Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Typewriter Hacked To Play Zork

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the old-school dept.

Classic Games (Games) 77

UgLyPuNk writes "Typewriters that can type by themselves are one thing. Typewriters that can type by themselves and play Zork are totally different — the stuff that dreams are made of (at least the dreams of little girls who spent hours in front of a Commodore 64 telling the machine to GO NORTH and such)."

cancel ×

77 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Ugherman (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34090606)

This article... it made my cheeks become very bootyassious!

No words required, see link for pic. (4, Informative)

kheldan (1460303) | more than 3 years ago | (#34090636)

Re:No words required, see link for pic. (3, Informative)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091286)

No sir. It's a legitimate mechanical typewriter, not a teletype. The disappointment you are looking for is in that it's Arduino-controlled, instead of having been mechanically engineered to actually play the game. This is confusing because Slashdot summaries usually mention the Arduino if they have the chance. But I guess the drive to be blatantly wrong in TFS is more powerful than the drive to plug nerdy products.

Re:No words required, see link for pic. (1)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 3 years ago | (#34092762)

Also all the more impressive due to it being an all-mechanical typewriter controlled by an Arduino, as opposed to, say, an IBM Selectric with a built-in RS-232 interface, which would make it as easy as playing Zork over a modem. Well, with a translation table from ASCII to control code for the golfball print head (and avoidance of unsupported characters).

Not that a Selectric typewriter isn't a fascinating design in itself.

Re:No words required, see link for pic. (1)

kheldan (1460303) | more than 2 years ago | (#34102588)

I didn't "say" anything, I posted a link to a picture, which you interpreted any way that pleased you; don't put words in my mouth.

Re:No words required, see link for pic. (1)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 2 years ago | (#34103210)

I would tend to say that the karma you ended up with (100% informative, no insightful!) suggests that it wasn't read that way. Hopefully you can forgive me for making the same mistake that three moderators did, and will consider changing what you consider to be clear communication.

Re:No words required, see link for pic. (1)

kheldan (1460303) | more than 2 years ago | (#34105820)

Wow. Some experiments go better than others.

Re:No words required, see link for pic. (1)

EWAdams (953502) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091472)

Seriously... why would you hack up a mechanical typewriter when a mechanical teleprinter already exists? Unless you want lower case, that is. :)

Re:No words required, see link for pic. (1)

Suzuran (163234) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091644)

Later model teletypes had lower-case letters. Mine even has graphics printing capability.

Re:No words required, see link for pic. (1)

RollingThunder (88952) | more than 3 years ago | (#34092736)

Probably because the mechanical typewriters are plentifully available, but an ASR-33 in working order is a bit harder to find.

Suspended (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34090672)

Far better. Creepier. Spooky even. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspended

Re:Suspended (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091508)

Whats even creepier than that, playing Eliza or connecting to IRC...

What's so bad about IRC on a tty? (1)

Suzuran (163234) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091582)

I've been on IRC with a teletype before. It's not anything new or unusual.

I used to have one of these... (2, Informative)

noidentity (188756) | more than 3 years ago | (#34090680)

...though we called it a "printer". Also, are there any pictures of the thing from the front? Not everyone has the ability to view videos. All I can see are some internals pictures on the project page.

No You Didn't ... (4, Interesting)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 3 years ago | (#34090796)

...though we called it a "printer". Also, are there any pictures of the thing from the front? Not everyone has the ability to view videos. All I can see are some internals pictures on the project page.

Printers don't generally accept feedback. I know you can't view the video but what you see is a typewriter (with the keys moving) typing out the opening to Zork and then the user issuing it a few commands on the same typewriter keys that then come back to life and respond. This level of interaction is unique and I've never seen a "printer" with that sort of functionality. If you're interested in how it displays the output:

computer to Arduino (via USB); Arduino to shift registers; shift registers to MOSFETs; MOSFETs to solenoids; solenoids to keys.

And to acquire input flattened resistors are placed beneath each key and are converted into a serialized device signal to the computer via USB. Not exactly earth shattering work but for the hobbyist that likes to see clever hacks and remembers Zork, it's a grin achieving piece of work.

Re:No You Didn't ... (1)

Cstryon (793006) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091404)

Kind of reminds me of Fringe! Except there are no mirrors, or windows to alternate universes. Ah I love nerdy stuff!

Re:No You Didn't ... (1)

wiredlogic (135348) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091456)

This level of interaction is unique and I've never seen a "printer" with that sort of functionality.

Before CRTs became commonplace it was routine to interact with a computer through a teletype. That is the primary reason for the terseness of the standard unix commands. Line editors like ed are much less opaque when your command input is being recorded on paper.

Re:No You Didn't ... (1)

BitterOak (537666) | more than 3 years ago | (#34093012)

This level of interaction is unique and I've never seen a "printer" with that sort of functionality.

Before CRTs became commonplace it was routine to interact with a computer through a teletype. That is the primary reason for the terseness of the standard unix commands. Line editors like ed are much less opaque when your command input is being recorded on paper.

The very first time I ever played a text adventure was Dungeon on a DECwriter hardcopy terminal. I kept the printouts for some time after that, but I'm afraid by now, they've been lost. I was about 8 years old at the time, and it was at an open house at the university in the town where I grew up. I remember my dad having to drag me away. It was several years later before I had a chance to play a text adventure again. (A stripped down version of Adventure on a Commodore PET with 8K of RAM.) I remember what a luxury it seemed several years later to play Zork on a Commodore 64.

Re:No You Didn't ... (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091480)

This level of interaction is unique and I've never seen a "printer" with that sort of functionality.

I have, it's called a "teletype console", and it's old, old tech. It's a cool hack, but it's nothing new.

Re:No You Didn't ... (1)

noidentity (188756) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091634)

Printers don't generally accept feedback. I know you can't view the video but what you see is a typewriter (with the keys moving) typing out the opening to Zork and then the user issuing it a few commands on the same typewriter keys that then come back to life and respond.

Nifty, so it's a teletype. Odd this word wasn't used in the article headline, as you'd think any real computer geek would know what that is.

Re:No You Didn't ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34092072)

Apparently (according to some comments above), it's not.

Re:I used to have one of these... (1)

Suzuran (163234) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091088)

No, we called a Teletype. TTY for short.

Better link for the video (4, Informative)

Monkey-Man2000 (603495) | more than 3 years ago | (#34090682)

At least for me: http://vimeo.com/16311288 [vimeo.com]

Re:Better link for the video (1)

transfatfree (1920462) | more than 3 years ago | (#34090904)

thanks, i was a bit confused when the vid in the article played "how to make a sock zombie"..

Fringe TV Show (0, Offtopic)

gustgr (695173) | more than 3 years ago | (#34090704)

This is nothing compared to Fringe's typewriter hacked to communicate with a parallel universe through a mirror.

Fringe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34090788)

Now we have a teletype to the other side!

So basically (1)

Monkeedude1212 (1560403) | more than 3 years ago | (#34090816)

Instead of the Screen for the input and output they turned it to a piece of paper - which takes longer so it's not entirely practical.

That being said, if this were around when Typewriters were still used widespread - this might have helped some people transition to computers.

However, the more I think about games like that I used to play, and how frustrating it was trying to convey what it is you wanted to do while sticking to the constraints of their input language... I mean coupled with how long it takes for the Typewriter to reply "I didn't understnad that. Try typing HELP if you need help" This might just be a massive waste of paper.

In my day though - I didn't play too many text only games, mine were usually coupled with some form of graphics and arrow keys movement, like Adventures of Hugo and Kings Quest. I remember ONE text only game I played when I was 5 or 6 - and I kept getting hit by a Bus or a car or something when I tried to cross the street. I mean when you're 5 or 6 you think "Maybe if I walk east and west back and forth a few times, the bus will have passed by then... No... Well maybe I'll try doing something else... Okay - maybe NOW I can cross that street". I wish I could remember the name of the game... Or even anything else to do with it. Man memory is so weird sometimes.

Re:So basically (1)

bmo (77928) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091102)

The point wasn't efficiency or practicality there.

The point was to make a piece of art, which is what this is.

If the person wanted to do "just" a paper terminal, one could probably find (well maybe not, it's been a while) a paper TTY (like an ASR33 or 43) to just plug into a serial port to USB adaptor and play Zork that way.

But that wouldn't be interesting, or fun. Reinventing an ASR33 through off-the-shelf components plus a used typewriter is.

--
BMO

context (1)

justforgetme (1814588) | more than 3 years ago | (#34099114)

Indeed, while hopelessly impractical and rough to common standards as a tool or game it still is very very cool as a statement! of course if you look at it from an 'ease of use' , 'gameplay' or 'previous art' standpoint it really isn't much. Interaction is very slow, gameplay is outdated and tty existed since ancient Greece. But this isn't a game nor is it a patent application. It's just a knowledgeable pal hacking on a typewriter for hours on some Sunday afternoon because he just could and maybe nostalgia drove him to. Therefore it's a statement and a cool one at that ;-)

Re:So basically (1)

Schadrach (1042952) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091144)

Heh, the only text adventures I really played heavily were the so called Time & Magik trilogy. I remember playing enough to beat 2/3 (Lords of Time and Red Moon), but I'd always get killed, age to death, or go insane trying to get through the Price of Magik.

Re:So basically (3, Insightful)

Abcd1234 (188840) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091232)

Instead of the Screen for the input and output they turned it to a piece of paper - which takes longer so it's not entirely practical.

Holy christ... you can tell how far Slashdot has fallen, as far as "News for Nerds" goes, when people are criticizing the *practicality* of something *truly* nerdy.

Re:So basically (3, Funny)

jrobot (1239050) | more than 3 years ago | (#34095098)

Waste is the highest virtue one can achieve in an advanced capitalist society. The fact that this guy bought paper from Canada and wasted vast quantities playing Zork put an extra spin in the global economy, and that extra spin lifted capitalism to yet greater heights. If you put an end to all the waste, mass panic would ensue and the global economy would go haywire. Waste is the fuel of contradiction, and contradiction activates the economy, and an active economy creates more waste.

Trek? Roguelikes? (3, Informative)

bughunter (10093) | more than 3 years ago | (#34090870)

My very first computer game was TREK.BAS, hosted on a city hall computer and played on a DecWriter paper terminal hidden in a janitor's closet at my St. Petersburg, FL middle school.

Why the janitor's closet? Because that's where they could get to a phone line.

This machine could replicate that experience.

(OK, well, you'd have to pour some ammonia and pine sol on it, to really take me back, but I'm talking about the game...)

Why ? ... (2, Insightful)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 3 years ago | (#34090884)

No, not why did they do it - that part is obvious. Rather, why did they write such a short meaningless summary and then embed a flash 10 video in it? The website is damned close to worthless for anyone who isn't running the latest flash.

Flash 10 (1)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091078)

Flash 10 has been around for ages, and older versions of Flash are filled with known exploits. I can't think of a good reason why you'd want to keep an older version of Flash, unless you really want some malware.

You can make the argument that we should abandon Flash and go straight HTML5, except most people aren't running browsers with proper HTML5 support yet. If you think demanding people have Flash 10 is asking people to be needlessly up-to-date, requiring a HTML5 browser is even more so.

Re:Flash 10 (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 3 years ago | (#34092662)

Flash 10 has been around for ages

Which doesn't change the fact that it doesn't work well with a lot of systems. Even current hardware on certain operating systems cannot run flash 10 very well; for that matter flash 10 is so absurdly CPU intensive that it really can't be said to run that well on modern hardare with recent microsoft or apple OSes, either.

I can't think of a good reason why you'd want to keep an older version of Flash, unless you really want some malware.

I can think of plenty of worthwhile systems that are incapable of running flash 10. And plenty of other systems that are so crippled by flash 10 to make it not worth running on them, either.

If you think demanding people have Flash 10 is asking people to be needlessly up-to-date, requiring a HTML5 browser is even more so.

It isn't so much about what is up-to-date as what is worthwhile in terms of requirements. If all they want to do is show a video, they don't need any version of flash to do that - a lot of shitty webmasters all over the world seem to have forgotten that. And likely they could have done a good job of describing a lot of it without a video at all; they instead took the easy way out and skipped text in favor of video (or whatever else they are doing with flash).

So while it would be great to see flash disappear completely, immediately, forever, in favor of HTML5, they most likely did something that they could have done with HTML4. And every browser that is currently available for displaying web pages with graphics can do HTML4, without any plugin nonsense.

In short, they crapped all over themselves by making a really shitty web design choice.

Re:Flash 10 (1)

Rich0 (548339) | more than 3 years ago | (#34094474)

Yeah, point me to a reliably-updated version of it for the amd64 platform on linux and maybe I'll run it. For now I'm sticking to gnash, and that doesn't support flash v10. HTML5 is of course preferred...

Re:Flash 10 (2, Funny)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 3 years ago | (#34094532)

Re:Flash 10 (1)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123872)

Someone modded this as funny, but I'm not sure if they realize but Adobe does offer 64-bit builds for their major platforms now, and updates these builds.

Ah, memories (1)

wandazulu (265281) | more than 3 years ago | (#34090938)

I really wish I still had all my green-bar output from the decwriter I used to play adventure, tic-tac-toe, and even Star Trek. I think one game of that generated more than 100 pages (and took about 8 hours to play).

More than that, I can't for the life of me remember how exactly I *got* to the games, being a little kid; I remember it was a PDP-something, but no idea what the OS was.

Regardless, this looks like an awesome hack and makes me wish I'd kept that old IBM Selectric I had for years and years....it hadn't even occurred to me to do something like this (much to my dismay), even though that *was* the interface to a system like the IBM 7090 or somesuch.

Re:Ah, memories (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34093768)

Yes I remember that paper. I just found the paper tape(?) for an ascii drawing I did while my father was working on something. To bad I cant remember what it was - way to many years ago. I just found out that the neat box with the blinking lights an switches my dad brought home for a weekend was worth $15,000 in 1970's money.

Already done on....the PDP-10 (3, Interesting)

Danathar (267989) | more than 3 years ago | (#34090940)

Given that Zork was originally run on the PDP-10 back in the late 70's chances are it already ran on a paper driven console..WHEN IT FIRST CAME OUT.

Re:Already done on....the PDP-10 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34091320)

Darn skateboarders... Get off my lawn!

Very cool, but... (1)

Dan East (318230) | more than 3 years ago | (#34090972)

This is very cool, and I'm sure they got quite a kick out of interacting with the game in this way. And for the people that are saying this is impractical or a waste of paper - you're missing the point entirely. It's not like this something to be marketed or used extensively. It was done because someone had some originality coupled with technical prowess.

Now for my gripe. I was hoping they had written some new firmware / software for an existing typewriter's controller / CPU, as opposed to using thoroughly modern electronics to control the typewriter. So in the scheme of things they could have used any old printer, and any old keyboard. Kudos that they are combined into a single physical device, but I was expecting more of a hacked 80s era typewriter with no hardware modifications or interface.

Regardless, job well done!

Re:Very cool, but... (1)

tibit (1762298) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091312)

Yeah, I too was expecting to see a more modern CPU-controlled electronic typewriter, or even a word processor, hacked to get Zork running on it. They are in plentiful supply in some thrift stores.

Jewel Encrusted Egg (1)

transfatfree (1920462) | more than 3 years ago | (#34090992)

climb tree > "look an egg" > take egg > open egg > "you don't have the tools or expertise to do that" Whats Inside The Egg!?

Re:Jewel Encrusted Egg (2, Insightful)

jspayne (98716) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091438)

I forget what's inside the egg, but if you are carrying it when you meet the thief, he will steal it. Then later in the game, when you find the thief's lair, you will find the egg opened.

Re:Jewel Encrusted Egg (2, Interesting)

LoP_XTC (312463) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091490)

I forget what's inside the egg, but if you are carrying it when you meet the thief, he will steal it. Then later in the game, when you find the thief's lair, you will find the egg opened.

If I remember correct it was like a wind-up mechanical bird. You could either leave the egg laying around, or let it get stolen from your inventory. Either way it was always a pain to remember how long you had to wait before you could kill the thief and the egg would be open.

Aaron
 

Re:Jewel Encrusted Egg (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34093508)

You can also drop the egg to break it open, but that's a terrible idea because it also ruins the bird.

I used to play Star Trek on a Decwriter (2, Informative)

karlandtanya (601084) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091028)

I think it was actually called Star Trek at the time, but at some point, people started calling it "Space War".
We had eliza, and dungeon, too, and a chat program called "connect".
Once the connect fans had a party in the basement of one of the dorms, because they had really nice computer equipment. VT50s.
They all sat at their terminals and "chat"ted with each other. While in the same room.

Re:I used to play Star Trek on a Decwriter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34091226)

more like "apart-y" ahaha!

Re:I used to play Star Trek on a Decwriter (2, Informative)

rnturn (11092) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091282)

I recall once a couple of us playing startrek on the school's HP3000 via a Teletype at 110 baud. (Tip: don't play with someone who's in the habit of asking for a map of the galaxy every other turn.)

Re:I used to play Star Trek on a Decwriter (1)

hoggoth (414195) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091672)

We've come a long way since then.

Now they sit in the same room, send text messages to each other, and update their facebook pages about each other.

Re:I used to play Star Trek on a Decwriter (1)

operagost (62405) | more than 3 years ago | (#34092698)

Now 14 year olds text each other in the same room. Young people are still dumb :-P

Re:I used to play Star Trek on a Decwriter (1)

El_Oscuro (1022477) | more than 3 years ago | (#34151928)

20 years ago, I sent an email to a coworker who sat in the desk next to mine. When he complained, I apologized and promised to phone him the next time.

Interesting.... (1)

rickb928 (945187) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091234)

But if he had interfaced a Mag Card, THAT would have been impressive. And very different.

Mag Cards used a transmit block to code keystrokes to the processor. Selectric mechanism printed, and yes they used magentic cards (about 3"x8") to store data. The whole thing was not much different in size than a Xerox 860, except that the Mag card had a typewriter in place of the monitor & keyboard.

And of course, the Selectric takes a bit more maintenance, maybe. Those SCM typewriters had their problems, and the cartridges must be getting hard to find.

Gee, maybe I can score an IBM Electonic 60 and wire up that transmit block. Yeah, what a POJ that was. Better off making a Typetronic [google.com] work. At least there you only need two inputs to do everything.

Hey! I resemble that! (2, Interesting)

__roo (86767) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091284)

Some of us actually grew up playing Adventure (still playable online today -- wow! [dyne.org] ) on something that looks suspiciously similar to that! In my case, a LA36 DECWriter II [columbia.edu] , which apparently came standard with hippie dress, porn mustache and butterfly collar [microsoft.com] . I think I still have the old 300 baud acoustic coupler modem lying around somewhere.

Dungeon? (1)

dazedNconfuzed (154242) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091810)

Anyone have a port of (or source to) DUNGEON for the DEC-10?

If I spent that many hours playing it, I should acquire a copy for my legacy library...

Re:Dungeon? (1)

__roo (86767) | more than 3 years ago | (#34094944)

Google turned this up: http://www.onlineifgames.com/zdungeon.asp [onlineifgames.com]

Watch out, or you might get eaten by a grue.

Re:Hey! I resemble that! (1)

bawolff (984111) | more than 3 years ago | (#34095870)

apt-get install bsdgames will also get adventure for you, as well as some other older games.

You realize (1)

SnarfQuest (469614) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091494)

Way back, in the far distant past, you could buy kits to make your IBM selectric connect to a serial port, and it would work as both a printer and a keyboard.

There were also kits available to us many common electric typewriters as printers, by putting a solenoid above every key.

And many of the later electronic typewriters came with a serial port.

Or you could have bought one of the letter-quality daisy wheel terminals, which could often be used as a typewriter.

It doesn't even appear that they used a manual typewriter.

Yeah, But... (2, Funny)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091730)

Yeah, but...can it display Kindle books?

Re:Yeah, But... (1)

StarQuake64 (1136291) | more than 3 years ago | (#34092410)

No, because it doesn't support DRM yet... We can only hope!

Re:Yeah, But... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34099570)

... yes, that's the next planned 'improvement' for the automatypewriter -- using the period to produce WYSIWYG text. (Remember DAK and the program that produced dot-matrix output on daisy-wheel printers???)

Requires microjustification control over the carriage, and finer control of the platen advance, neither of which is particularly difficult for the development team...

BENEFIT: You can keep the output and read it at leisure... unlike ordinary uncivilized Kindles.

DRAWBACK: Latency. With a capital L - A - T - E.

NetHack (1)

IllusionalForce (1830532) | more than 3 years ago | (#34091918)

How much longer until they can abstract input even more and use correction tapes for playing NetHack?

Can't be long now, NetHack runs on pretty much anything.

Selectric Adapters (2, Informative)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | more than 3 years ago | (#34092318)

In the early 80s, my "80-Micro" magazines used to have ads for a gadget that turned an IBM Selectric typewriter into a computer printer. You fit the device over the keyboard of your typewriter and it had a set of solenoids and plungers that, when signalled, pressed the appropriate keys, causing the typewriter to 'type.' I remember watching these beasties at trade shows - It was almost creepy.

Back in the day almost every office had an IBM Selectric, so this provided a means of getting a "letter quality" printer into an office during a time when a letter quality printer could cost $1500 or more ($3000+ in today's dollars).

This is a mod not a hack (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34092608)

when the hell will people learn the difference between a "Hack" and a "Mod" This is a mod not a hack.

yeah but (1)

adavies42 (746183) | more than 3 years ago | (#34092738)

can it communicate with alternate universes?

Steampunk... (2, Insightful)

Chruisan (1040302) | more than 3 years ago | (#34092844)

With a little bit of accessorizing, this would make a cool steampunk gadget.

ASR-33 rules (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34093248)

I learned to play on an ASR-33. No, really. First thing you'll notice, the paper for a ASR-33 I bet was cheaper than the 8x11 paper for thing thing. Also, all the paper changing required for playing for 5 hours I bet is easier for an ASR, and they ASR-33 is way faster (10 cps). Also, when you drop a roll on the floor, you don't have to worry about what order the pages were in.

little girls and C64s? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34095118)

"the stuff that dreams are made of (at least the dreams of little girls who spent hours in front of a Commodore 64 telling the machine to GO NORTH and such)."
I'm sorry but those don't exist.

Re:little girls and C64s? (1)

Spugglefink (1041680) | more than 3 years ago | (#34098406)

little girls who spent hours in front of a Commodore 64 telling the machine... ...I'm sorry but those don't exist.

I can't imagine she played text adventures, but I did, in fact, know an actual girl who played with a C64. It was pretty sad, really. Her parents bought on on clearance in the late '80s. She didn't even have a cassette tape machine for the thing, so her only amusement was typing in BASIC programs that persisted until the power was cut.

If I had been more enterprising at the time, I should have introduced her to mass storage. She was cute. Alas. At the time I was more interested in being a morally superior pompous ass, and pointing out what a pile of crap her computer was.

Way to score with the ladies, Spugglefink.

hmm (1)

Orgasmatron (8103) | more than 3 years ago | (#34096226)

This gives me an idea. I think I might head out to the pending recycle pile and rescue a pair of IBM Selectrics. Not as cool as rigging up ~50 solenoids to tug on the keys of a mechanical typewriter, but still cool.

Vic 20 nostalgia (1)

Wynter Stark (1933332) | more than 3 years ago | (#34098920)

One of the happiest days of my childhood was when I discovered that 'N' was every bit as effective as 'Go North.' Sad, but true.

weeeee (1)

Abdul Jakul (1912090) | more than 3 years ago | (#34133892)

hahaha this is awesome. maybe hack that machine to play super mario too? Learn DSLR Video Store [learndslrvideostore.com]
Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?