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Mount Everest Gets 3G Service

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the yeti-bell dept.

Wireless Networking 150

bossanovalithium writes "It's what every mountaineer wants when they reach the summit of Mount Everest: a 3G high-speed communication. Those who have trekked to the top will soon able to call their mates, go on Facebook or Twitter, and boast that they got there thanks to TeliaSonera and its subsidiary in Nepal, Ncell, which have brought 3G to the Mount Everest area. Climbers who reached Everest's 8,848-meter-high peak previously depended on expensive and erratic satellite phone coverage and a voice-only network set up by China Mobile in 2007 on the Chinese side of the mountain."

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It's true! (1)

bennomatic (691188) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063166)

I'm posting from there right now. So... very...cold...

Re:It's true! (2, Funny)

boristdog (133725) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063248)

Let your loved ones hear you freeze to death!

Re:It's true! (5, Insightful)

Gizzmonic (412910) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063478)

You joke, but I remember when I watched an IMAX documentary on Mt. Everest. One of the guys had climbed it several times, but he messed up and got stuck somewhere halfway up where he would definitely freeze or starve to death. He left behind his pregnant wife, and they played some of their last conversation. After the final conversation, the narrator called the guy a hero. I remember that pissing me off even as a kid. How can someone who pointlessly risks his life when he has responsibilities to a wife and child be called a hero? People who climb Mt. Everest aren't heroes, they're thrillseekers who border on suicidal. Which is fine, but let's be honest about it.

Re:It's true! (2, Insightful)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063564)

He left behind his pregnant wife, and they played some of their last conversation. After the final conversation, the narrator called the guy a hero. I remember that pissing me off even as a kid. How can someone who pointlessly risks his life when he has responsibilities to a wife and child be called a hero?

Am a I heartless bastard if the first thought that crossed my mind was "Damn, he successfully passed on his genes before dying of gross stupidity"? I'd suggest a Darwin award but the idiot managed to reproduce before he kicked the bucket.

Re:It's true! (5, Insightful)

dtml-try MyNick (453562) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064062)

Am a I heartless bastard if the first thought that crossed my mind was "Damn, he successfully passed on his genes before dying of gross stupidity"? I'd suggest a Darwin award but the idiot managed to reproduce before he kicked the bucket.

Let's see, the physical strength and stamina to climb one of the toughest mountains on earth several times, not to mention the mental fitness, flexibility and willpower one needs in large quantities in order to do something like that.

I'd say his genes were top of the bill really

Funny you mention Darwin though.. .
The guy traveled around the world, visiting remote deserted places for years at a time in a era where such voyages were still the equivalent of playing Russian roulette. Also gross stupidity?

Re:It's true! (-1, Troll)

insertwackynamehere (891357) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064066)

Maybe you should kill yourself. You obviously have no clue how "people" and "society" work so you aren't doing anything by continuing to waste oxygen and if we misinterpret Darwin and look at eugenics, you honestly should commit suicide for the good of the gene pool :)

Re:It's true! (5, Funny)

kenj0418 (230916) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064264)

I read "He left behind his pregnant wife" and my first thoughts were - "Damn that's heartless of him" and "WTF was she doing climbing Everest if she was pregnant anyway?"

Re:It's true! (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34063674)

We do that all the time. We call slain police officers and soldiers "heroes", when really they aren't. They have dangerous jobs and working a dangerous job means that you run a higher than normal risk of injury or death. They get extra pay and extra benefits (police pension, G.I. bill education, etc) to help compensate for the additional risk. Sure, their deaths are tragic and sad and usually unnecessary, but that doesn't make them heroes.

I only consider someone to be a hero when they go above and beyond. For example, a guy off the street who runs into a burning building to save someone is showing heroism in my book.

I find the overuse of the word "hero" just as annoying as every time there's a natural disaster and thousands of people die, but one child survives, everyone starts calling it a "miracle". A miracle would be if we never had natural disasters. Or if we had a giant earthquake and *not one person* died.

Re:It's true! (3, Insightful)

harrkev (623093) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063860)

They ARE heroes. They know that they could die in the line of duty, and they do what has to be done anyways (extra pay does not matter). We need policemen and firemen (anybody who suggests otherwise just needs to look no further than Somalia). We do NOT have to have mountain climbers to function as a society. I admire their bravery, but mountain climbers are doing it for themselves and as such are not heroes.

Re:It's true! (2, Insightful)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063962)

No, they're not "heroes." They're doing their job. A "hero," is a person who willingly throws themselves into mortal danger for the benefit of another. I think, for example, about Lenny Skutnik, the bystander who, in January 1982 leapt into an ice-choked Potomac River to help save the life of a passenger from the wreckage of Air Florida Flight 90. Actually there were at least three other heroes in the Flight 90 saga: Helicopter pilot Donald Usher, bystander Roger Olian and of course Arland Williams Jr., who drowned in the freezing river after repeatedly passing life lines to other passengers. Someone who rescues another mountain climber, at the risk of their own life, could also be considered a 'hero.'

Re:It's true! (0, Flamebait)

Oligonicella (659917) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064042)

Read the dictionary, you are incorrect.

Re:It's true! (2, Insightful)

Wiarumas (919682) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064482)

A hero is someone who throws themselves into mortal danger for the benefit of another. PERIOD. It doesn't say compensation is a dis-qualifier. I agree that not all cops, firemen, etc are heroes by default, but their profession does allow them to go above and beyond for another human being. A patrol cop handing out parking tickets is not a hero, but the fireman who saves a little girl from a burning building who would have otherwise died is. He put himself at risk and saved another. Sure, it might be his job, but it doesn't lessen the risk of him dying to save someone else.

Re:It's true! (1)

Peeteriz (821290) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064566)

Ergo, the mountain climber is no hero, as he throws himself into mortal danger only for the benefit of his ego.

Re:It's true! (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064654)

Cops, firemen, etc. are not even in the top10 of most dangerous jobs by mortality rates.

By your standard, the level of heroism of loggers (doing the job for other people, so they can have all the wood they need - in the past warmth saving from disease and death, now construction material (which must be safe) or paper (for education or functioning of public services - think how many deaths were saved by information kept on those pieces of paper)), fishermen (so other people will have food, won't starve) or construction workers of various kinds (so other people will have safe buildings to live in, work in, play in; roads to drive on, et al.) - dwarfs what cops, firemen, etc. are doing.

Re:It's true! (1)

misexistentialist (1537887) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064244)

There is a lot of thrill-seeking involved in those jobs too. Not to say there isn't the chance of heroism like the rescuers at the WTC...but there is also the chance that they do more harm than good in pursuing glory.

By that measure, there are much bigger heroes (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064374)

Police officers and firefighters are not even in the top 10 of most dangerous jobs, by fatality rates; soldiers probably likewise.

Conventional wisdom is often wrong; logger, fisherman, construction worker, drivers, etc. are much more dangerous.

Re:By that measure, there are much bigger heroes (1)

sshore (50665) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064884)

Conventional wisdom is often wrong; logger, fisherman, construction worker, drivers, etc. are much more dangerous.

I don't doubt that's the case, but it seems like one of those unsourced soundbites that may or may not be true. So, with all due respect..

[citation needed]

Re:It's true! (0)

slapout (93640) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063882)

I would call anyone who is willing to risk their life for me a hero. And that is exactly what police, fireman and soldiers do every day.

Re:It's true! (0, Redundant)

sznupi (719324) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064494)

They are not even in the top10 of most dangerous jobs, by fatality rates; but I'm sure they like the attention brought on them thanks to this fact remaining obscure.

Re:It's true! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34064002)

I find the overuse of the word "hero" just as annoying as every time there's a natural disaster and thousands of people die, but one child survives, everyone starts calling it a "miracle". A miracle would be if we never had natural disasters. Or if we had a giant earthquake and *not one person* died.

That one thing could be more of a miracle does not preclude a lesser miracle.

And really, a lot of fire men, police officers and soldiers do go above and beyond, even more so than their fellows.

Re:It's true! (2, Insightful)

pckl300 (1525891) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064672)

A miracle would be if we never had natural disasters. Or if we had a giant earthquake and *not one person* died.

Isn't that what happened with the Chilean miners? I don't think there were any deaths... that's pretty miraculous.

Re:It's true! (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064758)

If only during the time the Chilean miners were trapped, an order of magnitude more miners wouldn't die worldwide...

Re:It's true! (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34064732)

> "They get extra pay and benefits..."
I can't speak to the Police pay and benefits, but as a retired USAF E-6 I can speak to military pay & benefits. Military pay is just above the poverty level. As a 15 year NCO in California, I qualified for subsidized housing. Living was paycheck to paycheck and any unanticipated expense (and some of the anticipated ones) were a financial disaster.
Yes, I "retired" after 20 years (while remaining part of the reserve forces for the privilege), but not with anywhere near enough money to actually live on, so I started a second career at the age of 39.
Those of us who have served long years aren't in it for the money - trust me on that.

Re:It's true! (3, Insightful)

dtml-try MyNick (453562) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063908)

No, these are people that want to probe the boundaries and limits of their world, want to explore, excel and stretch their own limitations. These are most likely the types that actually will become true heroes if the situation would call for it.

If the guy climbed mt Everest several times than he and his wife were fully aware of the risks involved. About 1 in 10 climbers die on that mountain I think. So if she got pregnant she was fully aware that her husband had a decent chance of never returning.

They made choice, who are you to judge them about that?

Re:It's true! (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064090)

It's very easy to find situations / areas that would call for true heroism...

And while people can easily say they are conscious of certain risk, there's always the effect of hoping how I will cheat it.

Re:It's true! (2, Insightful)

Gizzmonic (412910) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064302)

These are most likely the types that actually will become true heroes if the situation would call for it.

And you know this how? 'Probing the boundaries of reality'? Please. His single motivating factor was pride, plain and simple. He wasn't probing the boundaries of reality any more than the woman who died from water poisoning in an attempt to win a Wii game console.

They made choice, who are you to judge them about that?

Wait, I'm confused. You just got done telling me that this guy is a hero because he recklessly risked his life. But you're telling me not to judge him? Yes, he made a choice: a terrible choice that had tragic consequences for himself and his family. Again, not unlike the woman who died drinking too much water in order to win a Wii. Why isn't she a hero?

Re:It's true! (1)

sosaited (1925622) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064186)

Well the word Hero shouldn't be just reserved for people who apparently do something selfless, or violent/inhumane acts in the name of the country or religion.

It takes a great deal of courage to even think of putting yourself through this much hardship, and even a greater deal of courage to do so while having wife and kid. For me, this qualifies as a Hero as well. And on a side-note, where would the world be without people trying to do seemingly impossible things just because it was their dream or downright silly at the moment

Re:It's true! (1)

Gizzmonic (412910) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064434)

It takes a great deal of courage to even think of putting yourself through this much hardship, and even a greater deal of courage to do so while having wife and kid. For me, this qualifies as a Hero as well.

And if he was skydiving without a parachute? Would you consider that heroic as well?

And on a side-note, where would the world be without people trying to do seemingly impossible things just because it was their dream or downright silly at the moment

What a sappy thing to say. One person's dream might be educating the poor. Another's might be coating himself in bear grease and singing the soundtrack to Grease at a City Council Meeting. All dreams are not created equally, friend.

Re:It's true! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34064270)

It seems as if you are referring to the 1996 Mt Everest Disaster, and specifically the New Zealander Rob Hall, who along with 8 other people, all died on the mountain on day in May. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1996_Everest_disaster

I also watched that same IMAX documentary, and I think they referred to him as a hero, because he stayed behind on the descent to help a couple of slow climbers, and then got caught by a fast moving storm. While I disagree with you on the suicidal comment, it certainly seems as if some people climb when they most definitely shouldn't, due to lack of fitness or whatever... I guess some people like to spend big, and grossly underestimate the dangers of such a feat.

Re:It's true! (1)

barzok (26681) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064342)

You're talking about Rob Hall. May 1996 was a very bad month on Everest. I'm not sure how to feel about Hall - he was a very accomplished climber and guide, and was very conscious of safety concerns.

However, on that expedition, he had a client with him who had previously attempted Everest with him, and they were unable to make the summit. Hall pressed forward in 1996, hell-bent on getting that client to the summit to make up the previous failure, completely ignoring his 2 PM "point of no return" deadline - all climbers in his group were to turn back & return to the high camp regardless of where they were on the mountain, but he kept pushing forward instead.

I don't want to ever hear that conversation. If you want to read first-hand accounts of what happened that year, read Into Thin Air (I hate Krakauer; that book is more like first-and-a-half account, because Krakauer spent a lot of time in his tent) and The Climb (co-written Anatoly Boukareev, who had summited w/o supplemental Oxygen and then went back out to rescue people), and what he wrote is why I don't like Krakauer). It's haunting.

The IMAX crew helped with the rescue effort for several of the climbers who got caught out in that storm that blew in that day and summited later in the month. Those guys are the heroes.

Re:It's true! (1)

Defenestrar (1773808) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063386)

I've got a message from your boss: the [complicated work thing] is down and you need to be back at the office right away. The stern lecture about being slow to respond to the [truthfully trivial] emergency that would have been weathered fine without you should heat you up good and plenty.

And you thought mountaineering was a "safe" hobby.

Wireless internet in the wilderness: now making sure work can follow you "home" even when you aren't there.

Re:It's true! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34063610)

Somehow, I think if one has the financial backing to be able to afford to climb the mountain, the cost of cell phone service is one of the least of their considerations.

Because it's there (0, Redundant)

PatPending (953482) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063168)

First Summit!

Re:Because it's there (0, Redundant)

bennomatic (691188) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063182)

(not)

No such thing as a voice only network (1)

davidwr (791652) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063178)

If you give me voice you've just given me digital.

Sure, it may be sub-300 bps digital but is more likely at least 4800 bps and the latency may be terrible, but you've given me digital.

Re:No such thing as a voice only network (1)

Xoder (664531) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063246)

A lot of the audio compression done on cell signals can, and will, completely ruin a data connection. And even if the compression doesn't get you, the occasional dropped packet with silence fill enabled will cause the modem to give up entirely.

Re:No such thing as a voice only network (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063664)

Considering the network on the Chinese side can almost certainly carry SMS - transferring data via this channel, in a way similar to how WAP could use it, would be probably more straightforward, reliable and faster (considering voice-optimised compression)

Re:No such thing as a voice only network (1)

gravis777 (123605) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063856)

You obviously have not driven around Rural Texas. Still lots of old analogue towers out there, with no data - that's right, no text messaging, no internet, no visual voice mail until you change repeaters. Considering this is setup on a mountain, is it really that hard to imagine that its an old antenna, with a microwave dish pointed to some distant reaches of the outskirts of China that may not have internet access?

Re:No such thing as a voice only network (1)

JesseL (107722) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064364)

It's a sad day when we have slashdotters who are completely unaware of the concept of an acoustic coupler.

Frist piss (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34063186)

on you

Can you hear me ... (0)

powerlord (28156) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063200)

NOOoooowwwww.....?

Re:Can you hear me ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34063778)

No, I can't hear you while you are on Mt. Everest because apparently you are on Verizon. There is a GSM network on the mountain. Perhaps one of your climbing buddies has a phone with, you know, a SIM card in it?

So... (0, Offtopic)

OfficialReverendStev (988479) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063212)

So can I now, finally, get something better than dialup and AT&T EDGE at my house? My house that's 30 minutes from a major metropolitan area? Please?

Of course. (2, Insightful)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063278)

Just make sure your house is a destination for a lot of rich, well-connected climbers who will ensure your telco gets lots of publicity.

Great News (1)

JoeSixpack00 (1327135) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063238)

Now if only they would add 3G service to my aunt's neighborhood...

(Just saying... it would be a lot more practical.)

Mt Everest 3G Photo Challenge (2, Funny)

abbynormal brain (1637419) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063284)

First person to climb to the top, take a picture of their junk, and post it on Facebook using the 3G access wins!

Re:Mt Everest 3G Photo Challenge (1)

dsavi (1540343) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063744)

...And subsequently loses.

Re:Mt Everest 3G Photo Challenge (5, Funny)

Thinine (869482) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063820)

...Their junk to frostbite.

Re:Mt Everest 3G Photo Challenge (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34063750)

First person to climb to the top, take a picture of their junk, and post it on Facebook using the 3G access wins!

Brett Favre accepts your challenge.

Re:Mt Everest 3G Photo Challenge (1)

mark72005 (1233572) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063784)

Brett Favre has now decided to take up mountaineering.

Re:Mt Everest 3G Photo Challenge (1)

Dunega (901960) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064148)

...and then loses when he complains about Facebook's privacy settings.

The mountain with the biggest tits in the world (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34064512)

Re:Mt Everest 3G Photo Challenge (1)

TheSync (5291) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064694)

First person to climb to the top, take a picture of their junk, and post it on Facebook using the 3G access wins!

There are some places you just don't want frostbite!

This is what we've come to. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34063298)

Depressing.

Re:This is what we've come to. (2, Funny)

nizo (81281) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063536)

Just wait until the elevator to the top is finished in 2018.

Almost there! (1)

m2shariy (1194621) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063324)

Now all is left is to build McDonalds on the top.

Re:Almost there! (1)

leuk_he (194174) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063572)

Re:Almost there! (1)

insertwackynamehere (891357) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064266)

Place I Do Not Want To See a McDonalds
A Hipster Expose on Not Liking Things That Don't Exist
sherpa derp

Re:Almost there! (1)

Abstrackt (609015) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063798)

I think a resort would be a much more likely scenario. If you're going to spend all that money building a structure at the top of a mountain you might as well build something people can spend the week in so you can continue to gouge them during their stay.

Re:Almost there! (1)

Arrepiadd (688829) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064590)

A resort to spend a week?!
Do you have any idea what the oxygen content of air is at that altitude? Do you have any idea how hard is it to be up there? It's not something gramma is gonna do, even if taken by helicopter. She'd die of pulmonary and cerebral edema pretty soon. Or are you suggesting putting a acclimatized, pressurized resort at the top would be the solution? Complete with thick bunkerlike walls so you don't even have to see the outside...

Peak Hours (2, Insightful)

digitaldc (879047) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063328)

Now Verizon can do a 'Can you hear me now?' commercial from the top of Mt. Everest and the answer will be 'YES! NOW LEAVE ME THE HELL ALONE!'

Re:Peak Hours (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063412)

I suspect that might still be a problem - with a Verizon phone, in a network of GSM family...

Publicity Stunt (1)

Ancantus (1926920) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063356)

Thats all that it is, sounds cool but utterly worthless to almost every-one.

Re:Publicity Stunt (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064016)

Or a side effect of expanding their network in Nepal (which they apparently do, also in rural areas), a very useful thing - at some point allowing close enough line-of-sight view of the mountain from some cellular base stations primarily serving local population; or maybe at most via trivial expansion of nearby infrastructure.

In a place where there's a rotating group of people with lots of money (a rarity there), valuing ability to stay in contact and of decently fast internet access.

Oh... my iPod Touch only has WiFi (1)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063396)

Still, I expect there'll be a Starbucks there soon enough.

Re:Oh... my iPod Touch only has WiFi (1)

confused one (671304) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064532)

A Starbucks with an oxygen bar just below the summit might be appropriate. Warm drinks and air...

Not at all unusual (2, Interesting)

AntEater (16627) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063426)

Last year I led a group of college age students on a hike up a small local mountain (2700'). First thing that nearly every one of them did at the top was to whip out their cell phones and call someone to let them know where they were. I guess this falls under the "why not" category. Maybe it'll even help with rescue efforts for those who get lost or injured when on the mountain.

Re:Not at all unusual (1)

b0bby (201198) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063488)

Maybe it'll even help with rescue efforts for those who get lost or injured when on the mountain.

The downside, of course, is the people who go places they shouldn't, without the equipment they should have, confident that if something goes wrong they can just call for help. It's not a reason for not carrying a phone, but few things are an unmitigated good.

Re:Not at all unusual (1)

aplusjimages (939458) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063712)

There's an app for that.

That's nice. (1)

Harold Halloway (1047486) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063432)

Now I will be able to e-mail Mountain Rescue when I get into difficulties. How do you operate an Android keyboard with frost-bitten fingers?

Re:That's nice. (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063600)

Now I will be able to e-mail Mountain Rescue when I get into difficulties. How do you operate an Android keyboard with frost-bitten fingers?

There are a number of vendors that sell capacitive stylus for the HTC and other Android devices. As long as you can still grasp with your palms, you should be okay.

Re:That's nice. (1)

kellyb9 (954229) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063656)

There are a number of vendors that sell capacitive stylus for the HTC and other Android devices. As long as you can still grasp with your palms, you should be okay.

It's actually all a moot point since there's little to no chance of rescue on Everest.

Re:That's nice. (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063898)

It's actually all a moot point since there's little to no chance of rescue on Everest.

It's useful in case you need to write that last letter for your love ones, finish that last Will and testament you forgot to do before you left for your trip.

Transfer all your money to your trust's swiss bank account, before you go, so the US gov't can't screw you with the death taxes.

Send your GPS position and pictures of where you're at to your loved ones, so they'll know where to collect the body (assuming they can get up there).

Re:That's nice. (1)

CronoCloud (590650) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064476)

What death taxes? Oh, you mean the "Estate" tax. Do you know that 95+% of people will never pay it because they simply don't have a large enough estate for it to kick in?

Re:That's nice. (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064794)

Do you know that 95+% of people will never pay it because they simply don't have a large enough estate for it to kick in?

It's a silly argument. Akin to writing off the studies of meteors and the possibility of impacts with earth, because 99% of humans who ever lived are already dead and have nothing to gain by us stopping a meteor collision.

5% of the population is over 1.5 million people.

Yes, we know the US population is large, and there are a very large majority of people who are really really bad at managing money that spend every penny as soon as, or even before they actually get it, and don't budget or plan well.

And the people who do that are also the ones most likely to have way too many children, due to their lack of ability to plan -- which results in them and their children (who learn from them) consisting of a larger percentage of the population.

And this lack of planning puts them in the street and prevents them from ever having an estate, unless they learn better ways and more judicious money management.

That's neither here nor there... taking up mountain climbing is expensive, getting the training is expensive, travelling to Everest is expensive.

Do you care to speculate on What percentage of Everest climbers will never have a large enough estate and won't get close to using up their lifetime gift allowance?

Re:That's nice. (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063910)

Some Eurocopter landed on the summit few years ago - so just wait a while? A matter of setting up the service to assure safety of those willing to pay for it...

Re:That's nice. (1)

rokstar (865523) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063828)

No, more like you can still get a call right before you die from your boss informing you that his internet is down

Great, another dimension to advertising (2, Insightful)

macwhizkid (864124) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063450)

Now we're going to have to endure stupid TV ads that incorporate Everest:

Verizon: The largest and TALLEST 3G network!

ATT: The fastest and HIGHEST 3G network!

Then the lawyers will file suit, and we'll have interviews on CNN with a bunch of middle-American jury candidate idiots trying to decide whether highest == tallest ("well, ya see, ah looked it up een mah dictionary, and ah guess who eyver wrote English decided the two words ahr diff-rent, so they must nawt be the same!")

Meanwhile, T-Mobile will remind everyone that "Stick Together" is good advice for mountaineering, especially since they don't have coverage there. Verizon will eventually phase out "Rule the Air" to "Rule the Entire Atmosphere!"

Eventually, Apple will release a new iPhone or something and people will move on to talk about that instead and still not be able to find Everest on a map.

FB and Twitter... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34063466)

...what a filthy shame. In the name of someone climbing a fucking 8km high mountain, the "journalists" taints it with the notion of "going on" Twitter or Facebook to tell the news?

New cause of Avalanches... (4, Funny)

geekmux (1040042) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063522)

"So, what caused the Avalanche?"

"Dunno. All I heard was some guy yelling 'Can you hear me NOW?!?' and then all hell broke loose."

Not what it was (3, Informative)

nloop (665733) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063530)

K2 is the real challenge these days. With enough money you can have your lazy ass dragged to the summit of Everest. Fitting.

Kind of a shame (3, Insightful)

timeOday (582209) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063568)

Some of us, and many of our parents, were born into a world where no man had ever set foot on Everest. It was only climbed in 1953! The first without oxygen not until 1978.

Now, everybody and their dog is doing it. Helicopters land on it. Discovery Channel had a reality show about it. The mountain is heavily littered with garbage. And now you can surf the web from your iPhone up there. I realize this is all inevitable eventually with better technology. But I am a little jealous of our forebearers, for whom there existed unknown frontiers. And solitude is extinct.

Re:Kind of a shame (2, Interesting)

rossdee (243626) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063758)

I am sure that the late Sir Edmund Hillery would prefer they gave better connectivity to the poor villages in the surrounding area.
(and Tenzing Norgay too)

Re:Kind of a shame (1)

Princeofcups (150855) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063760)

But I am a little jealous of our forebearers, for whom there existed unknown frontiers. And solitude is extinct.

Excuse me? I see those frontiers every time I look up at the night sky. You are just looking in the wrong direction.

Re:Kind of a shame (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063810)

But I am a little jealous of our forebearers, for whom there existed unknown frontiers. And solitude is extinct.

Only if one chooses it to be so... (both not willing to give up our modern toys and acting disgusted about them)

Re:Kind of a shame (1)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063812)

And solitude is extinct.

WTF are you talking about? Even if you live in a concrete jungle like Manhattan, solitude is but a few hours away. If you live in a less densely populated area it's probably only a few minutes away. They don't have state and national forests/parks/preserves where you live?

Re:Kind of a shame (1)

fermion (181285) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064170)

I don't think that the situation is this dire. Sure, the high profile places with heavy promotion and profit opportunities are fully exploited. On the other hand highest does not mean most difficult to pursue, especially when every trail has been mapped.

I believe that their are a few high peaks that remain unclimbed. This might make them more important that tall peak. I mean any deity can hide in high peak. It takes a cleaver deity to live in a lower, but well protected, peak.

Also there are a few place on earth, particularly in South America, that are pretty unexplored. Although they are probably just like any other piece of real estate in the area, only the most dire hard explorer is going to go there.

Re:Kind of a shame (1)

wumpus188 (657540) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064676)

Don't worry, there's always K2 [wikipedia.org] and Denali [wikipedia.org] .

YUO FAIL iT (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34063590)

Let's keep to may disturb othEr I ever did. It over to yet another learn what mistakes guys are usually take a look at the people already; i'm of the above Design approach. As

The best thing about climbing Mount Everest... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34063616)

...isn't reaching the top--it's showing everyone online that I did.

New challenge (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063640)

To be the first person to tweet: "On Mt. #Everest #mountain #climbing just reached the #Summit pwn3d. ph3ar m3 n0w n3wbs, for I am l337. Next stop, #Olympus Mons"

Needs to be a Foursquare Check-In Point (1)

Maarx (1794262) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063776)

This absolutely needs to be a Foursquare check-in point.

Foursquare (1)

pckl300 (1525891) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063824)

Joe just checked in to Mount Everest - Summit.

Congratulations (1)

ChrisBader (1232968) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063980)

Congratulations climbers that will die on the trip back down! Now your pictures can be posted to facebook or twitter to proclaim your success and no one can argue that you didn't make it!

Takes Something Away (1)

JimDrewberry (1931370) | more than 3 years ago | (#34063992)

I know it would be good to call relatives from the top and it obviously has safety benefits but having 3G at the top of Everest definitely takes something away from the extremeness and remoteness of climbing the mountain. I know this is over the top but it rings out 'McEverest'. Admittedly it's still a damn hard climb!!

You know its coming... (1)

ivrexpert (1931368) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064080)

the Iphone app might make Everest become a crowded place

GPS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34064198)

Does this mean they get now get GPS access? Might be really useful to help locate people after an accident.

Getting away from it all (1)

nexttech (1289308) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064474)

When people climb Everest they really want to get away from it all. Now they can't

As an NCELL subscriber, all I can say is good luck (1)

herojig (1625143) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064500)

I live in KTM and have NCELL on a smartphone. While they are better then the state-sponsored service, NTC, my advice to tourists going up the Nepali side is to keep their sat phones handy. I'd hate to be trouble up there and get a "Sorry, Network Busy" - as we do all the time down here in the valley.

Won't last a Season (2, Interesting)

dogma2fun4u (1931390) | more than 3 years ago | (#34064756)

Between vandalism and weather the equipment won't last more then a season. On the north side (Chinese side) the only intact equipment is the main terminal at base camp and one additional repeater part way up the mountain (between BC and IBC). All the remaining equipment above IBC and ABC is non-functional, no use to any climbers. It's going to be the same on the Nepal side. http://7tops.com/media/max/1/5059.jpg [7tops.com] http://www.everestnews.com/everest2010/7summitseverest201005272010.htm [everestnews.com]
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