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North Korea Opens .kp Sites On the Internet

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the best-place-for-them-really dept.

Government 175

eldavojohn writes "What an auspicious day for the Democratic People's Republic of Korea! To commemorate the 65th anniversary of the founding of the ruling Workers' Party of Korea, North Korea will no longer depend on Chinese national internet service to reach the outside world — they have their own connection and are hosting sites like the state run media. The article mentions that about a thousand websites are coming online, including services like Skype and Twitter. From where I sit in the United States, I can't seem to get any .kp TLD sites to resolve, but the news is promising if in fact it will bring more information to the information-starved masses of North Korea."

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175 comments

oh (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33846838)

i has to poop.

Yay! (4, Funny)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 3 years ago | (#33846844)

I'm going to beat the land rush to register "NorthKoreaIsTheBestKorea.kp" before Kim Jong-Il gets there first!

Re:Yay! (5, Insightful)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847712)

The Democratic People's Republic of Korea isn't the best Korea; it's the only Korea, you Capitalist Roadster.

Completely Embrace the Forward Thinking Progress of the People's Informational Movement!! Let The Empowered Voices Of The People Be Audible Across The Web!!* Down With The Internet Imperialists!

*Offer void where in opposition to the rule of the Kim family and the Korean People's Army.

Re:Yay! (1)

reverendbeer (1496637) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847852)

The Leader is gratified that your prove his point that oppressed masses throughout the world laud the technological strides that makes the DPRK the leader in advancement and computer science (III) throughout the world. He offers you a place at his side in the coming revolution. [you are likely to be eaten by a grue]

Information-starved masses won't see the internet (3, Insightful)

GrumblyStuff (870046) | more than 3 years ago | (#33846852)

I doubt they even have TVs or radios. I bet it's not even legal for them to either.

Re:Information-starved masses won't see the intern (3, Interesting)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 3 years ago | (#33846874)

I recall reading somewhere that radios imported from China could be bought in North Korea, but you were legally obliged to have the radio modified so that it could receive only the government broadcasts. A similar law existed in much of the former Communist Bloc.

Re:Information-starved masses won't see the intern (1)

Hooya (518216) | more than 3 years ago | (#33846982)

I read somewhere that their radio was permanently tuned to the govt channel. and you couldn't turn it off. very 1984. i don't know if the author of that article was hyperbolizing the reality in north korea or if 'dear leader' had taken 1984 for a "totalitarian regime for dummies".

Re:Information-starved masses won't see the intern (4, Informative)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847194)

I read somewhere that their radio was permanently tuned to the govt channel. and you couldn't turn it off.

Sorta correct. The radios are pre-tuned to the government station, and then sealed. If you're caught with a radio with its seals broken (i.e. someone opened it up) then you're arrested. This is to prevent people from trying to receive signals from South Korea and/or China. You can, however, turn the radios off.

Re:Information-starved masses won't see the intern (5, Informative)

bjoast (1310293) | more than 3 years ago | (#33846894)

They have TV, but tuning in to Chinese or South Korean broadcasts is illegal. Their television sets are even modified to avoid such actions.

Re:Information-starved masses won't see the intern (1)

piemcfly (1232770) | more than 3 years ago | (#33846988)

Radios are quite normal in North Korea. They are sealed to specific ranges and checked every, I think, 3 months, to prevent people from listening to foreign media.
TV's are also prominent amongst the higher classes of the country. South Korean soap operas are apparently quite popular to watch illegally on imported DVD'

Re:Information-starved masses won't see the intern (3, Funny)

Pharmboy (216950) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847038)

South Korean soap operas are apparently quite popular to watch illegally on imported DVD'

I would hate to go to jail just because I wanted to find out if Kim ever recovered from double amnesia to discover his wife was really his father's ex-lover...

Re:Information-starved masses won't see the intern (5, Informative)

camperslo (704715) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847922)

Perhaps someone can provide some citations to info on what frequencies they're using?
A.M. and shortwave radio technology is not high tech. It wouldn't take much knowledge of electronics to make receivers or frequency converters from parts out of old VCRs or whatever.
Clever hacks are possible too. If they're using the low cost Chinese CFL replacements for incandescent lamps, maybe some could be modified to work at a switching frequency that would allow them to act as an conversion oscillator to shift a desired signal to a vacant supported frequency.

Beyond radio inspections, their government might be able to tell what frequency a standard radio is tuned to by detecting radiation from the oscillator. The oscillator normally is offset by a standard amount from the frequency of the selected signal. (typically + 455 kHz for AM, + 10.7 MHz for FM)

To illustrate the principle, one can tune a typical FM radio to a quiet spot on the top half of the band, and hear the oscillator (silence instead of static) when a second nearby radio is tuned 10.7 MHz lower in frequency. I once read of a college station that went around tracking down listeners and surprised a few knocking on doors and giving them a prize. That's a pretty good gag, but hard to do in areas where the band is very congested. When one is tuned to the upper half of the band, the oscillator may fall on VHF aircraft frequencies. That is why many had those bans on using radios when flying.

Re:Information-starved masses won't see the intern (5, Insightful)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 3 years ago | (#33846906)

I doubt you'll actually bother looking up info on TV/radio ownership in North Korea. I bet your random guessing and stabbing in the dark will get +5 Insightful.

On a tangential ramble, Kim Jong-Il's Comedy Club [bbc.co.uk] was a very interesting documentry, and a rare glimse inside the weider-than-fiction world of North Korea.

Re:Information-starved masses won't see the intern (5, Informative)

westlake (615356) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847286)

In the early ninties, a country profile for the Library of Congress estimated that North Korean had about 250,000 television sets and 3.75 million radio sets, all fixed to receive only government broadcasts. Visitors cannot bring a radio into the country.

Radio and TV sets in North Korea are pre-tuned to government stations that pump out a steady stream of propaganda. The state has been dubbed the world's worst violator of press freedom by the media rights body Reporters Without Borders (RSF).

Press outlets and broadcasters - all of them under direct state control - serve up a menu of flattering reports about Kim Jong-il and his daily agenda. North Korea's economic hardships or famines are not reported.
Ordinary North Koreans caught listening to foreign broadcasts risk harsh punishments, such as forced labour. The authorities attempt to jam foreign-based and dissident radio stations.
The "only glimmer of hope", according to RSF, is the "communications black market" on the North Korean-Chinese border. Recordings of South Korean TV soaps and films are said to circulate.
North Korea country profile [bbc.co.uk] [Oct 2, 2010]

If You're Interested, Some Updates from RSF (4, Informative)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847540)

The state has been dubbed the world's worst violator of press freedom by the media rights body Reporters Without Borders (RSF).

Huh, you must be referencing an older report. Allow me to bring you up to date on 2010's assessment [rsf.org] of the illustrious Democratic People's Republic of Korea!

Internet: Nothing but a vague rumor

A very limited Intranet has developed, consisting of an email inbox, a few news sites relaying regime propaganda, and a browser providing access to the databank Web pages of the country’s three biggest libraries: the Grand People’s Study House and those of the Kim Il-Sung and Kim Chaek Universities. This Intranet is accessible only by academics, businessmen and high-ranking civil servants who have received special clearance.

Here's to hoping that once that intranet is connected to our internet we see those academics online :)

Oh, also, I like how one hour of internet usage in a cafe in North Korea will set you back $8.19 (high even by my cushy American standards) and yet the monthly wage in North Korea is a paltry $17.74. So yeah, go ahead and walk into an internet cafe and blow a month's salary in two hours. I almost feel guilty about bitching about Comcast's $40/month cable internet.

Furthermore Eritrea beat them out in 2009 [rsf.org] leaving them at 174/175 on their worst violators ... there are nation states and there are sad states. I wish there was a non-detrimental way to help the people inside North Korea.

Re:If You're Interested, Some Updates from RSF (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33848016)

People in North Korea need to help themselves. High-ranking officials cannot stop them alone, only the military can. And if military likes the way things are, then the rest of the people cannot win. Keep in mind that regular people make up the military. Thus if there is a large resentment towards the ruling clique, there will be resentment in the military too.

Current actions of humanitarian aid towards North Korea do not help the people. They simply prolong current conditions. Humanitarian air that lasts more than few months towards *any* country tends to be bad for that country anyway. As proof, see Africa where humanitarian aid hurts local farmers and creates a culture of dependence.

Re:Information-starved masses won't see the intern (1)

GrumblyStuff (870046) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847356)

Given the replies that while there are TVs and radios they're inspected regularly and have to certified to pick up only specific frequencies, I'd say I was close. The information-starved will remain so. They might open the borders enough to pull a China and sell what amounts to slave labor but human rights certainly won't follow.

Re:Information-starved masses won't see the intern (1)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847570)

He may have been stabbing in the dark, but he was sort of right. TV ownership according to wikipedia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Media_of_North_Korea [wikipedia.org] ) is 55 in 1000 households, while radio is more widespread. However all TV and radio sets are pre-tuned to government channels and sealed so the tuning cannot be changed (which carries sever penalties if you did manage it). And in any case foreign radio stations that can be picked up in NK are jammed.

Re:Information-starved masses won't see the intern (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847240)

Radios are sold and pre-set to official frequencies. If you have an imported radio, you are required to have it 'certified' which involves pre-seting it to the official frequencies and having a sticker placed on it so they can tell if its been tampered with to allow 'unofficial' broadcasts. the "organization" may come into your house and conduct inspections on this at any time to ensure it hasnt been tampered with.

TVs are less common, but exist nonetheless. Usually whoever owns a TV lets all their neighbors come by and watch it. Once again, it only gets official channels. VCRs and tapes are quite popular, mainly because when DVDs because wide-spread in China, they were able to buy second-hand VCRs from China for quite cheap.

Missing the point (1)

Roger W Moore (538166) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847364)

You are missing the point. They haven't got internet for their citizens to use, they have it to tell the world know how wonderful things are in North Korea. Its a shame they did not go with '.nk' though - there are far more interesting domain name possibilities for that domain...

Re:Information-starved masses won't see the intern (1)

Megane (129182) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847408)

to the site they represent (except maybe e-mail), they allow information to come from the site.

Submitter needs to see an opthmaloogist about getting a stellarectomy.

Re:Information-starved masses won't see the intern (1)

Megane (129182) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847432)

(wow, I managed to completely screw that up thanks to a broken HTML tag, even when using preview)

Furthermore, how would a TLD help bring information to the "information-starved masses"? Domain names don't bring information to the site they represent (except maybe e-mail), they allow information to come from the site.

Submitter needs to see an opthmaloogist about getting a stellarectomy.

I seriously doubt... (4, Insightful)

The Fanta Menace (607612) | more than 3 years ago | (#33846858)

...that the average North Korean even has a computer to access the internet with.

Re:I seriously doubt... (4, Insightful)

St.Creed (853824) | more than 3 years ago | (#33846890)

True... but this means we can send as much spam, 911-mails and virusbombs as we like to North Korea, without hurting innocent bystanders :)

It's sort of like painting a big red target on any spot housing party officials, except only visible in the virtual world. And if they went with 3G or mobifi or something, it would be visible in the real world as well.

Re:I seriously doubt... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33846920)

The few that have, I would be interested in contacting them.
I am a Nigerian Prince and I....

Re:I seriously doubt... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33846984)

It's part of the newest Five Years plan. North Korea is going to increase their MMORPG gold harvesting capacity.

Re:I seriously doubt... (5, Informative)

Blain (264390) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847046)

If you look at the satellite photo of the world at night (http://www.bertc.com/subfour/truth/night2.htm), it's quite easy to see North Korea -- it's the dark space just West of Japan, and north of the very bright lights of South Korea -- the DMZ is a visible line between light and darkness. Just one little spot of light in the whole country, and the rest is darkness.

The average North Korean doesn't have power, and isn't sure they'll have enough food to eat today.

Re:I seriously doubt... (2, Funny)

Threni (635302) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847168)

> The average North Korean doesn't have power, and isn't sure they'll have enough food to eat today.

Don't knock it, champ. Korean food is the dog's bollocks!

Re:I seriously doubt... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847278)

At least it's fresh. [youtube.com]

Re:I seriously doubt... (1)

Kenja (541830) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847318)

Lil' Kim told me that they have abundant free electricity in the glorious peoples republic. But you have to BELIVE to see it.

Re:I seriously doubt... (1)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847462)

I also seriously doubt that the people in charge of the .kp domain care much about the average North Korean. Every country on earth, no matter how poor, has its rich and powerful class, who these days are pretty much guaranteed to have a computer and the infrastructure for an internet connection.

And historically, totalitarian governments have been obsessed with compiling, storing, and organizing information. The internet, you may have noticed, is very good for this.

Re:I seriously doubt... (1)

Pharmboy (216950) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847544)

And historically, totalitarian governments have been obsessed with compiling, storing, and organizing information. The internet, you may have noticed, is very good for this.

The internet is good for storing information? Since when? It is great for DISPLAYING information, and sharing it, and for finding videos of nut shots, but it doesn't actually "store" anything. When a site goes down permanantly, so does all the information unless archive.org has a copy, and if they go down, no one has a copy.

The internet is a transient medium, just as a telephone lets you talk to someone now but doesn't by itself "remember" the conversation, the internet is only valid as a medium to see what is online NOW. This is why archive.org and the waybackmachine exist in the first place, to try to find a way to store the internet. It isn't a great system, although it is the best system we have and no one else seems interested in long term storage. I don't think that even Google is storing their cache for very long.

We Love Lil Kim and Son (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33846872)

And by love, I mean want to see buried 10 feet under!

Now to go find a dog hanging from a bridge. It's DINNER time in Korea!

And don't drink the water!

kitchen patrol (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33846886)

see subject lol :D

Who believes that N. Korea will allow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33846898)

North Koreans to see the outside world? The NK government move seems like a way to cheaply post propaganda that other countries can access.

Cheerleading a transparent move on part of NK (2, Insightful)

OnePumpChump (1560417) | more than 3 years ago | (#33846922)

This is just going to be for more external propaganda. The very act of using this domain IS propaganda.

Even if it does indicate more internal dissemination of information, more information isn't always good, if it's more of the same disinformation.

Re:Cheerleading a transparent move on part of NK (0, Offtopic)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847418)

The very act of using this domain IS propaganda.

Wow, you're displaying a Kim-Il-Sung-ian level of logic with that line. Have you thought of applying for a job with the North Korean government?

Seriously, of course the .kp domain will be used solely as a conduit for NK government propaganda. Everyone gets that. But to claim that the act of a country using its TLD is propaganda in and of itself is just mindless bashing. You remind of me of the guy who claimed that Libya should lose the .ly TLD because the current assignment is inconvenient for people who run URL redirect services.

Information starved? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33846940)

You mean just plain "starved".

The Chinese people want information.
The Chinese government wants prosperity.
The North Korean people want to survive.
The North Korean government wants purple neon sheep carrying a glowing statue of the leader in massive parade.

Re:Information starved? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847180)

I find your ideas intriguing, and would like to subscribe to your newsletter.

shouldn't have gotten my hopes up :( (5, Informative)

el_tedward (1612093) | more than 3 years ago | (#33846952)

From the effin' article:

"While Internet access is believed to be available to small group of elite members of the ruling party, the rest of the country is not permitted access to outside sources of news." :(

The real reason for this (4, Funny)

Nidi62 (1525137) | more than 3 years ago | (#33846966)

The real reason for this is that Kim Jong Il's cognac distributor went electronic and he needed to provide a contact email. Kim Jong Il knew the only domain for a email address he could trust is one Norht Korea owned, so they had to make .kp.

Re:The real reason for this (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847160)

Shut up, nerd.

Re:The real reason for this (3, Funny)

paiute (550198) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847222)

Shut up, nerd.

This day in history: October 9, 2010 at 4:15PM, Kim Jong Il makes his first contribution to the Internet, an anonymous posting on a once-popular website called "Slashdot".

Re:The real reason for this (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847304)

Fuck you, Hans Brix!

Well... given that... (1)

jd (1658) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847016)

...just about every other national domain has been (ab)used by people thinking of ways to use the letters in "cute" ways, this will doubtless be used the same way. North Korea won't care - money is money. Though I just can't see Kim Possible fans being amongst the takers.

North Korea is a criminal state (5, Informative)

bkmoore (1910118) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847044)

North Korea, or the "Democratic Peoples' Republic of Korea" as they like to call themselves is a criminal state that murders its own citizens while denying them even the most basic human rights such as freedom of movement. The only North Koreans who will be blogging or communicating on these web sites will be ones from the Propaganda and Agitation ministries. North Korea has lost a lot of face over abducting Japanese and South Korean citizens, shooting down a Korean airliner, sinking a Korean destroyer, and the mass starvation after the collapse of the Soviet Union. North Korea wouldn't even exist if it weren't for external support from the Soviet Union, and later on China and South Korea. The only legitimate government on the Korean peninsula is the Republic of Korea. The regime in North Korea are a bunch of criminals and they maintain the largest prison in the world. Hopefully one day it will all end peacefully the same way that East Germany dissolved as soon as the Soviets refused to crush the crowds of demonstrators with their tanks.

And now for the real world (5, Interesting)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847256)

The above is accurate ALTHOUGH the accusations COULD be put on different countries. The USSR shot down a korean plane that came into its airspace and the US has shot down a Iranian airliner claiming it was an wave of fighter aircraft (despite being far slower climbing constansly and only firing ONE missle at SEVERAL incoming aircraft (real naval action would have been to throw everything at incoming fighters including the kitchen sink after the experience at the falklands)) and as for mas starvation, how many indians died of that again after forced relocation to inhostipable regions of the US to make way for white settlers?

Ancient history? Yeah, that is convenient BUT this ancient history IS being remembered by people around the globe who use it to excuse their own injustices. It is a very powerful excuse. China does not want north korea but it wants the vassal state of south korea even less. That would mean US forces right at its borders. North Korea abducting Japanse citizens? Gosh, somehow I don't see China caring. That would be like Israel caring about germans getting killed. Japan is not wel liked in the region. Something about being a nation riddled with war crimes and never making attonement for it might have something to do with it.

And so North Korea continues to happen. As a buffer against the US as a way of saying "No, rampant captalism will NOT overrun the entire world" as a way of not having to answer just why this was allowed to go on.

And lets face it, IF NK is going to collapse, who is going to pay for it? The reunification of germany cost western germany dearly and is still not going smoothly. The collapse of the USSR has made the world less safe and make life in those regions far less free. One dictartorship fell, countless replaced it.

The world ain't a nice place. NK is one of most not nice places around but it happens because the rest of the world isn't nice enough to stop it. And that includes people like BKMOORE, the parent, who claim SK is only legitimate government... yah. That government never did any wrong. Nope...

AND that is what fuels division and allows NK to exist. If you want to change the world, you got to start with yourself. SK is puppet government that has become legit because it has made economic success so people forgot about the past. If you want to convince the NK that it must change its way, claiming money makes right is not going to do it.

Re:And now for the real world (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847954)

Japan is not wel liked in the region. Something about being a nation riddled with war crimes and never making attonement for it might have something to do with it.

Japan has both apologized and pay reparations numerous times. What more do you want them to do? Resurrect the dead?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_war_apology_statements_issued_by_Japan

Re:North Korea is a criminal state (1)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847274)

To be criminal mean i.e. to go against the laws of your country. If you define the laws, and go according to them, then you aren't a criminal, whatever the laws of another countries say. In fact, under the laws of another country, you or your government could be criminals (think how far from that was Bush last period). Not so much defending North Korea, just attacking that way of reasoning.

Re:North Korea is a criminal state (1)

The Snowman (116231) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847450)

To be criminal mean i.e. to go against the laws of your country. If you define the laws, and go according to them, then you aren't a criminal, whatever the laws of another countries say. In fact, under the laws of another country, you or your government could be criminals (think how far from that was Bush last period). Not so much defending North Korea, just attacking that way of reasoning.

There are also international treaties, such as the one that created the United Nations. Any signatory to the U.N. charter must abide by its rules, which includes the The Universal Declaration of Human Rights [un.org]. Is The Best Korea a signatory? I couldn't get Google to turn up any information on the topic.

Re:North Korea is a criminal state (1)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847524)

Regardless of whether North Korea is a signatory or not its leaders can still be tried and convicted as criminals in the International Criminal Court. The court statute allows it to try cases even when the accused is not a national of a country that accepts the court's jurisdiction, if the case is referred to it by the UN Security Council. Not that this would even happen in case of North Korea.

Re:North Korea is a criminal state (1)

hey! (33014) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847884)

Well, you put your finger on the essential issue. Who gets to define what is lawful?

Appealing to "International Law" does not really get you anywhere, especially with a country that isn't a signatory to international conventions.

For example, the standard in maritime law that was pretty much universally observed was that a state enjoyed sovereignty over waters ou to three miles from its coast. Then the US and a bunch of other nations got together and extended sovereignty to 12 miles plus a 200 mile "Exclusive Economic Zone" -- a concept that didn't even exist beforehand. So suppose North Korea isn't a signatory. Why should they obligated to respect the US EEZ, which is something that other countries pretty much invented out of nothing?

Because we'll give them a bloody nose if they mess around in the waters we claim. If you aren't a superpower, you have to rely on other nations who have signed on to the EEZ concept to support you, so basically you and your gang collectively give the "interloper" a bloody nose.

As the arctic sea opens up, resources like oil will be up for grabs. Russia has been making noises about territorial claims that the US isn't happy about. Some of the basis for these claims are frankly laughable extrapolations of international conventions. But it won't matter. What will matter is that they're well placed to make anyone who tries anything in their newly claimed waters regret it. I suspect that this state of affairs will become "international law" because nobody will be willing to do what it takes to challenge Russia's claims.

If you were an alien anthropologist with no ideological stake in the question, you'd inevitably come up with the following empirical definition of "criminal": a criminal is a party that violates rules set down by another party which is in a position to inflict punishment. This is entirely separate to whether those rules are ones all parties would agree to, or whether those rules have any rational basis at all. If a lawyer sends you a legally bogus threat that forces you to stop doing something, that alien anthropologist would describe your actions as criminal; that you are not a de jure criminal would seem to be of no significance to him at all.

The harsh lesson is this: the protection of "the law" is only meaningful to the degree that people are willing to fight for that protection. The enslavement, abuse and murder of North Koreans by the regime in Pyongyang strikes any decent human being as "criminal", but the stark truth is that nobody cares enough to impose that concept of "criminality" on the regime. Human rights in such a case is just a noble sounding, but empty sentiment.

Re:North Korea is a criminal state (1)

copponex (13876) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847420)

North Korea is another result of the Cold War that has yet to be resolved. External influences and pressures created the State, and are unlikely to correct it without causing serious damage.

Facilitating the deterioration of North Korea would likely lead to an extremely dangerous situation involving millions of refugees, Russia, China, Japan, and the United States. And frankly, that's the reason Kim Jong Il and the necrocracy there still rules. Being next door to China and Russia, the United States doesn't want to poke around too seriously. China doesn't want to deal with the refugee problem and actively hunts and sends defectors back to North Korea where they are tortured and usually die in detention camps.

South Korea believes that engagement and talks are the way forward. Since it's their brothers and sisters and fathers and mothers over there suffering, I think we should let them take the lead instead of using it as a political talking point. The less ego you inject into that situation, the more likely real progress can be achieved.

So I herd u liek.... (4, Funny)

TomHandy (578620) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847060)

mud.kp.

Re:So I herd u liek.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847146)

lol that is so not off topic... r337

Re:So I herd u liek.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847176)

Moderator is clearly upset that Tom Handy knows about his love for a certain Pokemon.

DIBS! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847062)

Dibs on the mud.kp domain.

What an unfortunate domain (1, Insightful)

poptones (653660) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847064)

How long before all the child model sites - long ago kicked off the com, net and org byways and even apparently now finding it hard to exist on the info highways, end up on ".kp?" Littlemodel.amber.kp seems the perfect fit! North Korea, kiddie porn... oh, the irony.

Re:What an unfortunate domain (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847094)

So, apparently North Korea is a nation of pedophiles? Otherwise, that's not ironic but rather coincidental.

Re:What an unfortunate domain (1)

linzeal (197905) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847334)

How is it ironic, that they create the perfect tld for kiddie porn by giving one to a sovereign country which has the 60 years of human rights abuses as its #1 talking point?

We are talking about a country that has a problem with cannibalism [wnd.com] for eff's sake, kiddie porn is child's play.

Re:What an unfortunate domain (1)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847488)

Given how puritanical Communist governments tend to be, that seems unlikely. You can bet that every .kp domain will be very, very carefully vetted by legions of low-level officials ... and if they screw up (so to speak) and let any porn site through, whether it's child porn or not, the penalties will be a lot worse than just getting fired.

What does the TLD have to do with it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847796)

Are you suggesting there are special rules for com, net and org domains that bar child modeling websites from those domains in particular? I don't recall ever seeing such terms in domain registration agreements and presume that takedowns of such websites are due to either hosting or law-enforcement issues.

Hooray! (3, Informative)

frank_adrian314159 (469671) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847084)

Now maybe we'll get Voice of Korea (was Radio Pyongyang) streamed on the internets! That's some good agitprop: "Today, Glorious Leader stated that he is pleased at the 3000% increase in rice production announced by the Ministry of Agriculture. The running dog capitalist Western press had no comment on our great achievement." Really! They still broadcast stuff like this. It really doesn't get any better, comedy-wise.

Re:Hooray! (4, Insightful)

hedwards (940851) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847162)

Well, considering how many people in the US still think we're the best at absolutely everything, it's not that hard to believe. It's just with the better access to information they have to keep it somewhat within the realm of possibility.

every country believes they are the best (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847584)

nationalism is not a trait unique to the usa, nor north korea, not brazil, china, india, switzerland, norway, etc...

Re:every country believes they are the best (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847792)

nationalism is not a trait unique to the usa, nor north korea, not brazil, china, india, switzerland, norway, etc...

Na nationalism is not a unique trait to the USA, Britain, China etc etc, excluding India.
You ask an Indian who he is in India he will give you 360 different answers and very few of them will tell you I am
Indian.
Indian Nationalism is considered a SIN.
You have to be "Secular" in India, which means one party elected royalty under the Gandhi family run by the Italian Mafia.

then india is doomed (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847826)

nationalism is like a glue. without which, the pieces fly apart

indians have to believe in the idea of india for india to exist. if enough don't there's no pool of people to tap to keep the country together

Re:Hooray! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847228)

In America, it's basically the same, but with flags or apple pie or something.

Re:Hooray! (0, Flamebait)

Nimey (114278) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847784)

Mostly in Republican areas, though, when they're not busy howling about liberals and the government.

Re:Hooray! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33848200)

Check their news agency:

http://www.kcna.co.jp/index-e.htm

Glorious internet.. (2, Funny)

EDinWestLA (453682) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847200)

I'm betting their computers are like their tv's.. a cardboard box with the glorious leader's picture on it.

Re:Glorious internet.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847268)

I'm betting their computers are like their tv's.. a cardboard box with the glorious leader's picture on it.

Yeah, well they have modern technology now. The Glorious Leader's picture uses one of those stickers that changes when you view it from a different angle.

IOW (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847236)

no longer depend on Chinese national internet service

the great firewall of china wasn't filtering ENOUGH out so they're going to do it themselves from now on.

dig kp. SOA - nothing so far. (1)

Cyberax (705495) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847260)

"dig kp. SOA" - nothing so far. Is this article a hoax?

Re:dig kp. SOA - nothing so far. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847452)

Googling for site:.kp shows two different domains (kcce.kp and friend.com.kp) but nothing resolves here.

Potemkin Internet? (1)

The Archon V2.0 (782634) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847300)

So, to go with Gijeong-dong [wikipedia.org] we're going to have websites that show North Korea as being lovely and wonderful and maybe you should come across the border and join the glorious revolution.

I await... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847402)

www.welac.kp/oor_people/orsuffering.html .

I will certainly be checking my browser... (1)

pulse2600 (625694) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847434)

...to look for (and remove) certificates for North Korean Certificate Authorities. Oh this is going to go sooooo well.....

DPRK ip block info... (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847480)

I have some scripts which periodically scan DPRK ips, and found a few things recently.

There is a news site at http://175.45.179.68

There are a couple http/https servers with self-signed certs for domains which dont yet exist:
176.45.176.6/7

And there are cisco routers at 175.45.176.131, 175.45.177.193,194,197,198,201

Re:DPRK ip block info... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847568)

I'll add stuff as I find it...

smtp:
    175.45.176.10
    175.45.176.11
ftp:
    175.45.176.12

J

Re:DPRK ip block info... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847630)

well now, this is interesting:

nmap -sS -P0 -O 175.45.176.10

Starting Nmap 5.21 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2010-10-09 14:37 PDT
Nmap scan report for 175.45.176.10
Host is up (0.30s latency).
Not shown: 999 filtered ports
PORT STATE SERVICE
25/tcp open smtp
Warning: OSScan results may be unreliable because we could not find at least 1 open and 1 closed port
Device type: phone|firewall|general purpose
Running (JUST GUESSING) : Nokia Symbian OS (89%), Juniper embedded (89%), FreeBSD 6.X (86%)
Aggressive OS guesses: Nokia N81 mobile phone (Symbian OS) (89%), Juniper Networks SSG 20 firewall (89%), FreeBSD 6.2-RELEASE (86%)
No exact OS matches for host (test conditions non-ideal).

Re:DPRK ip block info... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847768)

250 spinef1.star.net.kp
MAIL FROM:kimjongil@spinef1.star.net.kp
250 sender ok
RCPT TO:kimjongil@spinef1.star.net.kp
550 #5.1.0 Address rejected.

Re:DPRK ip block info... (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847928)

telnet 175.45.179.67 110
Trying 175.45.179.67...
Connected to 175.45.179.67.
Escape character is '^]'.
+OK Microsoft Exchange 2000 POP3 server version 6.0.4417.0 (email.kp.col.cn) ready.

More information (4, Insightful)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847498)

it will bring more information to the information-starved masses of North Korea

I tried to read that aloud with a straight face but failed miserably.

Should we start a pool? (1)

pedantic bore (740196) | more than 3 years ago | (#33847510)

When will the first North Korean porn site open?

And how long after that will it be taken down?

And how long after that will its proprietors be executed?

kp (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847576)

.kp? They must be nuts.

you have it half right (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847744)

They are starved alright but I don't think they would give two cents about their country coming "online"
The only ones with net access are the ones who are privileged. The masses are starving to death for their great leader.

information-starved North Korea? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847814)

A little introspection should reveal a dire famine of information in the good old United States.

Did you know blacks and browns commit some 80% of the crime while forming only about 20% of the population?
Sounds like the Americans are as starved as the poor North Koreans.

Y\OU FAIL IT (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33847970)

look at the A way to spend duri8g play, this fo8 the project.
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