Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Oracle Solaris 11 Express Released

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the long-time-coming dept.

Operating Systems 160

comay writes "Today Oracle released Solaris 11 Express 2010.11. It includes a large number of new features (PDF) not found in either Oracle Solaris 10 or previous OpenSolaris releases, including ZFS encryption and deduplication, network-based packaging and provisioning systems, network virtualization, optimized I/O for NUMA platforms and optimized platform support including support for Intel's latest Nehalem and SPARC T3. In addition, Oracle Solaris 10 support is available from within a container/zone so migration of existing systems is greatly simplified." Reader gtirloni adds, "Oracle also announced that this is not a beta or preview, but a full, supported release aimed at everybody developing, testing, prototyping or demonstrating applications running on the latest Solaris release (not allowed to be used in production)."

cancel ×

160 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Wait, what? (1, Insightful)

Corporate Troll (537873) | more than 3 years ago | (#34236902)

Wasn't Oracle going to kill all good stuff from Sun according to the slashdot hivemind?

Re:Wait, what? (1, Flamebait)

abigor (540274) | more than 3 years ago | (#34236940)

These are the same people who use words like "good", "evil", "oppression", "abuse" and any number of other meaningless adjectives to describe computer software and the companies who create it.

Re:Wait, what? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34237142)

Microsoft is not good, they're evil. They exercise oppression over true innovation. They abuse their user base through the use of meaningless, proprietary technologies and perversions of established protocols to further their objectives of market dominance.

BTW, "oppression" is a noun, and "abuse" is either a noun or a verb, depending on the context. Neither of them are adjectives.

Re:Wait, what? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34237202)

You just proved the GP's point.

Re:Wait, what? (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34237880)

Of course, any post that says Microsoft is evil gets automatic "Insightful" and any post that is even slightly indirectly questioning it in a very generic way gets modded as Troll, even if it made sense. Way to go, mods.

Re:Wait, what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34239008)

Well, DUH! I used the same "adjectives" he named to write an inflammatory statement about everyone's favorite, evil software company. It was actually supposed to be a funny post.

Re:Wait, what? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34237654)

Almost all Open Source / Free Software is nothing more then derivatives of this "horrible" closed source software. What has Open Source / Free Software actually done that is truly innovative outside of programming tools? Even then not much even compares to Visual Studio 2010.

Re:Wait, what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34237952)

If what you say is true, then how do you describe Apple?

Re:Wait, what? (4, Funny)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238690)

If what you say is true, then how do you describe Apple?

More evil then Microsoft, but looking FABULOUS doing it?

Re:Wait, what? (3, Interesting)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237384)

Yeah, people [slashdot.org] who use the word "evil" when talking about software and related companies [google.com] are clearly ignorant incompetent morons with no idea what they are talking about. I also totally agree with you that "good" and "evil" are meaningless adjectives, that are only included in the dictionary because the companies creating dictionaries specialize in the "abuse" of the English language. Did you know that Google doesn't turn up any results showing "Oppression" as an adjective! So much for their "Do No Evil" slogan!

Re:Wait, what? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34238138)

Whoever modded this as troll is a moron. Hint: Replying to a flaimbaiting asshole, and pointing out what an idiot they are, is not trolling. If you are going to mod, at least learn what the fscking terms mean people!

Re:Wait, what? (1, Insightful)

Mitchell314 (1576581) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238524)

Sometimes there are troll modders. It happens. Can't reason with them, just know that those who take it way too seriously don't matter that much anyways.

Re:Wait, what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34236956)

Oh it'll still be around, you just won't be allowed to use it without a bottomless checking account.

Solaris was the only good thing from Sun. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34236986)

Solaris was basically the only good software to come out of Sun.

Even though it's merely 15 years old, Java has aged quite badly. As a language, it's now far behind C#, and even further behind cutting-edge languages like Scala. Its standard library is full of obsolete crud that needs to be removed. Netbeans is, to put it nicely, a pile of crap.

I don't even need to point out how shitty MySQL is. If its problems aren't obvious to you, you need to stop working with databases before you make an even bigger mess than you already have.

It's no wonder that OpenOffice.org never really took off. It's slow, it's bloated, and still has compatibility issues, even after decades of development.

VirtualBox? (0, Offtopic)

Conley Index (957833) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237146)

Solaris... there are alternatives. I wonder if ZFS will continue to be released to be used in FreeBSD.

OpenOffice.org... some project will build on it (and I do not need "Office"-Software, LaTeX does what I need).

Java... "Open" is not really done and the other license...

The only thing that I really worry about is VirtualBox. I have not found any other free Desktop virtualization that works.

Re:Solaris was the only good thing from Sun. (2, Insightful)

udippel (562132) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237208)

Sometimes ACs need to be taken seriously. Very seriously.
I was considering your post as one of this class, until I hit
OpenOffice.org [...] still has compatibility issues
That kind of kills your post, since an intentionally closed, unpublished, proprietary, format that alas made it as de-facto standard can hardly be expected to be met 100%. Were it published, and nobody from StarOffice through SUN and now Oracle could have written a 100% compatible clone, I might have modded you up.

Re:Solaris was the only good thing from Sun. (4, Insightful)

renegadesx (977007) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237696)

OK I'll bite.

Personally I agree with AC on Netbeans... it is a pile of crap. Eclipse is nice enough and I agree C# is a much neater language for application development but Java does have it's place and not going away anytime soon (just no more Java in SAP please).

MySQL is crap if you are trying to run big databases that usually run on Oracle, DB2. Otherwise it's fine for its intended purpose. Personally I would switch to Postgres as I still worry of MySQL's future.

OpenOffice is bloated but it is supposed to be. It's feature rich and designed to be an alternative to the 800lb Gorilla known as Microsoft Office, personally I find that to be the true star of the Sun software suite. Compatibility has not been an issue with me for a long time except VB macros (which need to die badly)

Re:Solaris was the only good thing from Sun. (2, Insightful)

Blakey Rat (99501) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237732)

OpenOffice is bloated but it is supposed to be. It's feature rich and designed to be an alternative to the 800lb Gorilla known as Microsoft Office,

The problem isn't that it's bloated. The problem is that it's *more* bloated than Microsoft Office, and has fewer features.

Re:Solaris was the only good thing from Sun. (1)

Mitchell314 (1576581) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238546)

Yeah, that bugs me too. It's the [lack of] performance that bugs me the most.

Re:Solaris was the only good thing from Sun. (1)

grcumb (781340) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238828)

...except VB macros (which need to die badly)

They already do. That's the problem.

Re:Solaris was the only good thing from Sun. (4, Insightful)

CynicTheHedgehog (261139) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238974)

I'm curious about all of the NetBeans hate. NetBeans ships with:

  - A standard Ant- or Maven-based build system with stellar support for both
  - All kinds of VCS integration (CVS, SVN, Mercurial)
  - Plugins for Jira, Bugzilla, and other ticketing systems
  - Support for every major app server
  - Very decent XML/schema editor with auto-complete and recognition of tags in context-sensitive help
  - An incredibly powerful formatting and styling engine
  - Has an integrated database query tool with SQL syntax highlighting
  - Ctrl+o to quick-search any type in any project you have open (ctrl+shift+o for any file, period) with recognition for acronyms/camel case abbreviations
  - Excellent integration wtih JUnit
  - SVN revision highlighting with mouse-over diff and undo/revert (change by change)
  - Incredible diff and conflict resolution interface
  - WYSIWYG JSF editor
  - JSF tag auto-complete (even with Seam and other third-party taglibs)
  - A full-featured profiler with the ability to take snapshots the entire runtime
  - JavaDoc validation and auto-complete
  - Project groups so you don't have to close and re-open your IDE to switch "workspaces"
  - Language support for Ruby, C++, PHP, and scripting languages (JavaScript, Groovy)

I can appreciate that there is a group of developers that prefer to use lightweight editors and command-line tools, and that's fine. But if you like big honkin' IDEs then NetBeans is a worthy platform, and I've found it to be a huge time saver.

Yes, looks that way to me... (5, Insightful)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | more than 3 years ago | (#34236992)

This is only allowed to be used in dev. They killed Open Solaris. It certainly seems like they are killing a good part of the *free* stuff from Sun to me.

Solaris 11 will be available in 2011 (3, Insightful)

gtirloni (1531285) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237032)

Solaris 11 Express is aimed at people that want to preview the features that will come in full production mode in Solaris 11. But they are also offering support for the Express edition today (the license terms are kind of cryptic, as always). I can't see how Oracle is killing Solaris no matter how hard I try to imagine that.

Re:Solaris 11 will be available in 2011 (5, Informative)

Corporate Troll (537873) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237074)

He's talking about OpenSolaris... The open source branch. He's right about that, it's effectively been killed.

Re:Solaris 11 will be available in 2011 (3, Insightful)

ToasterMonkey (467067) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238712)

He's talking about OpenSolaris... The open source branch. He's right about that, it's effectively been killed.

Technically, that open source branch has not been killed, OpenSolaris the distribution has been rebranded as Solaris Express and supposedly the source will be released following binary releases rather than leading it. There are other projects based on that source that predate OpenSolaris, and then there is OpenIndiana which is supposedly going to be to Solaris as CentOS is to RHEL.
Something like that anyway.

All this OpenSolaris is dead talk amuses me. If anyone gave a damn about it, they'd simply be waiting for Solaris Express 11 that was announced when OS "died" or working with the other community driven Solaris distros with real communities. If you don't give a damn... what's this all about?

Re:Solaris 11 will be available in 2011 (3, Insightful)

jonwil (467024) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238884)

Illumos is the real future of OpenSolaris IMO.
Efforts are being made to remove anything from OpenSolaris that is closed source (especially anything with limits on redistribution)

Re:Solaris 11 will be available in 2011 (2, Insightful)

mysidia (191772) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237552)

They're not killing Solaris as an OS.

They are in effect killing Solaris as an open platform and making it more like Windows.

Re:Solaris 11 will be available in 2011 (1)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237598)

Yeah, Solaris as an open platform: that's the good stuff.

Re:Wait, what? (1)

forkazoo (138186) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237086)

Wasn't Oracle going to kill all good stuff from Sun according to the slashdot hivemind?

Well, Oracle Solaris Express only exists because Open Solaris got killed. So, yeah. I think the hive mind pretty much called it on this one. Oracle has been actively, systematically destroying the good name of Sun. What's left is a stinky corpse stuffed full of medical waste that Oracle raped.

Re:Wait, what? (3, Funny)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237094)

Wasn't Oracle going to kill all good stuff from Sun according to the slashdot hivemind?

The good stuff (TM)(Oracle) is not quite dead yet. It's feeling much better. It thinks it might go for a walk.

It doesn't want to go on the cart.

It shouldn't be such a baby!

Re:Wait, what? (1)

vwjeff (709903) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238254)

Calling it Oracle Solaris makes me die inside even more.

Re:Wait, what? (1)

chef_raekwon (411401) | more than 3 years ago | (#34239018)

well .. admittedly 'IBM Solaris' sounds worse -- we're left with the lesser of two evils I guess.
 

it puts the lotion on it's skin (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34238908)

or else it gets the hose again!

Re:Wait, what? (1)

professional_troll (1178701) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237422)

Sun did a good job of killing themselves off considering Solaris hasn't been good since version 8

Re:Wait, what? (1)

ilsaloving (1534307) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237660)

How exactly did you become a professional troll? Did Microsoft hire you for their Get The Facts campaign?

Re:Wait, what? (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237534)

Wasn't Oracle going to kill all good stuff from Sun according to the slashdot hivemind?

Didn't you see the caveat ? (not allowed to be used in production)."

This is not only closed source, but it is also restricted usages.

If the license says you cannot use it in production, then how is it any good for the average person?

You might as well switch to Windows 2008 R2. At least you can use that in production, and you get software updates+patches+support, without paying thousands a year per seat.

Re:Wait, what? (1)

SETIGuy (33768) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238184)

Wasn't Oracle going to kill all good stuff from Sun according to the slashdot hivemind?

What does "not allowed to be used in production" mean to you?

Re:Wait, what? (1)

Mitchell314 (1576581) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238568)

They don't work in factories?

Re:Wait, what? (2, Insightful)

CAIMLAS (41445) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238228)

Kill? I suppose it depends on your definition of "kill".

They did kill OpenSolaris. The code, process, and community was destroyed and made unavailable to the community as a whole; it's now (essentially) freeware/shareware. Support, what's that?

Thankfully, OSol was forked, and we now have several viable alternatives - a couple of which do what people need 'better' than Solaris itself (ie 'gobs of clustered network storage').

As for Solaris in general... Solaris, particularly due to ZFS, is the biggest reason why Oracle bought Sun. The other properties are circumstantial and, I'd argue, largely inconsequential to Oracle's ends. Virtualbox might play in there somewhere, and I'm sure Java will as well (largely due to licensing anti-competitive behavior on Oracle's part).

Re:Wait, what? (1)

keeboo (724305) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238342)

If you want to use the Programs for any purpose other than as permitted under this agreement, including but not limited to distribution of the Programs or any use of the Programs for your internal business purposes (other than developing, testing, prototyping and demonstrating your applications) or for any commercial production purposes, you must obtain a valid license permitting such use. We may audit your use of the Programs.

Well... That does not sound very open to me.

Re:Wait, what? (1)

shugah (881805) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238976)

Who says it's not dead?

But ... (0)

donstenk (74880) | more than 3 years ago | (#34236914)

does it run linux?

Re:But ... (3, Informative)

0100010001010011 (652467) | more than 3 years ago | (#34236930)

Yes [opensolaris.org]

Re:But ... (3, Informative)

trims (10010) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237020)

No. BrandZ is dead, and support for it has been removed, in favor of VirtualBox as the preferred method of supporting Linux-on-Solaris.

Re:But ... (4, Informative)

carton (105671) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237164)

BrandZ never supported newer than CentOS 3.8 because it emulated Linux 2.4 kernel. It was killed and put in the attic before the Oracle takeover. Also the emulation was never good enough to run apache. I don't think it was ever used very much except internally to run 'acroread', but Sun sure did flog it to death at every users group marketing event. Half of the Solaris 10 Promises they actually did fully, usefully deliver, albeit a couple years late, but BrandZ wasn't one of them.

I would say Xen is a better way to run Linux than VirtualBox. There's a lot of work in OpenSolaris on polishing Xen, though unfortunately, (1) Xen isn't in OpenIndiana, and (2) you can't run VirtualBox and Xen at the same time. :)

There's stuff in Solaris that doesn't get nearly enough credit though, like Crossbow 10gig NIC acceleration similar to RPS & RFS in Linux, Infiniband support and NFS-RDMA transport, 'eventports' (an Nginx-friendly feature similar to epoll and kqueue), and the integration between the ipkg package system and ZFS, and mdb (everyone talks about dtrace, but no one about mdb). Then there's stuff that just shockingly sucks, like JDS and ipfilter and the permanent lack of a Chromium port.

Re:But ... (2, Informative)

Piranhaa (672441) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237588)

They don't have 2.6 support?

[root@brandz ~]# uname -apm
Linux brandz 2.6.18 BrandZ fake linux i686 athlon i386 GNU/Linux
[root@brandz ~]# cat /etc/redhat-release
CentOS release 5.5 (Final)
[root@brandz ~]#

no, they really didn't have 2.6 support. (2, Informative)

carton (105671) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238438)

This post is extremely dishonest. If you've actually installed enough to get that output, that necessarily means you already realize (1) you installed from some experimental .tar.gz file with all kinds of undocumented tampering, meant for development, not from the actual release .iso the way the 2.4 'lx' brand installs, so 'cat /etc/redhat-release' doesn't actually mean the installer ran up to that point which is something it would imply to any reasonable individual. In fact the GNU tar that extracted that .tar.gz was probably the solaris one, not even Linux tar.

And (2) it's so broken that basic programs like 'rm' don't run! [jbit.net] That page says, b131 was the first one with enough basic syscalls for 'rm' to work. and lx brand was moved to the attic in b143 (search for EOF lx brand) [sun.com] .

This field is full of overwhelming arcania, and without the good faith effort of people like yourself we'll make bad decisions and garble our own history. Please don't spew out deliberately misleading teasers just for the contrary LULZ of it.

Re:But ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34237396)

Wasn't BrandZ used to get Solaris 8 and 9 running on Solaris 10? How will that be possible now that BrandZ is dead?

Do not want (3, Informative)

countSudoku() (1047544) | more than 3 years ago | (#34236928)

Thanks, Larry. Unfortunately, we're up to our ears in new hardware running virtual instances of Solaris 8 and 9 still. Imagine all that wonderful new crap we could do with Solaris 11? Like hosting Solaris 8 and Solaris 9 forever... Please do something useful like not being a giant IT asshole. Thanks!

Oh, and great work on Java and OpenOffice! Way to drive off any good developers. Guess you'll need to raise your prices even more to pay for angry junior software engineers to replace freely available, superior talent. Weren't you going to ride a balloon to the sun, or was that Beardy Branson? I get you two confused.

Re:Do not want (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34237012)

The "freely available, superior talent" producing the Linux desktop is really innovating and producing superior software... Practically every open source software project that matters, including those you mentioned and the Linux kernel, is produced primarily by paid developers.

Re:Do not want (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34237160)

Thanks, Larry. Unfortunately, we're up to our ears in new hardware running virtual instances of Solaris 8 and 9 still. ...

I call BULLSHIT!!!!

Virtual instances of the damn-near nonexistent Solaris 9 for x86?!?! Or the runs-on-no-hardward, crappy-supported P.O.S that was x86 Solaris 8?

Or you're running something SPARC-based, which means you're running Solaris 10 underneath?

Most likely you're full of shit.

Full, Supported Release -- That we can't use (5, Informative)

Chuck_McDevitt (665265) | more than 3 years ago | (#34236954)

So, it's a "Full, Supported Release", but we can't use it for anything except as a development platform (and what to deploy on?). From the license agreement: We can't "use the Programs for your own internal business purposes... or for any commercial or production purposes" So in reality, it's just a way to show off, an try to keep people from jumping ship to linux. It's definitely the antithesis of FOSS -- nothing is free about it.

Re:Full, Supported Release -- That we can't use (0)

mark72005 (1233572) | more than 3 years ago | (#34236970)

Exactly...

Solaris is dead as fried chicken

Re:Full, Supported Release -- That we can't use (1)

Chuck_McDevitt (665265) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238954)

But I like fried Chicken! That doesn't mean I like Solais :(

Re:Full, Supported Release -- That we can't use (5, Insightful)

syousef (465911) | more than 3 years ago | (#34236982)

So, it's a "Full, Supported Release", but we can't use it for anything except as a development platform (and what to deploy on?).

From the license agreement: We can't "use the Programs for your own internal business purposes... or for any commercial or production purposes"

So in reality, it's just a way to show off, an try to keep people from jumping ship to linux.

It's definitely the antithesis of FOSS -- nothing is free about it.

They're just giving away the development tools for free. So when/if developers use them, and end users like the result, they've got you by the short and curlies. It's a time honoured tradition, often rightly or wrongly compared to a drug dealer's "the first hit is free, kid".

Re:Full, Supported Release -- That we can't use (2, Interesting)

segedunum (883035) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237414)

They're just giving away the development tools for free. So when/if developers use them, and end users like the result, they've got you by the short and curlies. It's a time honoured tradition, often rightly or wrongly compared to a drug dealer's "the first hit is free, kid".

Given that Solaris usage has been declining for ten years now, Oracle is pushing Solaris back into an ever higher end niche as a response and those using free development tools have Unix-like alternatives they can use for any purpose it's a bit optimistic to think they have anyone by the short and curlies. You can have as many hits as you like from other dealers and many would consider that what Oracle is selling is sherbet. I just can't see where Solaris is going now where it hasn't already been or tried to be.

Re:Full, Supported Release -- That we can't use (1)

shadowofwind (1209890) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237538)

It's a time honoured tradition, often rightly or wrongly compared to a drug dealer's "the first hit is free, kid".

The president of one of my previous companies fondly compared it to an alien that attaches to your face and you can't get it off.

Re:Full, Supported Release -- That we can't use (1)

Pharmboy (216950) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238918)

The president of one of my previous companies fondly compared it to an alien that attaches to your face and you can't get it off.

If an alien attaches to my face, quite frankly, I am not hoping it will "get off". However, that would be a good analogy for what Oracle is doing to their Solaris customers.

Alternative take... (1)

SIGBUS (8236) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237542)

They're just giving away the development tools for free. So when/if developers use them, and end users like the result, they've got you by the short and curlies. It's a time honoured tradition, often rightly or wrongly compared to a drug dealer's "the first hit is free, kid".

Another way of looking at it:

Prospective customer is already a Solaris (or Oracle DB, etc.) shop, and wants a project based on this platform. If the development tools cost a fortune, you might pass up the business.

That still doesn't excuse Oracle for its shabby treatment of the OpenSolaris community - though Sun was partly to blame with its half-hearted opening of Solaris to begin with. Illumos will be nice to have, but it's going to be a while before they replace the closed code with open code.

Re:Full, Supported Release -- That we can't use (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34237704)

This is exactly how I feel when it comes to using Matlab ...
Yes I know about Octave, but so many other packages I can conveniently use are using Matlabisms.

Re:Full, Supported Release -- CORRECTION (5, Informative)

gtirloni (1531285) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237002)

It seems you actually CAN request a support contract for Solaris 11 Express. The issue seems to be that the download from the Oracle Technology Network alone doesn't give you that hability (to use in production). It looks like they should have paid more attention to the wording... the download from OTN shouldn't be used in production but if you want support to use it in production, contact Oracle. This has been pointed out to many people, perhaps they will make that more explicity. The download page also mentions it's a "full supported release".

Re:Full, Supported Release -- caveat (1)

ArtFart (578813) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237644)

The gotcha here, if it's like the way Oracle's jigged things for Solaris 10 and earlier, is that they'll only support it (and license it for production) if you buy a full-bore support contract on the hardware--and they'll only write support contracts on Sun/Oracle branded iron purchased from them or an authorized reseller. You want licenses for those 25 servers you just picked up from a refurb house? Sorry...

Re:Full, Supported Release -- That we can't use (2, Insightful)

comay (979887) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237718)

Yes, it's a commercial product. And like many commercial products, it's available free for evaluation or for use by developers. However if you wish to deploy it on your production server, you should be obtaining a support contract (which if you're serious about production is probably a good idea anyway.)

Re:Full, Supported Release -- That we can't use (1)

turbidostato (878842) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238640)

"Yes, it's a commercial product. And like many commercial products, it's available free for evaluation or for use by developers. However if you wish to deploy it on your production server, you should be obtaining a support contract"

No, that's not about support contracts. You need an usage license.

"which if you're serious about production is probably a good idea anyway."

Which you'll get *on top* of your usage license.

Re:Full, Supported Release -- That we can't use (2, Insightful)

Chuck_McDevitt (665265) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238936)

Solaris, for a while, was free to use. Now it has become not free. For a while, they (Sun) were trying to make it open-source, now (Oracle) they are reversing that. I would buy a support contract if I was running real, important, production work. But, If I want to run a low-priority internal server, or a small external web app, I can't see it worth the support contract, so I'll just go with Linux. If not free, I'll go with Windows for many uses (yes, Windows does work in real-life applications).

Re:Full, Supported Release -- That we can't use (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34238334)

This is exactly the antithesis of what MySQL AB used to do - charge *developers* of commercial software to write stuff for MySQL!! Of course, most would not do this and simply get free development tools from Oracle, IBM or even Microsoft. Though Microsoft option was least "free" (as in beer) option.

Oracle makes their money from selling solutions to customers. Customers are not the developers. End-users are their customers. 3rd party developers are the leverage tool. Not releasing free tools to them is extremely stupid and short sighted move. It is all about developers. Once you have developers using your platform, customers of those developers will pay Oracle for the licenses.

So yes, this is free (as in beer) for developers intending on leveraging Solaris 11 to make money for themselves and for Oracle. Anyone wanting to develop middleware for Oracle DB should be very interested in this.

Re:Full, Supported Release -- That we can't use (1)

ToasterMonkey (467067) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238596)

So in reality, it's just a way to show off, an try to keep people from jumping ship to linux. It's definitely the antithesis of FOSS -- nothing is free about it.

Oh, an enemy of Linux is an enemy of FOSS, is that your argument? Do we care?

Re:Full, Supported Release -- That we can't use (2, Insightful)

Chuck_McDevitt (665265) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238920)

I dont really care about that... I care I can't use it for anything useful. So what is the point, and why should I be happy about this "release"?

Someone must die (2, Insightful)

Capt.DrumkenBum (1173011) | more than 3 years ago | (#34236974)

I am sitting here trying to take a short break from fighting with MySQL on Solaris, and I find that Oracle has released Solaris 11, with Encrypted ZFS, something that I have needed for over a year. I think I will get out my bow, and hunt down Larry, he must pay. Or maybe I will just install Linux on this box and be happy.

Re:Someone must die (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34237088)

It's not Solaris' or Oracle's fault that you clearly don't know anything about Solaris or MySQL.

Let me guess, you're one of those the-problem-isn't-me-it's-the-"shitty"-tools-i-have-to-use guys, aren't you? Somehow EVERY SINGLE TOOL you're forced to use "doesn't work" for you, but the moment me or somebody else with even a little bit of experience tries it, it works perfectly. Of course, it MUST be a problem with the tools, RIGHT?

Minor quibble... (5, Informative)

trims (10010) | more than 3 years ago | (#34236998)

Yes, you can't use the free download version for any production use. It's really annoying, and severely limits the usefulness of S11 Express.

However, note that if you have an Oracle Premium Support contract (all Oracle Support is Premium ;-), then you have an entitlement to use S11 Express in a production environment, and receive normal support for it, just like you have an RTU and Support for Oracle Linux and Oracle Solaris 10 via the same contract.

This is just an FYI - I'm not commenting on the utility or "goodness" of S11Express.

-Erik

Re:Minor quibble... (1)

barryp (31185) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237922)

What does a Premium Support contract cost? I browsed the Oracle website for a bit but didn't see anything other than a phone number to call. Is it one of those "if you have to ask you can't afford it deals"?

Re:Minor quibble... (5, Informative)

j_sp_r (656354) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238040)

Excellent news (1)

snowtigger (204757) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237004)

I'm glad to see some positive news coming from Oracle. Solaris is a great OS and I'm thankful that I can keep using it for free on my servers at home.

Now if we could also get full ZFS support for Linux, that would be great.

source or tl;dr (1)

carton (105671) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237038)

Wake me when these features are available in OpenIndiana [openindiana.org] and Nexenta Core [nexenta.org] . I'll not be trapped investing more time in platforms where ``I'm altering the deal. Pray I don't alter it any further.''

Great!! (1)

CyberSnyder (8122) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237042)

First there's Red Hat's "Linux by the pound" announcement and then this humdinger. I'm ready to learn .NET.

Sadly, I'm only half joking....

Re:Great!! (1)

CyberSnyder (8122) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237110)

I reconsider my hasty comment. They do allow use for internal development purposes. It's not free as in beer, but that's actually not too bad.

"The Open Source and Its Enemies" ... (2, Insightful)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237052)

How come when an Oracle story gets posted these days, I think of Karl Popper's work . . . ?

really? (1, Insightful)

kallisti5 (1321143) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237072)

Should of been posted in the "who-gives-a-shit" department. Do we really care what Oracle offers anymore?

And nothing of value... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34237140)

was gained.

From the license (4, Informative)

rrossman2 (844318) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237234)

You may not:
- use the Programs for your own internal business purposes (other than developing, testing, prototyping and demonstrating your applications) or for any commercial or production purposes;
- remove or modify any program markings or any notice of our proprietary rights;

- make the Programs available in any manner to any third party;

- use the Programs to provide third-party training;

- assign this agreement or give or transfer the Programs or an interest in them to another individual or entity;

- cause or permit reverse engineering (unless required by law for interoperability), disassembly or decompilation of the Programs;

- disclose results of any benchmark test results related to the Programs without our prior consen

Re:From the license (1)

comay (979887) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237664)

To be clear, you can use the release for production purposes but this requires a support contract. This is not unlike many other commerical operating systems or for that matter, other software products. For more details on the support offerings, see the links from the main page http://bit.ly/dkhwZ6 [bit.ly] . As for the other restrictions, many of them are similar to again other commerical products - they're not be redistributed by third-parties, etc.

Re:From the license (1)

hxnwix (652290) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238190)

disclose results of any benchmark test results related to the Programs without our prior consent

Oracle has never had any faith in their own products, and when they pretend to by offering performance bounties and such, they are burned badly.

Solaris under ESX? (1)

Deviant (1501) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237258)

So if you work for an organisation that has been drinking the VMWare Koolaid and wants to virtualize everything from their servers to their dekstops to their network firewalls/appliances how does Solaris x86 play under ESX?

The old advantage of the IBMs and the Oracles of "it is our software, our OS running on our hardware supported by our services business" is being eroded a bit by the desire to drop anything and everything into the same ESX farm...

Re:Solaris under ESX? (1)

FictionPimp (712802) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237520)

I'm guilty of drinking that ESX koolaid, but only because it tastes sooooooo gooood. I wonder sometimes if I'll be killed in the end by some poison.

Yesterday's News (5, Insightful)

segedunum (883035) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237290)

Solaris had it's shot at being something the Slashdot crowd could pick up and run with, but given that you can't use Solaris for anything useful now I'm not sure how this qualifies as news. Solaris is now a very high-end OS that's as relevant to people as AIX is, because that's the only feasible place it can survive now.

Re:Yesterday's News (4, Informative)

SigmundFloyd (994648) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238302)

Solaris is now a very high-end OS that's as relevant to people as AIX is

Actually, it's 17 times less relevant than AIX, at least in the Top 500 [top500.org] .

Re:Yesterday's News (4, Insightful)

ToasterMonkey (467067) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238742)

Solaris had it's shot at being something the Slashdot crowd could pick up and run with, but given that you can't use Solaris for anything useful now I'm not sure how this qualifies as news. Solaris is now a very high-end OS that's as relevant to people as AIX is, because that's the only feasible place it can survive now.

Why, because it's not "cool" or it doesn't meet some technical criteria? Is there really no space between IBM midrange hardware running AIX and the "Slashdot crowd"?
I'm thinking that's a shockingly large amount of space.

Sparc T3? Interesting... (3, Interesting)

blind biker (1066130) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237906)

I lost touch with Sun microprocessor development since I left my life as an IT/Unix specialist behind me, a couple of years ago. I am pleasantly surprised to learn that Sun engineers have been working at it, though, and have produced a rather intriguing architecture with 16 cores and 8 HW threads per core. That's pretty fucking impressive, methinks, especially since it seems to integrate two 1/10 GB ethernet controllers on die, and the 4 DDR3 channels are not bad to have, either. Anyhow, I think this is the most exciting CPU, for me, of recent years.

Time to move to RHEL 6 (3, Insightful)

mikelieman (35628) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237950)

There's a wonderfully simple solution to this. Time to move off them expensive SPARC boxes...

Solaris future is Oracle's 300,000 customers (2, Interesting)

Bryan-10021 (223345) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237964)

Oracle has over 300,000 customers of it's products. Sun had 30,000. I think the future looks bright for commercial Solaris. At the end of the day someone has to pay for the R&D that leads to innovation and Oracle knows how to sell software and make money. It's called capitalism and it's what pays everyone's salaries. And it's because of this that we will see more innovations like ZFS and DTrace.

This is a good thing as competition always benefits everyone including open source.

Re:Solaris future is Oracle's 300,000 customers (1)

yuhong (1378501) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238906)

Yep, quotes from http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/04/08/sun_bonuses_ibm/ [theregister.co.uk] :
"However, IBM operates in the real world of profit and loss, and sources told The Reg categorically that IBM failed to get a satisfactory answer on which, if any, of Sun's software makes money."
"Only if Sun accepts the full facts, and quits playing the kind of Silicon Valley game that has given Web 2.0 services like Digg ridiculous assumed valuations based on nothing more than number or users and potential future revenues can Sun's own future resume in earnest, with IBM."

OpenIndiana (1)

windcask (1795642) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238012)

I'm disappointed that there's been almost no activity out of OpenIndiana's web site (http://openindiana.org/latest-news/). It was supposed to be the next-best thing to an official open-source fork, but for whatever reason it's been dead since its release...

Re:OpenIndiana (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34238308)

Try reading the twitter feed or mailing lists. It mostly appears that the website is getting the short end of the stick because of alternative information distribution channels. Rev 148 is mentioned in the twitter feed. I'm sure there will be a slashdot article when they've got a milestone achieved.

if this is anything like Oracle RDBMS Express.... (1)

grokgov (972024) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238318)

Just beware -- Don't make the mistake of putting this in production. The "Express" version of Oracle is not taken seriously by Oracle support - There are no Oracle support bulletins for Express versions of the RDBMS - it's just off their radar. If you have an issue, and you will, you are on your own...

Who cares about Solaris? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34239074)

Solaris is dead. If you are still running on some ancient Sun hardware & paying through the nose for support, more power to you. You're stupid. We have virtualized our environment
using Citrix XenServer and I have a VM that is more powerful than our old Sun E10k. Runs circles around it, not even a contest. We killed off Oracle 10g too with Postgres Enterprisedb.
See ya Oracle.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>