i'm sure as normal sign maintenance happens they will adhere to the new standard and that will be taken from the pool.. but it is still a massive amount of work to be done.

Non-story (5, Informative)

NeoRete (628054) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761354)

In another article [nypost.com] about this states that NYC replaces 8,000 signs a year anyway due to wear and tear and has until 2018 to finish.
From the article:

The additional cost to the city, if any, will be "marginal" because it receives a steady stream of state funding for routine sign repairs and replacement, DOT spokesman Seth Solomonow said. The life of a typical sign is about a decade, so most of the city's signs would be replaced in the next few years anyway, Solomonow said.

They didn't follow federal regulations on road signage, but are fixing them now as part of regular maintenance.

Damn (1)

snookerhog (1835110) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761380)

I knew I should have listened to my mother and gone into the street sign business.

I could have been set for life!

Hmmm.. (1)

Jaysyn (203771) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761386)

I guess $108 / sign isn't too horribly high since you are paying for gas, workers, equipment, etc. but damned if they didn't pick a horrible time to decide they needed to fix what really amounts to a non-problem.

Re:Hmmm.. (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761564)

It is a problem. Currently, they cause more accidents. and it's over 8 years.
The government rolls on. stuff needs to be done.

How long do signs last? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33761406)

Replacing them over the next 8 years sounds like it may just be end-of-lifetime replacements ($3 million/year in replacing old signage seems fair). The budget seems big because NYC is one of the few cities in the United States with tens of thousands of street signs. I would love to see what NYCs budget is for repaving the roads.

This is ass backwards (1)

Xerion (265191) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761426)

If anything, capital letters are easier to read and fewer to learn (26 as opposed to 52). Foolish consistency should not cost $27 mil. Besides, where the hell did they come up with this budget. It translates to $100 per sign, seriously? All the while raising the subway fare every year...

End of the Year Budget Inflation (1)

tootalltom (1097273) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761434)

This is classic governmental end of the year expendature. If they don't spend the money, then they don't get as much next year, It really bothers me when beaurocrats spend money frivolously like this just to keep their current budget the same. In my opinion, this is the kind of governmental overspending that needs to be eliminated (along with porkrolling congressional bills.) And here's a bigger question, WHY CAN'T THEY USE THAT MONEY TOWARD THE 9/11 MEMORIAL TOWERS?!

Re:End of the Year Budget Inflation (2, Informative)

FuckingNickName (1362625) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761600)

Because taxpayer money is for maintaining roads, but not for building political monuments.

You buy the land and build your own towers.

Here's an idea! (0)

pastafazou (648001) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761454)

Fire every person responsible for this decision. Then put in a policy that when a street sign is damaged or worn and needs to be replaced, it gets done with the proper upper and lower case letters.

Re:Here's an idea! (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761638)

Here is another idea:
You take the time to learn about city operations and then realize that accidents cost the city money and this will actually save money, and lives? It's an 8 year project.

Attrition may take decades in some areas. Do you want to pocket up the money for all the accidents that didn't need to happen?

This is a good sensible decision. But hey, you just keep snuggling up to you arrogance through ignorance.

Re:Here's an idea! (1)

Joebert (946227) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761824)

Considering it's slated to take 8 years, I'm guessing that's how they're going to do it.

UPI article is deceptive. (4, Informative)

Remus Shepherd (32833) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761514)

Hold on! That UPI article is deceptive, and does not tell the whole story. Check out the original article in the NY Daily News [nydailynews.com] , which I found via MotherJones: [motherjones.com]

The mixed upper- and lowercase rule was adopted in 2003, but municipalities were given until 2018 to comply completely, Hecox said....The additional cost to the city, if any, will be "marginal" because it receives a steady stream of state funding for routine sign repairs and replacement, DOT spokesman Seth Solomonow said. The life of a typical sign is about a decade, so most of the city's signs would be replaced in the next few years anyway, Solomonow said.

So the signs are going to be replaced on a schedule where they would be replaced anyway, almost all of the funding comes from the routine sign replacement budget, and the whole deal was arranged back in 2003.

This is a non-story that some political jerks want to blow up into unreasonable proportions.

Re:UPI article is deceptive. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33761894)

But....but.... taxes! Big government! Incompetence! Socialist fascist nazis spending my hard earned money on services for me! Booga booga booga!

Re:UPI article is deceptive. (1)

Volante3192 (953645) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761932)

This is a non-story that some political jerks want to blow up into unreasonable proportions.

And apparently it's working, based on some of the posts in here.

Re:UPI article is deceptive. (1)

wiredlogic (135348) | more than 3 years ago | (#33762008)

Maybe NYC gets the luxury of replacing its signs every ten years but there are places in the rest of New York where you can still see barely legible 30+ year old signs with the zinc frames (think Sesame Street).

Cheaper than teaching it in the schools. (1)

billyoc (614185) | more than 3 years ago | (#33761664)

Given that they've removed the teaching of English grammar in the public schools in NYC, this might actually be the only lesson New Yorkers get on proper capitalization.

How about readability? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33761926)

I mean, reading all capital letters from a far is easier right?

Welcome to FARK (1)

imthesponge (621107) | more than 3 years ago | (#33762012)

where people write and approve troll articles to increase page views. Next up: "THE GUBMINT IS COMIN TO TAKE UR GUNS AWAY!!"

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