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Small Asteroid To Pass Close To Earth Tomorrow

Soulskill posted about 4 years ago | from the bruce-willis-alert-color-mauve dept.

NASA 126

Matt_dk writes "A small asteroid will pass very close to Earth this Tuesday. Astronomers are still tracking the object, now designated as 2010 TD54, and various estimates say it should come within anywhere from 52,000 km (33,000 miles) to 64,000 km (40,000 miles) on October 12, with closest approach at approximately 11:25 UT."

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Fuuny coincidence? (4, Interesting)

ls671 (1122017) | about 4 years ago | (#33862506)

In other news "retired Air Force officer, Stanley A. Fulham", whoever that guy might be, "predicts October 13, 2010 as the date for a massive UFO display over the world’s principal cities". ;-) Given the distance, can we really be sure it is an asteroid ?

http://www.disclose.tv/forum/october-13-2010-worldwide-ufo-display-t33304.html [disclose.tv]

Re:Fuuny coincidence? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33862740)

Of course we can't. Any alien spacecraft capable of traveling across interstellar space to Earth would have to be much more advanced than any technology that we have. They could be stealthy beyond our imagination. That also implies that we have absolutely no way of telling whether or not they are here already.

I think this is the best SETI attempt so far. And I mean that quite seriously: http://ieti.org/hello/index.html

I don't think that they are here by the way. They're probably too busy doing alien stuff.

Re:Fuuny coincidence? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33862794)

I wouldn't necessarily think they are stealthy just because they have the technology to travel long distances.

Consider how magical a jet airplane would be to the people that first circumnavigated the globe in wooden boats.

Re:Fuuny coincidence? (1)

x2A (858210) | about 4 years ago | (#33864822)

"I don't think that they are here by the way. They're probably too busy doing alien stuff"

Rectal probing rednecks?!! Eeek, that means that they are here!! That's like, proof or something!

Re:Fuuny coincidence? (1)

Thud457 (234763) | about 4 years ago | (#33863082)

X-37B? Oh, wait, they found that already. [space.com] holy crap, there really is an app for that...

Re:Fuuny coincidence? (1)

History's Coming To (1059484) | about 4 years ago | (#33863920)

Nice, but a real pity...I was really enjoying it up until:

...through the services of a world renowned channeler, the author has communicated with an ethereal group of entities known as the Transcendors... "

Re:Fuuny coincidence? (1)

ls671 (1122017) | about 4 years ago | (#33864440)

In realty, we are called the Asgards, how dare you doubt our existence ?

We continue to exist and influence things long after the last of us has left its primitive physical body ;-)

Just in case... (5, Funny)

kellyb9 (954229) | about 4 years ago | (#33862528)

Please place Bruce Willis on standby.

teh centauri are invading (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33862584)

they are doing to us what they did to the narn and hurling meteors at us form there mass driver weapons , having to be way back off in solar system means they cant be too accurate

Re:teh centauri are invading (1)

Pojut (1027544) | about 4 years ago | (#33862600)

Are you sure Centauri isn't planning on dropping a bunch of arcade machines [wikipedia.org] ?

Re:teh centauri are invading (3, Funny)

Chris Burke (6130) | about 4 years ago | (#33862620)

Nonsense. This was obviously a rock launched via Bug Plasma, an attack which fortunately will miss us. Join the Mobile Infantry and fight back before they succeed and destroy Buenos Aires!

Re:teh centauri are invading (2, Funny)

Zider (211890) | about 4 years ago | (#33862816)

Would you like to know more?

Re:teh centauri are invading (2, Funny)

rhyder128k (1051042) | about 4 years ago | (#33863136)

Unisex showers, baby! Of course I'd like to know more.

Re:teh centauri are invading (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33866398)

I'm doing my part!

Re:teh centauri are invading (1)

rhyder128k (1051042) | about 4 years ago | (#33863618)

Thems there mass drivers over there, you mean?

Re:Just in case... (1)

KingAlanI (1270538) | about 4 years ago | (#33862588)

nah, leave that annoying Russian guy on the asteroid instead.

Re:Just in case... (1)

bwintx (813768) | about 4 years ago | (#33862994)

nah, leave that annoying Russian guy on the asteroid instead.

But be sure to take his wrench. You never know...

Re:Just in case... (1)

KingAlanI (1270538) | about 4 years ago | (#33864602)

I admit I don't get whatever reference you're trying to make here.

Re:Just in case... (1)

hairyfeet (841228) | about 4 years ago | (#33863768)

Hey! What did Yakov ever do to you? And where would /. be without the Russian Reversal? In Soviet Russia Asteroid leaves annoying YOU!

Russian Reversal (with Magic card) (1)

KingAlanI (1270538) | about 4 years ago | (#33863962)

Good use of the Russian Reversal there I'll admit, but I was talking about Peter Stormare's Lev Andropov character in the 1998 film, in case y'all didn't pick up on that.

My previously-designed Magic card for Yakov:

Name: Yakov Smirnoff
Mana Cost: 1 Blue, 1 Colorless
Legendary Creature - Human
Rules Text: Untap Yakov, pay 1, say something that refers to a Slashdot meme: Switch target creature’s power and toughness until end of turn.
Flavor Text: In Soviet Cartamundi plant, cardboard prints YOU!
Power/Toughness: 2/1

(This is a joke card, but there is an actual ability now [premiered in 2008's _Shadowmoor_] that has you untap a creature to use an ability, instead of tapping like, say, Prodigal Sorcerer.
http://magiccards.info/shm/en/16.html [magiccards.info] for example

Re:Russian Reversal (with Magic card) (1)

hairyfeet (841228) | about 4 years ago | (#33864836)

I knew who you were talking about (yet another reason why /. needs joke and sarcasm tags) but here "annoying Russian" is a title usually reserved for old Yakov, who BTW is running his place down in Branson. My GF went and saw him not too long ago and says like Henny Youngman kept beating the dead horse he is still cranking out the old Russian reversal. Personally i thought Stormare should have gotten more credit for playing Lucifer in Constantine. Sure the movie itself wasn't great but Stormare gave Lucifer that nice demeanor with a dark undercurrent of malice. I thought Pacino went a little too overboard in his portrayal, the only other recent I thought was good was Viggo Mortensen in the original prophecy. Stormare gets a lot of credit for his comedy (like the crazy Russian cosmonaut) but he is actually a damned good dramatic actor as well.

As for the Yakov playing card? All I can say is "Look Ogre, a nerd!" Ogre: "NERDS!"

Re:Russian Reversal (with Magic card) (1)

KingAlanI (1270538) | about 4 years ago | (#33866098)

I am not really up on films for the most part, old or new, so I'm gonna have to trust you on that one. :P

Re:Just in case... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33862636)

Can't we just strap Ben Affleck to a rocket instead?

Re:Just in case... (1)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | about 4 years ago | (#33863742)

Works for me.

Re:Just in case... (1)

raphael75 (1544521) | about 4 years ago | (#33862724)

Place Space Battleship Yamato on standby. The Gamelons must be stopped!

Re:Just in case... (1)

countSudoku() (1047544) | about 4 years ago | (#33862796)

Giant, triangular spaceship at the ready. (pew pew pew) You have impulse engines and HyperSpace too, just hit the "HyperSpace" button, or pull back on the stick, if a dedicated button is unavailable. You have three chances. Watch out when the asteroid breaks into slightly smaller chunks! Oh, and there might be an alien or two out to shoot at you. Other than that should be smooth asteroid hunting. Good luck, Captain!

Re:Just in case... (1)

SnarfQuest (469614) | about 4 years ago | (#33863220)

Please place Bruce Willis on standby.

Yet another stupid movie. 1st off, they'll need to reach the asteroid when it is within the shuttle's range (600 miles), which gives them about 1 second to drill their hole, insert the a-bomb, and detonate it. Which would just leave a large cluster of radioactive debris crashing into the Earth a few seconds later.

Even if you extended the Shuttles range 10x, that would still give you less than a minute to do something.

Blowing it up into tiny fragments would still not stop it's destructive effects. All that mass is still going to crash into the Earth, with all the fun heating properties, would still fry anything that happens to be living underneath it.

And what type of drill bit will wear out drilling through a supposedly mostly ice comet?

Stupid movie. You almost expect them to be attacked by space zombies.

Re:Just in case... (4, Funny)

maxume (22995) | about 4 years ago | (#33863508)

Did you miss the part where the movie starred Bruce Willis?

Re:Just in case... (1)

SudoGhost (1779150) | about 4 years ago | (#33864762)

Stupid movie.

I've never seen a major blockbuster movie where everyone agrees, "That's exactly how it works in real life!"

Movies are stupid. They're fantasy, an escape from reality. That's how they work.

Re:Just in case... (1)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | about 4 years ago | (#33863732)

I've been hoping for that for years.

Not a lot of advance warning... (5, Insightful)

Chris Burke (6130) | about 4 years ago | (#33862594)

I was kinda alarmed when I read the name "2010 T" which means it was discovered in the first half of October, 2010 (as opposed to discovered in the second half via time travel). And in fact TFA says it was discovered Oct 9.

TFA also says it's a pretty small asteroid only a few meters across, which is a pretty good excuse for not finding it sooner (and makes it Mostly Harmless), but still... More funding to asteroid finding/tracking pls thx.

Re:Not a lot of advance warning... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33862688)

DISCOVERED BY TIME TRAVEL

i think you're onto something

I'm not. (1)

AnonymousClown (1788472) | about 4 years ago | (#33862868)

I'm never alarmed at this kind of stuff. Same thing with terrorism.

OTOH, driving (traffic accidents) and heart disease is something that I'm mildly concerned about. The odds are, those are things will take me out prematurely.

Re:I'm not. (2, Insightful)

Chris Burke (6130) | about 4 years ago | (#33863020)

Sure if all you care about is yourself.

Me, I think it's pretty rational to be alarmed by things with the highest probability of killing me or someone I love, or things with a very low probability of killing me, everyone I know and love, and possibly the entire human species.

In the latter category asteroid impacts would be less alarming than the Cuban Missile Crisis, but I think my level of concern is commensurate with that reality.

Re:I'm not. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33863808)

Rule #1 if being worried:

    #1 - IF YOU CAN'T DO SHIT ABOUT IT, DON'T WORRY!!!!

You can worry about politicians and their nukes. Then ask them what they are doing about these nukes to make sure they don't go off, ever. Then you can stop worrying about asteroids from space - can't do anything about them anyway.

You can do shit about it, so be worried! (1)

Chris Burke (6130) | about 4 years ago | (#33864462)

Then you can stop worrying about asteroids from space - can't do anything about them anyway.

Of course we can do something about asteroids from space! It's actually quite simple conceptually, and quite feasible technologically, to prevent a catastrophic asteroid impact, if and only if you detect them sufficiently far -- as in years -- in advance. A spacecraft of reasonable mass equipped with ion engines for long-term station keeping could act as a gravity tractor and pull the asteroid out of the impact trajectory. It doesn't take a whole lot of acceleration today to prevent an impact in five or ten years.

So you should be worrying, and asking your politicians what they are doing to make sure we can detect planet-killer asteroids sufficiently far in advance. We need more funding for searching and tracking of asteroids, and some test missions to work the kinks out of the process of actually moving asteroids so we're ready if we find an potential danger without sufficient time for an R&D phase.

We're starting to fund the search/tracking part, though still inadequately for the magnitude of the problem (as in the amount of space and potential objects). Only the Russians AFAIK are doing anything about actually trying to implement the solution to actually preventing a catastrophic impact. More funding pls thx!

Re:You can do shit about it, so be worried! (1)

Dthief (1700318) | about 4 years ago | (#33864664)

Luckily (I say this because military applications increase the chance of funding) this technology could also be used to do the same thing with an asteroid that was going to miss, but instead we make it hit the earth!

Re:I'm not. (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 4 years ago | (#33864698)

Yeah, but the way things are going, I think it's much more likely that all of us (or a large number of us) die off from simultaneous heart attacks, then the odds of getting hit by a species killing asteroid. To be more serious, it's much more likely that someone in my family, or a large part of my family will be taken out by a single event like a car crash. I think the most likely things we should worry about, even if we aren't selfish are heart attacks and car crashes. That's why I ride a bike everywhere. Helps fend off heart attacks, and probably less dangerous than being in a car, even if I'm on the same roads.

Re:I'm not. (2, Insightful)

Nyeerrmm (940927) | about 4 years ago | (#33865520)

Alarmed is certainly an overreaction. However, that doesn't mean it should be ignored -- kind of like terrorism. Plus, unlike terrorism, taking precautions on the NEO threat doesn't interfere with civil rights, and hasn't seen significant overreaction on the part of the general public.

Detection programs cost tens of millions of dollars, and even a mitigation testbed for a modest sized asteroid is only around $500 million. These kinds of programs have scientific benefit as well (and costs are on par with other space science efforts,) so it has value beyond the NEO threat.

Additionally, the threat is not just from extinction-class asteroids, but smaller asteroids that can cause regional destruction. These are expected to occur on a much more regular basis (hundred-ish years). If something like Tunguska were to occur over a populated area, the material damage would be far greater than the cost of NEO programs, and that doesn't even include loss of life.

Re:Not a lot of advance warning... (3, Insightful)

GrumblyStuff (870046) | about 4 years ago | (#33863014)

Heh, yeah, I can see it now.

"Why does the President want to spend money looking at the sky?! He should be looking at the bottom line!"

"Is there something he doesn't want us to find on the ground?"

"Look, the Earth is 75% water and only half of it would be facing bombardment. Add that up and we've got a negative 25% chance to be hit!"

"Asteroid monitoring? What's the use in that?"
Cue asteroid strike a la Bobby Jindal and volcano monitoring [huffingtonpost.com] .

oblig (1)

gandhi_2 (1108023) | about 4 years ago | (#33862624)

no bigger than a chihuahua's head.

Re:oblig (1)

samkass (174571) | about 4 years ago | (#33862952)

Or about the size of 1 book from the Library of Congress.

Why is this news? (1)

chemicaldave (1776600) | about 4 years ago | (#33862662)

FTFA

A five-meter-sized near-Earth asteroid from the undiscovered population of about 30 million would be expected to pass daily within a lunar distance, and one might strike Earth’s atmosphere about every 2 years on average.If an asteroid of the size of 2010 TD54 were to enter Earth’s atmosphere, it would be expected to burn up high in the atmosphere and cause no damage to Earth’s surface.

Is it because we know about it? If this happens daily and would cause no harm if striking the Earth...then why is it newsworthy?

Re:Why is this news? (1)

vlm (69642) | about 4 years ago | (#33862744)

Is it because we know about it?

Bingo. This time we found it 2 or so days ahead of closest approach. Usually we don't find out until you look up and see a meteor streaking across the sky, or even worse, discover it a couple days later in historical photos.

I always thought from a ham radio perspective it would be interesting to try "scheduled meteor scatter" not where you schedule an attempt in a general sense and hope a meteor flys by, but where you select your little individual tiny meteor. Would certainly save a lot of overheated amplifiers.

"OK you transmit first on the impact of 2010-TD245 at 1307Z. 73 and good luck"

Re:Why is this news? (1)

Nethead (1563) | about 4 years ago | (#33863688)

Normally the term "meteor scatter" describes using the ion trail of micrometeors (sand size and smaller) to bounce a VHF/UHF signal further than line of sight.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meteor_burst_communications [wikipedia.org]

73 de w7com

Re:Why is this news? (4, Informative)

Chris Burke (6130) | about 4 years ago | (#33862938)

First, yes, because we know about it.

Second, because this is actually passing much closer than the lunar orbit and is thus not a daily event.

Third, because we do know about it, but also know it would most likely cause no damage, is information worth conveying.

Fourth, because some of us are quite interested in space and space objects and the field of asteroid tracking, especially as it relates to near earth objects.

Fifth, because there's a slim chance we could see it! TFA says you'd need a "moderate" sized telescope, which could mean a lot of things in different contexts. The JPL NEO tracker page gives an absolute planetary magnitude of 28, which if my math is right is 10.8 apparent magnitude ideally (i.e. appears 'full' from our perspective, is roughly spherical etc) Which would be within the capabilities of plenty of amateur telescopes.

Ultimately and obviously, how much this is newsworthy to you is subjective. But I think it's cool.

Re:Why is this news? (2, Interesting)

Spatial (1235392) | about 4 years ago | (#33864278)

Check out this video [youtube.com] .

An animated overview of the Solar System showing the last 30 years of asteroid discoveries and their orbits. It's to scale, created from real data. Pretty awesome.

Re:Why is this news? (1)

NemoinSpace (1118137) | about 4 years ago | (#33865182)

I only believe half of what i read.
You: Second, because this is actually passing much closer than the lunar orbit and is thus not a daily event.
TFA: A five-meter-sized near-Earth asteroid from the undiscovered population of about 30 million would be expected to pass daily within a lunar distance,
Guess which half?

Re:Why is this news? (1)

theshowmecanuck (703852) | about 4 years ago | (#33865274)

I guess it is obvious now that I read the article, but I find it interesting that the meteors that actually hit the earth must be a lot bigger than people think before they hit the atmosphere. Since they say this one would probably burn up and not even hit the earth were it even on a collision course, how big does an asteroid have to be in order to actually impact?

Geosync is only 26200 miles (3, Interesting)

vlm (69642) | about 4 years ago | (#33862700)

Geosync is only 26200 miles ... the uncertainty is almost large enough that it could hit a geosync satellite. If only they provided a std deviation or some other probability metric.

Re:Geosync is only 26200 miles (1)

Phleg (523632) | about 4 years ago | (#33862870)

There is a lot of volume in space. The odds that this hits any satellite in orbit are virtually nil.

Re:Geosync is only 26200 miles (3, Funny)

kellyb9 (954229) | about 4 years ago | (#33862944)

There is a lot of volume in space.

Incorrect... there is no sound in space.

Re:Geosync is only 26200 miles (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33863374)

no one can hear you scream

Re:Geosync is only 26200 miles (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33863544)

Incorrect... he is saying that there is too much "space" in space for the asteroid to be likely to hit a satellite.

Re:Geosync is only 26200 miles (1)

TheDormouse (614641) | about 4 years ago | (#33864898)

Also no beards in space [vimeo.com] .

Re:Geosync is only 26200 miles (1)

aarenz (1009365) | about 4 years ago | (#33862982)

The damage that would be done if it took out a core communication sat is very high, so you need to balance that into the overall risk calculation, so even very low probability equates to high risk when multiplied on financial and social impact. Or is this just being put out by North Korea to cover up their latest attempt to take down a satellite?

Re:Geosync is only 26200 miles (1)

Arthur Grumbine (1086397) | about 4 years ago | (#33863554)

There is a lot of volume in space.

I believe this [brainyquote.com] is what you meant to say.

Re:Geosync is only 26200 miles (1)

net28573 (1516385) | about 4 years ago | (#33866054)

can someone less lazy than i please link this guy to the satellite clutter and junk article about how badly cluttered it is up there

Re:Geosync is only 26200 miles (1)

jayrtfm (148260) | about 4 years ago | (#33862958)

put one pin on a random lane in a bowling alley. Blindfold yourself at the entrance to the alley, then walk to the lane and bowl the pin down.
It's kinda like that, only the pin is also moving at 7,000 mph

Re:Geosync is only 26200 miles (1)

dmgxmichael (1219692) | about 4 years ago | (#33863058)

As is the bowling ball.

Re:Geosync is only 26200 miles (2, Insightful)

vlm (69642) | about 4 years ago | (#33863296)

put one pin on a random lane in a bowling alley. Blindfold yourself at the entrance to the alley, then walk to the lane and bowl the pin down.
It's kinda like that, only the pin is also moving at 7,000 mph

And the pin is a critical piece of national infrastructure, that costs $10B to replace, with a multi year lead time... and you don't get to toss one ball, but randomly a couple per month, almost all of which we don't know about until after the ball is thrown... I wouldn't expect failure every time, or even a given time, but its gotta happen sooner or later.

Re:Geosync is only 26200 miles (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33863944)

Then define your timescale?? Hasn't happened yet. And people are putting satellites up into space for the last 50 years!

It's heck of a lot more likely that a solar storm will kill a satellite than anything extraterrestrial hit it.

Re:Geosync is only 26200 miles (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33865106)

Oh my god! OH MY GOD!!!!!!! WE'RE ALL GOING TO DIE!!!!!!!!

Yes, it will eventually happen, but no, the odds of it happening are unimaginably small

Re:Geosync is only 26200 miles (0, Flamebait)

RaymondKurzweil (1506023) | about 4 years ago | (#33863474)

This sounds like a great way to end up getting raped.

Re:Geosync is only 26200 miles (1)

Nyeerrmm (940927) | about 4 years ago | (#33865640)

The JPL HORIZONS data tend to have covariance data for their ephemerides. Might look it up there if you're interested. Unfortunately, six-state covariance matrices don't fit well in public articles, a range of values which probably correspond to an RMS 3-sigma value are the best you're going to get.

This is a bit worrisome . . . (0)

themoneyish (971138) | about 4 years ago | (#33862704)

FTFA:

A telescope of the NASA-sponsored Catalina Sky Survey north of Tucson, Arizona discovered 2010 TD54 on Oct. 9 at (12:55 a.m. PDT) during routine monitoring of the skies.

. . . if an asteroid can get this close to us without our knowledge until 3 days before a flyby, the Pan-STARRS isn't doing enough [hawaii.edu] to detect NEOs in advance.

Re:This is a bit worrisome . . . (2, Insightful)

ravenspear (756059) | about 4 years ago | (#33862728)

It's not worrisome at all. It was not detected until then because it is very small and poses no threat even if it impacts. It's much easier to find larger objects. If an object large enough to cause a global catastrophe was on it's way toward us, we would have way more advance warning than 3 days with these kinds of efforts.

Re:This is a bit worrisome . . . (2, Funny)

dugjohnson (920519) | about 4 years ago | (#33862810)

If an object large enough to cause a global catastrophe was on it's way toward us, we would have way more advance warning than 3 days with these kinds of efforts.

So we'd have plenty of time to get out of the way....whew!

Re:This is a bit worrisome . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33864992)

It all depends on the scale of the catastrophe, not all may be global.

Spotting a city killer sized object and knowing it's trajectory far enough in advance would realistically warrant an evacuation order. If I had knowledge that my town would be a smoking crater in two weeks, sure I'd like to know to start packing the bug-out bag and get the hell outta dodge. (A nuke still might be useful against one this small, yet I wouldn't put a guarantee on it. "Buckshotting" one this size may count as a win though, since most wouldn't make anywhere near the ground. Interestingly enough, the copper slug in NASA's Deep Impact mission [wikipedia.org] has dimensions and a mass that nearly match a complete Mk-12 warhead assembly with a W62. At least based on comparing the Wikipedia info... So somebody must have considered it.)

If it was more of a regional killer type thing, you'd know something's up. You'd hear about the asteroid being spotted. But then in some part of the world - there would be massive military movement. Presumably to get the troops out of harm's way, and perhaps stage some kind of recovery operation in the aftermath.

However if it's too damn big you're probably better off not knowing. Can't do shit in that case anyways.

Re:This is a bit worrisome . . . (1, Interesting)

Phleg (523632) | about 4 years ago | (#33862852)

Unfortunately, no. About half the asteroids that could hit us come from the daytime sky (e.g., from the direction of the sun). We stand essentially zero chance of spotting any of these any time in the near future.

Re:This is a bit worrisome . . . (1)

c6gunner (950153) | about 4 years ago | (#33862918)

About half the asteroids that could hit us come from the daytime sky

Well this is obviously why we have observatories in Australia. Duh!

Re:This is a bit worrisome . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33864568)

I see you still believe in the geocentric constellation...

Re:This is a bit worrisome . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33864812)

That also means that half the asteroids that could hit us come from the nighttime sky... so the odds are 50-50...

Re:This is a bit worrisome . . . (1)

ravenspear (756059) | about 4 years ago | (#33865402)

Huh? Any extremely large object is going to be noticed more than a year before it hits. The earth rotates around the sun, giving us no more than a few months blindness to any one direction.

close? (1)

rossdee (243626) | about 4 years ago | (#33862730)

from TFA:
  "its closest approach to Earth's surface at an altitude of about 45,000 kilometers"

Only in astronomical terms would 45,000 KM be called close...

  "At that time, the asteroid will be over southeastern Asia in the vicinity of Singapore. "

And I would not call 45,000km as "in the vicinity of' when even South America is only about 1/5 of the distance further away...

Re:close? (4, Insightful)

gmuslera (3436) | about 4 years ago | (#33862804)

In a sense, is far, is more than 3 whole earths side to side of distance. No, you will not hear a "zing!" when it passes over.

In the other hand, was discovered just 2 days ago. If a bigger one coming with a bit more accuracy is discovered now won't be anything that could be done, the plans that are actually to deal with possible impacts implies maybe years,

Re:close? (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | about 4 years ago | (#33863746)

In space, the sound you hear is not Doppler.

Re:close? (2, Informative)

amRadioHed (463061) | about 4 years ago | (#33862844)

I think what they mean to say is that the point on the Earth that the asteroid will be directly over at closest approach is in the vicinity of Singapore, not the asteroid itself.

Re:close? (1)

elrous0 (869638) | about 4 years ago | (#33862956)

That's a helluva lot closer than the moon, and most people consider that pretty close.

Hot fudge Sundae? (0, Offtopic)

frodo527 (614767) | about 4 years ago | (#33862758)

Does Hot Fudge Sundae fall on Tuesdae this year?

Re:Hot fudge Sundae? (1)

Artifakt (700173) | about 4 years ago | (#33865384)

Did this get modded offtopic by someone who just didn't get the Lucifer's Hammer reference?

Comparisons (5, Informative)

pgn674 (995941) | about 4 years ago | (#33862778)

International Space Station: 229 miles
Geosynchronous orbit: 26,200 miles
Moon: 236,216 miles

Re:Comparisons (3, Informative)

aarenz (1009365) | about 4 years ago | (#33863056)

Please read article, the distance is measured from the center of the earth. So it is only 28,000 miles from the surface, which is right in the gesynch range, based on size, composition and speed, it could vary more than 2,000 miles during its pass near our big old earth. Goodbye dish network, or maybe that sat phone uplink from midway island.

Re:Comparisons (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33866068)

Kilometers, metric is superior, stupid americans, catch up with the rest of the world, cream cheese, etc.

minus 2, Tr ol7) (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33862886)

DUnless you ca8 work

Hype? (2, Informative)

Anomalyx (1731404) | about 4 years ago | (#33863140)

From TFA:

A five-meter-sized near-Earth asteroid from the undiscovered population of about 30 million would be expected to pass daily within a lunar distance, and one might strike Earth’s atmosphere about every 2 years on average.

So really this happens all the time.

If an asteroid of the size of 2010 TD54 were to enter Earth's atmosphere, it would be expected to burn up high in the atmosphere and cause no damage to Earth's surface.

AND nobody will notice if it does decide to visit our planet. Maybe it will even hit one of those "dead satellites" and do its bit to clean up the junk in geosync for us.

I suspect this article is nothing but NASA's way of saying "moar $$$ pl0x!!!!!1"

Re:Hype? (2, Insightful)

BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) | about 4 years ago | (#33863354)

I know you're being sarcastic, but if it did nail a GEO sat, that would make the GEO orbit belt a lot messier and more dangerous...

Re:Hype? (1)

jaa101 (627731) | about 4 years ago | (#33865006)

Yes, it happens all the time and satellites get hit way less than the earth because, think about it, their surface area is *way* less. Sadly, hitting satellites will make the orbital debris problem worse since every hit just makes more smaller pieces. Even little pieces are a disaster for other satellites at 10km/second, though they fall out of orbit faster.

Interestingly, the frequency of hits is inversely proportional to mass (weight) of the object. Guessing this thing weighs about a 100 tonnes (probably more) and one hits earth every two years (burning up in the atmosphere). That means a 1000 tonne object will hit about every 20 years and a 10000 tonne object every 200 years, etc. ... on average. It also means 1 gram objects (a millionth of a tonne) hit the earth about once a second ... making shooting stars.

OMG OMG OMG (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33863264)

OMG it's going to hit us!

In related news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33863562)

...I will be passing gas near Earth tomorrow.

Small Asteroid To Pass Close To Earth Tomorrow.... (2, Funny)

afabbro (33948) | about 4 years ago | (#33863638)

...but will not, alas, hit it.

Why is the post-apocalyptic paradise just out of reach? After 40 years of Cold War teasing, I was almost ready to give up hope, but asteroids still mock us. I cry at all the missed opportunities.

If I might be so bold (1)

DryGrian (1775520) | about 4 years ago | (#33863882)

All of you showing concern over this event should have a gander at orbit@home [psi.edu] , a distributed computing approach to monitoring near-Earth asteroid activity.

Do some people gonna die? (1)

mysidia (191772) | about 4 years ago | (#33864110)

You know it's going to change course and enter earth's atmosphere, unleashing a horde of super-nanonites that will massively replicate and rapidly consume all the resources of earth.....

Finally we get our flying car ! (1)

NemoinSpace (1118137) | about 4 years ago | (#33864574)

FTA:

A newly-discovered car-sized asteroid will fly past Earth early Tuesday.

Don't complain about stupid jokes. In space no one can hear you, on Slashdot no one cares.

move along, nothing to see here (1)

us7892 (655683) | about 4 years ago | (#33864706)

Paraphrasing, an asteroid this size would burn up in our atmosphere.

Move along, nothing to see here.

Message recieved from asteroid: (1)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | about 4 years ago | (#33864872)

NASA has intercepted a stream messages being constantly coming from the "asteroid". It has been decoded. It says, "Attention Heaven's Gate. Your pick up time is in 24 hours. Please prepare. Sorry for the delay"

NASA artists impression? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33864916)

You're gonna tell me that the "artists impression" credited by NASA is 33000 miles from Earth? It looks like 2000 miles altitude at most. This is the kind of dishonesty that ruins the public faith in anything to do with the government.

Nasa (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 years ago | (#33865194)

Nasa this is this what we need for my country,where on the world is the best place to find asteroid fragments
Katalog Firm [katalogi.co]

Night of the Asteroid! (1)

stink_eye (1582461) | about 4 years ago | (#33865222)

I for one will sleep in my corrugated tin shed with a loaded shotgun and rations and wait to welcome our new zombie overlords...

What are the correct precautions? (1)

shikaisi (1816846) | about 4 years ago | (#33866352)

What should I do? Take my hat off
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