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Nintendo Entertainment System Turns 25

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the mine-still-works dept.

NES (Games) 164

harrymcc writes "On October 18th 1985, Nintendo launched its NES console in the US, reviving a near-dead video game industry and establishing Nintendo as a leader in home consoles. We've celebrated with a roundup of some of the stranger spinoffs that the NES has inspired over the last quarter century, from odd controllers to a lock parents could use to disable the console to do-it-yourself projects like an NES built into a Super Mario cartridge."

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Crazy... (4, Interesting)

grub (11606) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938424)


I remember going to parties, getting pissed and stoned out of my tree, and playing NES with my buddies.

Now we play some of the same old games on the Big Ass Emulation Disc for XBOX with the family. Minus the booze and drugs, of course. That's pretty impressive staying power for those games.

Re:Crazy... (4, Informative)

PatHMV (701344) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938524)

God, I'm old. This was 5 months after I graduated high school.

Re:Crazy... (2, Interesting)

Krau Ming (1620473) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938618)

I never knew how old NES was... I was ~4 years old when my Dad came home with an NES and mario/duck hunt one day, and given my birthyear of '81, he must have bought it within the first year of release. I'm pretty sure that qualifies him as an old school tech geek...

Re:Crazy... (4, Informative)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938856)

NES is actually older than the Summary suggests.

The NES is simply the US version of the Famicom, which was released to Japan in 1983. Same hardware and specs; different plastic package. So it's really 27 years old now..... almost as old as a Commodore 64 or Atari 5200/Supersystem or Colecovision (1982).

Re:Crazy... (1)

Hylandr (813770) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939068)

Oh FU you all geting old and all that.

I was 13 when it came out. Blearg...

- Dan.

Re:Crazy... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33939578)

Not same hardware, Famicom had no Start and Select button on controller #2.

Re:Crazy... (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938710)

I remember that Nintendo was much better than the Fairchild gaming system I had at the time.

Re:Crazy... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33939764)

My wife bought me an NES for my 26th birthday. It was the best birthday present I ever got. We stayed up 'til 2 or 3 in the AM playing link and mario even on work nights for a year. Got a controller and an emulator last year on the wife's computer and she played Super Mario 3 for months. Not past midnight anymore, though.

Re:Crazy... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33940004)

Fuck, you really are old. Have you started telling people to get off your lawn yet?

Re:Crazy... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33940332)

the NES came out 6 months after i retired (@age 58)

Re:Crazy... (3, Informative)

Aquina (1923974) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938548)

Yeah, but I disliked NES and rather chose SNES games like Terranigma, Zelda (3), Secret Of Mana, Secret Of Evermore, Illusion of Time and... oh yeah Battletoads in Battlemaniacs. ;-) Give Terranigma a try (http://www.romnation.net/srv/roms/43226/snes/Terranigma-G.html)!

Re:Crazy... (2, Funny)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939628)

When I played the NES the SNES did not exist yet.

Re:Crazy... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33939634)

SNES came much later and SNES didn't bandaid the western video game industry.

Funny how you link to a ROM site when your home page is some open source software advocacy page behind the guise of a fictional video character's name of "J.C. Denton"

Re:Crazy... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33938790)

Reminds me of Saturday night...

Re:Crazy... (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939576)

Maybe I'm Crazy...

Or High...

But how did Super Mario Bros turn 25 before the NES Turned 25?

Re:Crazy... (1)

basotl (808388) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939658)

Released on the Famicon first.

Re:Crazy... (1)

lgw (121541) | more than 3 years ago | (#33940366)

I played Super Mario Bros as a coin-op arcade game long before I saw it on a console. Wasted a ton of quarters on it. I remember thinking it was far better than Mario Bros, which seemed like a particularly lame Donkey Kong sequel.

up up down down (1)

deviceb (958415) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938426)

b a select start

Re:up up down down (1)

deviceb (958415) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938448)

oops forgot the left-right(s)

Re:up up down down (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33938662)

Yeah, I think it's law or something-- Konami law, if you will, that any time one recites the Konami code, it will inevitably be *wrong*

Re:up up down down (1)

mrnobo1024 (464702) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938786)

Not only that, but "select, start" isn't really part of the code. The full code is just up, up, down, down, left, right, left, right, B, A - once you've done that, you can press anything you want and you'll still get 30 lives once you start.

"select" switches to 2-player mode (not necessary - the code works in either 1- or 2- player mode), "start" starts the game"

Re:up up down down (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33938904)

Whenever anyone restarts it as "b a start", it means they're a jerk who didn't play two-player mode.

Re:up up down down (1)

drcheap (1897540) | more than 3 years ago | (#33940514)

I just enter the uuddlrlrba and then hit the power button because I know I'm going to beat the game anyway with all those lives.

Obligatory (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33938438)

In Soviet Russia, Mario plays YOU!

wireless (4, Interesting)

snookerhog (1835110) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938498)

according to the Nintendo store in NYC, the NES was originally designed to have wireless (IR?) controllers. They have the prototype on display.

Re:wireless (1)

syphyre (783379) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939328)

And they did come out with a wireless unit later, the NES Satellite http://www.gamersgraveyard.com/repository/nes/peripherals/nessatellite.html [gamersgraveyard.com] Takes six C batteries :) (or was it D?...) Parents still have one. Works great. Just don't walk in front of it when my dad is trying to get that L block into place.

Sure makes you feel old (4, Interesting)

mirix (1649853) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938508)

I remember getting my NES for christmas when I was a child.

Most of my favourite games are still from that era. New games seem to be missing some sort of soul... mind you, there were a lot of truly horrible games for NES too!

Re:Sure makes you feel old (5, Insightful)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938932)

The thing is, games for the NES and that era were -made- to be abstract, when we got to the N64/PS1 era, developers started releasing "realistic" games which end up looking like crap when the next generation of games come out.

Graphics were secondary to making an entertaining game, the game was developed with the concept first then the graphics followed and the graphics were what made sense. For example, the look of Mario wasn't developed to look like a specific person, but rather to compensate for the lack of advanced hardware. Today, developers take graphics first, take a storyline first, then let the game fill in the cracks.

Re:Sure makes you feel old (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#33940592)

Graphics were secondary to making an entertaining game, the game was developed with the concept first then the graphics followed and the graphics were what made sense. For example, the look of Mario wasn't developed to look like a specific person, but rather to compensate for the lack of advanced hardware. Today, developers take graphics first, take a storyline first, then let the game fill in the cracks.

I think you're falling into the trap of comparing the classics worth remembering to the average game released today. Sure, any of the Super Marios for the NES were more fun than "Wii shovelware game #3406," but for my money, Super mario Galaxy is much better than even Super Mario Bros 3, and that's not just because it has better graphics and an extra dimension. Contra was fun back in the day, and I know this is even more blasphemous, but I actually prefer Halo 3 to it. Again, not just graphically. I'm sorry, I know it's wrong to like MS products and I feel like I'm betraying my generation, but that's how it is.

Compare classics to classics or average shlock to average shlock and I think you'd have to agree that games have improved graphically, in terms of plot mechanics, game mechanics and features, and it's overall made better games.

Re:Sure makes you feel old (1)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939124)

You knew it was going to be good if it had CAPCOM stamped on it.

Bionic Commando had plenty of soul in its quasi-psychedelic militarily progressive rock soundtrack. It was also the only Nintendo game released in the U.S. to say the word "damn" (by Hitler^W Master-D!) and feature a close-up of an exploding head, [youtube.com] complete with eyeball.

Superb. Fond memories all around.

Re:Sure makes you feel old (1)

Labcoat Samurai (1517479) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939602)

This claim seems strange to me. What games back then do you think had soul? And what new games have you played that you felt lacked soul? It's a sort of nebulous concept, so I could benefit from some examples. Maybe some explanation of what gave those examples soul.

Re:Sure makes you feel old (2, Insightful)

Captain Spam (66120) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939810)

This claim seems strange to me. What games back then do you think had soul? And what new games have you played that you felt lacked soul? It's a sort of nebulous concept, so I could benefit from some examples. Maybe some explanation of what gave those examples soul.

I can explain it in two words: "Nostalgia filter".

To add more words, there's really the same proportion of good games to bad games nowadays. That didn't change. But when you look at the past through the rose-tinted glasses of your own nostalgia, back to your memories of the carefree days of your youth with NES games right alongside them, it looks a lot better than your more recent memories of the cynical, stressed-out days of your adulthood with more modern games right alongside them.

So, give it about ten or so years until we get the people who grew up on video game generation n (where n is some generation after the NES). We'll hear them wax soulful and philosophical about THOSE games, too, while deriding the current generation of the time. And then the cycle of life continues! Ah...

Re:Sure makes you feel old (1)

Labcoat Samurai (1517479) | more than 3 years ago | (#33940122)

Well, yes, this is exactly what I thought was going on, too, but I figured I'd give him the opportunity to surprise me with a point of view I didn't anticipate :)

Re:Sure makes you feel old (1)

moortak (1273582) | more than 3 years ago | (#33940446)

There is an aspect of gaming from that era that is missing now. There's no unified whole. At the height of the NES era everyone had the same system, got most of their game news from the same magazine, and shared a pretty similar experience. With three major systems, tons of magazines, and countless websites there really isn't that shared culture occurring.

Re:Sure makes you feel old (1)

mirix (1649853) | more than 3 years ago | (#33940252)

Well for me I think it was the fact that games could be very entertaining, while being horribly ugly and fitting in 64k of ROM. Brute and simplistic, yet I can't seem to put the controller down.

Some of the games were truly epic, although they looked horrible, they kept you engrossed for weeks (dragon warrior was one for me). Others were ridiculously simple, but you could play them forever (tetris, dr. mario). Others were great for multiplayer compared to older systems (jackal, contra, etc.. lots of konami stuff... pretty groundbreaking for a home system.)

I loved a lot of the music as well. Very simple (I think NES has one square, one triangle, and a white noise channel?) yet they managed to make it catchy and take next to nothing for rom.

It seemed to me on say... SNES, the music got somewhere in between. It wasn't "real music" yet it didn't have 8bit primitive charm.

Certainly some of it is nostalgia too, though.

Slashdot Turns 20 or Something !!!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33938528)

time to call it quits, Slashbot. Your stories are old AND duplicated.

Yours In Ufa,
K. Trout.

Mach Rider (1)

Krau Ming (1620473) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938578)

Did anyone ever beat Mach Rider? I think that game just went on forever with increasing difficulty at each stage. And what was with the random super powers?

No mention of R.O.B. (1)

rwa2 (4391) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938588)

The robot was the only thing I remember from the early TV advertisements. No mention of it in TFA.

Then I moved to Thailand and it was all Famicom... which seemed a lot sleeker at the time... smaller carts and integrated controller holsters. But Nintendo America knew their market wouldn't go for anything that didn't remind them of a VCR.

Mine still works... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33938616)

And my original NES still works. My PS1 or first XBox, not so much.

Re:Mine still works... (1)

Applekid (993327) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938744)

Mine died about 2 months ago. :(
Solid red light, blue screen with a "wave" of darkness creeping down screen. I found a schematic online but it's kind of hard to figure out where the problem is without a list of test points. I'm considering replacing the capacitors as a cheap and relatively easy thing to try before I give up and hold the funeral.

Re:Mine still works... (1)

twoallbeefpatties (615632) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938746)

And my original NES still works.

Yeah, but do you ever have to blow on your PSX CDs? Hell, I remember the magical day when I discovered that rubbing a damp cotton swab over the contact of the cartridge would grant a +50% bonus chance of game operation. And just what was up with that blinking reset-button light?

Re:Mine still works... (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938970)

No, my PSX disks got scratched to oblivion after about a decade.

Plus, I've never had a loading screen on an NES, with a PS1/2 I swear I've spent several days of my life looking at nothing but loading screens.

If Nintendo decided to make a console without the lockout chip and a top-loading console like the NES2 or Famicom, things would have been a whole lot better for us retrogamers.

Re:Mine still works... (4, Insightful)

Applekid (993327) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939132)

Hey, it's already pretty good. The lockout inside the console is easily neutered (cut pin 4 on the DIP IC with "CIC" on the silkscreen), the cartridge connector -- while flawed -- is straightforward to repair and you can buy replacements for about $5, and the console can be opened up with regular old Phillips screwdriver.

If it were made today, it would use security screws under rubber feet and labels, have a sticker about voiding the warranty, and disabling any kind of protection device would either brick it, make it impossible to play with more than one player at a time, or get you in trouble under DMCA.

Re:Mine still works... (1)

ProppaT (557551) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939014)

I wish that blowing on a PSX disc worked. If so, I wouldn't have gone through 3 PSXs and 2 PS2s due to laser failure.

In retrospect, its a shame we didn't know that blowing on the NES cartridges was actually making the situation worse instead of better. If we would have used a decent, non-harsh cleaning solution (not alcohol or ammonia) when our games started acting up, instead of blowing (which corrodes the contacts over time), the issue wouldn't have been nearly as bad. I have new pins in my NES and many of my old games won't play due to abuse (blowing and cleaning with rubbing alcohol too often).

Re:Mine still works... (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939058)

If we would have used a decent, non-harsh cleaning solution (not alcohol or ammonia) when our games started acting up

The manual for the NES Cleaning Kit actually recommends using diluted isopropyl rubbing alcohol when cleaning Game Pak edge connectors if water doesn't get all the gunk off.

Re:Mine still works... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939304)

You can clean up the contacts and lay down some solder if you they really act up.

How are they not working?

So far I have never had a game system die on me.

Re:Mine still works... (1)

mirix (1649853) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939662)

I don't think alcohol should be a problem, it's what I clean circuit boards with all the time.

The main flaw was... well kinda two fold. one was that the cart moved (quasi-ZIF, i guess), instead of being straight in, which reduces the self-cleaning aspect a normal edge connector (think ISA slot) has.
The second flaw was that the connector in the NES didn't have gold flash/plate, just tin, which gets pretty ugly after 1000000 mate/unmate cycles. Realistically tin connectors are generally only rated for like.. 50 cycles, if that.

I don't think famicoms had the problem, because of their straight-in cart. They didn't have the security chip either (blink... blink... blink...)

Re:Mine still works... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939112)

The connectors get ever looser and eventually the NES lockout chip does not talk to the cartridge, thus the reset cycle. You can replace them easily and cheaply.

Re:Mine still works... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33939120)

Actually my NES, SNES, Sega, and N64 all still work. Just the PSX and XBox died.

Obituary != Birthday Card (-1, Troll)

Veggiesama (1203068) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938622)

You don't really say, "My grandma turns 86 today" if she died 15 years ago.

Re:Obituary != Birthday Card (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33938676)

Unlike grandma, my NES still functions just fine.

Re:Obituary != Birthday Card (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33938884)

You don't really say, "My grandma turns 86 today" if she died 15 years ago.

I don't know what you're talking about. I've got a system next to my tv that still works perfectly fine.

Re:Obituary != Birthday Card (2, Interesting)

Sowelu (713889) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938990)

Me and my roommates still huddle around it to play Mario. When the gray screen and flashing light got too prevalent, I went down to my local retro game store (more NES games than you used to be able to buy in the old days!) and picked up a brand new 72-pin connector, and replaced my old one. It works like it's new again, and I got some new games, too. Wizards and Warriors is hard. All my old battery games still work, and when I bought Wizardry used, it came with the last owner's dead party members in the dungeon still. I found them and hauled them back to the surface, and now they're in my party; it's almost like I was playing Shadows of Yserbius. My PS2 died. The only console I now own is my NES. Hell, it's the only thing I use my TV for since it doesn't get that new digital whatever (and I wouldn't watch it anyway). I beat both quests of Zelda on my NES while waiting on some long downloads and compiles over the course of a long weekend.

Re:Obituary != Birthday Card (3, Insightful)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939056)

...Except for the fact the NES isn't dead or abandoned.

Nintendo sells NES Roms for $5 a piece on the Wii, the NES still has a thriving homebrew scene, new versions of the NES/Famicom hardware shows up nearly daily from replicas of other systems made to con unwary buyers (PolyStation anyone?)to portable consoles.

Just about every one of Nintendo's NES titles have gone on to spawn successful franchises the majority of which continue to this day (Mario Bros, Zelda, Punch-Out, Metroid, etc.)

I don't think there has been an older system with as healthy of a community and such surrounding it. Just because Nintendo isn't churning out any more NES consoles doesn't mean the NES is dead.

Re:Obituary != Birthday Card (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 3 years ago | (#33940728)

>>>the NES isn't dead or abandoned.

On the day when a console stops being manufactured on the assembly line, that's when it's dead. For example Atari 2600/VCS stopped in 1992. Ditto the C=64 computer. Off the top of my head, I recall NES ceased manufacture in 1996.

Sure the games might still live-on via emulation, just like some people still drive Model T's, but the model has been retired from production.

Re:Obituary != Birthday Card (1)

aldo.gs (985038) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939338)

Unless your grandma is John Lennon or something.

Re:Obituary != Birthday Card (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33939934)

As others have mentioned, the NES isn't technically a dead platform, but I still got a chuckle out of this, and am not at all surprised you've been modded down. Better not mess with nerds and their nostalgic gaming. Everyone else in this thread is acting like the NES remains the pinnacle of gaming, and everything since represents selling out in some way. I can't count the number of times I've heard frothing idiots exclaim that games back then were all about *fun* and they didn't need graphics. Like "fun" is somehow a missing quantity in modern gaming. Modern games have all the elements of classic games and then some. The only reason to prefer the classic is nostalgia... I'm not even saying it's a bad reason. I do things for nostalgia as well. I just think it's patently absurd that people genuinely seem to think that games were better then than they are now.

And in 25 years, presumably we'll have it happening all over again, only there likely won't be any working Wiis, PS3s, or Xbox360s floating around. But if you played a PS3 as a kid, you won't care about Zelda 1 or the original Super Mario Bros. Maybe you'll remember the good old days of LittleBigPlanet, back when games hadn't sold out and stopped being fun.

Missing options (1)

demonbug (309515) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938788)

U-Force. God, that thing was useless.

Also - no power glove?

Maybe I'm just confusing "strange" with "bad".

Re:Missing options (1)

kd5zex (1030436) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939184)

"I love the power glove... It's so bad..."

Mario vs. Duck Hunt (1)

coolmoose25 (1057210) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938796)

I never had any interest in the Mario Bros. game(s)... Everyone else seemed to though. I was perhaps the only one of my friends who really liked Duck Hunt. I LOVED that game! I only wish that you could have shot the dog when he laughed at you for missing.

Re:Mario vs. Duck Hunt (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938876)

Duck hunt was fun... till you eventually realized you could just shoot at a lightbulb and hit every single time.

Re:Mario vs. Duck Hunt (1)

Unkyjar (1148699) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939274)

This, I never realized...if this works I will tithe to you.

Re:Mario vs. Duck Hunt (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939346)

You can just use a sheet of white paper if the room you are in is well lit.

Re:Mario vs. Duck Hunt (1)

Unkyjar (1148699) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939430)

These both sound like much better methods than my old 1 inch from the screen method.

Re:Mario vs. Duck Hunt (1)

JDeane (1402533) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939724)

Or turn the brightness of your TV way up, (was probably easier back in the day since most TV's used knobs.)

At least thats how I did my cheating lol

Re:Mario vs. Duck Hunt (1)

Dwedit (232252) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939496)

Duck Hunt does not work that way. If you watch carefully, the game displays a black screen for one frame before the white target appears. The zapper must see both the black screen as well as the white target.

The zapper is constantly sending light information to the game regardless of whether the trigger is pulled or not. It's looking at the screens that happen after you pull the trigger, and the game processes that. Pulling the trigger does not send a "Hit" or "No hit" to the game.

Wait, what? (1)

Chaonici (1913646) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938832)

Didn't Super Mario Bros. (the original) turn 25 last month?

Is the game really older than the console on which it runs?

Re:Wait, what? (1)

Trent Hawkins (1093109) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938918)

Yes, Mario was an arcade game first.

Re:Wait, what? (2, Informative)

mrnobo1024 (464702) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938938)

Only if you look at the release of each in a different country.

July 1983: NES (actually, "Famicom") released in Japan
September 1985: Super Mario Bros. released in Japan
October 1985: NES released in US
March 1986: Super Mario Bros. released in US

The mark of good games... (2, Insightful)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 3 years ago | (#33938836)

The mark of good games is when you can still pick up and play them 5, 10, 15 or even 25 years from now and they are just as good as the first time you picked them up.

I can't say that many Xbox or PS1 games can say that. On the other hand, almost the entire NES library seems to be filled with examples that are just as fun today as they were back in the day without having to put on rose-tinted glasses of saying that this game was fun for its time.

Re:The mark of good games... (3, Insightful)

CronoCloud (590650) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939228)

That's nostalgia talking, there was plenty of crap on the NES, and plenty of great games on the PSone.

Re:The mark of good games... (2, Insightful)

grumbel (592662) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939486)

The problem with the PSone, as well as most other 3D consoles, is that their graphics age extremely badly. NES still look quite ok, SNES games can even look pretty good, PSone games on the other side just look really ugly. Same goes for the controls, there is only so much you can do wrong in 2D with a Dpad, but in 3D things have improved a lot over the years and many PSone titles are borderline unplayable by todays standard, even the good ones.

Re:The mark of good games... (1)

nu1x (992092) | more than 3 years ago | (#33940078)

You are just a graphics whore.

There is also artistic direction department, where few games today even touch something like Vagrant Story or Chrono Cross.

Re:The mark of good games... (2, Insightful)

syphyre (783379) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939248)

I sense exaggeration. There are what, perhaps 20-25 games that could still be considered just as good today (if that many)? There were what, just under 800 games published in the US for the NES? Small sample selection. Same thing goes for the Xbox, PS2, SNES, etc. Huge libraries, few games that will last and last and last.

Re:The mark of good games... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33939864)

You're just playing the wrong PS1 games. Castlevania SotN is still kicking ass and taking names.

But to be fair, that series did start on the NES...

Re:The mark of good games... (2, Interesting)

QJimbo (779370) | more than 3 years ago | (#33940406)

There are plenty of PS1 games that are still very fun to play now. Crash Bandicoot, Spyro the Dragon, Tomb Raider are just some examples.

NES In a Cartridge Design Flaw (1)

uzd4ce (1916592) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939150)

I thought it was very interesting -- nice and compact, although now I wonder if you'd have to blow it to get the whole system to work instead of just a rogue cartridge... (yes, i know the real problem was with the contact fingers wearing out and no longer making contact....)

1mod Up (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33939170)

again. there Are

To Celebrate (1)

rakuen (1230808) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939242)

We should all play a nice, relaxing round of Battletoads.

...guys? Where are you all running off to? Come back!

Re:To Celebrate (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939354)

Damn, that was the hardest game ever.

Does the hovercycle thing actually ever end?

Re:To Celebrate (1)

JDeane (1402533) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939832)

Yes the hovercycle level does end.... I did manage to beat that game but holy hell it required you to sacrifice your life and memorize large patterns of precise timing!

I am not sure if its harder then Ninja Gaiden, thats another game that was "Nintendo" hard.

Re:To Celebrate (1)

moortak (1273582) | more than 3 years ago | (#33940552)

Fuck Ninja Gaiden. That game stole way too much of my life.

Re:To Celebrate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33939866)

I never understood why people hate that level so much. It's only level 3 and with a little memorization it's nothing.
There are many levels coming after it and they're much harder...

Awesome (1)

Stargoat (658863) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939546)

That's awesome. Someone gave the NES a chastity belt!

Near-dead video game industry? (1)

ZXDunny (1376265) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939594)

I'm confused by the phrase "near-dead". I distinctly remember back in 1985 seeing masses of new game releases from some of the real great publishers of the day, released in stores up and down the country. Nothing was "near-dead" at all - the Commodore 64 and Sinclair Spectrum were really going well, and looked unstoppable. Was this "near-dead" thing a US problem, or worldwide? I have some of my fondest gaming memories from 1982 to 1989. I'm talking about the UK of course.

Re:Near-dead video game industry? (1)

Belial6 (794905) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939834)

It is a myth that was generated because the Atari 2600 finally died, and many of the big chain stores had huge amounts of money in Atari 2600 cartridges. This was compounded by several big companies trying to introduce their own systems and being completely trounced by the C64. The video game crash was a lot like the internet crash. A bunch of people jumped in with low value offerings, and lost money on it while the high value offerings continued to grow at the same rapid pace.

Re:Near-dead video game industry? (1)

pandrijeczko (588093) | more than 3 years ago | (#33940002)

Not wishing to sound like a fanboi but in the UK, the ZX Spectrum was about the biggest selling games platform with the Commodore 64 a close second & the BBC Micro in third place.

I recall Spain had a big ZX Spectrum user base also but for the rest of Europe it was mainly the C-64, though I know the Russians and parts of Eastern Europe had their own version of the Spectrum - the Hobeta??? - as well.

Re:Near-dead video game industry? (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 3 years ago | (#33940626)

>>>It is a myth that was generated because the Atari 2600 finally died

Sorry. Not a myth. For whatever reason* consumers lost interest in videogame consoles, and Christmas 1982 barely sold any games at all. 1983 was even worse. It killed Mattel's Intellivision, killed Colecovision, and almost killed Atari 2600, 5200 and 7800 too. You can read more about it on Wikipedia if you search for 1983 Videogame Crash.

In 1984 the game console market was considered as "dead" as pinball. Then came the Japanese Nintendo & Sega companies in 1985-86 who revived it.

*
* One theory is people bought computers instead of consoles.
* Another is that it was just a side effect of the 1982-83 economic recession - people stopped spending money on "toys" like game consoles.

Re:Near-dead video game industry? (1)

pandrijeczko (588093) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939946)

I think we in the UK (and Europe) had things slightly different to the USA & Japan.

I do remember a few people having systems like NES & the Sega Master System, but most people (myself included) had the ZX Spectrum or Commodore 64.

I don't think I've ever played a Mario game more than a few minutes - it's not that I didn't enjoy it but games like Mario & Sonic The Hedgehog just were not ported to 8-bit computers in great numbers; my memorable games were Manic Miner, Jet Set Willy, the Ultimate games (Jetpac, Jetman, Sabre Wulf, etc.) and, of course, Lords of Midnight.

I went from the Spectrum to the Amiga but I think, by that time, the consoles had started to take hold in the UK - that's why the SNES & Mega Drive were a lot more popular here than the NES ever had been.

Re:Near-dead video game industry? (1)

Captain Spam (66120) | more than 3 years ago | (#33940070)

Was this "near-dead" thing a US problem, or worldwide? I have some of my fondest gaming memories from 1982 to 1989.

I'm talking about the UK of course.

Was a US-only problem, as I understand it. Once everyone, their brother, and their dog had to jump on the video game bandwagon (there was even a time when Quaker Oats, a grain company, wanted a video game division), store shelves were filled with crap games (retailers couldn't tell the difference) that never sold and took space from potentially good games that never got a chance to sell, and the whole thing soured everyone on this side of the pond to video gaming enough that it knocked video games out of stores entirely.

Then along comes a small Japanese electronics company with R.O.B., claiming that it's a toy, not a video game console (so really, R.O.B. was a trojan horse), and the rest is history. Well, that and a rather draconian policy of content control to stave off the same too-many-games glut from happening again, a policy which many would argue they held on to for WAY too long, but still.

Re:Near-dead video game industry? (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#33940726)

The video game industry is to be considered different than the computer game industry as far as the video game crash is concerned. Home computers becoming affordable and powerful alternatives to consoles is one big reason the video game crash happened.

did this make anyone else feel really old? (1)

PJ6 (1151747) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939766)

I loved the Nintendo but christ, 25 years? Has it been that long?

That was only the test release (1)

NotSoHeavyD3 (1400425) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939862)

They didn't do the full US release until Feb/Mar of 86. (Before that they only place you could get it was NYC or LA.) Also back then no internet so no going on the web and having one shipped to you.

Mario Bros. for the WIN! (1)

BMAPARTS (1901854) | more than 3 years ago | (#33939878)

Oh Super Mario, You never get old :)

Most ported game of the 8-bit era? (1)

pandrijeczko (588093) | more than 3 years ago | (#33940208)

Did the NES have Manic Miner or Jet Set Willy ported across to it? It was on just about every 8-bit computer platform.

I'd probably hedge my bets on "Elite" being ported to more platforms than any other game, though it was strictly a non-console game due to the number of command keys needed.

I'm scratching my head to think of any titles that appeared on the consoles & computers as well - maybe Bobble Bubble or New Zealand Story?

Re:Most ported game of the 8-bit era? (1)

pandrijeczko (588093) | more than 3 years ago | (#33940254)

Don't forget also that there were a large number of 8-bit computer platforms, many with tiny user bases - ZX Spectrum, Commodore Vic-20 & C-64, BBC Micro & Electron, Oric 1 & Atmos, Dragon 16 & 32, Texas Intruments TI-99, Camputers Lynx, and possibly a couple more that escape me for the moment.

Re:Most ported game of the 8-bit era? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33940620)

There was an official commercial version of Elite for the NES.
I have the UK PAL cartridge here.
The control system works surprisingly well.

"The best way to re-experience the feel of 8 bit Elite is to run the NES (Famicon) version using an emulator. " -Ian Bell

Re:Most ported game of the 8-bit era? (1)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 3 years ago | (#33940686)

>>>"Elite" being ported to more platforms than any other game, though it was strictly a non-console game due to the number of command keys needed.

"Strictly" a non-console game?
Elite does exist on the NES console.

As for most-ported game it's probably "Ms. Pac-Man" which exists on all 3 Atari consoles, possibly Jaguar too?, Intellivision, Colecovision, all the 8-bit, 16-bit, and 32-bit computers of the 1980s, plus the NES, PS1, N64, PS2, Gamecube, and Xbox.

Speaking for all the Sega folks out there... (1)

avatar139 (918375) | more than 3 years ago | (#33940470)

...Bah, wake me up when Sonic turns 20 next year! Meantime to all the new youngsters playing on your Wii's, quit Duck Hunting on my Lawn!

Down memory lane (1)

Paspanique (1704404) | more than 3 years ago | (#33940714)

Ahh the memories!

    I was 10 years old and the only looser who's parents bought him the Sega master system. Sure, hand-on & safari hunt, alex kidd or wonder boy were good games for a 10 years old, but finding someone to trade or just talk about a game was painful. The seemed to have all the fun!!!

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