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Fun With an Induction Cooktop?

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the do-try-this-at-home dept.

Toys 147

fishfrys writes "Besides generating heat quickly and efficiently in ferromagnetic pans, what sorts of fun things can you do with an induction cooktop? This seems like a pretty serious piece of electromagnetic equipment — boiling water can't be the only thing it's good for. I went to YouTube, expecting to find all sorts of crazy videos of unsafe induction cooktop shenanigans, but found only cooking. What sort of exciting, if not stupid, physics experiments can be performed with one? Hard drive scrubber? DIY Tesla coil? There's got to be something."

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Lightbulb (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34067514)

An efficient incandescent lightbulb.

Re:Lightbulb (-1, Flamebait)

TrisexualPuppy (976893) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067596)

You can cook food with one. End of story.

Why are all of these pointless, irrelevant questions asked? This site is now worse than Yahoo Answers at the exception of the lame cartoon avatars. Get a job, and get to work. You might find yourself doing something productive.

Re:Lightbulb (2, Informative)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067650)

It's a nerd site. We like to investigate, determine, build and generally fiddle.
The real question is "Why is a boring muggle like you even doing here?"

Re:Lightbulb (0, Redundant)

houghi (78078) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067794)

Asking the question is not being a nerd. He should come up with his own ideas and the tell us what he did. He is not a geek, he is a script kiddie.

Imagine if Linux would have asked Tanenbaum on how to make a good kernel.

Re:Lightbulb (5, Funny)

Dr Caleb (121505) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067860)

Tanenbaum would have said "Holy fuck! A talking Linux!"

Re:Lightbulb (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34068356)

Linus used to call himself "Linux" on the intarwebs back in 1991.

Re:Lightbulb (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34070320)

"Holy fuck! There were talking Linuxes in 1991!"

Re:Lightbulb (5, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068322)

2 things:
1) Asking is how you find a place to start. When I want to create with electronics, I don't do mine copper.

2) Presuming you meant Linus, he asked several people about how to create a kernel. He was taught a foundation of computer science.

Do you think Linus that created a kernel with no knowledge? having never asked an computer science questions?

Re:Lightbulb (2, Funny)

Mikkeles (698461) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068338)

'Imagine if Linux[sic] would have asked Tanenbaum on how to make a good kernel.'

We might have got a good kernel.

(Sorry, I couldn't resist)

Re:Lightbulb (-1, Troll)

clydemaxwell (935315) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067906)

"why is a boring muggle like you even doing here?"
-1 for HP reference, -1 for grammatical failure

Re:Lightbulb (-1, Troll)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068704)

Explain to me what is wrong the Harry Potter.

Grammatical failure isn't -1. Plus, you should clean you're own house before complaining about someone else's grammar.

Re:Lightbulb (0, Offtopic)

webgovernor (1852402) | more than 3 years ago | (#34069328)

"Explain to me what is wrong the Harry Potter."

Are you asking "the Harry Potter" to explain what is wrong, or are you asking "what is wrong *with* Harry Potter?"

-1 for ambiguity

Re:Lightbulb (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34067658)

Or break your cellphone with it, like this guy does [bit.ly]

Re:Lightbulb (5, Informative)

tophermeyer (1573841) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067940)

Can we just go ahead and get a "-1, Goatse" mod option?

Re:Lightbulb (3, Informative)

by (1706743) (1706744) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068126)

Can we just go ahead and get a "-1, Goatse" mod option?

Perhaps we could get /. to display the dereferenced URL instead of bit.ly, etc. -- hardly rocket science (don't click on any of these, obviously...):

user@host:~$ wget -O /dev/null http://bit.ly/d9LffL [bit.ly] 2>&1 | grep -o 'http[^ ]*'
http://bit.ly/d9LffL [bit.ly]
http://goatse.fr/ [goatse.fr]
http://goatse.fr/ [goatse.fr]

user-side answer (w/ Greasemonkey) (3, Informative)

KingAlanI (1270538) | more than 3 years ago | (#34070652)

http://userscripts.org/scripts/show/40582 [userscripts.org]

Here's a user-side answer in the form of a Greasemonkey script... /. could thereotically implement a bit of JS like that server-side (this works with a bunch of URL shorteners)

Re:Lightbulb (2, Informative)

alta (1263) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067962)

WARNING DO NOT CLICK GOATSE

Re:Lightbulb (3, Funny)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068556)

Thanks, but at least provide a full list of things you shouldn't do with goatse:

  • Warning: Pregnant women, the elderly, and children under 10 should avoid prolonged exposure to goatse.
  • Caution: Goatse may suddenly accelerate to dangerous speeds.
  • Goatse contains a liquid core, which, if exposed due to rupture, should not be touched, inhaled, or looked at.
  • Do not use goatse on concrete.
  • Discontinue use of Happy Fun Ball if any of the following occurs:
    • itching
    • vertigo
    • dizziness
    • tingling in extremities
    • loss of balance or coordination
    • slurred speech
    • temporary blindness
    • profuse sweating
    • heart palpitations
  • If goatse begins to smoke, get away immediately. Seek shelter and cover head.
  • Goatse may stick to certain types of skin.
  • When not in use, goatse should be returned to its special container and kept under refrigeration. Failure to do so relieves the makers of goatse, Wacky Products Incorporated, and its parent company, Global Chemical Unlimited, of any and all liability.
  • Ingredients of goatse include an unknown glowing substance which fell to Earth, presumably from outer space.
  • Goatse has been shipped to our troops in Saudi Arabia and is also being dropped by our warplanes on Iraq.
  • Do not taunt goatse.

Re:Lightbulb (1)

Captain Centropyge (1245886) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067678)

Perhaps we should get off your lawn and stop tinkering with this "science" garbage, too? Your name isn't Red Foreman, is it..?

Re:Lightbulb (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34067724)

Feel free to fuck off any time.

Re:Lightbulb (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34067772)

You can cook food with one. End of story.

Why are all of these pointless, irrelevant questions asked? This site is now worse than Yahoo Answers at the exception of the lame cartoon avatars. Get a job, and get to work. You might find yourself doing something productive.

HOW IS BABBY FORMED?

Re:Lightbulb (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34067912)

I was wondering about this myself. How girl get pragnant?

Re:Lightbulb (1)

ThurstonMoore (605470) | more than 3 years ago | (#34070658)

Why is there no -1 Dickhead?

recharge induction-rechargeable devices (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34067530)

so fast they explode?

Yes! (1)

Grapplebeam (1892878) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067532)

Now you can cook chicken with a Tesla Coil! The possibilities are end... well, you're still only cooking things with a tesla coil. Maybe you'll become a master at it and keep the chicken from being horribly burned in the wrong places, or not cooked at all in others. You could be the first man to be arrested for aggressive chicken handling!

Re:Yes! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34067834)

In fact some induction cooking systems aren't very safe.
A 2008 study had shown that it can cause serious harm [bit.ly]

Re:Yes! (1)

EdIII (1114411) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068088)

You could be the first man to be arrested for aggressive chicken handling!

Uhhh, I hate to burst your bubble, but in Texas they are already passed 5 digits for people arrested for Aggressive Chicken Handling. I hear Arkansas has a special prize for the millionth "customer" too.

Of course Virginia is the only state that legalized it.

make aluminum foil burn (5, Interesting)

RealBorg (549538) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067540)

that's what i have found so far. normally you cannot use aluminum on an induction cooktop, probably because a thick layer of aluminum is equally as conductive as the copper inductor in the cooktop, however a thin layer of aluminum can be brought to hover itself away from the cooktop and / or begin to glow if held in place. my cooktop took no damage from trying this but of course - don't try this at home

Re:make aluminum foil burn (4, Informative)

queazocotal (915608) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067972)

For much the same reason - 'magnetic stainless' is typically said to be OK for induction cooking, and 'non-magnetic' not.

This is due to the 'skin depth' (look at wikipedia) being thinner in magnetic materials.

This means that in both steel and iron pans, which are magnetic, in addition to the high resistance of the pan material, the electricity doesn't go very deeply, so it's only passing through a thin skin of the pan.

However - with very thin containers, non-magnetic stainless works just fine.
I regularly heat up a large (non-magnetic) stainless washing up bowl that's maybe 0.5mm thick on my induction cooker.

Any thicker and it doesn't work.

My favourite utensil to use with it is actually a cheap 0.8mm or so thick steel wok.

Heats up in seconds, and once seasoned, is quite non-stick.

My second favourite is a large steel plate 6mm thick, again seasoned.

Re:make aluminum foil burn (1)

noob22 (1749444) | more than 3 years ago | (#34069690)

I regularly heat up a large (non-magnetic) stainless washing up bowl that's maybe 0.5mm thick on my induction cooker.

Washing up bowl? Please explain.

Re:make aluminum foil burn (1)

treeves (963993) | more than 3 years ago | (#34070190)

It's a bowl used for washing up (washing dishes) in. It's a Britishism, AFAIK.

Re:make aluminum foil burn (5, Interesting)

i.am.delf (1665555) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068402)

Once upon a time I worked in a metal foundry. There people used induction furnaces to melt all sorts of alloys for castings. Skin depth is key. If you have tiny skin depth in your material it will take forever for something interesting to happen. Step 1 find an insulating container which will not burn. Glass can work(assuming your metal melts before the glass does) or ceramic is better. Place fun things in it like steel wool. Turn on the coil. Be astounded by steel wool. Aluminum cans are thin enough to melt, but be cautious they can ignite in air and if they do you can be poisoned or otherwise injured by the alumina.

I think it might be fun to use a thin metal implement in a glass bowl to cook something from a hot rod.

Re:make aluminum foil burn (2, Informative)

Prune (557140) | more than 3 years ago | (#34070378)

Uh, first of all, alumina is not toxic to humans as it's quite an inert material (as are many other inorganic oxides in general). It's only dangerous in physical terms if you inhale a quantity of very fine powder. Second, you don't need induction heating to be amazed by steel wool. If you spread it out (reduce the density so it has lots of air within its volume) it is fairly easy to light with a torch and it looks a bit like fireworks.

Drop it (1)

Helpadingoatemybaby (629248) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067552)

...off the roof of a building!

Re:Drop it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34067858)

...but will it blend?

Re:Drop it (1)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | more than 3 years ago | (#34069160)

...off the roof of a building!

Catch It And You Can Keep It!! -- Firesign Theatre

Induction Heating of Block Ice = Glowing Red Hot I (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34067560)

I remember seeing induction heating used to make a block of ice glow red hot.

http://videosift.com/video/Induction-Heating-of-Block-Ice-Glowing-Red-Hot-Ice

Apparently it heats the trace amounts iron inside the ice so this only works with tap water. Not really sure if it would work with an iduction stove top though. Worth a try.

Re:Induction Heating of Block Ice = Glowing Red Ho (2, Interesting)

skids (119237) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067928)

Neat. I imagine their are potential lithography applications. Or you could just inject a BB into an egg and cook it from the inside out for the ultimate in runny whites.

Re:Induction Heating of Block Ice = Glowing Red Ho (1)

RajivSLK (398494) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068098)

Wouldn't the BB just sink to the bottom of the egg? you'd have to suspend it in the middle of the yolk somehow...

Re:Induction Heating of Block Ice = Glowing Red Ho (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34068542)

There is a triangular piece of metal in the ice. It's a demonstration by Huettinger, a manufacturer of induction heaters.

http://www.huettinger.com/en/about-us/multimedia.html

I think water would flash to steam before you got it to glow. Unless it was under enormous pressure I suppose.

Re:Induction Heating of Block Ice = Glowing Red Ho (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068960)

Apparently it heats the trace amounts iron inside the ice so this only works with tap water. Not really sure if it would work with an iduction stove top though. Worth a try.

No offense, but if the ice were this hot, it'd melt and flash into steam. There's probably metal (not just trace amounts) embedded in the ice and that's what's glowing.

water balloon (1)

wasteoid (1897370) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067578)

safer than your hand. modern induction ranges have safety mechanisms to prevent accidentally burning your hands or other non-cooking inductable materials, so you are probably limited to what will be perceived (by the range) as a skillet/pan/pot - large, ferrous surface.

Re:water balloon (4, Informative)

queazocotal (915608) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068140)

Not really.

There is no 'safety mechanism' as such that stops it heating hands.

The coil can safely be energised with no load.
It won't get too hot, or anything, and it won't noticably heat your hand, or a duck, or anything non-metallic.

(well, it would heat graphite blocks and such, but that's cheating).

The reason for the device not turning on with no load is to prevent it heating up forks and other metallic implements that have been placed on the surface.

www.st.com/stonline/books/pdf/docs/12443.pdf

Re:water balloon (1)

Strider- (39683) | more than 3 years ago | (#34069870)

Also, I would assume, rings and jewlery that may be on your hands. Being a Canadian Engineer, I wear an iron ring, though it's non-magnetic now (closer to stainless I suppose) so I don't know how much an induction cooktop would do to it.

Then again, I prefer the primal experience of cooking on a gas flame myself.

Rail gun (1)

rewt66 (738525) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067604)

Hardware modding may be required. Remove ceiling or wall before use. If you try it, on your own head be it - I do not guarantee your safety.

Re:Rail gun (1)

iammani (1392285) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067730)

By that, do you imply that you do guarantee his safety, if he did not try it on his own head?

Re:Rail gun (1)

Surt (22457) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068804)

Sure, guarantee limited to original purchaser of advice, and not heirs or estate.

It's consumer electronics (1)

contra_mundi (1362297) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067618)

It's been carefully designed to be only usable in heating up pans and pots and maybe their contents. Maybe because a friend of mine got one that's so sentive that it sometimes decides his cooking isn't worth heating up!

So's a Microwave, but... (1)

Quantus347 (1220456) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067668)

Its not hard to convert one to a MASER that can boil water, burn wood, or blow up zombie heads at 50 yards or more. Not that Ive tried it of course, that would be dangerous, irresponsible, and possibly illegal. Just sayin'

Re:So's a Microwave, but... (3, Insightful)

goodmanj (234846) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067850)

A microwave oven's power source is not a maser, just like an incandescent light bulb is not a laser.

If you don't understand the distinction, PLEASE don't open up your microwave and try to make a death ray.

Re:So's a Microwave, but... (1)

mujadaddy (1238164) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067982)

The first microwave ovens could cook a turkey in 15 minutes. Do want.

Re:So's a Microwave, but... (1)

steeleyeball (1890884) | more than 3 years ago | (#34069540)

True, If you like rubbery turkey, but they also caused your scrambled eggs to turn kind of a greenish colour.

Re:So's a Microwave, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34068006)

If you don't understand the distinction, PLEASE don't open up your microwave and try to make a death ray.

If I do understand the distinction, then can I make a death ray?

Death rays and logic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34068086)

If you don't understand the distinction, PLEASE don't open up your microwave and try to make a death ray.

If I do understand the distinction, then can I make a death ray?

If you don't understand logic, please don't affirm the consequent.

Re:So's a Microwave, but... (1)

644bd346996 (1012333) | more than 3 years ago | (#34070368)

Yes, but you still can't make it from a microwave oven.

Re:So's a Microwave, but... (1)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 3 years ago | (#34070514)

Erm.. You can make a death ray out of your microwave's magnetron, it doesn't need to be a MASER. You can make a death ray out of an equivalent-power incandescent bulb, too...

Re:So's a Microwave, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34070744)

Please learn to read.

Repulsion coil? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34067638)

Try cutting a large metal "washer" out and placing it on the "burner." This may demonstrate Lenz's second law and cause some violent repulsion . . . although I haven't tried it.

I do know it doesn't work with my gas burners though.

Try whatever you got in the house. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34067640)

Try some unexploded WW2 shells, some walmart bullets, a kid with braces. An arm with a tattoo. A hamster that ingested iron shavings. You were looking for unsafe and stupid things to try, right?

Re:Try whatever you got in the house. (5, Funny)

Dogtanian (588974) | more than 3 years ago | (#34069800)

unexploded WW2 shells, some walmart bullets, a kid with braces. An arm with a tattoo. A hamster that ingested iron shavings.

Raindrops on roses. Whiskers on kittens. Bright copper kettles. Warm woolen mittens. Brown paper packages tied up with strings.

Re:Try whatever you got in the house. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34069918)

Bomb squads and robots. Packages on the curb. Evacuated neighborhoods and trauma centers on standby.

It doesn't rhyme very well but that's what a brown paper package tied up with string will get you. God forbid you leave a big copper kettle sitting out. Somebody would immediately steal it for the cash metal value. Warm mittens would be ignored. The kittens would starve after their mother was hit by a car.

Times change.

sure (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34067680)

Sure there is, me and my brother managed to get pieces of metal red glowing.
We connected our own coil to stuff inside, and any metal object that we put in/on the could started glowing.

remote iPhone volume control (5, Interesting)

guorbatschow (870695) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067684)

Last time I used my induction stove to cook water for noodles, I put the power to max, all the while listening to music on my iphone via headphones. You know, those standard apple headphones with microphone and volume controls. Right when I put the power to max, the music went off. Turns out the volume was set to minimum. So I tried to restore the volume via touch controls, but it went to minimum immediately, again. I already had experience with malfunctioning apple headphones (cable short-circuit) so I unplugged them, which helped. Then I noticed that the proximity to the cooktop had an effect. Apparently the induction pattern induced the same signal in the headphone cables that a volume down would produce...

Anybody with a Bosch induction stove and an iPhone/iPod should try to confirm this.

Re:remote iPhone volume control (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34067864)

In truth it was the AI in the stove commenting on your taste in music. Try it without the Celine Dion next time.

Re:remote iPhone volume control (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34070562)

In truth it was the AI in the stove commenting on your taste in music. Try it without the Celine Dion next time.

Brilliant comment!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Re:remote iPhone volume control (1)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 3 years ago | (#34070576)

But.. Celine Dion [google.com] is an awesome song.

Re:remote iPhone volume control (3, Interesting)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068346)

get a magnet near the headphone wires, and you can control the device.

Re:remote iPhone volume control (1)

bic2k (140221) | more than 3 years ago | (#34070182)

This happens to me with my Kenmore model...

Re:remote iPhone volume control (1)

dangitman (862676) | more than 3 years ago | (#34070778)

Last time I used my induction stove to cook water for noodles

"Cooking" water?

I think the term you are looking for is "heating" or "boiling." When you heat water, and then allow it to cool, it is just the same as water that was never heated. Cooking implies a permanent change to the material that has been cooked. For example, when you cook a raw chicken, and then let it cool, it doesn't revert to being a raw chicken.

Producing high voltages isn't going to work. (3, Informative)

Mike Van Pelt (32582) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067748)

Induction cooktops operate at a frequency of a few tens of kilohertz. Using it to excite a Tesla coil probably can't be made to work, at least, not with a reasonable number of turns on your secondary coil. The coil under the surface of the cooktop has a large number of turns.

(To step up voltage, you want a few turns on the primary, and many times as many turns on the secondary.)

Re:Producing high voltages isn't going to work. (2, Interesting)

Technician (215283) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068046)

Using the coil from a monitor flyback transformer with the powdered iron core removed, the secondary often will have it's voltage rating exceeded in a spectacular display. Be sure to use lots of ventilation.

If you have several old dead monitors, you have a source of these.

Re:Producing high voltages isn't going to work. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34068078)

Tesla coils don't work identically to the typical transformer principle of turns-ratio. The primary source of the voltage gain is from the resonant voltage rise caused by the primary and secondary coils having the same resonant frequency. Additionally, a very large diameter secondary with 2000 turns (16+ inches), and a 36x8 inch diameter toroid could get you under 40kHz. The biggest constraint at this level is input current, and it would take a lot more power than any consumer electronics product could possibly put out.

Re:Producing high voltages isn't going to work. (2, Informative)

Technician (215283) | more than 3 years ago | (#34069144)

A Tesla coil works by a very high primary pulse of current and then it ringing in a LC tank at the same frequency the resonant secondary is. Most inductive cooktops have no tuning to match the resonant frequency of the secondary. Most Tesla coils work on higher resonant frequency than the cooktops due to the nature of the secondary.

One is a non resonant shorted turn and low impedance. The other is high Q and resonant over a very narrow frequency range. Outside of resonance, it is high impedance.

Re:Producing high voltages isn't going to work. (1)

DanRanger (664563) | more than 3 years ago | (#34070336)

Maybe a laptop computer could be charged using half of the U-core of a monitor/TV flyback transformer and a high-speed diode bridge. The 3" waxed HV winding sits like a hockey puck directly on the cooktop's effective 5" surface, without the ferrite core half in between .

Re:Producing high voltages isn't going to work. (2, Interesting)

Prune (557140) | more than 3 years ago | (#34070424)

This is why Tesla coils seem a lousy way to get high voltage. I've bought not-too-large 250 kV transformers from industrial portable X-ray machine power supply on eBay previously and you can chain a few together (in an oil tank, of course) to get in the megavolt range--at significantly higher _continuous_ power levels than with a Tesla coil of the same size. TCs are way oversized for what they accomplish.

This looks like a job for--Mythbusters! (1)

Chaseshaw (1486811) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067898)

sounds like something for the Mythbusters to check out!

Re:This looks like a job for--Mythbusters! (2, Insightful)

SEWilco (27983) | more than 3 years ago | (#34067958)

1. Create a myth about induction cooktops.

Re:This looks like a job for--Mythbusters! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34068012)

2. cut a hole in the induction cooktop

Re:This looks like a job for--Mythbusters! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34068016)

Step 2:

Step 3: Profit!

Mine goes up to 11 ... (3, Informative)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068002)

My stove has levels that go up to 11. It's from Functionica. Whenever I get a visit from someone from the US, who has seen Spinal Tap, I show it to them and they laugh their asses off.

Re:Mine goes up to 11 ... (1)

snspdaarf (1314399) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068250)

At least they don't laugh until they choke to death on someone else's vomit.

Re:Mine goes up to 11 ... (1)

Ogi_UnixNut (916982) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068398)

Yeah well, mine goes up to 12 :P (It does actually, damn Germans)

Re:Mine goes up to 11 ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34069866)

Congratulations! You have been exposed to what passes for the German sense of humor.

And you survived -without having your large intestine leap straight up your neck to choke you and end the misery.

This is no small feat.

Well done sir.

Re:Mine goes up to 11 ... (1)

tom17 (659054) | more than 3 years ago | (#34070600)

Grunthos the flatulent? Is that you?

Re:Mine goes up to 11 ... (3, Interesting)

Idiomatick (976696) | more than 3 years ago | (#34069898)

My stove has a button to 'STOP TIME'! Top that!

Wireless charger (1)

arc86 (1815912) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068104)

Use it to charge 30 Palm Pre's simultaneously. Or vice versa, buy 30 touchstone chargers and use them to cook a nice meal for that special lady in your life.

Here's one (1)

inode_buddha (576844) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068248)

I've seen induction heating used to temper truck axles, among other things. Though I imagine that with minor tweaks you could make one hell of a HERF weapon out of one. Screw up all the cell towers within a few miles, etc. Check ebay for used resturaunt equipment.

Re:Here's one (2, Interesting)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068442)

> ...with minor tweaks you could make one hell of a HERF weapon out of one...

Not likely. These things operate at about 27KHz. On the other hand, you might be able to generate a couple of kilowatts of ultrasound by fabricating a "speaker cone" from a resonant metal disk and some magnets and use it to curdle your brain.

Re:Here's one (2, Interesting)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068460)

I've seen induction heating used to temper truck axles, among other things.

I saw it used in the manufacture of commutators for starter motors:
  - Copper bar bent into circle.
  - Induction heat to orange in about 5 seconds, to weld the joint and take the stresses out of it. Result: Stress-free donut.
  - Smash the donut into shape (segmented hollow top-hat) with dies.
  - Mold plastic into it - to support it and make an insulated press-fit for the shaft).
  - Saw the segments apart.

I've been trying to figure out how to make slip rings for a windmill. Seems like bending, welding, and annealing a copper bar would do the trick. And an induction hot plate ought to be just the ticket for the welding/annealing step.

Re:Here's one (1)

inode_buddha (576844) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068628)

Hi ULR, I've been hanging out on the same board as you, under different nicks... (otherpower.com) as for your copper question, I think you'd be better off with conventional TIG welding due to the inert gas atmosphere - it's very difficult to work copper otherwise. Certainly TIG is much cheaper. Unless you plan mass-production enough to justify the cost of induction machines.

Using it to wipe a harddrive? (1)

Kojiro Ganryu Sasaki (895364) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068332)

Would that work?

Re:Using it to wipe a harddrive? (1)

sjames (1099) | more than 3 years ago | (#34070696)

I'm not sure about the magnetic field, but if the drive gets hot enough, it's wiped :-)

One Experiment to Try (1)

Hoi Polloi (522990) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068446)

Here is one experiment to try, how much can I fool around with an induction cooktop before I hurt myself?

Why So Expensive? (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068802)

Why are induction cooktops so expensive (here in NY)? I understand they're sold cheap in Asia. They don't seem to need to be very expensive.

If they were cheap, they'd be worth using for energy efficiency. But they cost more than the energy savings.

Re:Why So Expensive? (1)

Bigjeff5 (1143585) | more than 3 years ago | (#34070776)

Because they're cool.

Cool shit costs lots of money.

They aren't cool in Asia any more, so they are cheap.

Duh. ;)

Frying Passports (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 3 years ago | (#34068810)

Passports with IC chips in them can have the chips fried by a microwave oven, but it's hard to figure out how much to fry them without burning the passport itself.

Can induction cooktops do it more precisely?

Make Cubic Zirconia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34068870)

Make cubic zirconia [wikipedia.org]

induction charger? (1)

hitmark (640295) | more than 3 years ago | (#34069240)

rig up a matching coil so that the magnetic field can be converted back to electricity and charge a battery powered device.

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