Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

China Blanks Nobel Peace Prize Searches

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the par-for-the-course dept.

Censorship 326

1 a bee writes "CNN is reporting that China is attempting to block all communication regarding Peace prize winner Liu Xiaobo. Even texting is affected: 'Text-messaging on mobile phones is not immune from censors, either. A Shanghai-based netizen, @littley, tweeted his unfortunate experience: "My SIM card just got de-activated, turning my iPhone to an iPod touch after I texted my dad about Liu Xiaobo winning the Nobel Peace Prize."' Might as well add Slashdot to the censored list." Further coverage is available from NBC.

cancel ×

326 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Well (4, Funny)

Yocto Yotta (840665) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841422)

You got to admire their attention to detail. I wish my government cared that much about ANYTHING.

Re:Well (1)

hguorbray (967940) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841430)

more thuggish than the thugees

-I'm just sayin'

Re:Well (1)

Buffaloaf (887591) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841432)

I thought it was ABACADABA. That's how I got through school

Re:Well (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33841950)

It's the code to turn the blood on, on the Sega Genesis version of Mortal Kombat. It's also the reason why we have a Ratings system for games, today.

Re:Well (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33841446)

if you are in America, your government cares that much about corporations keeping their money

Re:Well (4, Insightful)

BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841528)

I don't. I'm an American. Given my government's current track record, I think such efficiency and attention to detail would only cause the destruction of American civil liberties and rights to come that much sooner. Personally, I like government inefficiency. It is one of the only things that helps keep my government from going on a totally batshit-insane, effective power trip. Just imagine if all those tomes of laws, at both the federal and state level, were actually enforceable on a wide scale. We citizens would be royally fracked.

Re:Well (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33841854)

It might also cause people to suddenly care about setting the right direction for government.

Re:Well (0, Offtopic)

Raenex (947668) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842226)

We citizens would be royally fracked.

The word is fucked. But since you mention fracking [wikipedia.org] , here's an example of effective government regulation that's sorely in need.

Re:Well (0)

erroneus (253617) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841578)

A somewhat valid point. The U.S. government cares a lot about certain things though. Among them are many things that are not in the interests of our national security as it keeps various parties angry at the U.S. endangering all its citizens. Keeping the war machines running it number one on the list of what it cares a great deal about.

I was just thinking, though, that China is really fighting a futile effort. They are trying to keep people from knowing, learning and thinking. It's quite impossible with humans I think.

Re:Well (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33841904)

I was just thinking, though, that China is really fighting a futile effort. They are trying to keep people from knowing, learning and thinking. It's quite impossible with humans I think.

What China needs is religion. That seems to do a superb job of making people not want to know, learn or think.

Re:Well (1)

VanGarrett (1269030) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841978)

Buddhism wouldn't do the job there, though. Choosing from existing religions, they'd need some form of Christianity or Islam.

Re:Well (1)

rhathar (1247530) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842138)

Earlier popularizations of Buddhism would work fine, but you're right about the modern Buddhist culture.

One of the tenents of Buddhism (in the texts, at least) is to seek enlightenment by finding peace with your station in life. Questioning authority, striving to better your place in society and studying the science of the Universe only leads to discontentment and frustration.

Re:Well (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841606)

In America we privatize our Tyranny. Try getting one of your letters questioning the integrity of the GOP read on Fox News some time.

Re:Well (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33841770)

Why? You got the other networks to do that.

Re:Well (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841626)

At least China's reach stops at their borders. Here I'm free to write about all I want.

Oh, hell, Slashcode ruined a great joke that needs Chinese characters. Some day this comment will render correctly. Check back then.

Re:Well (2, Insightful)

SETIGuy (33768) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841656)

There are only two things that can get you that much notice from the U.S. government: 1) Try to start a war they don't want. 2) Try to stop a war they do want.

But, but... (5, Insightful)

thestudio_bob (894258) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841440)

China is just trying to protect it's citizens against the terrorist and child porn. Sheesh.

Re:But, but... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33841490)

China is just trying to protect it's citizens against the terrorist and child porn. Sheesh.

Due to either improper grammar or ambiguous phrasing, that almost sounds like China is trying to protects its citizens against terrorist porn and child porn.

Wait, did I just give people a new super-fear thing from which they need to protect the children by combining terrorism and porn? OH SHIIIIIIII-

Re:But, but... (1)

nschubach (922175) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841820)

Well, technically you could have terrorist porn. Could you imagine if someone were having sex somewhere along a busy New York street (or having a XXX film played in Times square)? That might cause more accidents and traffic than bombing a store. ;)

Re:But, but... (4, Funny)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842076)

INT. SMALL BRICK AND MUD HOME SOMEWHERE IN DESERT -- NIGHT

NADA enters stage right, catching RASHID at a makeshift workbench covered in sections of pipe, wires, and indeterminate objects.

NADA: Rashid!! What are you doing with that pipe?!?

RASHID looks calmly at NADA -- perhaps even seductively.

RASHID: Do not worry, I am expert with all kinds of pipe.

NADA: Oh, Rashid!

NADA pulls on her sleeve, briefly exposing her wrist before..

FADE TO BLACK

{{Bom chicka bow wow}}

Re:But, but... (1)

Sir_Sri (199544) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841584)

To be fair, they are correct, his views on political reform and free expression by definition subvert state power, but the PRC is in no mood to have it's authority questioned when they are working hard to deflate currency and hide government incompetence and environmental damage.

Re:But, but... (1)

zach_the_lizard (1317619) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842176)

I think you mean inflate, not deflate. Their currency, just like most other currencies, is losing value. IIRC, they peg their currency to the dollar (or at least used to), so US inflation was exported there.

Re:But, but... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33841740)

When can we invent a technology to protect *me* from people who can't tell ITS from IT IS?

As long as we Americans keep buying made in China (-1, Offtopic)

Smidge207 (1278042) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841444)

Meanwhile, the Bible has six unique things about it that provide proof that it came from God.

1.) It's a unique book - It's the most widely distributed book in history. The Bible has been printed at least 4.7 BILLION times, in more than 2,400 languages. The Bible has endured bans and attacks from opposers.

2.) It is historically sound - People who are named in the Bible have been found to exist. Pontius Pilate, the Roman Governor of Judea - his name was found on a stone in Caesarea in 1961. Events that happened in the Bible are proven to have happened. The account of Edom and Israel battling was one such event that proved to be true.

3.) Candor and honesty - Not only are their achievements recorded, but the people of the Bible also recorded their shortcomings and errors. Moses told of a mistake he made, Jonah made a big mistake and landed in the belly of a fish. Even the Apostle Paul humbly admitted that he made mistakes.

4.) Internal Harmony - There were 40 men who wrote the Bible in the span of some 1,600 years. And yet, they wrote about the same theme - a harmonious message - God's Kingdom. From Genesis to Revelation, this theme can be found.

5.) Scientific Accuracy - People used to believe that the earth was flat, but the Bible told that it was round. (Isaiah 40:22) People believed that the earth was held up in th universe by a giant animal, the Bible told that it hung on nothing. (Job 26:7)

6.) Fulfilled Prophesy - Bible predictions are usually precise and have been fulfilled down to the last detail. Consider as an example - Isaiah prophesied that Babylon would fall, that the leader "Cyrus" would be the conqueror, and that the river Euphrates would dry up. Two hundred years later, the prophesies all came true as confirmed by historian Herodotus of the 5th century.

Re:As long as we Americans keep buying made in Chi (5, Funny)

countSudoku() (1047544) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841480)

And it's as boring as fuck and written by men scared of pork products. Next?! I love bacon. Where's your silly "god" now? 666, Hail Satan!!1!

Re:As long as we Americans keep buying made in Chi (2, Insightful)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841520)

Is it just my observation, or is eldavojohn an idiot?

Believe me, it's just your observation. At least he knows how to post on-topic.

Re:As long as we Americans keep buying made in Chi (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33841670)

I see you've never taken an introductory logic course before.

It is historically sound - People who are named in the Bible have been found to exist.

People named in the Futurama cartoon exist too, therefore it must be historically sound!

I'd continue, but actually I think I will go watch some historically accurate Futurama episodes instead.

Re:As long as we Americans keep buying made in Chi (1)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841704)

Sweet Zombie Jesus you're right!

Re:As long as we Americans keep buying made in Chi (1, Offtopic)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841762)

People named in the Futurama cartoon exist too, therefore it must be historically sound! I'd continue, but actually I think I will go watch some historically accurate Futurama episodes instead.

Of course Futurama is historically sound. It's from the future. It even says so right in the title: Futur ama. That's a portmanteau of 'Future' and 'historically accurate drama'.

Re:As long as we Americans keep buying made in Chi (1)

TangoMargarine (1617195) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842266)

The difference being that people don't generally try to disprove Futurama by finding instances where it contradicts historical sources.

Re:As long as we Americans keep buying made in Chi (2, Informative)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841774)

Scientific Accuracy? Pi is 3 in the Bible.

Isaiah 40:22 says a circle, not a sphere, not that it's round, but that it is a circle and "heavens like a canopy" of a tent.

You skip over the universe being created in six days and it being a bit over 6,000 years old.

As for confirming the Bible with Herodotus, he didn't get the title of Father of Lies for being accurate.

Re:As long as we Americans keep buying made in Chi (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33842204)

Pi is only 3 if you assume that bowls have no thickness.

Which is a pretty dumb assumption, really.

6000 years isn't anywhere in the Bible, and was created via a priest who added up essentially random strings of numbers from geneologies. Given that he lived within the last few centuries, this is far from essential church doctrine. Similarly, interpreting the beginning of Genesis as anything other than poetry is extremely recent - most well respect theologians have historically held this to be true - see Aquinas, for example.

Even if you are to ignore the poetic elements, you quickly run into issues - measuring time would be devilishly tricky without any matter to establish a reference frame, for example.

It's not like there's a verse that says "And then YHWH took Moses away for seventy years, starting him on basic mathematics and proceeding through higher and more accurate models of the universe, until Moses was an expert in the most advanced and arcane of physics, adept at quantum and a master of relativity. And then He said unto Moses 'Now that I have shown you all this, I will relate unto you an in depth account of exactly how I created the universe'."

Re:As long as we Americans keep buying made in Chi (1)

Jurily (900488) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842128)

but the Bible told that it was round. (Isaiah 40:22)


  22 He sits enthroned above the circle of the earth,
              and its people are like grasshoppers.
              He stretches out the heavens like a canopy,
              and spreads them out like a tent to live in.

Which Bible are we talking about?

Re:As long as we Americans keep buying made in Chi (1)

rhathar (1247530) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842194)

The prophesy thing always gets me. The Bible MUST be true because someone in 400 AD wrote a book set in 200 BC that "successfully" predicts an event taking place in 50 BC.

Damn! All those history books in the library are actually prophesies! And they came true!

P.S. Star Trek successfully prophesied cell phones, touch screens and hot alien love making (still waiting).

Social stability or autocracy? (1)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841468)

I've heard it said that much of the Chinese government's restrictions on free speech, protest, etc. are to maintain social stability.

Is that an ideal that's especially resonant with the Chinese culture for some reason? If so, why?

Or is it a transparent attempt to maintain power (stability = keeping the same people/party in power)? Or is it both?

Re:Social stability or autocracy? (4, Insightful)

clampolo (1159617) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841568)

Is that an ideal that's especially resonant with the Chinese culture for some reason?

No, it's something that is resonant with people that want to suppress speech. Look at recent articles and you will see similar lame excuses (ie. stopping terror, child porn, copyright protection) for allowing the NSA/FBI/etc to spy on citizens or try to take down their computers.

Re: Social stability or autocracy? (5, Interesting)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841582)

I've heard it said that much of the Chinese government's restrictions on free speech, protest, etc. are to maintain social stability.

Is that an ideal that's especially resonant with the Chinese culture for some reason? If so, why?

Or is it a transparent attempt to maintain power (stability = keeping the same people/party in power)? Or is it both?

Kinda like announcing that a soldier who died by friendly fire actually died a heroic death? Or quietly putting a priest out to pasture so people won't figure out that he's been molesting children?

People in power do this kind of crap all the time. The only difference is the degree and the extremes they'll go to.

Re:Social stability or autocracy? (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841592)

It's an ideal that is especially resonant with the people elevated to an unstable social standing by party affiliation, who need tyrannical rules against free speech to keep them there.

Re:Social stability or autocracy? (1)

readin (838620) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841594)

I've heard it said that much of the Chinese government's restrictions on free speech, protest, etc. are to maintain social stability.

Is that an ideal that's especially resonant with the Chinese culture for some reason? If so, why?


They've had plenty of problems with instability, including as recently as the cultural revolution. Prior to that they had the Chinese Civil War. Prior to that World War II in which both the Chinese and the Japanese killed a lot of Chinese. Prior to that they had many decades of great power contests over the Chinese empire. So it does seem to make sense that they would place some value on stability.

What gets me is that they even claim their imperialist ambition to capture Taiwan is somehow tied to stability.

Re:Social stability or autocracy? (2, Informative)

NeutronCowboy (896098) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841858)

You can start here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confucianism [wikipedia.org] . Basically, social harmony is one of the effects and goals of a virtuous person. Even Confucius knew though that political loyalty - one of the qualities of a virtuous person - could be abused by governments.

As such, it is both a culturally resonant idea and a commonly abused method for the ruling party to stay in power.

Chinese people know... (5, Informative)

Amlothi (207848) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841478)

In an effort to pre-empt any assumptions about access to information, I am in China and I have been able to access news sources and most articles online using Google News and various Western media outlets linked therein. Searches seem to be filtered by key-word, but most Chinese are aware of the award. Honestly, most of them don't care that much. They all know that the award often carries a political agenda. See: Barack Obama. Some feel it's just the West finding new ways to apply pressure to China on these issues where there has been long-standing disagreement. They are aware of the news though.

Mainly, I think the government is trying to avoid any large gatherings, unrest, or protests in the wake of this decision. We'll see what happens.

I've never had a problem accessing Slashdot from here. Some of the linked articles, yes, but not Slashdot itself. *ducks*

Re:Chinese people know... (5, Insightful)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841614)

most Chinese are aware of the award. Honestly, most of them don't care that much.

So a Chinese man is kept in prison purely because his opinions disagree with the government and he gets a Nobel prize and now the government will censor your website, email and even deactivate your cellphone if you as much as mention his name. If they really don't care they most definitely should.

Re:Chinese people know... (1)

cuby (832037) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841960)

They prize stability over free speech. As a meter of fact they can criticise the communist party and its actions, the problem is when somebody questions the single party system and its mechanic.
Also, they are very nationalistic. They see western counties using the human rights "trick" as a way to leverage a political and economic position.
What a hell! If we cared so much about civil liberties and democracy we would not buy so much stuff from them.

Re:Chinese people know... (3, Insightful)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842104)

Frankly I think that's a bunch of bs. First of all, how do you know what Chinese people want? Have they perhaps had a referendum to decide that they would prefer to live under a one party dictatorship rather than democracy? As an experiment, ask Chinese people in Hong Kong would they prefer to give up their relative freedom and exchange it for the "stability" in mainland and see what they tell you. How many Chinese people moved to mainland China from Hong Kong over the last few decades, especially before the transfer to China, because they preferred the stability there?

Re:Chinese people know... (1)

flamingnight (234353) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842114)

Have they perhaps had a referendum...

No, they had a revolution.

Re:Chinese people know... (1)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842208)

Oh I see, so when a group of people armed and financed from abroad (USSR) exploit the post war chaos to seize power by force or arms, brutally wipe out all the leaders and intellectuals and cultural values of the previous order, and then stay in power for the next 50 years by imprisoning and/or killing anybody who disagrees with them that is is exactly the same thing as having a vote.

Re:Chinese people know... (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33842248)

Frankly, I smell a rat.
The poster is fluent in English, posting from China where this subject is banned, towing the party line, telling us how Chinese people think, and generally doing preemptive damage control.

I've lived in a communist country before, and I can guess how this works.
The communists in general spare no effort in propaganda - it's how they stay in power. When the engine of propaganda fails, historically, their power is in danger. I'd be shocked if there weren't a hundred Chinese communists in the ministry of state, paid to read foreign websites/press and reply spinning the pro-party line.

Seriously everyone: do you expect someone from China to publicly voice support for that dissident and his peace prize if it can land them in jail for 11 years (and there are no TVs and such in Chinese jails)? Use common sense. And when a poster is defending their totalitarian government for the indefensible and is currently on soil controlled by that government, do you really expect things to be on the level? If this guy wasn't a plant, he'd never be around to post a response, don't ya think?

If the dissident gets the award, it might be the first time in a long time it's gone to someone deserving, and may force the Chinese to let the guy out from jail (he might be exiled instead). Prizes and international recognition like this have saved lives of the receivers in communist countries before.

Re:Chinese people know... (1)

Per Wigren (5315) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842046)

It's actually not that different from USA, EU or most of the rest of the "western" world.
See DMCA, ACTA, PATRIOT act, INDECT, and so on...

Re:Chinese people know... (2, Insightful)

z-j-y (1056250) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842082)

No, it's very different, it is as different as it can be. One billion people, zero message about the news.

Isn't it interesting that liberals never miss a chance to defend an evil regime and downplay their evilness?

Re:Chinese people know... (2, Funny)

BasilBrush (643681) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842264)

I didn't see any liberals defending or downplaying the evil regime of George W Bush. Yet, I did see Margret Thatcher defending and downplaying the evil regime of Pinochet.

Looks like your observation was naive in the extreme.

Re:Chinese people know... (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842282)

Isn't it interesting that liberals never miss a chance to defend an evil regime and downplay their evilness?

Why don't you see it as criticizing the problems in the west rather than endorsement of the problems in the east?

We've got effectively no control over what China does, but we do have control over what our governments do and one of the best ways to educate our fellow citizens is to point out the hypocrisy of our own governments so that they won't be so passive about it.

Or are you just defending the failures of the west out of some sort of half-baked nationalism?

Re:Chinese people know... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33842250)

So a Chinese man is kept in prison purely because his opinions disagree with the government [...] If they really don't care they most definitely should.

Think of it as like Americans caring about people being held prisoner at Guantanamo Bay - plenty of people care about it in the abstract sense, but 8 years later you notice it's still going on.

Re:Chinese people know... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33841630)

They all know that the award often carries a political agenda. See: Barack Obama.

Liu was nominated for the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize by Václav Havel, the 14th Dalai Lama, André Glucksmann, Vartan Gregorian, Mike Moore, Karel Schwarzenberg, Desmond Tutu and Grigory Yavlinsky, I guess you can call that a "political agenda". The Norwegian committee does not listen nor responds to Obama, even if they awarded the prize to him last year.

Re:Chinese people know... (1)

flamingnight (234353) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842120)

I think the reference was to Barack Obama winning the Nobel Peace Prize last year, despite ongoing occupations of Afghanistan and Iraq.

Re:Chinese people know... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33841672)

Are you by chance connected to the Chinese government?

Re:Chinese people know... (4, Informative)

z-j-y (1056250) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841986)

I am a Chinese, and you are bullshitting.

Nobel prizes has been a hot news item and most major news sites in China had extensive coverage. Chinese care about it very much. Today, *all* coverages about *any* Nobel prize have been removed from these sites. Interestingly that's how many Chinese knew Liu got the Peace Prize.

You won't find any discussion about it on Chinese sites, sure. But it's all over overseas Chinese forums. I haven't seen any single event being discussed so extensively.

And please don't pretend to be a Chinese expert. We (Chinese) know your kind, and we know why you live in China. We despise you.

Re:Chinese people know... (2, Insightful)

amRadioHed (463061) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842132)

And please don't pretend to be a Chinese expert. We (Chinese) know your kind, and we know why you live in China. We despise you.

Care to share your insight on why he lives in China?

Re:Chinese people know... (1, Interesting)

z-j-y (1056250) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842156)

>Care to share your insight on why he lives in China?

for Chinese chicks.

Re:Chinese people know... (4, Insightful)

amRadioHed (463061) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842252)

Right. I figured that was the extent of your insight. Just wanted to make sure.

Re:Chinese people know... (3, Interesting)

preaction (1526109) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842254)

Because there's absolutely no money to be made in China. There's no history or culture to explore in China. There's no opportunity in China except to bang Chinese chicks. Wonder if he'll bring her back home to America where there's money, history, and culture...

Re:Chinese people know... (1)

Raenex (947668) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842268)

Ok, that was the one answer I was not expecting.

Re:Chinese people know... (1)

smist08 (1059006) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842060)

When I was in Shanghai I could browse the Internet completely freely from my western style hotel. But if I went to an Internet Cafe, browsing was very restricted. They run a very multi-tiered system of censorship. When I was there, BBC news was censored in most places, but not my hotel.

Re:Chinese people know... (1)

microbee (682094) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842122)

They don't care because they don't know about these things.

It's like colors to color blind people.

Let them know about those rights, and even give them some, then try to take them away, and they don't care, THEN they truly don't care.

Hacktivism (5, Insightful)

BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841516)

Somebody ought to write an exploit for Chinese iPhones and Android based phones that autotexts the name "Liu Xiaobo" to everyone in a person's contact list, then goes on to force their phone to do the same thing. Within a matter of days the entire population of the two most popular smartphone platforms in China would have their favorite toys censored. I am pretty sure that could cause an effective public outrage.

Re:Hacktivism (1)

newcastlejon (1483695) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841588)

I am pretty sure that could cause an effective public outrage.

Perhaps, but not necessarily against the Chinese Government. Think more along the lines of OMG h4x0r5!!

Re:Hacktivism (2, Informative)

dyfet (154716) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841694)

And this demonstrates well one reason why PC health certificates would similarly fail. One need only propagate an exploit that convinces those running such a system your doing an "unapproved" activity and you can rapidly lock out large numbers of people. Is it not rather interesting also how very closely PC health certificates and censorship also relate?

public outrage (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841728)

in china, that gets you killed. AND your family if you aren't careful.

Re:Hacktivism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33842036)

The people in China that have iPhones and such are already savvy enough to know what's going on in the world. They are a very tiny minority of the population though. Hacking their phones won't let them know any more than they already do and will not reach the important parts of the population.

The poor uneducated dirt farmers and factory slaves that make up most of China do not have iPhones.

Re:Hacktivism (3, Interesting)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842256)

I was in China after the Falun Gong tried a similar trick by hijacking a satellite broadcast and sending out their message, blocking world cup games. It's hard to get a good view of what people think of that kind of stunt (good luck doing a survey), but my sense was that people were mainly annoyed, and viewed the Falun Gong as trouble-makers. I suspect if you tried such a stunt, the same thing would happen: people would blame the 'troublemakers' and not the government.

I don't think this is only in China. I had a chance to interview people after the civil war in El Salvador, and a lot of them also saw the rebels as troublemakers. And not completely without reason. They say that when elephants fight, the grass always suffers.

If you want to make a difference, the best way isn't to attack the government, which makes them see you as their enemy. The best way is to approach them as friends, and talk about all the good things of democracy, etc. Because democracy, free speech and all that really is better. And in a friendly environment, they will see it. Remember we don't hate the government, we aren't trying to depose them; we just want the government to treat the people right, and if they can do that without being deposed, it's MUCH better.

Another Nobel Peace Prize dud (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33841536)

Don't know much about this guy, but I understand he's a Chinese democracy activist. How does that promote peace, really?

Re:Another Nobel Peace Prize dud (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841564)

When Russia became a democracy in the late 80s, what happened to the Cold War?

By induction, what happens to the Cold War when China becomes a democracy?

Re:Another Nobel Peace Prize dud (1)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841602)

We don't have "Cold War" with China.

Re:Another Nobel Peace Prize dud (1)

clampolo (1159617) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841628)

We don't have "Cold War" with China.

Considering the rich usually run their respective countries, a good precursor to war is economic conflict. And right now the US and China are in a currency war.

Re:Another Nobel Peace Prize dud (3, Interesting)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841660)

Then why does North Korea still exist? Why is Tibet not free? Taiwan?

We may be trading with them. We may even be their main source of income and innovation. But we're also still each other's worst enemy, still armed to the teeth, and still targeting each other.

Re:Another Nobel Peace Prize dud (1)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841776)

Because N Korea has their artillery pointed at S Korea's capital.

Freeing Tibet is not our problem, and on the whole, that's a good thing, even if you want to kick some commie Chinese butts.

Taiwan, you know, still exists.

Re:Another Nobel Peace Prize dud (2, Insightful)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841906)

North Korea's artillery, and its nukes, are not a sufficient deterrent.

The only thing keeping it alive is China. And the only reason we don't liberate North Korea is that it would cause a shooting war with China, which, if it were democratic, would join with us.

Freeing Tibet is the world's problem, just as much as imprisoning Tibet is China's problem.

Taiwan wants to be free of China, but can't even discuss it without getting China's saber rattled at it.

Re:Another Nobel Peace Prize dud (1)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842062)

You are right about N. Korea.

Taiwan is a bit more nuanced case. Apparently, those that came with Chiang's Nationalists see things bit different than those who were there before.

Tibet, that's no more "world problem" than any other ethnic group without a country of their own, the Kurds, Chechens, various American natives, you name it. Don't be a lama licker.

Re:Another Nobel Peace Prize dud (1)

readin (838620) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842078)

Taiwan wants to be free of China, but can't even discuss it without getting China's saber rattled at it.

It's worse than that. Most other countries (include at times partial allies like the U.S.) help China rattle that sabre, even to the point of opposing the practice of democracy in Taiwan. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republic_of_China_United_Nations_membership_referendum,_2008#External_responses [wikipedia.org]

Re:Another Nobel Peace Prize dud (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33841702)

And you're not an idiot, right?

Re:Another Nobel Peace Prize dud (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33841754)

Yeah, that's what they want you to think.

Re:Another Nobel Peace Prize dud (1)

dapyx (665882) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841570)

The Nobel committee said that human rights are a requirement of a peaceful world.

Re:Another Nobel Peace Prize dud (1)

ChefInnocent (667809) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841658)

Because the illusion of choice is better than no choice? What would the world be like if there were no Pepsi, and only Coke Cola? Everyone must have cola, and you have a choice. Similarly, in the US, we have a Republican and a Democrat to choose from. It doesn't matter if you don't like cola, you'll choose a damned cola and you'll like it.

Re:Another Nobel Peace Prize dud (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33841886)

Don't know much about this guy, but I understand he's a Chinese democracy activist.

He was at Tien An Men in 1989, when hundreds (according to Chinese government) to 10000 (according to Soviet Intelligence) students and freedom activists were killed. He returned from the US (where he was teaching iterature) to China to try to talk the army out of attacking the students on the spot. He was sent into prison and on re-education for that. Now he's in prison for what he has been writing since then, most importantly "Charta 08".

 

How does that promote peace, really?

"The Norwegian Nobel Committee [nobelpeaceprize.org] has long believed that there is a close connection between human rights and peace. Such rights are a prerequisite for the “fraternity between nations” of which Alfred Nobel wrote in his will." Also note that Liu has always been calling for peaceful and gradual reformations. He also risked his life trying to save others and he was punished for that.

Letter From America (5, Funny)

Bemopolis (698691) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841558)

Dear China,
Fuck you and your backward, stultifying Communist state!

P.S. Do you have 4 trillion to loan us so we can extend our tax cuts?

Re:Letter From America (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33841738)

"P.S. Do you have 4 trillion to loan us so we can extend our tax cuts?"...because we refuse to cut spending

Re:Letter From America (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33841816)

lol Tax cuts don't cost money. Spending cost money.

Re:Letter From America (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33841834)

It's more like "Want to swap goods? No? Here's some IOUs to buy your cheap stuff then."
Only recently has the government said "About those IOUs you keep stuffing in your mattress.. Could you stop doing that and buy something already?"

Great story, pity it isn't true (1)

ballyhoo (158910) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841560)

Uh, works fine for me:

http://www.baidu.cn/s?wd=%C1%F5%CF%FE%B2%A8 [baidu.cn]
http://www.baidu.cn/s?wd=liu+xiaobo [baidu.cn]
http://www.baidu.cn/s?wd=nobel+peace+prize [baidu.cn]

all these urls print up plenty of results.

-ballyhoo

Maybe: (2, Informative)

Hartree (191324) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841742)

Obvious question: Are you hitting Baidu from inside China, or from outside? An awful lot of sites give different results based on where they determine you are coming from.

It could also depend on what part of the path from the computer to the server the filtering and monitoring was being done on. If it was at a few choke points en route rather than at boatloads of individual sites(likely) then a non Chinese located computer might not hit the filters.

Slashdot was already banned (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33841576)

slashdot was already banned last year when i lived in china. Thank god for the VPN

Nobel committee getting their act together? (-1, Troll)

jcr (53032) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841720)

After last year's embarrassing decision to award the Nobel Peace Prize for Wishful Thinking and Teleprompter Reading, it's good to see them give the prize to someone who actually deserves recognition again.

-jcr

Governmental Control of Content (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841768)

And they said it couldn't be done. This is actually a quite elegant solution: ALL internet access goes thru a SIM card, and if you do bad things it gets turned off by your carrier.

Google still keeping it real (1)

kaptink (699820) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841796)

Google still seems to be keeping search results good - http://www.google.com.hk/search?hl=zh-CN&source=hp&biw=&bih=&q=Liu+Xiaobo [google.com.hk] .. But then I am not up to date on whether google is blocked or not. Either way I sense a streisand effect about to woop some commie butt.

Re:Google still keeping it real (1)

amRadioHed (463061) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842224)

That's Google HK, I'm pretty sure HK's internet was never censored.

How to get China to "come around". (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33841890)

Let them know that freedom in secularism, or falling to Islam is their eventual future. The control they exert is only one hop, skip and a jump away from the Muslim way. You think Saudi Arabia is bad? Imagine an Islamic China.

End-to-end encryption (1)

DrYak (748999) | more than 3 years ago | (#33841940)

Do someone know if there are ports of the "Off-The-Record" library over plain SMS ? I mean direct SMS, not the SIMPLE protocol as recently featured on /.

For WebOS, that should be fairly trivial given that it already uses Pdgin's libpurple as a basis for its chat application.

Are there any Off-the-record supporting Apps for Android ? (And perhaps for iPhone, although I doubt that Apple will green-light one)

Trade will encourage Democracy. Sure it will. (5, Interesting)

jeko (179919) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842102)

In 1989, we watched in horror as the Chinese government murdered 3,000 students [wikipedia.org] for the crime of asking for a Democratic government.

A lot of us tried to boycott China after that for fear of making those bloody monsters even more rich and powerful

We were shouted down. "We have to trade with China. As China grows wealthier, the wealth will trickle down to their middle class, who will then rise up and demand basic human rights and freedoms. As we trade with China, as we stregnthen their middle classes, China will be dragged into joining the civilized world."

It didn't quite work out that way. China still has no real middle class, though ours has been decimated. The Chinese government started executing prisoners and selling their organs for profit, [bbc.co.uk] but that uprising of the newly-empowered middle classes still didn't happen.

So where is this "Enlightenment Through Trade?" China took that money, and used it to build a military that they're now threatening Japan with. They're kidnapping Toyota executives and holding manufacturing hostage with the market corner they've got on rare earth elements.

We've sacrificed our manufacturing base to this idea that a richer China is a friendlier China.

Really? How do you explain this?

http://www.thestar.com/news/world/article/870490--chinese-dissident-tipped-for-nobel-peace-prize

"Last Dec. 25 her husband was sentenced to 11 years behind bars, after being found guilty of trying to incite others to subvert state power.

Liu was the lead author of a document called Charter '08, calling for multi-party elections in China, where the Communist Party keeps a lock grip on power."

Why are we still doing business with these monsters?

This is real censorship (4, Insightful)

noidentity (188756) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842126)

This is an example of real censorship. Please reserve this word for things like this, and not your boss preventing you from using company computers to chat with someone about whatever you want. Thank you.

Not Bush (1, Insightful)

ad454 (325846) | more than 3 years ago | (#33842228)

At least Liu Xiaobo did more to earn his Nobel Peace Prize then just not being Bush.

The Chinese state may not be happy about him winning now, but hopefully in the future, the Chinese will fondly remember him as their first Nobel price prize winner.

No matter how much the government thinks that they can hide that he won this year, the information is still leaking through the blocks.

They is a large Chinese scientific community that follow the Nobel prizes each year, and most will notice that there will be omissions in the reporting this year.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>