Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

China Mobile Joins the Linux Foundation

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the global-marketplace dept.

Businesses 56

eldavojohn writes "As a gold member, China Mobile has joined The Linux Foundation putting it next to AMD, Google, HP and Cisco in the roster of the foundation's gold members. This marks the very first time a Chinese enterprise has joined The Linux Foundation. Earlier this year, we saw the first Chinese company openly participate in open source and now China Mobile, ranked 77th in the world by Fortune with over half a billion customers, has joined the foundation that fosters the growth of Linux."

cancel ×

56 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

In before (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34123150)

In before Americans spinning this as somehow a bad thing, bla bla communism, bla bla Obama health plan.

Re:In before (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34123208)

In before Americans spinning this as somehow a bad thing, bla bla communism, bla bla Obama health plan.

Forget Communism, China out-capitalisms the US by a wide margin. And I doubt their health provision for the poor is too good either.

Re:In before (3, Insightful)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123216)

I hope Americans see this as a bad thing and that it will sting them to be more competitive.

Re:In before (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123830)

I don't understand your remark, nor the mod.

It's hard for US mobile phone providers to compete with the lines of China Mobile and China Unicom (the #2 in China, afaik there are only two, thanks to state regulations). China Mobile has over half a billion subscribers - that's more than the entire US population. China has the advantage in numbers.

Re:In before (1)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 3 years ago | (#34124206)

Yes, my formulation was silly.
I just hoped that people who say "This comes from evil communist China! It must be stopped !" would just work at making "great freedom-loving America" better.
But yeah, silly reaction to a silly comment. Sorry about that.

Re:In before (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34134324)

Americans, You were the top of the hill, but you exported your manufacturing. Now the sons and daughters of workers in the manufacturing countries are sending their children to universities. These children return home, as they know their language, they get top jobs. As a result, Americans have not gotten smarter, they just developed their competition. The only way America is going to compete is to isolate itself, or to lower their standard of living to where salaries match those offered offshore. Slip Sliding away.

Re:In before (0, Offtopic)

derGoldstein (1494129) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123224)

Observation: Go to any story on Slashdot these days, and just reply with the words "bla bla communism, bla bla Obama health plan" -- you will be modded up. I've gotta try that...

Re:In before (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34123226)

Except that the "conservatives" are holding the Chinese up as the way we should go with their low taxes and pro-capitalistic policies. [washingtonmonthly.com] (Gawd I wish I was making that up.... )

Actually You Didn't Beat Me, the Submitter (5, Insightful)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123260)

In before Americans spinning this as somehow a bad thing, bla bla communism, bla bla Obama health plan.

I'm the submitter. I'm American. The submission wasn't edited at all and I don't think I put a negative spin on it.

I even omitted some things like China Mobile being a state-controlled and state-owned company. But you can find that int he linked Wikipedia article. The company has been terrible with it's move to 3G. And, as a telecommunications company with 570 million customers, it's probably done a lot of harm as well as a lot of good. The most xenophobic statement you'll get from me is that it's a Chinese company so there's probably a lot of corruption at all levels. And that's not to say that there isn't corruption in the lobbyists of the American equivalent but I'm guessing the customers have even less rights when it comes to dealing with a state-controlled massive corporation.

So there's that but, you know, regardless of whether or not they're a member of the Linux Foundation, that's going to persist. If the Linux Foundation refused their entry (and, come on, Google and HP are in there so ethics like privacy aren't huge concern) I doubt China Mobile would break down and clean up just so they could get in. But now that they're in, maybe they can offer better service to customers? They're definitely paying dues to the Linux Foundation so unless you see that as 'blood money' it's a really good thing. It's good for us, it's good for the Linux community, it's good for people who want cheaper mobile phones and it's good for the people of China.

Getting the evilest of the evil to use Linux is a net positive for everyone involved. The only people who lose are the companies that make money off of everyone by selling a cash cow operating system like Windows hammered down into some sort of Frankenstein mobile operating system.

bla bla communism

Ha. I wish. If China were truly Communist without social classes, the bulk of the people would be treated a whole lot better and the system would either collapse or work properly for the first time Communism has been put into practice. Instead you've got some sort of hybrid closer to socialism than the United States is that keeps itself working by slowly implementing more and more capitalism. I still can't understand how people can call China "Communist" when the income, living conditions and rights of a rice farmer in BFE greater China is not even comparable to a banker in downtown Beijing.

I think this is just another sign that the year of Linux on the desktop is a dead dream but the year of Linux in the server farm and the year of Linux on the mobile device are already here.

Re:Actually You Didn't Beat Me, the Submitter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34123410)

I'm a different AC, but I think that despite everything, you neatly proved the GP's point. Some things you write may very well be correct, and I have to give you credit for not sinking to the level sometimes displayed on Slashdot where there's little more meat to a post than "China = bad in every conceivable way", but still, what do you really now about China, and - more - what do you really know about this company?

If all you can say about it is things like "it's a Chinese company, so there's probably a lot of corruption at all levels", I'm sorry, that *is* a xenophobic/racist/nationalist statement, no matter what. You're not speaking from facts, or even your own experience: you're speaking from your own biases, preconceptions and stereotypes. "Of course there's a lot of corruption. After all, it's a Chinese company. Everyone knows that Chinese companies have lots of corruption."

Now mind you, I'm no friend of China's politics myself, far from it; as you say, they're not even communist but rather a highly authoritarian, non-free state. Economic liberty may have increased compared to the past; personal liberty is still mostly non-existant (although they're not "the evilest of the evil", unless you adopt a utilitarian perspective and compensate for a comparative lack of quality with a vastly superior quantity). But I think we should be fair in dealing with China, and in fact everyone; call them out when shit's going on, but don't say "we know these guys are bad because they're Chinese, and the Chinese are always bad". In other words, employ a posteriori arguments, no a priori ones.

This will have the added benefit of strengthening your point when you make it, too, because it'll stand up to critical evaluation. Unless you're preaching to the choire on purpose, you should take care to present a good argument.

Re:Actually You Didn't Beat Me, the Submitter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34124636)

Then I can add what the OP was missing, as I have friends in China, have worked with Chinese companies, have family that have worked with and against Chinese companies on multi-billion dollar construction projects (airports in the Middle East, etc), and yes, there is a lot of corruption. From our point of view only, though. The Chinese viewpoint on what is and isn't corruption is different than ours in the West, so they would disagree. Often, they view it more like we would view performance bonuses, or job advantages, so while they generally know we don't agree with it and consider it a "bad" thing, they don't feel the same way. Different culture has different values.

Re:Actually You Didn't Beat Me, the Submitter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34123592)

China is in the first state of socialism and never claims to be Communist which may be a final target. At least, the joint of China Mobile will in some degree accelerate the heading way to mobile market for Linux. It's indeed a good thing!

Re:Actually You Didn't Beat Me, the Submitter (1)

paxcoder (1222556) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123906)

When did they introduce "A lot of text +1" moderation?

I like the "Frankenstein mobile operating system" phrase though.

Re:Actually You Didn't Beat Me, the Submitter (1)

Cyberax (705495) | more than 3 years ago | (#34129896)

"Ha. I wish. If China were truly Communist without social classes, the bulk of the people would be treated a whole lot better and the system would either collapse or work properly for the first time Communism has been put into practice. Instead you've got some sort of hybrid closer to socialism than the United States is that keeps itself working by slowly implementing more and more capitalism. I still can't understand how people can call China "Communist" when the income, living conditions and rights of a rice farmer in BFE greater China is not even comparable to a banker in downtown Beijing."

I've been to China recently. Hell, there's not a shred of socialism in Beijing. It's pure unadulterated capitalism.

There there ... (-1, Offtopic)

unity100 (970058) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123158)

welcome home.

Watch out!! (5, Funny)

powerlord (28156) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123192)

China Mobile probably just joined so they could get access to the Linux source repositories and steal the code.

Re:Watch out!! (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34123222)

*waits for someone else to spot the joke*

we did we did (2, Insightful)

unity100 (970058) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123232)

but we have either posted or dont have mod points handy

Re:Watch out!! (2, Insightful)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123296)

State capitalism has viewed the efforts of a theocracy to work with Nokia Siemens in catching/tracking dissidents and other NGO funded protesters.
Much better to grow and be part of any phone system than have to request outside help on your own phone network.
If the gov is part of the formation of any new phone system, the phone system is part of the gov.
A NSA Room 641A in your pocket. No need for sloppy push upgrades or requests outside the country. No Costas Tsalikidis, Adamo Bove style telco software needed. Linux shaped in the state image will give peace of mind to a generation of political leaders. With Linux on your phone, the state can find you before you stand in front of a column of Type 59 tanks.

Re:Watch out!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34126452)

was that a poem?

However... (3, Funny)

derGoldstein (1494129) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123196)

Only the Platinum members are allowed to bug the kernal. I think that Gold members just get a discount.

Oracle is a platinum member (1)

voss (52565) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123870)

With platinum friends like Oracle on the linux foundation who needs enemies.

Doesn't open source kind of clash... (4, Insightful)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123210)

With the Chinese government's view of technology?

Re:Doesn't open source kind of clash... (1)

takowl (905807) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123516)

More or less than paying a massive American corporation for software?

Re:Doesn't open source kind of clash... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34123538)

China doesn't respect copyright, the GPL relies on copyright.

Re:Doesn't open source kind of clash... (1)

RivenAleem (1590553) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123704)

Sorry for the offtopic

A capitalist society believes in survival of the fittest, world trade organisation, globalisation. They are against protection of local businesses. This all runs fine for the megacorps until everything crashes worldwide. Suddenly the companies that were against protection and developing local markets require bailout from the government. Thankfully the capitalistic government is happy to oblige and the taxpayer has to pay to keep this megacorps afloat after they manage to destroy themselves through bad practice.

The point? Governments will go against everything they are supposed to stand for when it suits them. Linux is superior in many areas to alternative OS's. It would be ridiculous of them to ignore the benefits of it because of it's openness

TL;DR version, Governments operate double standards, more at 11.

Re:Doesn't open source kind of clash... (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123898)

Honestly I can not answer that question directly.

However there is such a thing as "red flag Linux" or so - a Chinese state-initiated, localised distribution. No idea how much it's used as I'm used to seeing Windows all over the place.

Open Source is pretty communist in a way: open for everyone, free to go around and for all to use. But the main reason China and many other countries in the world outside US (e.g. India, Russia, Brazil) are supporting Linux or one of it's varieties is to become independent from foreign software. This has to do with control, economic security, and stimulation of local software development instead of importing it.

Re:Doesn't open source kind of clash... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34124368)

Any society that has class and centralised power is not communist.
period
QED
end of story
done

Just because the USA is pretty far right on the global political scale of industrialised countries does not make everyone *else* a communist.

Re:Doesn't open source kind of clash... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34153228)

This makes perfect sense. China has long been dependent on foreign technology which it has little or no say in.

At present the only realistic choice that China has it Windows XP or Windows 7. Linux and so on just are not well supported enough amongst the big application providers to be worth while for China.

If China can get a foot in at the Linux table it could create a cheap/free operating system that would break its dependency on the likes of Microsoft and Adobe for software and applications.

SLASHDOT TAKEN DOWN BY FEDS !! (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34123228)

But it's up now.

This is the year (1, Funny)

Combatso (1793216) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123324)

of rinux on the destah

Re:This is the year (1)

RivenAleem (1590553) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123720)

The year of the Penguin, it could happen!

Freedom of Open Source (1)

digitaldc (879047) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123478)

The Chinese really enjoy the freedom of Open Source, the opportunity and innovation it brings.
Freedom is the new Totalitarian ideal.

The word is spreading. (2, Interesting)

sosaited (1925622) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123528)

I don't care who joins the Linux foundation and who doesn't, as long as more corporations are supported OSS in some way. The Windows monopoly needs to end, even if Google develops a Linux based distro and starts selling it for money (Though I don't wish for this to happen)

All the excuses of hardware-compatibility and user-friendliness has been long gone. For example in my very own experience where I had to run a PCMCIA card via a PCI-PCMCIA adapter on my desktop, it took me 3 days to find a solution in Windows, while both the adapter and PCMCIA card worked out of the box on Ubuntu without any further settings.

Re:The word is spreading. (1)

ryzvonusef (1151717) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123840)

The interesting thing is that China Mobile is supposedly interested in the MeeGo project. A third party to join Nokia and Intel, and a mobile carrier at that, will furthur enhance MeeGo. Also, tellingly, the already have their own appstore, and Nokia seems to have partnered with them on Ovi, in this regard.

This might as well prove 2011 to be the year of Linux on mobile phones, if not desktops.

http://www.readwriteweb.com/mobile/2010/11/china-mobile-joins-linux-foundation.php [readwriteweb.com]
http://www.mobilebusinessbriefing.com/apps/article/reports-nokia-teams-with-china-mobile-on-apps [mobilebusi...iefing.com]

Re:The word is spreading. (1)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 3 years ago | (#34124306)

2010 is already looking like year of linux on the mobile phone. Android has made huge market gains.

Re:The word is spreading. (1)

Urkki (668283) | more than 3 years ago | (#34129960)

2010 is already looking like year of linux on the mobile phone. Android has made huge market gains.

It won't be year of Linux on mobiles until many more mobiles run Linux software (for practical purposes, Android does not).

Re:The word is spreading. (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123946)

And I hope it's not going to be replaced by a Linux monopoly - as at the moment, the serious choices are Linux and Windows for OS. Even in mobile (Chrome OS and Android are Linux derivatives, and Symbian is dying if not dead).

More like the current web browser market: basically WebKit, IE, Mozilla (I forgot it's engine's name). Three html kits that are packed in various shells. IE still a bit big at some 60-70%, Webkit should grow more. Nicely fragmented, requiring attention to standards, and switching becomes trivial as everything still works. That's what we need for competition.

Re:The word is spreading. (1)

Qubit (100461) | more than 3 years ago | (#34124134)

basically WebKit, IE, Mozilla (I forgot it's engine's name)

I believe the list you're looking for is Webkit, Trident, and Gecko (but don't quote me on that)

Re:The word is spreading. (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#34124288)

at the moment, the serious choices are Linux and Windows for OS.

I thought that the serious choices were Windows or OSX. At least many games and professional apps are being ported to OSX these days. There are a few geeky engineering type apps that run on Linux sure, but the "serious choices" for your average person are only Windows or OSX.

(I use Ubuntu at both work and home btw - my work is mostly web development, and I currently do all my gaming on consoles)

Re:The word is spreading. (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | more than 3 years ago | (#34124508)

OSX is nice too, sure. How could I forget typing this on an iBook.

And this discussion is not about the average Joe, it's a level higher. Corporate choices, government work, computer/phone manufacturers. The ones that decide what Average Joe can choose from later. And Joe generally chooses "a PC" or "an Apple". And on top of that China Mobile is definitely not in the desktop computer market.

The problem of OSX, just like iOS, is that it's restricted. Yes on one hand it's a big player, some 5% or so for OSX, I don't know the market share of the iPhone in the smartphone market but I guess double digits and iPad is doing quite well too. On the other hand they're niche players: iOS is available on like half a dozen devices or so (the iPad and a few iPhone incarnations, iPod Touch maybe too, not keeping track too well). Even Windows Mobile is available on more different devices. Android comes on maybe a couple hundred different products right now, with more being released all the time. And don't even thing of building your own computer or mobile phone and loading Apple's OS on it: you can't. Technically maybe; legally not; so it's not a serious option overall.

When you buy a computer, and are looking for an OS with it, OSX is not an option. If you want OSX then you must buy an Apple computer. When you want to build a tablet like the iPad, you can't go and install iOS on it. So for example for Nokia, iOS is not an option. Android is. ChromeOS too. And so is Windows Mobile. And that's what we're talking about here.

Re:The word is spreading. (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#34124778)

I don't think iOS counts as a "niche" player really. The iPad is a bit of a niche market, but the iPhone is very, very big. Yes, iOS not an option for non Apple manufacturers, but it is an option for end users, and that's all that really matters.

I wouldn't get an iPhone myself, but more and more of our employees are getting iPhones instead of Blackberrys, Windows or Nokia etc phones.

Re:The word is spreading. (1)

sosaited (1925622) | more than 3 years ago | (#34124342)

And I hope it's not going to be replaced by a Linux monopoly

Considering the developing model and community orientation (even in corporations) of Linux and variants, a Linux monopoly won't be even close to as terrible as Windows'. As a matter of fact, I would rather expect the OSS developers to work even harder in making their code more secure and stable when more users are migrating.

Re:The word is spreading. (2, Insightful)

mspohr (589790) | more than 3 years ago | (#34126718)

A Linux monopoly would be fundamentally different than a proprietary software (OSX or Windows) monopoly. A monopoly is only bad when it leads to lock-in and abuse of customers by companies charging a monopoly profit. This happened with Windows where Microsoft was convicted of abuse of their monopoly (not for having a monopoly).

However, it would be hard to implement customer lock-in with Linux since the software is all open source and the file formats for data are all open source. Any attempt to lock-in customers would be futile since they can just take their data and their software and go to another vendor.

Re:The word is spreading. (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | more than 3 years ago | (#34132576)

Microsoft's lock-in isn't the Windows platform as such, it's their applications. Most notable IE6 with all it's proprietary extensions (see regular /. stories on how companies just can't retire it), and MS Office's file formats. That's what keeps people stuck to Windows. And as a result the many other software applications that are Windows-only.

Re:The word is spreading. (1)

Urkki (668283) | more than 3 years ago | (#34130078)

Symbian is dying if not dead

Symbian can hardly be called dead as more phones ship with Symbian than with any other phone OS... But if you're right and it really is dead, then that's bad news, because then Symbian phones are zombies. And there are a lot of them. And people are holding them against their head. Braaaains....

If you're right, then we'd better start stocking up various phone zombie eradication tools, such as full glasses of beer (demise of many a mobile phone).

Re:The word is spreading. (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | more than 3 years ago | (#34132606)

According to this [slashdot.org] story, Symbian may not be dead yet (and of course phones with it installed will continue to be sold for the time being), but the future doesn't seem too bright.

Indeed yesterday looking for a new phone for myself I do recall having seen Symbian running Nokia's on display next to Android running Nokia's. Not sure though I am primarily interested in Android not Symbian, and those Nokias were out of my budget so didn't pay too close attention.

Re:The word is spreading. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34153754)

"Android running Nokia's"? That is grammtically incorrect and thus somewhat nonsensical, but if I intrepret that as Android running on Nokia phones, then you were mistaken. Nokia don't sell any phones running Android, they also have no intention of making Android phones, hence their investment in Meego, although I guess that could change with their new CEO.

Re:The word is spreading. (1)

Qubit (100461) | more than 3 years ago | (#34124106)

even if Google develops a Linux based distro and starts selling it for money (Though I don't wish for this to happen)

Android, or ChromeOS?

(okay, so one could theoretically build the base OS themselves, but when you add-in all of the proprietary apps google layers on top of the OS, and add in the fact that most people buy a new handset that comes with Android pre-installed, for the end user it's pretty close to Google selling [a distro] for money)

Not more innovation stolen by the Chinese (2, Funny)

scourfish (573542) | more than 3 years ago | (#34123576)

Just like all other technology ventures that have gone to China, the chinese are just going to infringe on the innovation from the western world's Linux technology and copy it without payi- oh I see what you did there.

website (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34124050)

try this: http://adsensesite.org/ [adsensesite.org] read and add to your website

Celebrate! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34125106)

This is a 100% good thing. Good for Linux, good for China, good for China Mobile, and good for the entire world.

Too many comments are having petty squabbles and arguments over this and that when it's such a 100% good thing.

Party (no not "communist party" but they're invited too :D ) and have fun and celebrate that even more people not only find Linux (and thus also the unavoidably important GNU programs) useful to themselves but want to support it for everyone.

Congratulations and thank you China Mobile, may many more all across the world join in!

Not to be a pig (1)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | more than 3 years ago | (#34126804)

but athe Chinese-controlled entity (read: all of them) submits code to the kernel, it better be not just put under a microscope, but sent through a freaking MRI. Trust but verify? No; just verify three or four times.

Wheres the liberated speech? (1)

Brotherred (1015243) | more than 3 years ago | (#34128604)

I know that most of my comments here do not get any traction. That is why I have not posted here in so long. I know that for this comment I might be modded as a troll or something like that. But I have been thinking for some time about liberated software in closed communist like countries for some time. I think it was N. Korea doing their own GNU+Linux that got me thinking more about the fact that for as much as we GNU geeks like to talk about Libre and the power of free speech given by FREEsoftware, I do not see very much of it coming to fruition. I do not see where liberated code has translated into free speech or what I see as more important in freedom of religion. The cross pollination of ideas provided by FLOSS is supposed to end up in liberation of minds. Yet all is see is the closed countries doing what they want with what they want and if the community did want to sue them which it does not, it does not have the money like Microsoft to do it anyway. Why would they be in violation? Simple non-compliance of the GPL v2 and v3 the most common license type used.

replica watches (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34145788)

I want to learn the php, my Ideal is become a hacker so i will get here often to learn the php, I am a lucky people.Because have you,thank you.
in here this is my Black's Web site recently:
Replica watch [replicawatchbox.com] Replica watches [replicawatchbox.com] Replica swiss watches [replicawatchbox.com] Discount watches wholesale [replicawatchbox.com] Replica cartier watches [replicawatchbox.com] Replica breitling watches [replicawatchbox.com] Louis Vuitton Watches [replicawatchbox.com] Hermes h watches [replicawatchbox.com] Bell & Ross replica watches [replicawatchbox.com] a lange & sohne watches [replicawatchbox.com] Replica breguet watches [replicawatchbox.com] Replica bvlgari watches [replicawatchbox.com] Replica gucci watches [replicawatchbox.com] Replica iwc watches [replicawatchbox.com] Longines replica watches [replicawatchbox.com] Franck Muller Watches [replicawatchbox.com] Replica tag heuer watches [replicawatchbox.com] Replica chanel watches [replicawatchbox.com] please give me some suggestion.

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>