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Carnivorous Swamp Beast Discovered In Madagascar

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the does-your-dog-bite? dept.

Earth 157

crudmonkey writes "Researchers have identified a previously unknown species of carnivore lurking in one of the world's most endangered lakes. Durrell's vontsira, named in honor of the late conservationist and writer Gerald Durrell, was first photographed swimming in Madagascar's Lake Alaotra in 2004. Subsequent surveys confirmed the mongoose-like creature was indeed a new species. Durrell's vontsira is the first new carnivorous mammal discovered in Madagascar in 24 years. Little is known about the species, which is roughly the size of a cat."

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157 comments

I don't usually complain about summaries (5, Informative)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 3 years ago | (#33856860)

I don't usually complain about the summaries (because I know they're all bad) but this one was a real disappointment to me. Carnivorous swamp beast?? I'm looking for this bad boy [travelpod.com] . But no, it's just a little cute furry guy, a little irate because someone is holding him by the throat. I would be irate too. OK, I know it's news, but such a disappointment.

Re:I don't usually complain about summaries (2, Funny)

Kenja (541830) | more than 3 years ago | (#33856994)

You're looking for a tin submarine toy and plaster? But we found that years ago...

beast , Any animal other than a human (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857006)

for some reason you're assuming beast has a different meaning

Re:I don't usually complain about summaries (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857098)

That's no vontsira, that's a water fox.

Re:I don't usually complain about summaries (2, Funny)

Nursie (632944) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857466)

That's no vontsira. It's a space station.

Re:I don't usually complain about summaries (4, Funny)

syousef (465911) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857162)

I don't usually complain about the summaries (because I know they're all bad) but this one was a real disappointment to me. Carnivorous swamp beast?? I'm looking for this bad boy [travelpod.com] . But no, it's just a little cute furry guy, a little irate because someone is holding him by the throat. I would be irate too. OK, I know it's news, but such a disappointment.

If it was a slashdotter vs that cute little guy, I'd put money on the beaver like thing. You're forgetting what years of living in a basement does to muscle. To most of us that is a BEAST.

Re:I don't usually complain about summaries (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857768)

Some slashdotters are actually healthy, athletic sports enthousiasts.

(Posting anonymously, because this confession may be embarrassing)

Re:I don't usually complain about summaries (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33858128)

You're forgetting what years of living in a basement does to muscle.

Wait - what does years of a slashdotter living in the basement do to muscle? Oh, so as long as we hold the beastie in our right arms, we'll be fine?

Re:I don't usually complain about summaries (3, Funny)

Some1too (1242900) | more than 3 years ago | (#33858246)

I don't usually complain about the summaries (because I know they're all bad) but this one was a real disappointment to me. Carnivorous swamp beast?? I'm looking for this bad boy. But no, it's just a little cute furry guy, a little irate because someone is holding him by the throat. I would be irate too. OK, I know it's news, but such a disappointment. If it was a slashdotter vs that cute little guy, I'd put money on the beaver like thing. You're forgetting what years of living in a basement does to muscle. To most of us that is a BEAST.

I think the average slahdotter living in his basement would have no problem choking something of the size of a small rodent...

I tried to resist but it was just too easy. I feel like I should also state I live in a basement, post on slashdot and have a girlfriend... ;-)

S.

Re:I don't usually complain about summaries (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857192)

I don't usually complain about the summaries (because I know they're all bad) but this one was a real disappointment to me.

But you aren't even complaining about the summary, you're complaining about the title.

If you'd read the summary you wouldn't have been disappointed by the pictures because of the following.

mongoose-like creature

roughly the size of a cat.

So stop complaining about the summary when you didn't even read the summary.

Also, heh. The captcha was "retorts".

Re:I don't usually complain about summaries (5, Insightful)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857254)

But no, it's just a little cute furry guy

I'd be careful about describing a previously unknown carnivore as cute. It might have been unknown because nobody met one before, but it could be because nobody who met one lived to tell about it.

Re:I don't usually complain about summaries (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857306)

...

Have you, uh, looked at the pictures of it in the article?

Re:I don't usually complain about summaries (4, Funny)

Neil Boekend (1854906) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857530)

Your knowledge of rabbit carnivorous creatures is lacking my friend. Although it looks cute the Rabbit of Caerbannog should not be trifled with!
On a side note: is copy paste somehow destroyed on /.? I was trying to copy the name from Wikipedia but it will not paste.

Rabbit of Caerbannog (1)

BrightSpark (1578977) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857718)

Ni!

Re:I don't usually complain about summaries (1)

moonbender (547943) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857898)

I agree that rabbit should generally not be part of a trifle. That said, it's originally a British dish, so who knows.

re: you did not raise your hand (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857652)

After much deep and profound brain things inside my head, I have decided to ignore your point.

Therefore, your heinous comment will be stricken from the record. Does anyone else have the heebiedibigibies? No? Good. So shut up.

How can you have the heebie jeebies for Durrell's vontsira? He's so cute, and plushy!

/King Julian

Re:I don't usually complain about summaries (1)

MonsterMasher (518641) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857764)

But no, it's just a little cute furry guy

I'd be careful about describing a previously unknown carnivore as cute. It might have been unknown because nobody met one before, but it could be because nobody who met one lived to tell about it.

Short book title for you: The Legacy of Heorot (1987)
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legacy_of_Heorot [wikipedia.org]

Re:I don't usually complain about summaries (2, Funny)

arivanov (12034) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857388)

I will give you my mom's siamese to hold.

It is roughly the same size, is very old for a cat (17y), frail, slow and has terminal cancer.

Wanna try? I am happy to call the ambulance afterwards.

Never judgde a creature solely by its size. That is a very fine set of fangs and razorblades I see there...

Re:I don't usually complain about summaries (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857778)

Yesterday I went out to buy some groceries. When I came back home my wife commented that the carrots I had bought were very big, so I told her: "If this is what the carrots look like, just imagine the size of the rabbit!"

She did not laugh. She does not share my sense of humor.

I don't usually complain about nicks on /. (0, Offtopic)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 3 years ago | (#33858126)

But when I see a nick name like this: "phantomfive", I expect to see this bad boy [irmin.com] but what we normally observe behind such impressive name on the interwebs is something like this [productappeal.com] .

Did I get that right?

Re:I don't usually complain about summaries (3, Funny)

agw (6387) | more than 3 years ago | (#33858212)

Took them 24 years to find the cute babies. Just wait until they find the first full grown one.

R.O.U.S. (3, Funny)

schlesinm (934723) | more than 3 years ago | (#33856864)

Obviously it's a Rodent Of Unusual Size.

Re:R.O.U.S. (-1, Offtopic)

The_mad_linguist (1019680) | more than 3 years ago | (#33856874)

Summary has a typo. Replace final "t" with "r".

Re:R.O.U.S. (4, Funny)

The_mad_linguist (1019680) | more than 3 years ago | (#33856906)

Look, which is a more sensible size for a Carnivorous Swamp Beast? "Roughly the size of a cat", or "roughly the size of a car"?

I can get a poet to testify under oath if necessary.

Re:R.O.U.S. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33856978)

I take it that in true ./ fashion, you did not, in fact, look at the photos in the article?

Re:R.O.U.S. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857182)

Mr Coward: Do you or do you not recall hearing, on the morning of Monday, October the eleventh, in the year of two thousand and ten, a loud sound that one would generally describe as a "whoosh?"

Re:R.O.U.S. (4, Funny)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857108)

Look, which is a more sensible size for a Carnivorous Swamp Beast? "Roughly the size of a cat", or "roughly the size of a car"?

Roughly the size of Cthulhu.

Re:R.O.U.S. (1)

thousandinone (918319) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857984)

Roughly the size of Cthulhu.

But Cthulhu can change size at will...

Re:R.O.U.S. (1)

terminallyCapricious (1838672) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857362)

Carnivorous swamp beasts often make a very good meal for visiting tourists.

Re:R.O.U.S. (3, Funny)

Neil Boekend (1854906) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857544)

Carnivorous swamp beasts often make a very good meal of visiting tourists.

FTFY

Re:R.O.U.S. (1)

AVryhof (142320) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857608)

Carnivorous swamp beasts often make a very good meal of forty visiting tourists.

FTFY

FTFY

Re:R.O.U.S. (2, Insightful)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857232)

More like a Rodent Of Usual Size. It's not much larger than a rat. :P

Re:R.O.U.S. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857714)

It's a grendel.

Re:R.O.U.S. (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857376)

I don't believe they exist.

An orange is just a carrot of unusual size (4, Informative)

k2r (255754) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857634)

> Obviously it's a Rodent Of Unusual Size.
The most obvious feature defining rodents are their teeth.
The most obvious feature of the newly discovered animal to see in the picture(s) are its teeth which are about as non rodent as an animal's teeth can be.

Re:An orange is just a carrot of unusual size (1)

captainpanic (1173915) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857876)

Indeed... it seems closer to an otter (non rodent) than a beaver (rodent).

and then... (4, Informative)

OnePumpChump (1560417) | more than 3 years ago | (#33856872)

it went extinct.

Re:and then... (4, Insightful)

Fluffeh (1273756) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857074)

it went extinct.

Oh come on, that's not trolling. The creature in question lives in a single lake. The land around the lake, which used to be heavy forest has been cut down. This now causes all the soil to get dumped into the lake whenever it rains. Even this article itself said that so much soil has been dumped into the lake that during the dry season, the level of water drops to a depth of 2 feet!

The comment there isn't a -Troll. It is merely prematurely +Informative.

Re:and then... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857142)

by OnePumpChump (1560417) on Monday October 11, @01:53AM

The comment there isn't a -Troll. It is merely prematurely +Informative.

I see what you did there.

Mod parent. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857322)

+1 Searching every hole for innuendo.

Re:and then... (1)

andr00oo (915001) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857468)

The land around the lake, which used to be heavy forest has been cut down.

The land has been cut down? Weird

Re:and then... (-1)

Rockoon (1252108) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857644)

Even this article itself said that so much soil has been dumped into the lake that during the dry season, the level of water drops to a depth of 2 feet!

For some reason I think that you are imaging the possibility of a lake being "filled up" with dirt so that there isnt any more water. Water has a constant volume. If at one point the lake dropped to 4 feet in the dry season, and now it only drops to 2 feet, either the lake is twice as big now, OR THERE IS LESS PRECIPITATION AND THAT IT HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH THE EXTRA DIRT.

Re:and then... (4, Informative)

LizardKing (5245) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857746)

The uncompacted soil absorbs most of the water which previously remained standing on a thick, compacted and sludgy lake bottom. The soil has also raised the lake bed, which allows the water to drain off more easily into the denuded land surrounding the lake - soil which is less tightly bound together thanks to the increasing absence of deep rooted vegetation.

Re:and then... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33858124)

You seem to think that a lake is as simple as a impermeable bathtub or a bowl with a fixed volume of water. It isn't. Water has a constant volume, but we aren't dealing with a constant volume. It's a dynamically flowing system. And the basin in which the water sits isn't fixed either.

Infilling of lakes by sediment happens all the time, and, yes, it does result in shallowing of the lake and its eventual conversion into dry (or at least swampy) land. Lakes rarely deepen. Vegetation and sediment usually fills them up unless some process is regularly cleaning that material out (e.g., river erosion), dissolving the bedrock (e.g., in limestone areas) or the lake bottom is subsiding for some reason (e.g., tectonics or sediment compaction).

Lakes are at a given level because of an equilibrium between inflow and outflow. Inflows can be from direct precipitation, from water on the surface of the land (i.e. runoff) or can be subsurface (i.e. groundwater). Outflows can also be over the surface or into the groundwater, plus evaporation. Independent of the water inflow and outflow, the equilibrium level is often strongly determined by the terrain and the effect it has on those inflow/outflow rates. For example, if the lake level overtops a natural barrier, then the outflow increases greatly and the lake doesn't get significantly higher no matter how much extra water flows in. Think of it like a natural dam with a reservoir behind it. In this circumstance, if "extra dirt" fills to the level of the top of the dam, then guess what? No more lake. All you have is mud-filled plain and maybe a river flowing over it. Change the shape of the terrain (e.g., by dumping sediment on it) and even with the same amount of water passing through the system and no change in climate you can make a lake disappear entirely. The water flow is still there, but it may be largely in the groundwater, not forming a pool on the surface.

In areas where vegetation is stripped away another effect comes into play. Not only will you deliver more sediment into the lake due to increased erosion, but you also change the timing and rates at which water flows over the terrain and into the groundwater. Vegetation acts as a kind of buffer, so that when heavy rains fall, it tends to soak up the water like a sponge and impede its flow. This has three important effects: 1) it increases the amount of infiltration of surface water into the groundwater, 2) it slows down the surface flow and prolongs it, and 3) it decreases the peak amount of surface flow. This means that if you strip away the vegetation more of the water fill flow quickly down the slopes into the lake basin, overtop the natural barriers, and keep on going down the drainage system. Raging river floods will become more common. Whereas if the plants are there, the water will be released more slowly into the lake and there is more groundwater, replenishing the lake in between the rainstorms. This difference in flow amounts and timing can mean the difference between the lake drying out completely between rainfalls and merely being lower, even with the rainfall pattern being exactly the same as it was before.

All other things kept the same, stripping away vegetation around a lake will often have profound effects. It's one of the reasons that it is standard practice in environmentally responsible parts of the world to leave a significant buffer of forest around lakes to try to minimize the effect of human activities.

Re:and then... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857680)

but its so cute ;'-(

-sad panda

Re:and then... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857416)

Shame too. Hopefully they can get some people in there to deal with it quickly and try to get a stable habitat going again. But i doubt it will happen.

Guess all they can do now is take a snapshot of its cells, DNA, etc, and store it in the DNA banks for whenever we can revive the species...

Which is it? Or is it both? (2, Interesting)

adamofgreyskull (640712) | more than 3 years ago | (#33856884)

Beneath the picture, is this:

Durrell's vontsira is the first new carnivorous mammal discovered in Madagascar in 24 years.

Elsewhere in the article, twice, is this:

The first new carnivorous mammal to be discovered for 24 years

Was the last carnivorous mammal that was discovered, discovered 24 years ago in Madagascar? I don't know about anyone else, but I would infer from the qualifier "in Madagascar" that a carnivorous mammal was discovered less than 24 years ago somewhere else in the world.

Re:Which is it? Or is it both? (3, Insightful)

Kilrah_il (1692978) | more than 3 years ago | (#33856948)

I guess they assume that having written "in Madagascar" once, you would understand the point and they would not need to keep repeating it. OTOH, why pass up an opportunity for being unnecessarily pedantic.

Re:Which is it? Or is it both? (1)

GoochOwnsYou (1343661) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857118)

I agree with parent. The latter sentence is implying there hasn't been a carnivorous mammal discovered in 24 years at all and if that is not the case then it should specify "in Madagascar"

First things first (3, Insightful)

jamesh (87723) | more than 3 years ago | (#33856956)

what does it taste like?

Re:First things first (4, Informative)

fotbr (855184) | more than 3 years ago | (#33856970)

Chicken.

Re:First things first (2, Funny)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857134)

That's just Western chauvinism. For example, in Japan, parents tell their children that chicken "tastes just like squid".

Re:First things first (4, Funny)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857210)

...And in Shunga Japan, squid parents tell their children that fishermen's wives taste just like fish.

Re:First things first (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857220)

What? If chicken tastes like squid and this tastes like chicken, then it also tastes like squid. Transitivity!

Re:First things first (3, Insightful)

LearnToSpell (694184) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857228)

Doubtful. Carnivorous animals tend to taste awful.

Re:First things first (1)

Beriaru (954082) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857820)

You probably wouldn't tell appart cat from rabbit in a stew.

Re:First things first (1)

moonbender (547943) | more than 3 years ago | (#33858018)

Tuna tastes pretty good to me. Lots of other reasons for not eating it all that often, though.

Re:First things first (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33858272)

I think you meant carnivorous mammals tend to taste awful.

Fish, crustaceans, reptiles, and similar all taste pretty good.

I'm not sure about carnivorous birds (maybe some of our elected officials can tell us what bald eagle tastes like).

Re:First things first (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857378)

what does it taste like?

It probably tastes, like whatever it ate.

Re:First things first (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857506)

Had Charles Darwin discovered the animal, he'd probably have tried it. (ref [google.co.uk] ).

Re:First things first (1)

Anne_Nonymous (313852) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857946)

>> what does it taste like?

A bit like Dodo bird with a hint of Moa.

We are so quick to label it a 'beast' (4, Interesting)

ParkedStar (1909314) | more than 3 years ago | (#33856966)

The...'beast'...has most probably NEVER encountered humans before...and I'm sure if I were a small animal who has lived most of my quiet existence never crossing the path of a 20-fingered, land-dwelling giant and suddenly found myself being strangled, dangling in the air in front of 2+ of these foreigners and kidnapped from my perfectly-fine home and family; I'd be questioning who the beast really is.

Re:We are so quick to label it a 'beast' (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857026)

Is it peer pressure?

Re:We are so quick to label it a 'beast' (3, Funny)

mister_playboy (1474163) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857044)

20-fingered

Inbreed much? :)

Re:We are so quick to label it a 'beast' (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857326)

Meh. Among biologists, beast refers to any therian [wikipedia.org] (basically, any placental mammal, I.E. mammals that are not marsupials(kangaroo) or monotremes(platypus.)) Only on Slashdot would butting into a conversation that you are not qualified to speak in and making an ass of yourself be called "informative."

Now, an animal with 20 fingers [wikipedia.org] would be new to science. I mean, the discovery of even 8 digits to a limb would be quite the curiosity. Finding that on the digits of the front limb of a primate would be quite amazing. I suppose it would be more likely to find one with two extra front limbs, most likely due to a partially absorbed twin.

Re:We are so quick to label it a 'beast' (1)

tokul (682258) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857386)

Now, an animal with 20 fingers [wikipedia.org] would be new to science.

In some languages toe [wikipedia.org] uses same noun as finger. 10 fingers + 10 toes = 20.

Re:We are so quick to label it a 'beast' (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857582)

And in some languages, they don't have a word for numbers larger than three. Your point is?

Re:We are so quick to label it a 'beast' (1)

tokul (682258) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857806)

Your point is?

An animal with 20 digits is not new to science. Homo sapiens has 20 digits [wikipedia.org] . Original poster only confused fingers with digits.

Re:We are so quick to label it a 'beast' (1)

CProgrammer98 (240351) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857762)

8 fingers + 2 thumbs + 10 toes = 20 digits

Fixed.

Re:We are so quick to label it a 'beast' (5, Informative)

Sique (173459) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857604)

I mean, the discovery of even 8 digits to a limb would be quite the curiosity.

I hereby present you the Acanthostega [wikipedia.org] , which has eight digits per arm. The number of toes per limb is yet unknown. But the Ichthyostega [wikipedia.org] , which has seven digits per arm, has also seven toes per limb, so I would not be surprised if newly found fossils would show eight toes per limb for the Acanthostega.

Re:We are so quick to label it a 'beast' (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857480)

The...'beast'...has most probably NEVER encountered humans before...

I wouldn't say so, as this region is quite populated. I bet that this species was already well known amongst local natives, but simply not to our scientists.

Re:We are so quick to label it a 'beast' (2, Funny)

RevWaldo (1186281) | more than 3 years ago | (#33858056)

Look, do you want a SyFy original movie based on this critter (Swamp Beast!, starring Lucy Lawless and Erik Estrada) or don't you?

.

species (1)

nxcho (754392) | more than 3 years ago | (#33856982)

I hope they name it Jozin.

Re:species (1)

spineboy (22918) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857046)

Maybe they can bomb it with the collectives crop duster.

Sjezus Christ! (1)

santax (1541065) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857082)

It is coming right for us!

I for one... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857092)

welcome our new flesh eating cat-bear looking overloards

Re:I for one... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857152)

I, for one, hope it likes the taste of retard, so we can feed it pieces of you and your children.

Nessie (1)

Ron Bakker (539650) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857168)

See .... the lochness monster is not that improbable ...

First carnivorous mammal discovered in 24 years. (0)

Hermanas (1665329) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857174)

TFA states that it's the first carnivorous mammal discovered in 24 years (presumably world-wide), not only the first in 24 years in Madagascar like in the summary. Which one is it?

Re:First carnivorous mammal discovered in 24 years (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857214)

Reading [slashdot.org] . You fail it.

I was hoping.... (2, Funny)

Fizzol (598030) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857180)

for Mokele-mbembe.

It seems very nervous in the pictures. (2, Funny)

SharpFang (651121) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857198)

Did they try wrapping towels around their heads to calm it down?

Re:It seems very nervous in the pictures. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857640)

Did they try wrapping towels around their heads to calm it down?

I think it was waiting for them to slather their fingers with delicious ketchup, mustard, BBQ, honey, and "duck" sauces. But not waiting too long. ("On second thought, I'll have those finger tips au natural, sauteed in their own juices. Now if only they'll relax their grip on my throat...")

New film anyone (2, Funny)

dredwerker (757816) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857206)

Madagascar 4 the wild beast of the lake - a homecoming story.

Hardly new (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857222)

It's not a "new species" – it might be previously unknown to us, though.

Its head looks a bit weasel-like (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857226)

Minus the ears.

Debianicus Ice Weaselius (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857372)

To me, it looks like an African Dassie, which like cockroaches, will *never* go extinct. However, maybe it is the illusive Debianicus Ice Weaselius?

Endangered Lake??? (1, Funny)

x_IamSpartacus_x (1232932) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857564)

Ok... what the heck is an endangered lake? Aren't all lakes different and therefore "the last just like it", therefore endangered? If there's only one left of any species of animal that animal would be endangered, so wouldn't you say that every lake is endangered simply because it's the last and only of it's kind? Am I missing something?

Re:Endangered Lake??? (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857796)

Well, you go to be careful. When a lake is in danger, it will curl up into a ball and pee on your foot...

Is it Old Greg? (1)

definate (876684) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857566)

I imagine that whatever this is, it must be Old Greg [youtube.com] .

He doesn't like people playin' in his waters. He's gonna hurt you, he likes you, what do you think of him? Don't lie to him boy!

He knows what you're thinking, he's Old Greg, he's a scaly man fish!

Huge Hands (0)

zAPPzAPP (1207370) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857656)

If this is the size of a cat (even roughly), that man has really huge hands.

I can't believe that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857844)

they haven't closed the ports yet.

And this is on /. because ...? (0, Offtopic)

yet-another-lobbyist (1276848) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857878)

Stuff that matters? Are you kidding? What's next? Filing weather forecasts?

Re:And this is on /. because ...? (1)

Yamata no Orochi (1626135) | more than 3 years ago | (#33858100)

Stuff that matters? Are you kidding? What's next? Filing weather forecasts?

...Discovery of new species posted as a Slashdot Science story. And you're complaining? Give me some examples of what YOU think the Science column should post.

Its teh chupacabra! (1)

xmorg (718633) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857924)

You were warned! We told you! You wouldnt listen! how many more time swill you ingore us wen the aliens come!!!!

Durrell (3, Informative)

Anne_Nonymous (313852) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857974)

For what it's worth, Durrell wrote a number of fun books about Zoology and his explorations of the natural world. I'd recommend them as good beach reading or for young people interested in animals or natural sciences.

mod 3o3n (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33857986)

do and doing what 1. Therefore the8e The resources that my efforts were AT&T and Berkeley they are Come declined in market Locating #GNAA, posts. Therefore its readers and join in. It can be problems that I've you are a screaming DOG THAT IT IS. IT that should be Clearly. There FrreBSD at about 80 list of other users. BSD/OS Shouts To the Standpoint, I don't Are having trouble project somewhere Have an IRC client corpse turned over bottoms butt. Wipe Culture of abuse Towels on the floor kill myself like Ass until I hit my in any way related The rain..we can be same worthless Can no longer be for the state of volatile world of Come on baby...and to say there have anyone that thinks sure that I've That has lost has brought upon [tux.org]? Are you prima donnas to

Looks Tasty. (0)

drmattnd (1918790) | more than 3 years ago | (#33857990)

I wonder who will be the first to go on record as having eaten this beast.

Whatever knows fear... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33858244)

Burns at the salanoia durrelli's touch!!!!

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