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China's Official Newspaper Pans iPad — Too Locked Down

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the ironing-is-delicious dept.

Media (Apple) 319

An anonymous reader writes "The People's Daily newspaper, which is the official news organ of the ruling Communist party in China, apparently recently posted a review of the iPad, where it complained about the locked down nature of the device, noting that 'There are many disadvantages. For example you cannot install pirate software on them, you cannot download [free] music, and you need to pay for movies you watch on them.' You would think a country that is in favor of locking down the internet so much would like a locked up device ..."

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apple blocked software that China GOV made (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 2 years ago | (#33992216)

apple blocked software that China GOV made and or they don't like the 30% cut.

Re:apple blocked software that China GOV made (2, Interesting)

aliquis (678370) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992726)

A country?

My first thought was "so what? What says the writer of the article agrees with the leaders of the country in general?", but then I saw that it was the paper of the communist party. And yeah, those are probably the people who want to lock down the Internet. Not "the country."

Though I do understand it was mostly written to be funny and may not correlate much.

frist (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#33992218)

I posted first.

Welp. (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#33992242)

Right now I am imagining China as a cat and Apple as a piece of bread, buttered on one side. Steve Jobs just taped the bread to the cat's back butter side up, and tossed it in the air. What will happen?

Re:Welp. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33992600)

Clearly the tape will come off, the cat will land on its feet, and the bread will land butter side down.

Re:Welp. (3, Funny)

captainproton1971 (1838798) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992788)

Next time, use staples.

Re:Welp. (2, Funny)

NatasRevol (731260) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992804)

Screw that, solder them together.

Re:Welp. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33992796)

We won't know about the cat until we open the box. I thought everybody knows that cats are placed in boxes and become clouds of probability during experiments like this. I guess that means the butter is both down and up at the same time until we open the box to check.

Re:Welp. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33992798)

The cat will do the crab walk

progress. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#33992248)

In spite of the trolls, the best perspective is that there's been remarkable progress in China.

Re:progress. (1)

zhong-guo (1872764) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992948)

shi ah, na, "For example you cannot install pirate software on them, you cannot download [free] music, and you need to pay for movies you watch on them.' " This is the exact reason why lots of the linux people won't buy one. But since china says it, then it really bad. HAHAHA At least there is honesty, even if we own the world.

The answer is, of course... (4, Insightful)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 2 years ago | (#33992258)

...only when it benefits them. Consider how Baidu beat Google: by offering free searches of copyright-infringing content in addition to the legitimate services that Google provides. If I'm reading the stereotypes correctly, the Chinese government has no interest in protecting IP rights, especially those of American companies, since it ultimately seeks to undermine the American economy by devaluing it. So this really is towing the party line, if you assume that the movies, software and music are all seen as tied to America and American-allied countries (Japan, South Korea...) from the Chinese perspective.

Re:The answer is, of course... CONFUSING OR UNTRUE (1)

paxcoder (1222556) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992468)

So you claim Google filters out copyright-infringing content? Since when?
Perhaps if a company knows how to compete with Google, it knows how to win its own countrymen to their own service?

Re:The answer is, of course... CONFUSING OR UNTRUE (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33992576)

Google doesn't speciifcally offer a torrent search. Picture a button between "Scholar" and "Local" labeled "Piracy".

Re:The answer is, of course... CONFUSING OR UNTRUE (3, Informative)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992646)

filetype:torrent Iron Man 2

Seems like that works just fine.

Re:The answer is, of course... CONFUSING OR UNTRUE (1)

blackraven14250 (902843) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992810)

Yeah, not as accessible though. Most people don't know about filetype: , so the button is easier. Also, doesn't necessarily work for straight MPG or MP3's that you may be looking for, while Baidu does.

Re:The answer is, of course... CONFUSING OR UNTRUE (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992874)

Most people don't know about filetype:

I do now. Honestly, I did not know. Thanks /. for helping America to keep up with the Chinese!

Re:The answer is, of course... CONFUSING OR UNTRUE (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992816)

But, but, but there's no Google Torrent (beta)!

Re:The answer is, of course... CONFUSING OR UNTRUE (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33992890)

God you're stupid.

Re:The answer is, of course... (4, Interesting)

mellon (7048) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992620)

The answer is that China is not America, and they don't believe the same things we do. Sometimes it's because they are wrong, and sometimes it's because we are wrong (for some value of wrong, of course). In this case it's quite interesting how differently they see it--they see the iPad as bad because they don't have any social norm at all in favor of copyright maximalism. To them, copyright maximalism is a bug to be worked around. It's kind of cool. I wish we (our culture) hadn't drunk that kool-aid. This is completely orthogonal to the great firewall (which, by the way, many members of the Communist party consider illegal).

You're right that Baidu probably beat Google by offering free searches for piracy sites. If you stop with the copyright maximalist viewpoint for a minute, that's exactly what you'd expect in a free-market situation. Baidu is better than Google, because it returns more useful results. This is only bad if you are a copyright maximalist, which most Chinese people are not.

Anyway, I'm not about to move to China--there are a lot of disadvantages to living there, particularly if you aren't Chinese. But I think it's worth thinking about this from a free market perspective, and not from the perspective of a system of law that is really not very widely accepted.

Re:The answer is, of course... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33992764)

>> Sometimes it's because they are wrong, and sometimes it's because we are wrong

If I like vanilla and you like chocolate, we disagree, but neither of us is wrong.

Re:The answer is, of course... (1)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992946)

That's not a disagreement, merely a differing. It's only a disagreement when your two choices are mutually exclusive—I want to go study for my midterm and people keep replying to my comment, for example...

Re:The answer is, of course... (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992832)

Not really, the reason why China is less than enthusiastic about cracking down on piracy comes down to cost. If there citizens had to start paying for software they'd all of a sudden notice that they don't really have much money and discontent would likely result. The Chinese government cracks down hard on malcontents and so piracy is allowed.

Plus it's generally software that's produce overseas rather than domestically.

Re:The answer is, of course... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33992950)

If Chinese citizens had to pay for software instead of pirating it, rather than discontent, I think the more likely outcome would be some combination of

1. Simply using less software
2. Using free software more often

For example, if they were unable to pirate the next Deus Ex, since there is no free software equivalent, they might go out and play baseball (or some other sport that is just as fun as Deus Ex). Why is there always the presumption that people will be content if they can't have the latest American entertainment/distraction?

Re:The answer is, of course... (1, Troll)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992954)

While that's certainly true, China has demonstrated their interest in harming intellectual property-based American businesses as well, for instance by stealing trade secrets. General software and media piracy is a double win for them.

Re:The answer is, of course... (2, Insightful)

witchman (214735) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992846)

"You're right that Baidu probably beat Google by offering free searches for piracy sites. If you stop with the copyright maximalist viewpoint for a minute, that's exactly what you'd expect in a free-market situation."

This has nothing to do with a free-market. A free market says you have the choice to either make something or not make something, and also, the choice to purchase something or not purchase something. Doesn't say anything about the right to steal something, or in the case of Baidu, aid you in stealing something.

What if Baidu helped me find all your bank account numbers and I "downloaded" all your money? How would you feel about their service then?

Re:The answer is, of course... (1)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992926)

I don't personally hold the "copyright maximalist" viewpoint, as you put it, but I urge you to not dismiss this as some kind of anarchist ideal situation. Remember all of those ugly stories about the Chinese government stealing the trade secrets of US companies? How about breaking into journalists' accounts at Google? And, on top of that, even if some (or "many") party members don't endorse the Great Firewall, it's still there and talking about Tienanmen Square is still illegal—and at least for a period, smoking was promoted as "healthy" because the government considered it a potential birth control option. This isn't merely culture that has different views on information security and privacy from us; this is a government—an organization made up of people who happen to live within that culture—which has demonstrated an active and repeated interest in manipulating information and undermining other countries.

Maybe, sure, the guy selling seedy DVDs with the inkjet label on the corner is culturally just not big on respecting the design work of others, absolutely. Same for the architects who built copies of various European landmarks to populate rich Chinese suburbs with. But it becomes a very, very different matter when the state acknowledges it as an end goal, especially a state that so consistently disrespects other countries when the culture of its people is so heavily driven by respect.

Re:The answer is, of course... (1)

timeOday (582209) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992632)

the Chinese government has no interest in protecting IP rights, especially those of American companies, since it ultimately seeks to undermine the American economy by devaluing it.

Yeah, they must be motivated by undermining us... it couldn't be that they simply want to enjoy movies and music and software without having to pay for them. Just like the millions of bittorrent users here in the US who seek to undermine the American economy by devaluing intellectual property in exactly the same way each and every day - clearly they're doing it to harm their own economic future!

Re:The answer is, of course... (2, Interesting)

Intrinsic (74189) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992740)

Intellectual Property is an illusion. You can't claim ownership over ideas no matter how many laws you make. People are always going to take someone else's Idea, change it, use it, make it better, what ever, get over it.

The real ecnomic future is when we stop claiming ownership over stupid things like ideas and in some cases expression of ideas and let the community work out the best way to make it work. You don't have a god given right to make money off of something you do, the people decide when, where and why you get to make that money. The internet is transforming the way we think about this and you better get on board before you get your ass left behind. Its as simple as that.

Re:The answer is, of course... (1)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992884)

That's a fair point, but again you must consider the Official Sanctionage that's going on here. This is a state-run newspaper, not merely popular opinion. Given that the state has the duty to set the polite status quo, especially in far-East cultures like China, this says quite a bit more than the abundance of counterfeiting does.

Re:The answer is, of course... (1)

gutnor (872759) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992678)

No country want to protect the IP of other countries. That is simply not profitable to do it ... unless you enter in vast trade agreements and you get compensated (your own IP is protected, access to market, you don't get nuked, etc)

China could destroy the US economy overnight (at the cost of its own economy) and seriously affect the bottom line of our great leaders. That means that the US has less bargaining chips and less will to bargain.

Re:The answer is, of course... (1)

mangu (126918) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992910)

the Chinese government has no interest in protecting IP rights, especially those of American companies, since it ultimately seeks to undermine the American economy by devaluing it

You are assuming that protecting IP rights will help the interests of American companies. That implies the analyses of the *AA must be correct. A very big IF.

Re:The answer is, of course... (1)

mrawhimskell (1794156) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992934)

Don't forget that japanese and americans did the same before they found their feet technologically. America now feels threatened and suddenly feels the need for IP protection and fair trade

Re:The answer is, of course... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33992936)

It's toeing the party line. Hard to imagine how one would tow an abstract object..

Download free music and sync it with iTunes (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#33992262)

Quoting what appears to be a translation of The People's Daily:

For example you cannot install pirate software on them, you cannot download [free] music

I thought one could download Free recordings of public domain music [musopen.com] on a PC and then sync them to the iDevices using iTunes. When did Apple disable that?

Re:Download free music and sync it with iTunes (1)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992448)

You're either an idiot or being intentionally dense. By "free music" they mean music they download off a shady pirate site not public domain music.

Or pirate music and sync it with iTunes (3, Informative)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992510)

And an iDevice owner can still use a PC to download music and movies "off a shady pirate site" and sync them to his iDevice with iTunes. So without a translation of the whole People's Daily article, I'm not sure exactly what is being complained about.

Re:Or pirate music and sync it with iTunes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33992720)

I haven't RTFA, either, but I'd guess it's more about the "use a PC" bit -- they're probably evaluating it as a stand-alone device with a web browser, and wanting to go to pirate sites, download $stuff, and play it. For someone with that expectation, saying "download on a PC and then sync with iTunes" comes off like a 1990s Linux evangelist telling a room of gamers that "no games on Linux" isn't a problem, because you can dual-boot to Windows!

Re:Or pirate music and sync it with iTunes (1)

cbhacking (979169) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992824)

PCs are a lot less common in most of China than they are in first-world nations. An iPad is an awfully expensive toy if you need a PC to go with it. Internet cafes are OK for a bit of email, IM, or gaming, but they aren't really suitable for downloading 10 GB of media for your iPad.

Re:Or pirate music and sync it with iTunes (1)

Laxori666 (748529) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992958)

An iPad is an awfully expensive toy.

Fixed that for you.

Re:Download free music and sync it with iTunes (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992776)

> You're either an idiot or being intentionally dense. By "free music" they mean music they download off a shady pirate site not public domain music.

How can you tell the difference. It's going to look the same and work the same way.

Fair Use and piracy look exactly the same to a neutral observer.

Re:Download free music and sync it with iTunes (1)

techno-vampire (666512) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992800)

Fair Use and piracy look exactly the same to a neutral observer.

In a word, no. Buying a CD, ripping it and putting the music in .mp3 format on your iPod is Fair Use. Posting those .mp3s to a warez site so that other people can use them for free is copyright infringement, often referred to as "piracy."

Re:Download free music and sync it with iTunes (1)

biryokumaru (822262) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992918)

Jedidiah likely meant a neutral observing watching someone use an iPad. Loading mp3s onto your little Apple toy is the same as loading mp3s onto your little Apple toy, regardless of where those mp3s came from.

Re:Download free music and sync it with iTunes (1)

itsdapead (734413) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992736)

I thought one could download Free recordings of public domain music [musopen.com] on a PC and then sync them to the iDevices using iTunes. When did Apple disable that?

There are certain lock-in aspects of the iDevices (particularly Apps) but the idea that you have to buy all of your media from the iTunes store is a complete myth.

iDevices can play MP3, unprotected AAC and MP4 video from any source, legal or otherwise. iTunes will happily rip your CDs (and there are third-party tools that will rip your DVDs into iDevice-friendly format) and the VLC media player was recently released for iOS. iBooks can read ePub and PDF, and there are several other reader Apps available.

You have to use the iTunes software - but not the iTunes store - to get the files onto the iPad but apart from that, the only lock-in is for Apps and firmware updates.

There are also various streaming apps - including YouTube. If the pirates aren't offering H.264 streams then complain to them, not Apple.

Re:Download free music and sync it with iTunes (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992806)

Apple's appliance devices support a limited number of formats. They have meagre hardware to deal with anything non-standard even if you do jailbreak the device.

For the average n00b, this is very effective at separating the rest of the world from Apple. It's trivial to us Apple bought content with apple appliances and progressively harder to use "other" stuff.

This has the same effect as if Apple were using their own proprietary formats. All they need to do is use a peculiar subset of standards. The difficulty dealing with the rest will be a sufficient barrier to stop the n00bs from using alien stuff. This is why stuff like VLC is so handy on a Mac. Plus the Mac has the hardware to handle all the weird stuff.

Ironic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#33992274)

I found it ironic that China, the first civilization to invent printing press, thinks the iPad is too lock down.
 
"Damn it! Pre-printed books are too locked down! You can't write your own stuff to them!"

Margin notes in printed books (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#33992398)

"Damn it! Pre-printed books are too locked down! You can't write your own stuff to them!"

On the contrary, printed books are ideal for writing notes in the margins because you don't have to worry about messing up the original. They're also ideal for spreading propa^W information to the masses.

ungrateful bastards (3, Funny)

jollyreaper (513215) | more than 2 years ago | (#33992278)

Next they'll be complaining about the amount of lead in the jobs we're shipping over there.

I'll say it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#33992290)

I love these guys.

Should we be hatin'?

not surprised (1)

L3370 (1421413) | more than 2 years ago | (#33992296)

This coming from a country where copying, stealing or selling other peoples ideas is not a crime, but a business model.

Color me surprised.

Re:not surprised (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992440)

How you steal an idea?

Re:not surprised (3, Funny)

Nikker (749551) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992478)

Not sure but I bet it involves lawyers.

Re:not surprised (4, Funny)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992536)

You might want to ask Christopher Nolan [imdb.com] about it.

Re:not surprised (4, Insightful)

mister_playboy (1474163) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992516)

China isn't bowing to the current Imaginary Property system because it only hurts them, just as they resisted Britain's attempts to get them all hooked on Opium in the 19th century.

The USA did the exact same thing in the early stages of its rise to power, ignoring the Imaginary Property of European countries.

Re:not surprised (4, Insightful)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992870)

In a sense you are right. Intellectual property is important to advanced economies which primarily rely on innovation in order to grow. It is less important to countries whose economy is based on plentiful supply of humans who can cheaply and mindlessly stamp out parts for products that other countries invent. China is still a primitive country by Western/Japanese standards with per capita GDP 1/13th that of the USA. It is still desperately trying to catch up. This is because being a production hub for foreign companies will only take you so far, the next step is for Chinese home-grown companies to begin to flourish and produce original innovative technology and that's when China will also start caring about intellectual property.

all about expectations (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#33992306)

Perhaps China is more experienced in sealing intellectual property than they are in paying for it and therefore they dislike this in the iPad. Since their government goes to such lengths to control the flow of information and the *ideas* that people are exposed to, I conclude that the Chinese leadership is quite comfortable with the idea of piracy.

Well (0)

Mikkeles (698461) | more than 2 years ago | (#33992310)

There's the pot calling the kettle black!

Not ironic (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#33992318)

If you drew up one of those 2x2 matrices favored by MBA consultants, Apple would be in the "locked down, good taste" cell. China would also be in the lockdown side of the "Freedom" axis, but would be opposite Apple on the "Style" axis.

Re:Not ironic (1)

biryokumaru (822262) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992942)

What are the other two? Rich Libertarians and Dirty Hippies?

Of course, I guess that depends on your definition of "style." I would probably have labeled that axis "wealth."

Steve, is that you? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#33992320)

Fuck you, Steve Jobs.

This Story is so much flamebait (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#33992328)

I'm sorry, but how many People's Daily stories or articles has slashdot linked to? I bet it numbers in the single digits in its 10 year history.

So why would anybody care what the People's Daily thinks about the iPad? There have been many countless review written already. It seems this story is just obviously flamebait to rile up the pro and anti-Apple zealots.

Can we finally get an editor moderation feature already? Timothy and kdawson are the biggest trolls here. How come they can't be held accountable?

   

I would think that? (1)

MrCrassic (994046) | more than 2 years ago | (#33992330)

Millions of computers in China are running pirated versions of Windows/Office/Microsoft software and the country itself maintains its own nationalized version of Linux. They, along with Russia, are the major contributors of malware and viruses, and are the one of the bastions of cyberterrorism today. With this kind of a status quo, they would clearly have no issues with a device that, by default, doesn't even let the user install apps from third-party vendors.

LOL

No, they wouldn't (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#33992332)

You would think a country that is in favor of locking down the internet so much would like a locked up device

It depends, as it always does, on who holds the key to the lock.

lack of fear of the law(yers) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#33992336)

O_O

Well (1, Funny)

Mikkeles (698461) | more than 2 years ago | (#33992338)

There's the Pol Pot calling the kettle black!

Re:Well (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33992450)

That's Cambodia artard. Pun rejected with extreme prejudice.

You missed their point. (1)

sosaited (1925622) | more than 2 years ago | (#33992340)

You missed the point. They are upset not because the device is locked in nature, but because Apple didn't consult them about what to lock in the iPads meant for China.

Oh really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#33992348)

I don't get the author's tone, China is more open than the US. There are fewer restrictions overall.

Re:Oh really? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992688)

Please feel free to expand on this. What extra freedoms do the Chinese enjoy?

Re:Oh really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33992756)

Freedom to steal foreign entertainment, foreign software, and foreign patents, of course!

Oh, and freedom to take a dump in the street when they think no one is looking. Though I can say first hand that freedom also exists in several neighborhoods in San Francisco.

Communism Rules (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#33992356)

the official news organ of the ruling Communist party in China

Thanks for clarifying that this concerns the ruling Communist party in China. I almost made the mistake of thinking it was about the non-ruling Communist party in China, which would have been awkward as it doesn't exist.

That's not what they were trying to do (1)

commodoresloat (172735) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992462)

They were trying to distinguish it from the ruling Libertarian Party there.

Strange, that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#33992366)

A slanted iReview.

If reality doesn't match common sense... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#33992374)

... suspect common sense!

If US folks think China is too locked and China complains about extreme locking in an US product, I'd carefully dedicate some quality time to think about my paradigms.

DISCLAIMER: I'm not from US (nor China).

Re:If reality doesn't match common sense... (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992556)

Makes perfect sense - it's just a different lock.

China needs free software to help local business (1)

newviewmedia.com (1137457) | more than 2 years ago | (#33992394)

China needs pirated software to help local business grow. Lived there for a while and couldn't find any person, company, or government organization that paid for licensing. All off the street corner for 10 kuai.

Awesome irony. (5, Funny)

Lord Kano (13027) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992410)

Apple is too totalitarian for the Chinese government's tastes.

LK

Re:Awesome irony. (1)

lennier1 (264730) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992738)

Glad I'm not the only one who sees the irony in that.

hahahaha (0, Troll)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992426)

that's priceless. China finds it too unlocked for their market.

There is a lesson there for all you Apple apologists.

It's about who does the locking (5, Insightful)

Tweenk (1274968) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992430)

The Chinese government likes lockdown only as long as they're the ones doing the locking. Once someone else is in control, it interferes with their own power.

Catholic Church is a good example. A variant of it can exist in China on the condition that it dissociates itself from the Pope, so it is not controlled by a foreign entity. Chinese don't like lockdown and censorship, they like a monopoly of power and influence on the public. Once you think about it, that's also what many of the Western leaders want, but don't have the means necessary to get it.

Re:It's about who does the locking (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992700)

A Catholic Church without the pope is not a catholic church. That would be the Anglican Church.

Political Power (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33992714)

This should be no surprise, at least if you consider the entire history of political power. Political power exists to serve its own interests, not the interests of the people they claim to serve. This is how it has always been, and this is how it always will be. 500 years from today, political power will still be serving its own interests, while claiming to serve the interests of the people they exploit. There is no solution to this, except to strictly limit or eliminate political power.

Mods, +1 parent (5, Informative)

jojoba_oil (1071932) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992792)

After sifting through the anal discharge that people call comments to this story, here's one that is actually worthwhile. I really wish people wouldn't post these stories, because the typical /.er--while knowing a good bit about technology--is ignorant in topics of Asian politics/culture and just spews trash they think is somehow relevant and/or funny. Because of this, I'm grateful for the refreshing comment that shows a deeper understanding. If only I had a few more mod points...

In addition to what Tweenk said, when something the Chinese gov't dislikes becomes popular, China generates their own homegrown option very rapidly. Since they block social networking sites and blogs, they offer things like RenRen Wang [renren.com] ("People-People-Net"; formerly known as XiaoNei, or "Within Campus"), YouKu [youku.com] ("Exceptionally Cool", video posting site), QQ zones (Tencent QQ [imqq.com] being the most popular instant messaging platform in China, and zones host blogs and pictures), and Sina Blogs [sina.com.cn] .

To reiterate: these are all built inside the country specifically so that China can control them. Access to the popular global networking sites like Facebook and Twitter are blocked. (Which, by the way, Western media seems blind to that and continually cites Chinese twitterers as the voice of the common Chinese person. This clearly isn't true, as the common Chinese citizen either doesn't know or doesn't care about the Great Firewall. The ones we see on twitter are the ones who are willing to risk everything to bypass the Firewall and are somewhat radical)

Thanks China, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33992436)

that's what I felt about Apple in the first place! Finally!

Foxconn? (2, Interesting)

The Grim Reefer2 (1195989) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992464)

Aren't iPads made at Foxconn? Maybe China should stop making these locked down products. Just sayin'.

Re:Foxconn? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#33992774)

They don't want to lose the money, they just don't want Chinese people using them.
 
They want Americans to buy iPads made by Foxconn, and for the Chinese to use pirate-friendly devices which can only be locked down by their government.

Variation on a theme (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992474)

In Communist China, iPad locks you down!

Re:Variation on a theme (1)

skozsert (1714328) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992822)

In Capitalist America, Steve locks you down!

China Daily already on the iPad. (1)

Animats (122034) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992488)

The amusing thing is that China Daily has an iPad app. [apple.com]

Counterfeit ipad endorsement? (1)

newviewmedia.com (1137457) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992500)

Sounds like an official government endorsement for Chinese companies to produce their own counterfeit version of unlocked Ipads.

Re:Counterfeit ipad endorsement? (1)

lyinhart (1352173) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992704)

Well, no not exactly. More like devices that *look* like iPads at first glance but don't really work at all. Like cheap tablets running some hacked together version of Linux with resistive touch screens.

Did you look to see if this was in The Onion (1)

sizzzzlerz (714878) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992508)

It took me a couple of scans through the article to believe this was real and not a parody news story.

Original article??? (4, Interesting)

Amlothi (207848) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992512)

Ok, so the Slashdot post links to Tech Dirt ad Tech Dirt links to Christian Science Monitor and Christian Science Monitor fails to link to the original article.

Anybody have a link to the ACTUAL article in the People's Daily? I want to see how badly those snippets were taken out of context, or if they are the result of glorified translation from the original Chinese.

Re:Original article??? (4, Interesting)

Amlothi (207848) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992604)

Seriously, where is the actual article? I'm starting to think it is fake.

I have searched and searched.

If I search Google for the quote from the article, I only find Western media sites quoting that phrase. That quote doesn't seem to appear on the English version of the People's Daily.

I have also tried searching Google for "site:peopledaily.com.cn +ipad" and all I get are news articles or positive articles about the product.

If I add "disadvantages" to the above search, I get nothing...

You know your tech is too restrictive (4, Funny)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992658)

When China calls you on it. :P

DVD DVD 5 dollar! (4, Interesting)

kidtexas (525194) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992710)

Sounds like China to me. When I went there, I was curious to see if one could find NON-pirated DVDs for purchase. Never saw one. All DVDs and CDs in the city I was were pirated.

They were all really cheap too. I think it was 10 CDs for $5 and 3 DVDs for $8 if I recall correctly.

Re:DVD DVD 5 dollar! (1)

jojoba_oil (1071932) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992886)

Sounds like China to me. When I went there, I was curious to see if one could find NON-pirated DVDs for purchase. Never saw one. All DVDs and CDs in the city I was were pirated.

They were all really cheap too. I think it was 10 CDs for $5 and 3 DVDs for $8 if I recall correctly.

You're using the wrong currency. The standard price of DVDs is simply 7 RMB per disc included in the package, and that's for complete strangers without bargaining. The most recent DVD purchase I made was a 16-disc set for 30 RMB, and the quality was fine. If you wanted legitimate DVDs, did you bother asking? They're really not that hard to find, even in some of the less-touristy cities...

That said, what this has to do with TFS is beyond me. The closest I can figure is that your comment talks about China. So you went to China for a vacation and came back with the same stereotypes you went there with, who cares?

"China"? (4, Informative)

emblemparade (774653) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992834)

You would think that Slashdot could tell the difference between "China" and the person who reviewed the iPad for The People's Daily. Newspaper censorship in the PRC is much more intense than in much of the rest of the world, but that doesn't mean that individuals are mouthpieces for certain sectors of their government.

The pot... (1)

witchman (214735) | more than 3 years ago | (#33992860)

Man if this isn't a case of "The pot calling the kettle black" then I don't know what is!

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