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UK Police To Get Facebook Lessons

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the learn-to-farmville-better dept.

Facebook 63

jhernik writes "The police are to receive training on how to use Facebook and Twitter to catch people committing serious crimes. The National Policing Improvement Agency (NPIA) will overhaul its training modules to include sessions on the social networking sites for detectives. 'This programme is a vital part of the career pathway for detectives and the new training covers sensitive areas of policing where limited guidance existed previously,' said deputy chief constable Nick Gargan, acting head of the NPIA, in a statement to the Press Association. 'These improvements are exactly what detectives need to tackle the challenges and complexities of modern policing effectively,' he added. 'The changes underline the importance to having a national agency to provide guidance and train detectives to a single high standard so they can work on investigations in any part of the country and give their colleagues and the public the best quality service in fighting crime.'"

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Be the first of your friends... (1)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 3 years ago | (#34081698)

"You LIKE this"

Well... (1)

denzacar (181829) | more than 3 years ago | (#34081988)

This new development should have some effect on the reduction of free-roaming individuals mentioned in your sig.

On the other hand, according to mine, actual effects will be purely cosmetic.

Re:Well... (2, Insightful)

GrumblyStuff (870046) | more than 3 years ago | (#34082826)

Funny but it seems that a good portion of those stupid people are either writing laws or enforcing them.

Re:Well... (1)

cheekyjohnson (1873388) | more than 3 years ago | (#34082936)

Did you just question authority figures? Everyone (except for terrorists and juvenile delinquents, of course) knows that authority figures are always right and should never be questioned!

Re:Well... (1)

GrumblyStuff (870046) | more than 3 years ago | (#34083422)

Nah, just their puppets.

I'd beg to differ... (1)

denzacar (181829) | more than 3 years ago | (#34083930)

IMHO, those writing "stupid" laws rarely posses the necessary level of stupidity required for creating SUCH levels of fuckup.
Laws like that are more often the result of naivete and incompetence/ignorance than stupidity or malice.
And it would be rather difficult for a person with such qualities to single-handedly come into position where he/she would be able to create laws.

ALSO, laws tend not to be written or passed by a single person.
So, the "stupidity" doesn't have to be the product of one person or even a small group.
In the long run, the responsibility for such laws lies with that group of people we refer to as "citizens".
Particularly the ones on the right side of the IQ curve. You know... the "smart" and educated ones.
Either for letting such laws pass or for not challenging them later - they are the ones responsible.

As for those who enforce such laws, you can't really suggest that they should pick and choose which laws they should enforce and which not, right?
Cause it is not just their job to enforce them, but a LEGAL OBLIGATION as well.

Re:I'd beg to differ... (2, Interesting)

GrumblyStuff (870046) | more than 3 years ago | (#34084542)

Ok, ok. Let me amend my statement.

Funny but it seems that a good portion of those stupid people are either in charge of creating laws or enforcing them.

Ok, yeah, that still doesn't quite get it.

Laws like that are more often the result of naivete and incompetence/ignorance than stupidity or malice.

I don't think it's naivete or incompetence but definitely ignorance, greed, or maliciousness.

Consider this: It's naive to think DRM won't negatively affect legitimate purchasers and will stop piracy but it's incompetent to outlaw breaking DRM and malicious to shut down internet connections based on mere accusations of piracy.

And, I will say outright that malicious (or at least sociopathic greed) is at play in Arizona where private prison companies helped draft Senate Bill 1070. Link [npr.org]

Oh, and there's red light cameras, too. Those in charge of enforcing the law shortened the yellow lights which resulted in an increase of rear end accidents and they did just to make a buck.

The law feels (or at least appears) to be written in black&white terms but it's a colorful world. There should be room for discretion and leniency as well as shame and punishment. You might say that that's already a problem as people on the bottom of the financial totem pole get hammered by the law while people on top have their lawyers apologize and they go about their merry ways and I would agree with you. And, frankly, I don't really have a solution short of bringing back 1950's tax rates since those with wealth and power use that wealth and power to influence elections and lawmakers to gain ever more.

Cause it is not just their job to enforce them, but a LEGAL OBLIGATION as well.

Talk about trying hard to keep people from doing any thinking on their own. They can just keep that in mind every time they need to decide how moral it is to bust a college kid for smoking pot and getting his federal aid revoked.

Re:I'd beg to differ... (1)

denzacar (181829) | more than 3 years ago | (#34092424)

Consider this: It's naive to think DRM won't negatively affect legitimate purchasers and will stop piracy but it's incompetent to outlaw breaking DRM and malicious to shut down internet connections based on mere accusations of piracy.

Please.
If anyone, RIAA and its cohorts have shown us how truly malicious they can actually be - when they REALLY get into it.
Every single one of their acts reeks with incompetence first and foremost.
Sure, their final motives can be perceived as malicious when you take any point of view other than "making money for people who employ them" but they are so bad at even sticking to that.

There should be room for discretion and leniency as well as shame and punishment.
You might say that that's already a problem as people on the bottom of the financial totem pole get hammered by the law while people on top have their lawyers apologize and they go about their merry ways and I would agree with you.

Oh, the problem's been brewing for a long time now and it is only now that stories about rich people "getting away with it" spread so quickly that the public is getting SOME idea of how all that legal-mumbo-jumbo deal REALLY works.
Just as you are now practically illiterate if you don't know your way at least around a word processor and a web browser - it is finally becoming obvious that "legal rights" only apply to those with knowledge of those rights i.e. have money for legal representation or are educated in legal matters AND have the resources to pursue those "rights".
And still they are likely to lose unless they have money - as money can pay for more than just lawyers.
I.e. You have no rights unless you are willing to fight for them AND KNOW HOW TO DO IT. Anyway, Carlin said it nicely... [youtube.com]

Again, fault lies with the people/citizens/voters.
They are the ones voting in and keeping voting in people who come up with such laws, and not raising up against such laws to have them overturned.

Discretion (2, Interesting)

WarJolt (990309) | more than 3 years ago | (#34081714)

Perhaps people will stop posting incriminating evidence, but something tells me those photos of people plastered aren't going away.

Re:Discretion (3, Insightful)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 3 years ago | (#34081832)

Police catch people, because people are dumb. It's not going to change.

Re:Discretion (2, Funny)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 3 years ago | (#34081882)

Dark Helmet? Is that you?

Re:Discretion (1)

sosaited (1925622) | more than 3 years ago | (#34085830)

Police catch people, because people are dumb. It's not going to change.

So that means when Police fail to catch them, they were either the likes of Stephen Hawking, or there have been lots of dumb recruitments in the force.

Re:Discretion (1)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 3 years ago | (#34095774)

No it means that they get lucky. Catching criminals is all about a criminal making mistakes so you can follow them. The dumber they are, the easier.

Re:Discretion (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34084874)

This is completely pointless in criminal terms. The UK is already the greatest "monitoring" state in the history of the world, especially London. They don't bother to look at the videos or computer data for ordinary crime, such as stolen luggage, ordinary street crimes, or even rape. They're not competent enough or organized to connect the dots and actually track a suspect, despite what you may see on Torchwood. Its "criminal" use is for what are really civil offenses: leaving your garbage cans out too late, leaving your pub open too late, or carrying tools to your car and leaving for the day when you're on medical disability.

There's a reason that "1984" was set in England: they've been like this for a long time. And there's a reason why "Brazil" is so funny and terrifying at the same time if you're from England. I had never realized that an incompetent police state could be so much scarier than a competent one until I tried living in England and registering a car.

Its a good thing (1)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 3 years ago | (#34081736)

That this method can't be foiled by simply changing the privacy settings or... say... not posting this sort of evidence in there.

Hey, maybe this'll encourage people to actually take privacy seriously. I'm pretty sure this'll never happen.

Re:Its a good thing (2, Insightful)

mysidia (191772) | more than 3 years ago | (#34082212)

That this method can't be foiled by simply changing the privacy settings or... say... not posting this sort of evidence in there.

They should still catch people who take those precautions, it will just require more time and resources.

But part of the job of police is to catch perps as quickly as possible, and that includes investigating the fruitful types of avenues that are easiest to investigate first. Most criminals are stupid and if joined to a social network will reveal some HINT authorities could use, such as their location at X, so searching FBs raises the bar on the "perfect crime", whatever that is.

Facebook/social network investigation should be among the easiest, and can easily be automated, especially if the social network provider has a policy of assisting authorities, and especially if they can combine this with info from cell companies -- such as the location of various FB/Twitter users when they posted their tweets.

Posting something completely innocuous could still flag the perp, if it revealed their location close to the crime scene, for example, at an unusual time. Even if their update didn't discuss their location.... the social network provider knows when the update was posted, and their cell phone company will know where their device was located, when the post was made.

"private settings" do no good, with the legal burden needed for police to require cooperation as low as it is. The burden of proof is not probable cause, it's much easier to require a third party to cooperate, since no warrant is needed. One of the differences is broad 'fishing expeditions' are legal and allowed, because the information posted "in private" is in the hands of a third party.

Re:Its a good thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34084140)

Thanks for explaining why the soon to be migration of Internet providers from western countries.
If it doesn't help the company make money, it is parasitic
companies with the lowest number of parasites will beat all other companies
facebook/twitter whatever must have lawyers on staff to refuse frivolous request or be seen as part of the government establishment
the exodus already happened for online gambling in the early days, the second exodus is well underway
if the us disconnects from the world Internet with the kill switch, the remainder of the world would be happy
reality sucks when you discover that you really aren't all that important, and your beliefs and policys end up on the discount rack with all the Elvis cds

Right... (2, Insightful)

mrsteveman1 (1010381) | more than 3 years ago | (#34081746)

"serious crimes" like uploading a picture of your friend smoking weed, or your "5 days shy of 18" girlfriend in her underwear.

Re:Right... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34081794)

"serious crimes" like uploading a picture of your friend smoking weed, or your "5 days shy of 18" girlfriend in her underwear.

This is the UK - age of consent is 16. I doubt anyone is going to object to pictures of your 17 year old girlfriend. Unless she's really ugly or something I guess.

Re:Right... (2, Insightful)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 3 years ago | (#34081814)

"I doubt anyone is going to object to pictures of your 17 year old girlfriend"

The girlfriend might have a thing or two to say.

Don't worry about that. (4, Funny)

denzacar (181829) | more than 3 years ago | (#34081880)

She'll calm down once he sends her some shit for her farm.

Re:Don't worry about that. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34087094)

hahaha

Re:Right... (5, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#34082012)

The age of consent is 16 in many places in the US too. It's still illegal to take explicit pictures of anyone under 18. Fuck her all you want, but take a picture and you're going to jail.

dumb people call radio shows and say they rob bank (2, Interesting)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 3 years ago | (#34082040)

Some dumb people have called radio shows and say they robed a bank. So you can want to be able to use that in court and not have the case drooped as the cop did not do things right in getting the evidence.

Re:dumb people call radio shows and say they rob b (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34082182)

Some dumb people have called radio shows and say they robed a bank.

I'd like to see that - it'd have to be a pretty big robe. Was there a wizard hat too?

So you can want to be able to use that in court and not have the case drooped as the cop did not do things right in getting the evidence.

Yeah, it's always embarrasing when your case starts to droop.

Re:dumb people call radio shows and say they rob b (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34082664)

>I'd like to see that - it'd have to be a pretty big robe. Was there a wizard hat too?

Sounds like a room of requirement would be more useful than a talking hat

Re:dumb people call radio shows and say they rob b (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34082992)

That must have taken a lot of fabric. No wonder the bank's tailor called in to a radio show to brag.

Re:Right... (2, Informative)

jo_ham (604554) | more than 3 years ago | (#34083686)

Weed really isn't a huge deal in the UK, where this story is from. If a cop catches you with some, they will "arrest and then de-arrest" you at the side of the road/in the pub/wherever you are and give you a street caution for it, then just confiscate the stuff. If you clearly have enough to be a dealer, they will arrest you properly. Having enough for personal use on you is just not all that serious at all - the cops just don't have the time to be dealing with that petty crap.

Re:Right... (1)

kwbauer (1677400) | more than 3 years ago | (#34084066)

From some of the articles I've read the cops in the UK don't seem to have the time to much of anything because all crimes seem to be fairly petty including armed robbery and mugging, etc. Although, they do seem to have time to arrest those defending themselves from such as serious criminals. The UK view of "Crime and Punishment" is as ridiculous as anywhere else; just for different reasons.

Re:Right... (2, Informative)

jo_ham (604554) | more than 3 years ago | (#34084128)

Was that in the British press?

That well known source of objective coverage of UK events.

It's really not as bad as the Daily Fail and others like to make out.

Re:Right... (0, Troll)

kwbauer (1677400) | more than 3 years ago | (#34084426)

not really as bad

usually means that it sometimes is that bad. Articles from various sources, US and UK. Also from some US citizens living in the UK. Like signs discouraging people from entering certain corridors in hospitals saying stuff like "High crime area - enter at own risk.

We have areas like that in the US (usually whole sections of cities) but we tend not to advertise the fact that we have just given up. Everybody just assumes we have but we don't advertise it that openly.

Re:Right... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34084954)

Where do you think they get their pot? When it's a party weekend, they just go round up a few of the "Usual Suspects". Let's face it, those tiny little unarmed wankers are too frightened to go buy their own. Why do you think they grab 15 of the pint-size pipsqueaks to "arrest" a man having seizuers in a store? I saw this once, anyone competent would have cleared the space and protected his head. They were more worried about crowd control than actually keeping the poor bastard from cracking his skull open and bleeding out on the carpet, and they weren't good at crowd control, either. I had to lie and say I'm a doctor to get to him. (I'm an experienced orderly from a psychiatric ward: I see a lot of seizures.)

After he came out of the seizure, and someone licensed to practice in the UK showed up, and I gave them what information I could, I had a quiet word with one of the street officers who arrived late and seemed competent, then I evaporated because I'm not licensed there. I walked through a door marked "do not enter" and evaporated. It's amazing what you can get away with in England if you're fearless. Do watch out for the cameras, but if they can't sell pictures of you with Amy Winehouse, they're not interested.

But they were the *smallest* police people I've ever seen. Not one of them over 5'10", most of them under 5'6". You expect these people to aggressively pursue anyone actually performing a violent crime, even a domestic violence scene? No, no, much too risky. They'd rather stay in the office watching videos of people parking illegally and fining people for not paying the television tax.

I can see it now (1)

Master Moose (1243274) | more than 3 years ago | (#34081830)

@Criminal ur nicked

News at 11 (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 3 years ago | (#34081856)

People are stupid and the law uses that against them. News at 11.
 

A picture doesn't prove anything... (3, Insightful)

moxley (895517) | more than 3 years ago | (#34081936)

Unless it's clearly child porn -

But it's total bullshit if any cops anywhere think they can arrest people for looking drunk, or being seen in a photo with a bottle of booze even if they're underage - or a photo of someone smoking something out of a bong or pipe - there is no way they could prove what the substance was, and while I am not sure about the UK, in the US our legal system hasn't eroded to that point yet, I am sure it probably will as we continue our descent into fascism and away from the rule of law.

it's bad enough that people think that the system works how it oes on TV and it's a hell of a rude awakening when you find out just how ridiculously fucked up it really is as it stands now.

Re:A picture doesn't prove anything... (4, Insightful)

Shimbo (100005) | more than 3 years ago | (#34082360)

There's more to being a detective than finding evidence that would be admissible in court. Social networking is likely a good place to find useful leads, or might be solid enough to obtain a search warrant.

Re:A picture doesn't prove anything... (-1, Troll)

LittleBigScript (618162) | more than 3 years ago | (#34082510)

There's more to being a detective than finding evidence that would be admissible in court.

Agreed. Detectives are required to manufacture evidence such as signed confessions gotten through intimidation and outright lying.

Re:A picture doesn't prove anything... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34082568)

"But it's total bullshit if any cops anywhere think they can arrest people for looking drunk, or being seen in a photo with a bottle of booze even if they're underage - or a photo of someone smoking something out of a bong or pipe - there is no way they could prove what the substance was, and while I am not sure about the UK, in the US our legal system hasn't eroded to that point yet, I am sure it probably will as we continue our descent into fascism and away from the rule of law."

I'm sorry, but that was the most egregiously run-on sentence I have seen in a long time.

Re:A picture doesn't prove anything... (2, Informative)

sunderland56 (621843) | more than 3 years ago | (#34082974)

Try googling for "suspended for picture on facebook". You'll be surprised.

Re:A picture doesn't prove anything... (1)

shentino (1139071) | more than 3 years ago | (#34085320)

Not to mention that someone can always frame you with some clever hacking.

If someone can plant kiddie porn on your PC, imagine how easy it will be to plant it on your FB account.

Re:A picture doesn't prove anything... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34083596)

They can just offer the accused the standard deal: Either plead guilty right now and get a lenient sentence, suspended, or fight the charge in court - in which case they may win or lose, but if they do lose the police will try to make sure they are sent to prison for as long as possible.

Re:A picture doesn't prove anything... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34083706)

But it's total bullshit if any cops anywhere think they can arrest people for looking drunk, or being seen in a photo with a bottle of booze even if they're underage - or a photo of someone smoking something out of a bong or pipe - there is no way they could prove what the substance was, and while I am not sure about the UK, in the US our legal system hasn't eroded to that point yet, I am sure it probably will as we continue our descent into fascism and away from the rule of law.

Wow. All this is a story about how cops are going to be taught about what Facebook is and how it works (and in another country, no less!) - and that's enough to make you wax paranoid about "our descent into fascism"? Dude, you really need to take a chill pill, and perhaps see a doctor.

Re:A picture doesn't prove anything... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34084020)

I think people are getting the wrong end of the stick. This isn't to catch people for petty offences, it'll be used to do things like check alibis, see who people are in contact with "I don't know the bloke!" "But you're a friend on Facebook, sir", etc.

People have been arrested here in the UK for showing guns in their Facebook profiles, stupid things like that. There's even the guy who famously escaped from prison (or while on bail or somesuch) and brazenly posted on Facebook for a good week or two.

Social engineering is a seriously powerful tool, anyone who has done a bit of Facebook stalking should know just how much you can get from someone just by flicking through their profile (even if much of it is stealthed). The only real protection is to have a non-searchable, friends-only profile page and limit what you put on it. That doesn't stop your friends (who have considerably laxer security on their pages) posting pictures of you at a party where someone got stabbed and you claimed to be nowhere near it.

Same with Twitter. People commonly post things like "train is late, as usual" - but the defendant says he was at home in his living room at that time?

So no, getting people for drinking underage (let's be honest, hard to prove given that ages can be faked on there) or smoking week (again, prove it's pot? pretty hard). This is for building up bigger pictures surrounding serious crimes.

Naw (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34081960)

Naw, that can't be right. You'd have to teach them to be able to read first.

I thought /. was fast... (1)

thaddeusthudpucker (1082657) | more than 3 years ago | (#34081964)

...but I heard this on the RADIO two days ago. But anyway, if you're stupid enough to rob a bank or whatever and then update your facebook or twitter status "i just robbed a bank lol" then you deserve whats coming. I only bother with facebook about once every two weeks, and I find twitter to be absolutely useless.

Re:I thought /. was fast... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34082044)

i agree with @thaddeusthudpucker. #twitter is useless

Re:I thought /. was fast... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34082122)

I haven't found a single use for twitter yet.

Uh oh. (4, Funny)

Interoperable (1651953) | more than 3 years ago | (#34082186)

I hope they don't find the bodies that I buried on my Farmville.

Re:Uh oh. (1)

The Wild Norseman (1404891) | more than 3 years ago | (#34083584)

I hope they don't find the bodies that I buried on my Farmville.

"Yes, your honor, we not only have a confession from Mr. Interoperable about his multiple murders, but we have conclusive proof of his Wars with the Mafia."

Hmmm... (2, Funny)

hahn (101816) | more than 3 years ago | (#34082442)

When I read this summary, why does it read like a description of a South Park episode?

Are They Really That Stupid (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34082462)

Who needs Facebook training? Are the police so stupid they can't figure out how to use Facebook?

Re:Are They Really That Stupid (4, Insightful)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 3 years ago | (#34083056)

Maybe its more like How to use FB without destroying your case or How to use the special police interfaces into FB.

Re:Are They Really That Stupid (4, Informative)

RobertLTux (260313) | more than 3 years ago | (#34083732)

covering such things as
1 beginning a chain of evidence (and keeping it intact)
2 creating a useable record of the page(s)
3 how to get the info you need without blowing your cover or tripping the entrapment trap
4 properly citing the pages in reports

ect

But maybe it might work...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34082520)

There are all sorts of hypothetical counter examples which have not yet happened, meanwhile we have oxygen thieves like this guy, posting these sorts of messages (apologies for the long picture, nicked it from elsewhere.)

http://img185.imageshack.us/img185/5817/lancecolelol.png

They wouldn't suggest it if there weren't SOME kind of benefits.

lazy cops (1)

Nyder (754090) | more than 3 years ago | (#34083154)

Dang, the cops are so lazy in the UK they don't even walk a beat

or

Damn, the cops are so cool in the UK because they like to surf.

okay, sorry, i would be funnier, but i got arrested for a pic of me smoking weed on facebook and the cops came over and "confiscated" my stash.

Re:lazy cops (1)

jo_ham (604554) | more than 3 years ago | (#34083696)

UK cops really don't care about personal use of weed. They'll take it off you if they find it on you during the course of a search for another offence (a weapons check, for example), but they aren't going to specifically go after you for it. Just not worth the time.

People announce serious crime on twitter now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34083534)

Meet outside Main Street Bank at 5 tomorrow for #bankjob. LOL. BYO Shotgun and SWAG bag!

Trolling For Fun & Profit? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34084304)

Hmmm.

I see an outstanding opportunity for trolling.

1. Create anon/pseudonymous account.
2. Use proxies and disposable email accounts.
3. Go data mining for undercover cops.
4. Track them, then notify everyone they add as a friend that they're a cop.

Hmmmm...

*clicks Post Anonymously*

I can't find anything on Google about it being illegal to reveal an undercover cop as such, but that doesn't mean they won't try to come after you.

List them as a friend (1)

sempir (1916194) | more than 3 years ago | (#34085864)

Wonder how that would work!

Translation of article (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34087186)

NPIA tries to sound relevant after that it's been announced that they will be scrapped alongside many other "qango"s. Mentioning twitter and facebook guaranteed to get coverage in "old" media also trying to sound still relevant.

We know what you did, we read about it on Facebook (1)

joelville (1180631) | more than 3 years ago | (#34088206)

This summer I was working in Yellowstone National Park as a waiter. After my boss was sacked he left his car behind in the parking lot where it sat for weeks. Spotting an opportunity to improve my truck's antiquated radio player I asked former boss, on Facebook, if I could have his car's cd player. He said sure!. Actually he said, "Awesome, Go Mengele on the old girl!" Two weeks later I'm called into my employers office and met by two Park Police Officers, who say, "We know what you did, we read about it on Facebook." I had no clue what they were talking about, as it turns out they were trying to scare me with a vandalism charge as leverage to give them my former boss's contact information, so they could charge him with abandoning his car.

YHGTBFKM (1)

almitchell (1237520) | more than 3 years ago | (#34088410)

Someone please help me here, are people really so dumb? They're having to be taught how to use Facebook? Hell, an *un*trained monkey could use it! Oh, wait...these are probably people who proudly trumpet "I'm so not technical!" when faced with a modem that needs to be reset or "the internet is broken". How do these people drive cars or work ATM machines? How have they not died in household accidents? And these are *POLICE*!?

A criminal's Journal in Facebook (1)

ovette_pta (1930698) | more than 3 years ago | (#34088870)

Just a funny thought, maybe they also need learn about Mafia Wars too. But seriously I think this is actually a good idea. Some crimes are even commited right inside Facebook like blackmailing.

Like

Added as friend

=)

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  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>