Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Facebook Introduces One-Time Passwords

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the i-forgot-that-too dept.

Facebook 215

angry tapir writes "Worried about logging into Facebook from a strange computer? There's now a way to get into the popular social network without entering your regular Facebook password. It's called a temporary password. To use it, users must list their mobile phone numbers with their Facebook accounts. They can then text a number from their phones and Facebook sends back a temporary password that is good for 20 minutes. The service will be available worldwide in the next few weeks."

cancel ×

215 comments

Great idea. (5, Insightful)

Timmmm (636430) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881394)

Now can we please get one-time credit card authorisation?

Re:Great idea. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33881458)

Move to Sweden and you already have it :)

Re:Great idea. (1)

mikael_j (106439) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881556)

The downside to these one-time cc numbers is that some american (I've yet to see a swedish company deny these numbers) companies tend to deny them. I had that problem with Blizzard when it came to WoW upgrades, I could pay for game time but for game upgrades my purchases were denied...

Re:Great idea. (2, Informative)

narooze (845310) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881788)

There is at least one Swedish company that does deny them, SF Bio (the largest movie theater chain in Sweden). However, in their case there is a good reason; to get the tickets you've bought online with your credit card you have to swipe the same card in their ticket printing machines. You could definitely come up with another way to get the tickets once they are bought, but as long as you have to have the credit card with which you paid to get the tickets, one-time cc numbers are probably out of the question.

Re:Great idea. (2, Insightful)

pspahn (1175617) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881886)

Swedes see movies in actual theaters? I assumed everyone just torrented everything.

MOD PARENT DOWN (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33882048)

I am of African descent and find this post highly irritating.

Re:MOD PARENT DOWN (1)

Codename Dutchess (1782238) | more than 3 years ago | (#33882134)

Protip: Everyone else here is also of African descent.

Re:Great idea. (4, Informative)

Rijnzael (1294596) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881478)

BOA does this already [bankofamerica.com] if you're in the US.

Copied from windows live. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33881576)

Copied from windows live.

Re:Great idea. (1)

n0dna (939092) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881616)

Discover also does this.

Re:Great idea. (4, Informative)

Rob the Bold (788862) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881618)

Now can we please get one-time credit card authorisation?

Amex did this for a while about 10 years ago. I used it and liked it. Then it went away.

Re:Great idea. (1)

barzok (26681) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881660)

And here I thought they just buried it on the site and I couldn't find it. They completely did away with it? Jerks.

My Discover Card Does This ... (2, Informative)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881632)

Now can we please get one-time credit card authorization?

You mean like my Discover More Credit Card offers me [discovercard.com] ?

You have the option of re-using the same one for a retailer or just continually requesting a new one if your dealings with them are infrequent or shady.

Closet homosexuality in Arab culture... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33881666)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/crime/8059246/Saudi-Prince-slept-in-double-bed-with-manservant.html [telegraph.co.uk]

FTA: "He said the detectives did not understand the Saudi Arabian culture, where men regularly travel together as companions."

Actually, we understand it quite well. You were both homosexuals, and members of a religion that still to this day advocates executing homosexuals. Hence, you were terrified to be open about your sexuality. This is quite common in Arab culture, where men can be seen strolling around hand-in-hand while their wives are forced to either stay home or walk several paces behind like the family dog.

Re:Great idea. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33881736)

Citicards/Citibank does this.

Re:Great idea. (1)

Mascot (120795) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881756)

The tech has been there for years. For any online store supporting verified by visa/mastercard, I'm sent to my bank's authorization page and required to enter my security token's current code and personal password.

For whatever reason though, there are still tons of sites out there that do not support verified by visa/mastercard.

On the other hand, it's only a matter of time before we get cards with built-in token generators. At which point I would expect CC companies to start refusing transactions based on nothing but the printed info on the card.

Having to remember even more passwords (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881912)

For whatever reason though, there are still tons of sites out there that do not support verified by visa/mastercard.

I seem to remember some sites using Verified by Visa and then abandoning it. Perhaps they found that shoppers were abandoning their shopping carts after having set up VBV before and then forgetting their VBV username and password.

Re:Having to remember even more passwords (2, Informative)

pasamio (737659) | more than 3 years ago | (#33882214)

The worst thing about VBV was not actually having it set up properly and then having a merchant require it compared to others that didn't. I had this happen to me when I was overseas trying to get internet and all of a sudden I got slammed by this Verified by VISA thing that wasn't setup and I could get internet to get the details I needed to get it set up (catch 22). Sounds like a good idea until it gets inconsistently applied in practice.

Re:Great idea. (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881934)

For any online store supporting verified by visa/mastercard, I'm sent to my bank's authorization page and required to enter my .... personal password.

Sounds like a great phishing opportunity... Thats why I don't like it. Especially since "most people" use the same password for everything.

Re:Great idea. (1)

JLangbridge (1613103) | more than 3 years ago | (#33882036)

I'm in France, and I have 2 options. One is, as said above, create a temporary credit card number that is good for only one transaction for a specified amount, but the other option allows me to buy on most sites in France, and on the authorization screen, my bank sends me a text message that I have to enter in on the site. No password, no payment. These codes are one-shot codes, and I don't have to enter any personal information. I love this system, it doesn't add a lot of complication for me, except for having a cell phone next to me 24 hours a day (which I have anyway), and no personal information is sent.

Re:Great idea. (1)

Mascot (120795) | more than 3 years ago | (#33882202)

What's your point, precisely? That it's somehow worse to require extra information compared to only what's physically printed on a credit card? If so, I think most would disagree rather strongly with you. Even a simple password verification like that (which I simplified, one also needs information from birth certificate) prevents a stolen card from being used in online stores.

Obviously I prefer my bank's solution (token). But I don't think we're going to get there until the token generators are actually on the cards themselves. Otherwise people will tend to prefer their bank's credit card offerings over others, since "others" would mean having to handle even more token generators.

Re:Great idea. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33881898)

You have no idea how much I hate my fucking job, and how fucking bored I am right now. :(

Re:Great idea. (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 3 years ago | (#33882156)

I have a LOT of phone numbers stored in my phone. This new "feature" would let me jack with any of their accounts if TFS is accurate.

texting (5, Funny)

Theoboley (1226542) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881396)

867-5309 will give you a password of "Jenny"

Re:texting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33881440)

LOL good reference, though not the best with that number.

I was at the mall after picking up Civ IV, sitting down while I waited for the bus. People pass by, I hear conversations. A couple of gals, none of which could be over 18 were talking about a party while walking by. One was bragging that someone she was not interested in tried to get her number, and she gave him 867-5309. It took me a second, hadn't heard the song in a while. Then I realized - oh yeah, the song. I was surprised someone that young knew the reference (under 18 at the time Civ IV was released).

Phone Theft. (0)

Zaulden (848844) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881398)

So now when someone steals my phone they can steal my facebook too. Jawesome.

Re:Phone Theft. (2, Insightful)

bilbravo (763359) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881428)

Wouldn't stealing your phone also give them loads of other personal information? And the first thing you think of is they will have your facebook account?

Re:Phone Theft. (0)

ByOhTek (1181381) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881492)

Typically this type of login requires both the one time passwords AND your normal passwords.

Then again, it is implemented by FB and I didn't RTFA, so it is quite possible that they intend to use the OTP without the original passwords.

Re:Phone Theft. (1)

Khuffie (818093) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881534)

Umm, the whole point of this login system is not to use your original password at all. Avoid keyloggers/malware on computers you don't know/trust.

Re:Phone Theft. (1)

Rhaban (987410) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881584)

Typically this type of login requires both the one time passwords AND your normal passwords.

No, the goal is that you can use this 1-time password on a non-trusted computer and it would not be useful if keylogged. Requiring you to also type your normal password makes no sense in this context.

Re:Phone Theft. (1)

Cwix (1671282) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881694)

What if you had to text your regular password to facebook to get a one time pass.

Re:Phone Theft. (1)

Rhaban (987410) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881724)

What if you had to text your regular password to facebook to get a one time pass.

Then you would have to delete your text history every time you use this feature.

Re:Phone Theft. (1)

elewton (1743958) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881798)

What if you have to prepend the first character of your password to the temporary one.
Doesn't help the malware all that much, if you're the kind who cares enough about security to use this and have a good password.

Re:Phone Theft. (1)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881560)

if your phone is being stolen you have security problems other than facebook.

Re:Phone Theft. (2, Insightful)

DrgnDancer (137700) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881914)

This is why my phone has a PIN on it and can be remotely wiped. Actually this isn't why. I'm a lot more worried about the banking app, my address book, my calendar and probably a dozen other things... This is a nice tangential benefit to having a PIN and remote wipe on my phone. Seriously though. You think the first thing someone is going to do on stealing your phone is see if they can use it to get into your Facebook account?

yeah, just give us your phone number (1)

YouWantFriesWithThat (1123591) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881406)

i am sure that there is no chance that they were scraping around for an excuse to collect cell phone numbers from their users. adding that very unique information to their already massive database on every user will make it much more valuable. as i tell my friends, it's just a pyramid scheme. you get a free website with communication tools bolted on and they get to know everything about you and will sell it to whoever they want.

Re:yeah, just give us your phone number (4, Informative)

TheKidWho (705796) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881426)

I don't think you know what a pyramid scheme is...

Re:yeah, just give us your phone number (1)

ByOhTek (1181381) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881500)

Yes, he most definitely does not, however the rest of the GPs post does seem to be reasonable.

Re:yeah, just give us your phone number (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33881578)

what an informative and exhaustively detailed response.

in a pyramid scheme the person (or people) on top make money off the efforts of the people on the bottom who don't ever really have a net gain from their involvement. the reason it works is that there are more suckers at the bottom than people at the top. if you can't see how this pertains to facebook then you are too dull to be helped.

Re:yeah, just give us your phone number (4, Informative)

TheKidWho (705796) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881604)

I don't think you know what a Pyramid scheme is either...

Let's wikipedia it:

A pyramid scheme is a non-sustainable business model that involves promising participants payment primarily for enrolling other people into the scheme, rather than from any real investment or sale of products or services to the public. Pyramid schemes are a form of fraud.

What you're describing on the other hand is just exploitation.

if you can't see how this pertains to facebook then you are too dull to be helped.

I've never heard that one before.

Re:yeah, just give us your phone number (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881820)

So you are claiming that face book somehow pays the people who were in early with the personal data of those who got in later?

Or you are ignorant of what a pyramid scheme, and too retarded to know that responding to a correction on a topic you are ignorant about is foolish.

   

Re:yeah, just give us your phone number (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33882084)

This has nothing to do with a Pyramid Scheme you idiot. Are there people at the top who make money off people at the bottom adding new users to the scheme?

Real advantage over SSL? (5, Insightful)

hcs_$reboot (1536101) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881410)

Yet another way for a big Internet organization to collect phone numbers.

Re:Real advantage over SSL? (4, Interesting)

Rijnzael (1294596) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881462)

I don't think this is an attempt to prevent interception of passwords in transit over the network; I believe it's an attempt to prevent keyloggers or other nefarious software/hardware on a machine from impacting the user's privacy.

Re:Real advantage over SSL? (4, Insightful)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881530)

Since when has Facebook started caring about user privacy? This is, as noted, an attempt to get more people to divulge their cell phone numbers.

Re:Real advantage over SSL? (4, Insightful)

JustOK (667959) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881884)

they've always cared about user privacy...just not in the traditional sense of protecting it.

Re:Real advantage over SSL? (1, Troll)

gparent (1242548) | more than 3 years ago | (#33882114)

Or maybe they just want to help people who login from school computers, "Free WiFi" places, and such?

Oh wait nevermind, you're right. All your phone numbers are belong to them, 9/11 was a hoax, we never landed on the moon, the titanic was bombed. *Salutes* Sir! Yes! Sir! Carry on!

Re:Real advantage over SSL? (1)

suso (153703) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881964)

Facebook caring about user privacy? Pulease!

Re:Real advantage over SSL? (1, Redundant)

sinclair44 (728189) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881706)

How exactly are phone numbers useful to them?

Re:Real advantage over SSL? (2, Funny)

silverglade00 (1751552) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881792)

*RING* Hello?
This is an automated call from Farmville reminding you to harvest your crops. Farmville would also like to remind you that you can get a free Special Edition Purple Cow!!!11!!!ZoMg! for your farm just for trying out the new Facebook Mastercard...

Re:Real advantage over SSL? (3, Insightful)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881822)

How exactly are phone numbers useful to them?

One more vector of information which can be correlated to you, spammed, sold, analyzed, or mined.

People won't know all of the ways this could be a bad idea until it's way too late -- same with most of Facebook and privacy. Give everything away and hope for the best, or don't use it at all ... and still hope for the best.

Re:Real advantage over SSL? (2, Interesting)

bball99 (232214) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881744)

won't matter if you use a throwaway phone - all my phones are $4.88 from Dollar General or the local FYE

Re:Real advantage over SSL? (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881872)

Until one of your Facebook friends wants to contact you, and uses the number you've listed on Facebook.

(Since this integrates very well with my HTC Android phone I use this all the time without realising it.)

Disadvantage of dumbphones (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#33882034)

all my phones are $4.88 from Dollar General or the local FYE

BREW phones like these tend not to have a wide variety of applications because the BREW application development process has substantial entry barriers against small developers. It's even more expensive than the iPhone developer program. So you'd end up carrying two phones, each with its own service plan: a smartphone to run apps and a dumbphone for anonymity.

Re:Real advantage over SSL? (4, Insightful)

tgd (2822) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881802)

Sometimes there's a conspiracy.

Sometimes you just really don't understand.

If you think this has anything to do with SSL, guess which camp you're in?

Re:Real advantage over SSL? (2, Insightful)

DrgnDancer (137700) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881982)

In this case it could be both. I mean, it's a really good system for protecting your password, but it also gives your cell number to Facebook which they really like. If you use a lot of public computers this becomes kind of a win-win. You get increased security, Facebook gets your number. If I want to access Facebook and I have my phone I use the Facebook app, so for me this isn't very useful.

makes sense (5, Insightful)

sakura the mc (795726) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881430)

but that limited password better come with limited privledges to protect the account from getting jacked.

Re:makes sense (2, Insightful)

Rhaban (987410) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881596)

agreed, you should not be able to change your e-mail/password/privacy setting with it.

What about privileges? (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881436)

With sufficiently complex spyware, an untrusted computer could do much damage even with a temporary access: Install applications, scrape your email, change your real password... this is only secure if the temporary access is severely restricted in what it can do with the account.

Possibly a good move (1)

Rijnzael (1294596) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881442)

I think this is a step in the right direction, assuming spoofing is difficult or impossible for these SMS messages (anyone care to weigh in there?). Still, my personal policy is to never login to a system which contains somewhat sensitive data from a computer that I don't fully control or whose controller I don't fully trust. Their solution seems like a workaround, while users could just stop any potential privacy violation at the source and opt not to provide their credentials via others' machines.

Re:Possibly a good move (1)

camcorder (759720) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881532)

Maybe you can live with not logging in from a "computer" that you don't fully control in your basement, but in real world, there happens to be a lot of times that you need to login through a computer (and sometimes only available ones are public). On the other hand, it's not over only with control of the computer you used as client. You need the control of the network as well.

General rule of thumb should be, never put anything secret at all to databases that could be accessed over public networks, like Internet. If you don't do that, just admit that the thing is not a secret anymore and live with it.

Re:Possibly a good move (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881630)

What situations do you wind up in where you need to log in to an untrusted computer, and you don't have any time to go find one you trust?

Re:Possibly a good move (2, Interesting)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881674)

Public labs at a university. While I have a hard time thinking of any time that I -need- to log into Facebook and can't just use, say, a smartphone app. There are a lot of occasions where in university you realize that there is something you need to do online (such as quickly type and turn in a paper you just remembered is due in 2 hours) but you can't trust the security of a lab computer (its pretty easy to install hardware keyloggers that just go between the PS2 or USB port and capture keystrokes) so you end up logging into an unsecured machine.

Re:Possibly a good move (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881750)

Perhaps, although I think that scenario says more about universities than anything else (like the fact that you have to log in to lab computers just to type a short essay). I do not find myself in that situation too frequently though, although it could just be the way I work (I usually have my laptop available).

Re:Possibly a good move (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881940)

What situations do you wind up in where you need to log in to an untrusted computer, and you don't have any time to go find one you trust?

On holiday
At some point between home and the amazing party you have an invite to on Facebook, but can't remember the location of
At school/college/university

Maybe when you want someone else to log in for you, e.g. to ask someone else to look up a phone number when you aren't near a computer.

Re:Possibly a good move (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#33882092)

What situations do you wind up in where you need to log in to an untrusted computer, and you don't have any time to go find one you trust?

Traveling without a laptop, for one. Some people aren't wealthy enough to own more than one PC. Others who have purchased an iPod touch or iPad no longer feel the need to carry a laptop, but a lot of Facebook apps require Flash, which doesn't work on iPod touch or iPad. Or traveling to the home of a relative who can't or won't give you the WEP key. Or in the break room at work.

Re:Possibly a good move (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881564)

If Facebook now stores people's sensitive data, we are in a lot of trouble...

Please tell me this isn't serious... (1)

cfriedt (1189527) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881474)

Please tell me I'm not the only one who sees this.

What if someone else uses your cellular phone, or worse, someone uses your cellular phone while you aren't aware of it? That's practically like giving anyone free access to your account.

I think the facebook geniuses are confusing the one-time-pass with the one-time-pad ... particularly in this case, they are two very different things, specifically because the pad is requires that the key be exchanged *securely*.

Re:Please tell me this isn't serious... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33881594)

More to the point, if you need your phone anyway, why don't you just browse facebook on your phone, like all my friends already do?

Stolen Phone? (1)

friedmud (512466) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881504)

I wonder what happens if someone steals your phone (or just if a roommate picks it up).... can they then get into your Facebook account by requesting a one-time password?

I'm sure they've thought of this trivial case... but I wonder how they're going to handle it.

Re:Stolen Phone? (3, Informative)

Rhaban (987410) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881602)

a lot of people who use have smartphones with a facebook app, so if someone steals the phone they already have access to your fb account.

Re:Stolen Phone? (1)

Mordaximus (566304) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881926)

Someone who is security conscious enough to use this service, is also probably bright enough to actually secure their smartphone with a PIN.

Re:Stolen Phone? (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881638)

Like another poster said most phones already have a Facebook app. But really, that is why you have a lock on your phone if you are around people who you don't trust.

Re:Stolen Phone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33881690)

Just have the user identify themselves normally on their trusted device (mobile phone).
The user then get the temporary password which can be used without worry on untrusted device (public computer).

Re:Stolen Phone? (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 3 years ago | (#33882022)

I don't use facebook, but obviously post that you used the service to your wall. Then when your little minions comment on how you "forgot your password this morning" ... but you didn't ... then you'll get the idea.

It would also be semi amusing to require a cellphone photo of a human as part of the password request.

Hooray! (1)

fridaynightsmoke (1589903) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881514)

Now nobody will ever know what you post on Facebook from an untrusted computer! Wait..

Stay calm and you won't (1)

Compaqt (1758360) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881620)

get hurt.

Hand over your cell phone and tell me your Facebook email.

Yay...ummm..except... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33881642)

...now Facebook has your phone number.

ZeusBot (1)

n0dna (939092) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881648)

"Man in the Mobile"

Smartphone variant already set to harvest OTP.

Won't work (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33881650)

You can implement as many security features you want, but it won't fix human laziness and stupidity.

Re:Won't work (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33881944)

Yes, everything is hopeless.
Why don't we all just kill ourselves and get it over with?

facebook: what an incredible waste of time (1)

digitaldc (879047) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881654)

Hurry! I need my password to I can login and complain about my miserable life and post pictures from the bar celebrating my miserable life!

Whatever did people do before facebook? Oh yeah, they actually talked to people face-to-face and spent 'quality time' in full 3-D social interaction.

I agree, I waste so much time on Facebook (2, Funny)

asdfington (1877976) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881852)

I barely have time left for my Serious Business on /.!!

If none of your neighbors shares a given interest (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#33882138)

Whatever did people do before facebook? Oh yeah, they actually talked to people face-to-face and spent 'quality time' in full 3-D social interaction.

There were also fewer people with whom to interact, meaning less chance of finding somebody in the same town who shares some specific interest with you.

Hmmm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33881682)

So how much will Zuckerberg be making off of the sale of all these phone numbers?

Steal A Phone (0, Redundant)

kellyb9 (954229) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881698)

So if someone steals my phone they not only have my phone, they now have my facebook account. Great job Facebook!

Re:Steal A Phone (1)

hjf (703092) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881832)

Got a better idea?

Re:Steal A Phone (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33882140)

Yes, don't be so needy of Facebook.

TEXT - What is that? (1)

jimwelch (309748) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881742)

I have it disabled on all 5 of my family phones. COST!

Re:TEXT - What is that? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33882128)

Sucks for you.. I have Immix and their $29.99 500 minute plan includes unlimited texting to anyone

For extra-light users, prepaid is cheaper (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#33882168)

their $29.99 500 minute plan

Because I use fewer than a tenth of that many minutes per month, I pay Virgin Mobile about $5 per month. COST!

just wait for those textvertisements (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33881784)

with facebook's regards to privacy, I wouldn't be surprised you were then weren't targeted with texted advertisements on your cell phone.

creators introduce more than one life/time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33881800)

no password/gadgets required.

the corepirate nazi holycost is increasing by the minute. you call this 'weather'?

continue to add immeasurable amounts of MISinformation, rhetoric & fluff, & there you have IT? that's US? thou shalt not... oh forget it. fake weather (censored?), fake money, fake god(s), what's next? seeing as we (have been told that) came from monkeys, the only possible clue we would have to anything being out of order, we would get from the weather. that, & all the monkeys tipping over/exploding around US.

the search continues;
google.com/search?hl=en&source=hp&q=weather+manipulation

google.com/search?hl=en&source=hp&q=bush+cheney+wolfowitz+rumsfeld+wmd+oil+freemason+blair+obama+weather+authors

meanwhile (as it may take a while longer to finish wrecking this place); the corepirate nazi illuminati (remember, (we have been told) we came from monkeys, & 'they' believe they DIDN'T), continues to demand that we learn to live on less/nothing while they continue to consume/waste/destroy immeasurable amounts of stuff/life, & feast on nubile virgins while worshipping themselves (& evile in general (baal to be exact)). they're always hunting that patch of red on almost everyones' neck. if they cannot find yours (greed, fear ego etc...) then you can go starve. that's their (slippery/slimy) 'platform' now. see also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antisocial_personality_disorder

never a better time to consult with/trust in our creators. the lights are coming up rapidly all over now. see you there?

greed, fear & ego (in any order) are unprecedented evile's primary weapons. those, along with deception & coercion, helps most of us remain (unwittingly?) dependent on its' life0cidal hired goons' agenda. most of our dwindling resources are being squandered on the 'wars', & continuation of the billionerrors stock markup FraUD/pyramid schemes. nobody ever mentions the real long term costs of those debacles in both life & any notion of prosperity for us, or our children. not to mention the abuse of the consciences of those of us who still have one, & the terminal damage to our atmosphere/planet (see also: manufactured 'weather', hot etc...). see you on the other side of it? the lights are coming up all over now. the fairytail is winding down now. let your conscience be your guide. you can be more helpful than you might have imagined. we now have some choices. meanwhile; don't forget to get a little more oxygen on your brain, & look up in the sky from time to time, starting early in the day. there's lots going on up there.

"The current rate of extinction is around 10 to 100 times the usual background level, and has been elevated above the background level since the Pleistocene. The current extinction rate is more rapid than in any other extinction event in earth history, and 50% of species could be extinct by the end of this century. While the role of humans is unclear in the longer-term extinction pattern, it is clear that factors such as deforestation, habitat destruction, hunting, the introduction of non-native species, pollution and climate change have reduced biodiversity profoundly.' (wiki)

"I think the bottom line is, what kind of a world do you want to leave for your children," Andrew Smith, a professor in the Arizona State University School of Life Sciences, said in a telephone interview. "How impoverished we would be if we lost 25 percent of the world's mammals," said Smith, one of more than 100 co-authors of the report. "Within our lifetime hundreds of species could be lost as a result of our own actions, a frightening sign of what is happening to the ecosystems where they live," added Julia Marton-Lefevre, IUCN director general. "We must now set clear targets for the future to reverse this trend to ensure that our enduring legacy is not to wipe out many of our closest relatives."--

"The wealth of the universe is for me. Every thing is explicable and practical for me .... I am defeated all the time; yet to victory I am born." --emerson

no need to confuse 'religion' with being a spiritual being. our soul purpose here is to care for one another. failing that, we're simply passing through (excess baggage) being distracted/consumed by the guaranteed to fail illusionary trappings of man'kind'. & recently (about 10,000 years ago) it was determined that hoarding & excess by a few, resulted in negative consequences for all.

consult with/trust in your creators. providing more than enough of everything for everyone (without any distracting/spiritdead personal gain motives), whilst badtolling unprecedented evile, using an unlimited supply of newclear power, since/until forever. see you there?

all the manuals say we're not to kill each other, & we're mandated to care for/about one another, before any other notion will succeed. one does not need to agree whois 'in charge' to grasp the possibility that there may be some assistance available to us, including from each other. there's also the question of frequent extreme 'distractions' preventing us from following the simple 'directions' we were given, along with everything we needed to accomplish our task. see you there?

boeing, boeing, gone.

Improving in the wrong direction... (3, Interesting)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881928)

When people want more security on their facebook, they usually mean protection from Facebook and other corporations - not passwords themselves.

How about fixing the lack of privacy instead?

privacy (1)

jDeepbeep (913892) | more than 3 years ago | (#33882040)

Because Facebook's version of privacy is like McDonald's version of nutrition. It's not part of their formula.

Alternative Solution (1)

killmenow (184444) | more than 3 years ago | (#33881952)

Or you could do like I did recently and just delete your facebook account. Problem solved. Added bonus: they don't have my cell number and can't automatically opt-me-in when they roll out their new FaceText feature.

If you're not paying for it, you're not the customer, you're the product.

Their scheme (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33881966)

While the proposed scheme may save your password from a dumb keylogger, once you log in (perhaps with a password you get on your cellphone), the (supposedly rogue) computer now has whatever it needs (e.g., a cookie) to do whatever it wishes on your facebook account. Perhaps it can't keep this access for later, but it can use it now.
So your future may be safe, but your present and past are all compromised.

Someone else's number? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33881988)

What happens if you register someone else's phone number with your account?

If only I had a phone (1)

slashdyke (873156) | more than 3 years ago | (#33882096)

Finally! Now when I am traveling around the world - which I do quite a bit, I can securely access my facebook account. That is, so long as my phone works where ever I am, and ummm, oh yeah! I need to buy a phone too.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...