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Google Testing High-Speed Fiber Network At Stanford Res Halls

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the should-be-cosponsored-by-seagate dept.

Networking 107

GovTechGuy writes with this news from "Google has reached an agreement to build its first ultra-high speed broadband network near Stanford University, the search giant announced on Thursday. The agreement with Stanford means the university's residential subdivision will be the first place to test Internet speeds up to one gigabit per second, more than 100 times faster than the typical broadband connection in the US. The plan is to break ground early next year." That might just be worth $50,576 per year to have.

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107 comments

Fiber (5, Interesting)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 3 years ago | (#33979852)

~10 years ago, Palo Alto installed a fiber network [cityofpaloalto.org] at a great expense.

I wonder if they're leveraging this existing network, or laying new fiber?

Re:Fiber (3, Funny)

Demoknight (66150) | more than 3 years ago | (#33979918)

The first post is never informative. I feel like you're doing it wrong.

Whereas the second post should probably at least entertaining so a pre-touche on that one.

Re:Fiber (4, Funny)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980274)

If you're attempting to get meaningful information from Slashdot comments, you're the one doing it wrong.

Re:Fiber (1)

socceroos (1374367) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980172)

I imagine they're laying new fiber since the summary says they're going to "break ground early next year".

Shaw is doing this in Canada (1)

RajivSLK (398494) | more than 3 years ago | (#33981406)

Shaw is already offering gigabit FTTH Internet in Calgary and Vancouver (http://www.shaw.ca/en-ca/ProductsServices/Internet/The+Fasternet/).

They call it the Fasternet and it's free for 6 months. I already have 100mbps from shaw in Victoria and can't wait for gigabit. Google doesn't seem very cutting edge to me.

Re:Shaw is doing this in Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33982058)

What kind of caps do you have on that? Here Videotron offers some reasonable speeds... but caps it at 120GBs... which if you have a 50Mbps connection, just shows how much they like to screw their customers over.

Re:Shaw is doing this in Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33982202)

It's about goddamn time. Coming from Seoul to Vancouver was like moving to a third world country for internet.

Imagine the piracy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33979894)

Ohhh, the uses are endless!

That might be worth ... (4, Funny)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 3 years ago | (#33979896)

To some students, it might be. Sadly enough I know someone who chose their undergraduate institution based on the ping times they got to their favorite gaming servers; he actually carried a notebook with him to each school he considered, and wrote down the ping times from each school to his favorite servers.

I'm sure you'll be shocked to know he graduated with less-than-stellar grades, and then took a rather mediocre job afterwards.

Re:That might be worth ... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33980434)

I'm sure you'll be shocked to know he graduated with less-than-stellar grades, and then took a rather mediocre job afterwards.

...so, like, what? A slashdot editor?

Re:That might be worth ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33982930)

Who's worse? Their editors, or their coders?

Re:That might be worth ... (1)

monkyyy (1901940) | more than 3 years ago | (#33982610)

lol i srsly googled their name to see if i can get in since this is my last year in highschool

Re:That might be worth ... (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 3 years ago | (#33984080)

lol i srsly googled their name to see if i can get in since this is my last year in highschool

If you haven't heard of them before now, then you probably aren't Stanford material. And I'm quite sure if you wrote your application essay (especially this late) like that, you would be laughed out of the admissions process.

Re:That might be worth ... (1)

Captain Segfault (686912) | more than 3 years ago | (#33982898)

To some students, it might be. Sadly enough I know someone who chose their undergraduate institution based on the ping times they got to their favorite gaming servers; he actually carried a notebook with him to each school he considered, and wrote down the ping times from each school to his favorite servers.

It's absurd to use it as the only criterion, but quality of internet connection is a perfectly reasonable thing to consider if you're going to be locked in to campus housing.

How convenient... (2, Interesting)

Luke has no name (1423139) | more than 3 years ago | (#33979910)

After all the hubbub, they put their fiber network in their own back yard. Real surprising, guys.

Re:How convenient... (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 3 years ago | (#33979994)

I can understand Google keeping it close and in an academic research environment. In a few years they might start investigating more mainstream uses, and in 5 to 10 years some of this may trickle out to the average Joe. I expect in that time frame other commercial interests will do the same.

Re:How convenient... (2, Insightful)

BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980088)

Well look at it from a testing point of view. No community can saturate an internet line quite as quickly or effectively as a bunch of horned up, tech-savvy college kids spending hours a day torrenting, playing facebook games, and streaming music, video, and porn 24/7.

Re:How convenient... (1)

Stregano (1285764) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980130)

Who said you need to be in college to continue doing this?

Re:How convenient... (2, Funny)

BJ_Covert_Action (1499847) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980186)

Colleges just exist as a nice aggregator of folks who do this, thus leading to a higher concentration of porn streaming per capita.

Re:How convenient... (2, Interesting)

Hooya (518216) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980654)

PornPerCapita (PPC) might just be the new meme to replace LoC...

Re:How convenient... (0)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 3 years ago | (#33981128)

>>>Colleges just exist as a nice aggregator of folks who do this, thus leading to a higher concentration of porn streaming per capita.

But college boys have college girls to play with.
What do they need porn for?
;-)
I can see how this situation might not be realistic though, considering colleges ban torrenting. Just imagine: A 1 million K line and you can't use it for its main purpose. Disappointing.

Re:How convenient... (2, Informative)

timeOday (582209) | more than 3 years ago | (#33981458)

I can see how this situation might not be realistic though, considering colleges ban torrenting. Just imagine: A 1 million K line and you can't use it for its main purpose. Disappointing.

Actually the main purpose for bittorrent vanishes with 1gbit symmetric Internet. Why bother pooling upstream when it isn't scarce any more? You'd still want lots of peer-to-peer servers (so 10,000 clients weren't all hitting the same server), but there would be no reason for a single client to connect to more than 1 server, which would eliminate most of the complexity of bittorrent. Just find any server with the file you want that isn't too heavily loaded, and download it from them.

Re:How convenient... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33984528)

This is why no-one really bothered with bittorrent for sharing mp3s. It really came into it's own with the rise of movie and TV piracy.

Re:How convenient... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33980616)

I know this is Slashdot, but seriously. RTFA.

Re:How convenient... (4, Informative)

Caspin (964414) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980916)

umm... RTFA?

There are only 850 homes that are being serviced at Stanford, mostly faculty (no dorms). Google has plans to scale they're broadband experiment up to 50,000-500,000 homes before their done.

Stanford was selected to be the first because it was small and close to Google's campus. It is essentially the trial run before the really big deployments.

The rest of the communities will be selected before the end of the year.

Re:How convenient... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33980956)

I don't know what article you read (or didn't, most likely) . As the article says, "Product manager James Kelly said Google will learn from the small deployment how to scale the Google Fiber program effectively for larger communities. The goal is to provide fiber connections to between 50,000 and a half-million people. Communities will be selected before the end of the year."

So, Google is doing a very limited test site at Stanford before they try to deploy to tens to hundreds of thousands of homes. Sounds one heck of a lot like common sense if you ask me. Run a very limited test close to where the tech is being developed so you can find all the problems and fix them faster. Nowhere in the article did it say that this would be the only installation, or anything like that.

What other bottlenecks? (1)

mewsenews (251487) | more than 3 years ago | (#33979912)

They'll have gigabit to their curb but I can't imagine they'll be piped directly into a backbone or anything..

or will they? Does Stanford have a beefy link to the internet?

Re:What other bottlenecks? (4, Funny)

Wesley Felter (138342) | more than 3 years ago | (#33979992)

This isn't a Stanford network; it's a Google network so it will probably connect to the GoogleBone. If you thought Google was fast now, just imagine - with this network you probably get search results before you type the query.

Re:What other bottlenecks? (3, Insightful)

timeOday (582209) | more than 3 years ago | (#33981388)

Between google search, google news, gmail, googletv, and youtube, some people might be fairly happy with fast access to nothing but google. Throw in facebook and you'd have a reasonable Cliff Notes version of the Internet. And I'm only being about 2/3 facetious.

awww (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33979926)

Lucky bastards..

One gigabit per second (3, Funny)

holywarrior21c (933929) | more than 3 years ago | (#33979928)

My university has 4GB/day cap on the internet. hypothetically speaking, if we had this 1gigabits connection, it can become useless in 32 seconds.

Re:One gigabit per second (1)

cheater512 (783349) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980136)

My uni a couple of years ago had a whopping 300mb/month cap. 2.3 seconds.

Re:One gigabit per second (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 3 years ago | (#33982354)

LOL, we had an OC3 connection just for the dorms in 1997. Unfortunately since then they've only upgraded to a 400Mbps connection on the resnet side since so it's way less impressive now relative to home connections =)

Re:One gigabit per second (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980278)

I think a certain university network I know has (had?) 10 GB/day. However, that did not apply to intra-campus bandwidth so it only encouraged people to access the ridiculous amounts available locally.

Re:One gigabit per second (2, Interesting)

Facegarden (967477) | more than 3 years ago | (#33981580)

I think a certain university network I know has (had?) 10 GB/day. However, that did not apply to intra-campus bandwidth so it only encouraged people to access the ridiculous amounts available locally.

Aww man, that just reminded me of the private P2P network my buddies setup in college a few years ago. It was totally local and private, and it was invite only, so there was basically no risk of getting caught. Very much content was shared over that link.

Ahh, the good ol days.
-Taylor

Re:One gigabit per second (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33980544)

8GB/month download cap

yes, per month

you can imagine the amount of account sharing that happens with people not living on the campus and people living in the dorms.

Re:One gigabit per second (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33982350)

Your university is terrible. Haven't you guys ever heard of Internet2? We've got multiple links to multiple carriers (research and common) adding up to over 40GB/sec. And this is just in Eugene!

Re:One gigabit per second (1)

Urza9814 (883915) | more than 3 years ago | (#33982922)

Penn State upgraded about a year ago from 4GB/week to 10GB/week. Man, that was rough. Have to set up downloading linux ISOs on Sunday night - if they were DVD images, one download could eat your entire cap. That or use the wifi - but there's no wifi in the dorms, so you'd have to go elsewhere for that. I used to leave my laptop running in it's bag so it could hop between wifi nodes and download while I walked from class to class.

This is not for students (4, Informative)

Wesley Felter (138342) | more than 3 years ago | (#33979932)

This network is for houses on Stanford's campus where faculty and staff live. The students will have to be content with only 100 Mbps in the dorms.

Re:This is not for students (1)

toastar (573882) | more than 3 years ago | (#33979964)

only 100mbps.... I only have like 10 o.o

Re:This is not for students (1)

froggymana (1896008) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980444)

yeah, well I'm stuck with a nice and crappy plan from Verizon, but now its switched over to "Frontier" and things have only gotten worse. I have a 1Mbit connection :/

Re:This is not for students (1)

yincrash (854885) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980188)

i assume there is still a sizable population of students who live off campus...

Re:This is not for students (1)

dorv_05 (1360937) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980532)

Your assumption is for the most part incorrect. 95% of Stanford undergraduates live on campus, as well as 56% of graduate students. Housing in the area is extremely expensive, and many faculty members live in university subsidized housing, which is necessary for the university to maintain a competitive compensation package for their professors.

Re:This is not for students (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33983474)

Actually, 99% of undergrads live on-campus. It's part of the culture.

Re:This is not for students (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33980536)

You're right. The residential subdivision of Stanford that has the name Stanford, CA is not student housing. It is for faculty and staff is and is very exclusive. I visited someone at one of these homes once. He had a live in butler, the house was massive (probably about 5-7k square feet) and he told us the story about how he didn't like where it was when he first bought it so he moved the whole house to the other side of the lot. I don't think anybody in this neighborhood is really hurting for more amenities. This is just icing on an already very fancy cake.

Re:This is not for students (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33981024)

On campus, I get roughly 80 Mbps up and down through speed test sites

Re:This is not for students (1)

godunc (1836034) | more than 3 years ago | (#33982316)

...because google doesn't want to stress their experiment that hard. Imagine how many torrents those kiddies would have going with a 1gbps connection. At least fu@!book doesn't require a fast connection...yet.

Not res halls (dorms) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33979942)

The recipients are faculty and staff who live in houses owned by Stanford.

Yeah what is this crap (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33979944)

Stanford?! I thought the point was to service areas that didn't already have good broadband. Really, this is some bullshit.

Re:Yeah what is this crap (1)

Shikaku (1129753) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980004)

Where would you like to start up an ISP from scratch:
A university where you can find patient and probably gifted and future employees.

Or just jump to a city or an urban environment, where the phones could be slammed because "the internet is down" while they test and deploy.

Re:Yeah what is this crap (5, Informative)

bv728 (943505) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980074)

In fact, if you RTFA, you'll notice the phrases such as 'Test' and 'learn from the small deployment how to scale the Google Fiber program effectively for larger communities.'. This is intended as a close to home, easy deployment.

Re:Yeah what is this crap (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33980202)

Stanford?! I thought the point was to service areas that didn't already have good broadband. Really, this is some bullshit.

Why? You can compress the traffic to those areas quite effectively, since it's mostly the same "OMG A NIGGER IS PREZIDENT!" emails anyways.

so when will we be getting this? (1)

TideX (1908876) | more than 3 years ago | (#33979966)

So when is google going to roll out their ISP service? I want 1GBps, screw comcast.

Re:so when will we be getting this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33980112)

There's a place you can move right now, and you can even call Comcast up and say SCREW YOU!

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/10/09/13/2040211/Gigabit-Speeds-At-Home-In-the-US?from=rss

Re:so when will we be getting this? (3, Insightful)

choongiri (840652) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980150)

Are you sure that's what you want? At least streetview stops outside your house. Sometimes. [streetviewfun.com]

With a Google ISP, you know they'd be cataloging every non-ssl page you visit, inferring things about ssl encrypted sites you visit (as your ISP they would know the IP address of the server you connected to, remember), and using every last bit of your data to target advertising and profit from you in any way possible.

Re:so when will we be getting this? (1)

TideX (1908876) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980426)

You make the assumption that Google cares about my data. Google has catalogued and indexed the internet itself I don't think they give a shit about what one person does on their computer. I trust Google and they have yet to disappoint me. I'd trust them with my information more than Comcast. Besides I already use SSL and TOR whenever possible. Before you start attacking Google consider what OS and programs you're using to type replies. Stop being so paranoid.

Re:so when will we be getting this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33982552)

How is this different from other ISPs?

Re:so when will we be getting this? (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#33984654)

Hyperbole. What they're trying to leverage is the self-reliance on distribution channels, not leeching everyone's data.

Yes, Return Some Of That Tax-Dodge Money (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33980124)

to the former U.S.A. and

do NO evil.

Thanks in advance.

Yours In Vladivostok [youtube.com] ,
K. Trout

Re:Yes, Return Some Of That Tax-Dodge Money (1)

HomelessInLaJolla (1026842) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980214)

Sochi, Rostov, Kiev, Odessa, Moscow, St. Petersburg... never made it to Vladivostok.

Which way is the money flow in this one? Does the Stanford board of reagents own a significant portion of Google and this was a business move for them or; is Google looking at making Stanford their next keyboard punching monkey farm? Just as likely there is a group of Stanford graduated attorneys and stock investors who managed to put together a solid case on some executives/VPs/major shareholders at Google and this fiber network is the token of appreciation to say,"Don't file that quite yet!"

$50k? Uh, it's already available elsewhere (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33980306)

In Japan they get gigabit for $90/mo and it has been available for 5 years or so. $50k seems kind of steep.

We here in the US seem to have a warped view of things due to our crapper Internet infrastructure.

Re:$50k? Uh, it's already available elsewhere (1)

Jason Kimball (571886) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980494)

But $50k would be expected if the bandwidth was provided by a cell phone network....

Re:$50k? Uh, it's already available elsewhere (1)

JonySuede (1908576) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980530)

did you click the link you bloody moron ?
56k is the tuition cost

Re:$50k? Uh, it's already available elsewhere (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33980590)

One whoosh for the dumbass

Re:$50k? Uh, it's already available elsewhere (3, Informative)

mmaniaci (1200061) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980582)

The $50k is housing and tuition costs for Stanford students, not the price of the service. I'd link you to the source, but, yeah, you won't click it.

What about Peter Lothberg's Mom ? (3, Interesting)

mbone (558574) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980378)

...the first place to test Internet speeds up to one gigabit per second

I think not. Peter Lothberg's Mom has had 40 Gbps [thelocal.se] for over 3 years now.

Re:What about Peter Lothberg's Mom ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33983698)

...and in several other Swedish cities, you can get 1Gb/s Internet connections (without the nepotism;) for between 40 and 120 USD per month. See the Prisjakt overview [prisjakt.nu] .

Drexel University has had this for years! (2, Informative)

GerbilSoft (761537) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980380)

I'm currently a student at Drexel University, and they've had gigabit Internet links for several years. It was initially implemented in the main buildings, but then extended to dorms around two years ago. I regularly download files from public Internet servers at over 20 MB/s, and the connection's mostly limited by my laptop's hard drive.

Re:Drexel University has had this for years! (1)

slimjim8094 (941042) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980982)

Over here at UPenn, they've rolled out 802.11n campus-wide, and I've hit the max at 300Mbps or so. They'll be rolling out gigabit in the next year or two...

Re:Drexel University has had this for years! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33981868)

I'm a grad student at UPenn. I was living in a dorm last year and the connection was terrible. Video chat on Skype with parents would often not work. Now I have Verizon and it works flawlessly. I also have great wireless connectivity in my office... I essentially need to walk with my laptop to the hallway every time I want to transfer a file to our department's linux server, because I only get a few KB/s in my office. The wireless sucks.

1000Mb connections are not unheard of (1)

ndege (12658) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980470)

Just over a month ago, Slashdot reported [slashdot.org] 1000Mb connections (up and down) to the home for $349.99 per month covering all of Chattanooga, TN.

I can order it where I live...and, no contract for this fiber to the home connection either. If you want to hear it from the horses mouth, read it here [epbfi.com] .

Also, I discovered that by adding a home phone (delivered via the same fiber) to that quote, the total price actually drops to $317.03 per month.

I have no personal affiliation with EPB, but I do think it is uber-cool that I could upgrade to 1Gb by making a phone call and paying [a lot] more each month. Their 30Mb up/down for $57.99 is enough for me. :)

Re:1000Mb connections are not unheard of (1)

GezusK (449864) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980690)

Exactly what I'm thinking...if you're going to post this news...at least don't forget about a fairly recent post that refutes it's "first" status.

I think its too bad that they picked an area that has the financial means to do this themselves, instead of helping an area that doesn't.

I think I speak for all of us when I say (4, Funny)

Matt Perry (793115) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980620)

Please seed!

Re:I think I speak for all of us when I say (1)

timeOday (582209) | more than 3 years ago | (#33981966)

If we all had gigabit network, there might not be any real need to "download" anything to local storage in the first place - or even to own a PC (or game console). Just move all apps to the cloud and display them on your internet-connected TV or monitor. Even 3d games could be run that way with a gigabit to play with.

Re:I think I speak for all of us when I say (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 3 years ago | (#33982396)

Nah, 1080p30 takes a bit over 3Gbps and I know most gamers whine about 30fps.

Re:I think I speak for all of us when I say (1)

oranGoo (961287) | more than 3 years ago | (#33983636)

Well, if Blue-ray can do 1080p24 in H.264 at around 25-35 Mbps then not sure where you pulled out 3Gbps out from (I only get a similar number if I multiply 1080 x 1920 x 50 frames x 32 luma/chroma = 3.31 Gbps).

And OK, maybe today we can not use commodity hardware to do real-time (as in interactive) encoding and decoding of 1080p60, but I have always liked the idea of thin clients and central resources.

Re:I think I speak for all of us when I say (1)

jack2000 (1178961) | more than 3 years ago | (#33982464)

You can't reliably encode, compress and stream realtime while maintaining perfect HD clarity. All of those little ms add up.

Australia's already got Gb to the home (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33980630)

As an election stunt last month or so, the Australian Government got the knob turned on the new National Broadband Network, being rolled out right now, setting it to 1Gbps instead of 100Mbps. So I think Australia beats Google.

So what? Hmmm (0)

Mysteray (713473) | more than 3 years ago | (#33980846)

Google pulls fiber to some "faculty- and staff-owned homes" at the school which incubated their search engine company?

They have fiber optics running at "up to one gigabit per second" even. For a distance of two whole miles. Wow. Good to know that in the year 2010 there's still cutting edge research going on in the Valley. Usually a Google project is a little more innovative and ambitious than that.

But wait: "The location just a few miles away from Google will also make it easier for engineers to monitor progress." Could it be that Google just might be interested in some other benefits of "easy monitoring"?

You don't suppose they could be .... nahh .. they would never be so evil as to test their personal data collection and targeted marketing algorithms on their old college professors.

Would they?

What are they "testing" here? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33982042)

What exactly are they "testing"? Aren't there enough trials of Gigabit around the world (in Tasmania, AU- http://www.nbntasmania.com.au -for example) that they could simply use the existing findings? Or is their something magical about fiber from Google?

Gigabit since 2004 in dorms at U of Minnesota (2, Interesting)

Paktu (1103861) | more than 3 years ago | (#33982106)

When I was a freshman there, they installed gigabit ethernet in all of the dorms. This was way back in 2004. I can't find anything that old, but here's a source from 2006 to confirm it: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2075070,00.asp [pcmag.com]

Re:Gigabit since 2004 in dorms at U of Minnesota (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33982268)

Yeah, that's not the same thing.

Re:Gigabit since 2004 in dorms at U of Minnesota (1)

blakelarson (1486631) | more than 3 years ago | (#33982984)

The gigabit ethernet is nice, but that's just the internal network. The connection to the Internet is what Google is working on.

Wrong Summary (1)

GWBasic (900357) | more than 3 years ago | (#33982152)

The summary is wrong. Stanford provides discounted faculty housing. The article doesn't talk about their dorms.

Had it in 2003 (1)

icthus13 (972796) | more than 3 years ago | (#33982654)

I had a GigE connection in my dorm at the University of Florida in 2003. Granted, all we did with it was stream music over iTunes and LAN Starcraft, but it was great for geek cred.

fiber'round d'world (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33984326)

Useful background information:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiber_to_the_premises_by_country

I have this option available in my area (Helsinki), €99.81/month:

http://www.sonera.fi/laajakaista/laajakaista+kotiin/1000+megaa

Basically, it's 1000/100 but since I am more than happy with the 210/10 that I have currently I don't think I will be bothered to upgrade the monthly fee at this time (the 210/10 is €45/month). The speed is pretty much maxed out any time of the day or month, no limits, so it's all pretty kick ass. I don't really CARE; I been happy with my internet connection since I got ADSL 1024/512 back in 2000. THAT was awesome, upgrade from 56K dialup to 1024/512 felt like the speed was unlimited. =)

The difference from 10 MB/s to 100MB/s is irrelevant for me, I don't transfer that much stuff. My biggest transfers are Steam games now and then, 4-8 GB will be done in less than 10 minutes, that's better than good enough for me. But nice to see things going forward, not complaining!

Case Western Gigabit in dorms since 2001 (1)

brian0918 (638904) | more than 3 years ago | (#33984502)

They installed gigabit fiber in the dorms my freshman year. I guess we were spoiled.

Shot across the bow Comcast (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33984630)

Please challenge Comcast Google.

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