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Chip Allows Blind People To See

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the bionic-eye dept.

Biotech 231

crabel writes "3 blind people have been implanted with a retinal chip that allowed them to see shapes and objects within days of the procedure. From the article: 'One of the patients surprised researchers by identifying and locating objects on a table; he was also able to walk around a room unaided, approach specific people, tell the time from a clock face, and describe seven different shades of gray in front of him.'"

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231 comments

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First Chimp (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122094)

A chimp has the same benefits and additionally is cute and eats banananas.

Re:First Chimp (-1, Offtopic)

SimonTheSoundMan (1012395) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122670)

Wow. Slashdot commenting goes down for an hour or so. No new posts show, so what happens, tons of people post off topic replies as they think they are the 'first poster'. I've never seen so much spam. Hey, I'm off topic too now.

i kan see (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122096)

well enough to get a frost pots

TOMMY CAN YOU SEE ME? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122098)

tommy? tommy?

Wow (4, Funny)

DirtyCanuck (1529753) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122100)

I didn't see that one coming.

Hearing Implants?

Nope never heard of them

the Obamanation vision (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34123072)

I didn't see that one coming.

Well with this new chip you'll be able to see like Obama, several shades of gray :

shade 1 : communist ("the good")
shade 2 : racist ugly gun-toting conservative old geezer ("the evil")

Cost is only your unborn children (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122112)

Not mentioned in the article, the patient needed to take out 3 mortgages, 5 loans and provide his unborn children as a deposit to pay for the implant. Researchers said that now that he could see there'd be no problems with him getting a job like other seeing people to pay off the cost of the procedure over the next 300 years.

In the land of the blind... (2, Funny)

thijsh (910751) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122130)

La Forge is king!

Re:In the land of the blind... (4, Interesting)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123174)

Once again reality has trumped Star Trek with an eye implant -- there's now no reason for La Forge to wear that visor.

Reality trumped Star Trek with an eye implant before. McCoy gave Kirk reading glasses for his age-related presbyopia because he was allergic to the eye drops that soften the lens (they don't have those... yet). But they've been implanting mechanical lenses since 2003; I have one in my left eye. McCoy could have just beamed Kirk's biological lenses out and beamed the mechanical lenses in. I went from being extremely nearsighted and farsighted at the same time (age related presbyopia), wearing both contacts and reading glasses, to better than 20/20. Of course, since we don't have transporters, invasive surgery is required. This retinal implant would require even more invasive surgery.

Of all the nerdy devices I have and have had, the implanted lens is my favorite.

Give them time and this retinal implant may surpass normal vision like the lens implant does.

Oh yeah -- you will be assimilated! Resistance is futile!

Nothing to see (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122148)

move along.

I.c.U. (-1, Offtopic)

da5idnetlimit.com (410908) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122152)

The come back 8)

ah. Frost piss ?

I can't see any comments... (0, Offtopic)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122168)

I can't see any comments - do you think I need to try the device from the story?

This is not new (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122178)

Previously, not allowed to be done in USA, but there are a few think outside the box doctors in Third countries
doing eye implants and brain implants to achieve much the same thing. It is just another variation of cochlear - 20+ sensors Vs Pacemaker = 1 or 2 flying leads.
But eye? Infection control is the 'secret' that must be mastered if you hope to hold onto the device.

Not a cure (for blindness) (3, Informative)

Manip (656104) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122180)

Just to clarify in case you didn't RTFA this isn't a cure for all forms of blindness. Unfortunately we still aren't at the point of being able to clip a camera on to people and having their brains understand that input directly. But it does somewhat mitigate forms of blindness which are directly associated with the eye (as opposed to the image processing centre which is a common form of blindness). But that being said, this is HUGE. We can cure several kinds of blindness or at least mitigate it. The quality of life increase to the people who receive this new medical technology will simply be like night and day.

Re:Not a cure (for blindness) (3, Informative)

janek78 (861508) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122744)

Could you supply a source on the "[...]image processing centre which is a common form of blindness"? As far as I know, and yes IAAMD, eye-related conditions are by far the most common cause of blindness, whereas cortical blindness represents only a small fraction of the total blind population (significant, no doubt).

Re:Not a cure (for blindness) (1)

jamesh (87723) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122938)

Yes I think the OP is lumping congenital blindness with acquired blindness, where I assume the latter is much more closely related to injuries or diseases to the eye.

This is actually pretty cool (5, Informative)

kurokame (1764228) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122182)

Firstly, it's probably going to be 50 years before this turns into an actual medical procedure rather than a proof-of-concept experiment. Let's just get that out of the way.

So what they're doing is taking people with a defective retina, and adding a synthetic one. The retina normally receives photons and sends a signal along the optic nerve. What they're doing is implanting a silicon photoreceptor behind the retina of people whose retinas aren't doing the job. The chip receives the photons and sends an electrical signal, serving the same function as a "healthy" retina to some fidelity. The results are sort of low-fi since (a) it's just a proof of concept trial, and (b) the retina is a horrendously complex photodetector so it will take a lot of work to approach that in an implantable device. But dude, blind people. Seeing. Go, science!

Re:This is actually pretty cool (1)

Peeteriz (821290) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122672)

We don't even need to match the quality of retina - even a hugely restricted sight, say a 50x50 black/white pixel sensor would be a life-changing experience to blind people, if that was available for mass-production and they could actually afford it.

Re:This is actually pretty cool (3, Insightful)

fredjh (1602699) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122820)

I recall seeing something like that (low-res BW "implants") at least 5 or more years ago. Someone was actually able to drive a car around a parking lot with one.

This just seems like a more advanced version, and unlike another poster, I think they should start implanting these now. Why make people wait for more trials? What's the worst that can happen? The person is already blind. This is one of the things that bothers me about the FDA; if people are willing to take the risks to get a "cure" now, they shouldn't be stopped.

But even still, once surgery to correct lens shape was allowed, that procedure really took off... it didn't take 50 years for it to become commonplace. Certainly this is more invasive, but once it's approved, I really doubt people will let that stand in the way... after all, people who were nearsighted could still see with corrective lenses, but now we're talking about people who can't see at all.

Re:This is actually pretty cool (4, Insightful)

am 2k (217885) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122890)

I think they should start implanting these now. Why make people wait for more trials? What's the worst that can happen? The person is already blind.

Well, I'm a complete noob when it comes to medical stuff, but I can think of three things:

  • Permanent damage to the nerves, removing the option for using any future improved version of this implant.
  • Brain damage, since this implant has a direct connection to the most sophisticated instrument known to man. Just send a few milliamps too much over there and it's partially fried.
  • An infection, killing the person (since you can't just cut off the head like it's done with arms and legs in extreme situations).

Re:This is actually pretty cool (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123008)

Brain pacemakers are an often used treatment option for things like Parkinson's disease.

Re:This is actually pretty cool (1)

heathen_01 (1191043) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123138)

Obviously bad things can hapen, nobody is denying that. The point is

if people are willing to take the risks to get a "cure" now, they shouldn't be stopped.

Re:This is actually pretty cool (1)

plastbox (1577037) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122912)

I would have you check out Sensory Substitution. I feel I'm ranting on about this every time something like this comes up and no one cares. Why is that? The TVSS (Tactile Visual Substitution System by WiCab) provides its users with a 20x20 grayscale image and the Forehead Retina System provides 512 taxel (tactile pixel) vision, all with no surgery. In addition, the BrainPort (also by WiCab) can be hooked up to an accelerometer to provide a sense of balance to people who's inner ears have been damaged. Hell, one can even add new sensory information through some existing channel (f.ex. FeelSpace), and the brain will integrate it thanks to sensomotoric correlations. The blind can already see. We've had the needed technology since Dr. Bach-y-Rita started experimenting with cameras, solenoids and sensory substitution in the 60's.

In 50 Years, we'll have hollographic Dellusions (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122760)

projected into our mind by electromagnetic induction into our cerebral cortex, and Smellivision. The article plainly presumes that the Host for this procedure must have existing Vision nerves to the Complex Nervous System (brain) in order for this to be achieved. To be actually born blind, consider an Earthworm or a Jellyfish; this procedure is geared more for people with a verry usual range of Degraded vision or at a certain level of impugned development since achieving Berth.

Also for those of you that consider Science FICTION, La Forge was using the advanced non-implant form that I described above, not a chip implant. Surgery is for suckers. The Brain visualizes electrical signals assembled by receptors collecting reflective Light: we should skip all this anti-Christian technology that just wants to install Silicon into our Brains. We need a Subliminal Message Machine with a Tin-foil hat to prevent spontaneous advertising of subliminal messages from others around us: wake me up in less than 10 years.

Re:This is actually pretty cool (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122814)

And the repo-men comes

Re:This is actually pretty cool (2, Insightful)

maxume (22995) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122974)

You are extrapolating linearly.

For reference, 50 years ago integrated circuits were still brand new.

First Wu-Tang (3, Interesting)

LaminatorX (410794) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122190)

Light is provided through sparks of energy
from the mind that travels in rhyme form

Givin sight to the blind

ST TNG (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122192)

Lt. Jeordi LaForge get ready

We are the borg... (1)

andr00oo (915001) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122202)

We will add your biological and technological distinctiveness to our own

So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122208)

What will become of Daredevil?

What is it, exactly? (4, Informative)

Nirvelli (851945) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122232)

The Abstract has more technical details [royalsocie...ishing.org] , such as the fact that this chip is externally-powered, and has a "38 × 40 pixels" resolution.

Re:What is it, exactly? (2, Funny)

j00r0m4nc3r (959816) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123190)

That's about what my old Apple 2 computer would do. You could play Zork on your own retina..

we did see it coming, no? (2, Interesting)

Adolf Hitroll (562418) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122242)

but what I'm waiting for is the answer to the Molyneux problem [stanford.edu] ...

rlbetkobse! (-1, Troll)

fluor2 (242824) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122244)

wevi ertj jiervtj etvsertj serj ers900!

"I see..." (1)

pinkushun (1467193) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122250)

said the blind man to his deaf wife.

Re:"I see..." (1)

bakamorgan (1854434) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122736)

...who was petting the paraplegic dog...

Kvrqe rjwt rnjuetnjiec,.s,l ! (-1, Offtopic)

fluor2 (242824) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122252)

JIjvj j erv brjwghb erthjio erhoser vttv..
wevrnwerv RHJIAIr rnivn vewhjivroghlhy.
ejije vtn we,. vwerv
i iojrwe!

Seven shades of grey? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122260)

And how would you describe a grey shade?

Re:Seven shades of grey? (1)

Looke (260398) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122796)

Count them, or compare them to eachother?

1 picture, 1000 words (1)

Statecraftsman (718862) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122262)

1500 diodes, making a rate of 0.67 words per photo diode. Stunning, simply stunning. Also, marvelous.

People that 'went blind' (4, Informative)

splutty (43475) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122278)

One caveat that seems to be missing in the summary, is that this was done with people that used to have normal eyesight, which degenerated into blindness.

Obviously the fact that the brain already recognizes shaped, forms, and knows how to 'see' makes a huge difference.

For people having been born blind, this sort of research might eventually help, but this would take all the visual stimulation and training that a small child gets as well, with brains that are not that of a small child, so will take a long time to adapt, unfortunately.

Re:People that 'went blind' (1)

simoncpu was here (1601629) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122782)

Who knows, the child's brain may adapt better to the low resolution images. The child's brain may develop some sort of anti-aliasing capabilities.

Re:People that 'went blind' (1)

SharpFang (651121) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122822)

One interesting caveat: eye projects the image on the retina upside-down and it's sent as such to the brain. The flipping is done fully "in software" and supposedly occurs only a few weeks after the child gains sight. It would be interesting to observe this effect in adult humans.

Re:People that 'went blind' (3, Interesting)

am 2k (217885) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122910)

I remember seeing a documentary of a study that did exactly that about twenty years ago... That person wore glasses 24/7 that flipped the image upside down. It took a while, but he adapted to it just fine. The problem was that when he took them off afterwards, the image was flipped again, so he had to go through all of it again :)

Re:People that 'went blind' (1)

matfud (464184) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122914)

The experiment has been done with glasses that flip the scene before it enters the eye. After a few hours most adults don't notice much difference.

Re:People that 'went blind' (1)

am 2k (217885) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122900)

You have to start somewhere though.

Correct, evidence from cochlear implants (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34123012)

For people having been born blind, this sort of research might eventually help, but this would take all the visual stimulation and training that a small child gets as well, with brains that are not that of a small child, so will take a long time to adapt, unfortunately.

Right. Kids who receive cochlear implants at very young ages (best before 5, preferably around 1) and are enrolled in schools mostly focused on speech and hearing (rather than sign) tend to show dramatic results. Most of these kids are mainstreamed into their local school districts in the kindergarten/first/second grades with limited (if any) instructional support. Using the phone with no assistance is pretty typical.

People, like my wife, who are pre-lingually deaf and receive cochlear implants later in life don't fare nearly as well. The language centers of the brain have developed and you've missed the window for dramatic gains. They still help, but she'll always need captions and alternatives to the phone.

0001 Fir St. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122290)

0001 Fir St.

Appropriate? (3, Funny)

SultanCemil (722533) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122294)

So is it wrong to goatse someone within a day of the operation?

Re:Appropriate? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122922)

no more than one-man-one-jar-ing him

Hungry (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122296)

Think I will go to the chippie for lunch. Hungry.

I really thought the article was about food when the title hit my RSS reader.

Appropriate? (0)

SultanCemil (722533) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122304)

So is it wrong to goatse someone within a day of them being able to see for the first time, ever, in their whole life? They said they can see shapes.....

Evolution, not revolution... (1)

Wizard Drongo (712526) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122324)

This, as my post title suggests, is not a revolution. It's an evolution of the existing tech. We've seen this before, but the achievable resolution is increasing. There's another project in Germany I read about recently where they're working on colour
Don't get me wrong, this is amazing work, and another step on the road to full Geordi's VISOR-like treatment for people that have an optic nerve but non-functioning eyes, but it's not a "new" thing, merely another refinement in the process

When the resolution achieves life-like levels, and we have control of a full gamut, so technically infra-red vision (or ultraviolet etc.) can be switched on or off, put me down for one. I'm tired of glasses and deviating vision...

Re:Evolution, not revolution... (1)

SharpFang (651121) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122866)

Actually, I'd be quite interested in one that is not based on daylight. Think of it as input device, taking, say, HDMI signal on input, and outputting the video directly to optical nerves. Attach an external camera, or a computer, or a remote camera, or a video player... skipping the middle-man of display-light-eye-retina and feeding video data straight to the optical nerve.

Blinding (1)

Mike Mentalist (544984) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122330)

I wonder how someone who has been blind all their life would actually go about describing colours and objects in this instance. When you talk to someone who is partially colour-blind you end up pointing at things asking what colour they see.

And they look at you as if you are an idiot...

Re:Blinding (2, Insightful)

Megane (129182) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122706)

As someone who is partially color blind, and has taken the "paint pots" test, I can tell you that it effectively only affects shades of brown. In other words, colors that we don't normally have names for.

The paint pots test is where they put 30 or so 1 inch round thingies on the table with a color sample on top, and you have to arrange them in order of slightly changing color. There are two points around the circle where brownish colors will be the same for those with partial (protanomaly or deuteranomaly) color blindness, or at least that's how it went for whatever form I have. Two of them seemed identical to me, so I think I ended up making a lopsided figure eight.

And someone who has been blind all their life will have had that part of their brain repurposed to increase the other senses, and have no experience with eyesight, so they probably won't even be able to process the visual cues that let you easily identify depth in a photograph.

Pretty cool. (1)

annex1 (920373) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122334)

It's about time this begins! :D

Ah, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122342)

I see what they did there.

Appropriate? (-1, Redundant)

SultanCemil (722533) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122344)

So is it wrong to goatse someone within a day of them being able to see for the first time, ever, in their whole life? They said they can see shapes after all.....

Yay for Chip! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122350)

Well, that certainly is nice of him.
I always liked Chip, he's a swell guy.

What's the catch? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122354)

Every silver lining has a cloud. Next week get ready for "Retinal chip causes aneurysms in the blind". Seriously, this sounds like science fiction.

It's a miracle! (3, Insightful)

HertzaHaeon (1164143) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122370)

Stories like these always make me think of how science, technology and development delivers so many of the things promised but undelivered by religion. This story, healing the sick and making the blind see again, is an actual, real miracle, and an awesome one at that. Religion, in contrast, offers only false hope and perhaps some comfort for unfulfilled promises and a harsh reality. And yet so many millions pin their hopes on imagined gods, not human spirit and ingenuity. It continues to baffle me.

Even the most extreme things promised by religion, eternal life and/or an immortal soul, might be deliverable in some form by science one day. We can certainly create a paradise for ourselves. Compared to how the people who first imagined today's religions lived, one could argue that many of us are already living in paradise (or some beta version of it at least) and it's within reach for every human on earth, regardless of religion, if we continue to produce our own miracles.

Re:It's a miracle! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122898)

[A]n actual, real miracle. . .

It's not a miracle. It's science.

Re:It's a miracle! (0)

foniksonik (573572) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122934)

How many of the miracle workers you describe are religious do you think? How many of them stand on the shoulders of religious people? What motivated those people to do the work of miracles rather than sod off and make money investing in real estate or some other margin related business?

Religion is more than a promise to an imaginary deity, it's a promise to your fellow man to do good works.

I attend church every Sunday and I've yet to see a miracle there but I do see lots of good people reaffirming their intent to participate in the greater good and seek out ways they can be a better person. That's just 1 hour on a week mind you. The remainder is spent working towards those intents as best we can.

Re:It's a miracle! (0, Offtopic)

wed128 (722152) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122998)

That is the most sensible interpretation of modern organized religion I've ever read. Thank you.

Re:It's a miracle! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34123160)

The remainder is spent working towards those intents as best we can.

... by hating gays.

Re:It's a miracle! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122970)

And what drives people to try to heal the sick and make the blind see? From a strictly evolutionary standpoint, it would be better to just let them die. You speak of false hope, but I've found that my hope is not false. It is very real. Hope is measurable. The impact of positive religion and hope on individual success and happiness is measurable. Your human-based worldview is empty and false.

Sure, there are twisted evil people who use religion for evil. There are also twisted evil people who use science for evil every day. Evil isn't a function of religion, it is a function of broken people.

Chip Allows A Small Fraction of the Blind to See (0)

DryGrian (1775520) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122374)

From TFA:

This technology could change the lives of patients with retinitis pigmentosa - a degenerative eye disease affecting approximately 200,000 individuals globally.

Not quite as earth-shattering as it appeared.

Finally i got first post yay (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122380)

First Poooooooooooost!2

fp? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122382)

FP?

Testing testing (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122384)

Do the comments work?
Perhaps noone said "First!" yet...

Having a shitty morning, but this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122388)

brightened my day, no pun intended. Truly, we live in an amazing time, thank Science.

Vaporware (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122390)

Ill belive it when i see it

i see. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122406)

dskha;l

Not convinced (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122428)

Pictures, or it didn't happen.

Meh (1)

c0mpliant (1516433) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122430)

I'd still want Geordi's visor!

Mice (4, Funny)

dintech (998802) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122436)

I assume pre-tests were done on 3 blind mice? /ducks...

Re:Mice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122978)

Yes,they did a blind test on them...

Re:Mice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34123040)

Mickey, Minnie, Mortimer, and Donald?

Pre-trials (0, Redundant)

dintech (998802) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122440)

I suppose pre-trials were done on 3 blind mice?

Wild. (2, Interesting)

Spit (23158) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122442)

Not much of a step from here to arbitrary, computer generated input.

Not good enough... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122452)

... to post to Slashdot apparently.

fristpsot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122454)

i can finally see the keys

Awesome news! (1)

AlexLibman (785653) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122472)

With my 19-hour-a-day computer screen addiction, I'm looking forward to a time when people can change eyes as easily as they change glasses. A human body is like a car - after every X miles, each part just simply needs to be replaced... 8-)

F1rst! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122482)

yay lulz

First post (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122492)

because I can see the keyboard now!

Derp (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122522)

Sounds like good news

Impressive (2, Insightful)

Jarik C-Bol (894741) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122546)

In all honesty, This amazes me, the fact that we have reached a point where we understand enough about both the brain, and computer hardware, that we are able to use hardware to correct problems of this detail and magnitude. Going from totally blind to being able to read a clock has to be an amazing experience.

Didn't see that one coming... (1)

AmonTheMetalhead (1277044) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122574)

Maybe i should get one of those

Ears? (1, Interesting)

paimin (656338) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122586)

Cool! Now can I get some new ears?

Neato (1)

ChinggisK (1133009) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122596)

Sounds like a lot more than just "shapes and objects" suggests.

Obligated Star Trek reference (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34122600)

I welcome our new Borg ocular-implant overlords.

Yippe! My first "First Comment" in 5 years .. (-1, Offtopic)

geekplayboy (954635) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122612)

...of Slashdot readership. and yes I ahvent RTFA

One more step to the mind-machine interface. (1)

_0rm_ (1638559) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122812)

Amirite?

Quick! Close the analog hole! (2, Interesting)

tommituura (1346233) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122846)

Now, how long do you think that it'll be until someone at the various copyright lobbies wants to force a macrovision-like drm technology in there just because someone might someday include video recording capability into artificial eyes?

Question (1)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122864)

How long can you go without subconsciously rubbing your eyes?

Yeah, yeah (4, Insightful)

smchris (464899) | more than 3 years ago | (#34122882)

It seems like one researcher or another has been twiddling with technologies like this now and then as one-off's for literally DECADES now. Will it ever make it into an on-going clinic?

I got an "insightful" for my jaded disillusionment the last time /. reported on one of these experiments, what, maybe five years ago. Can I get another "insightful" for still being disillusioned that these "cool hacks" will ever see production?
 

Descriptive (1)

toj (1934650) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123066)

How do you describe a shade of grey?

Chip allows blind people to see (2, Funny)

homesnatch (1089609) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123198)

Way to go, Chip! I always liked that guy...
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