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Video Games Found To Enhance Visual Attention

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the told-you-mom dept.

First Person Shooters (Games) 79

donniebaseball23 writes "Reporting on new research from WIREs Cognitive Science, IndustryGamers writes: 'Action games like Call of Duty and Halo can enhance visual attention, the ability that helps us focus on relevant visual information. The mental mechanism allows people to select pertinent visual information and ignore irrelevant information. It suggests that action titles can be used to augment military training, educational tools, and correct visual deficits.' Shawn Green, co-author of the study, commented, 'At the core of these action video game-induced improvements appears to be a remarkable enhancement in the ability to flexibly and precisely control attention, a finding that could have a variety of real-world applications. For example, those in professions that demand "super-normal" visual attention, such as fighter pilots, would benefit enormously from enhanced visual attention, as their performance and lives depend on their ability to react quickly and accurately to primarily visual information."

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When I click on the enemy, (2, Funny)

vandelais (164490) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237412)

I hear "zug zug".

Re:When I click on the enemy, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34237424)

Zerg zerg?

Re:When I click on the enemy, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34237998)

FAIL... Think earlier in Blizzard's history

Re:When I click on the enemy, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34238838)

It was a modernization, you insentive clod!

Re:When I click on the enemy, (1)

Hillgiant (916436) | more than 3 years ago | (#34244648)

Me not that kind of orc.

Re:When I click on the enemy, (2, Funny)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237650)

Speaking of your sig... on a related note, if World War 1 was fought today, it might go something like this ... :-)

http://i171.photobucket.com/albums/u292/Mx_Paladin/Pictures/WWII.gif [photobucket.com]

Re:When I click on the enemy, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34241474)

... if World War 1 was fought today, it might go something like this ... :-)

http://i171.photobucket.com/albums/u292/Mx_Paladin/Pictures/WWII.gif [photobucket.com]

Typo? The linked picture was WWII, as you can also see by the file name.

Re:When I click on the enemy, (1)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | more than 3 years ago | (#34301746)

Thanks.

Yup, off-by-one, literally :-)

Re:When I click on the enemy, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34244654)

That's, uh...

That's World War II. Not I.

Who cares about action games? (2, Interesting)

fruviad (5032) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237440)

What about ANGBAND??? Surely the hours I've poured into that have improved me in some way? Surely???

Re:Who cares about action games? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34238444)

Surely by now you know better than to drink unidentified liquids.
(and to avoid lowercase k's)

Re:Who cares about action games? (1)

CrazyJim1 (809850) | more than 3 years ago | (#34239202)

My favorite thing about Angband is ironman mode. No town, no going back up stairs. Just you and 100 level dungeon. It took me hundreds of tries, but I did beat it once with a Troll Warrior. Its soooo fun. You need to first manage your food and light. If you lose your food or light, you die. But if you dive too fast you die. So you need to dive at just the right rate to get food and light. If you get excess food or light, you can stay on a dungeon level longer for monsters to spawn and get you more exp+equipment. But if you linger on a level too long, your food or light might dwindle. On the other hand comes in the doom dive. This is when you have enough food and light, but bosses or troublesome zones force you to take down stairs as an "escape". But since you were having troubles on the last level, getting to a harder level means its more likely you'll run into that situation again! Which means you dive faster! Which means stuff gets tougher! Oh I love me some Angband. I have a rare build with an autosquelcher if anyone wants to try it without having to fight with the interface looking at drops at higher levels. Just let me know in a reply, and I'll upload to a server.

Re:Who cares about action games? (1)

CrazyJim1 (809850) | more than 3 years ago | (#34239274)

I forgot to add the hilarity of running really low on food. So instead of dying, you start eating all sorts of deadly enchanted mushrooms, drink potions, and even read scrolls in hopes of finding a satisfy hunger scroll. If you run low on light things are better, because you can start conserving on light and only using light when you need it, still things are rough. Also you don't just have unlimited identify scrolls, so you tend to save them for the best things you can find. If you get a ton of identify scrolls, you can start iding some potion stacks. If you're daring, you can just drink potions as you find them. Or you can tactically just drink potions in dire situations in hopes you get a lucky effect that will stave of sure death.

When you play regular non ironman Angband, you miss out on all the little things that make it a great game. In case you're wondering, the rules I use for ironman are: A one time run to town is optional depending on how you feel like playing. Then you cannot ever take stairs up or use a town recall scroll. If you see down stairs, you don't need to take them, it is just an option. Your choice of character is up to you. Don't ever reroll your stats, just go with the first roll.

Its sometimes fun to optionally go Random Race/Random class, but after you die enough, you might get annoyed at having to run a class you don't want on the next run.

Re:Who cares about action games? (1)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 3 years ago | (#34250246)

I prefer zangband or TOME myself, but the core gameplay remains.

Re:Who cares about action games? (1)

DMUTPeregrine (612791) | more than 3 years ago | (#34239270)

Sadly only SLASH'EM works for that.

Re:Who cares about action games? (1)

h00manist (800926) | more than 3 years ago | (#34241160)

What about ANGBAND??? Surely the hours I've poured into that have improved me in some way? Surely???

If you had to read and understand lots of text, it did help you with reading and interpretation. As to the visual, reflexes, etc, I believe playing ball will do the same, with some extra benefits for the rest of the body too. I love games. But I sort of put them aside a bit. I was sad to realize that several of the guys that gather around gaming places do tend to confuse reality and gaming and actually carry the "gaming" attitude into real life, getting into fights rather often.

I'm not so sure ;) (1)

Moraelin (679338) | more than 3 years ago | (#34244332)

Well, the examples they used do have multiplayer, while Angband doesn't. And they do talk about training your filtering _relevant_ information.

And if it's one thing that my days of counter-strike and other multiplayer FPS-es taught me, the only relevant information, the only thing that another player needs to know on a given map is (A) his mother's weight, (B) her sexual exploits, and (C) his real sexuality. At least that's what everyone was telling me, anyway. I came in expecting stuff like, you know, strategies to use, or who must lay suppression fire for whom and when, but got quickly disabused of the notion that such thing matter. The only thing I was left afterwards was a horribly complicated graph of who fucked whose mom, and how many hundreds of pounds did she weigh ;)

Also, that buying a sniper rifle equals coming out of the closet. And your mom suddenly doubles in weight and becomes more sexually active, or something ;)

Also that older fat women are uber-sexy, the way everyone was calling someone else's mom fat _and_ bragging about fucking her. I think we should get the fashion industry to play FPS, because they're doing something wrong using only thin models ;)

So, anyway, until such time as Angband gets a mod to stimulate your ability to filter such relevant information, I'm affraid it doesn't count ;)

Send me a Memo titled "Shit I already Know!" ... (-1, Offtopic)

DontScotty (978874) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237468)

Send me a Memo titled "Shit I already Know!" ... Ooo! A new episode of Red vs Blue is up, see ya!

Department of Redundancy Department (1)

noidentity (188756) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237472)

Action games [...] can enhance visual attention, the ability that helps us focus on relevant visual information. The mental mechanism allows people to select pertinent visual information and ignore irrelevant information.

Another mental mechanism is telling me that there is some irrelevant redundancy above.

Re:Department of Redundancy Department (1)

Seriousity (1441391) | more than 3 years ago | (#34239968)

No, I think it's the very mechanism described twice above; at any rate, well spotted.

mod d03n (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34237584)

[tux.org]? Are you dying. See? It's a nned to play OpenBSD wanker Theo ofone single puny Smith only serve sales and so on, every chance I got

of course (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34237622)

Because you'll need that extra visual attention for all the violence the video game will cause you to do.
/troll

Re:of course (1)

cheekyjohnson (1873388) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237690)

Yeah! I just got through playing a violent video game, reading a violent book, being exposed to pornography, viewing violent shows on television, and reading violent comic books, and I instantly became a murderer/rapist because I couldn't differentiate between fiction and reality (which, by the way, is something that all normal people are unable to do)! The video game truly helped me focus on the kill.

Not too surprising... (1)

poly_pusher (1004145) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237708)

Most of the gamers I know pass the following test: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJG698U2Mvo [youtube.com]

Re:Not too surprising... (1)

Amorymeltzer (1213818) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238118)

Sadly, that test is largely meaningless at this point - too many people have heard of it to be effective.

Re:Not too surprising... (1)

LongearedBat (1665481) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238370)

It worked on me, despite knowing what to expect. I just can't seem to concentrate and be aware at the same time.

Re:Not too surprising... (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238548)

Not necessarily, I've heard of that test or variations of it, but the extra player stuck out like a sore thumb.

Re:Not too surprising... (1)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 3 years ago | (#34241270)

OMG! The black team HAX!

Re:Not too surprising... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34238790)

Never really been a gamer, but I got 14 out of 15, and I saw the damn gorilla. Too easy.

Re:Not too surprising... (1)

corsec67 (627446) | more than 3 years ago | (#34239342)

Wow, first time seeing that clip, and I got exactly 15 passes, and noticed the gorilla when she was in the middle of the screen.

It was interesting how I was able to make the people in black simply disappear from view since they weren't relevant to the goal.

Re:Not too surprising... (1)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 3 years ago | (#34250262)

I managed to count 15 - by luck I believe. I also saw the gorilla.

What DID give me problems - occlusion! I couldn't reliably keep track of what the balls were doing because they were obscured far too often.

Re:Not too surprising... (1)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 3 years ago | (#34240652)

So do most Furries.

Re:Not too surprising... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34241068)

I'm 28, I've been playing TF2 for 4000 hours in the last 3 years, counted 14 and didn't see the gorilla while counting.

What does this mean other than I got no life and no girlfriend?

Re:Not too surprising... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34252792)

I had no problem observing the gorilla, the smile on the players, the balls being passed and the overall performance of every team.

Did I count the passes ? of course not ! the simple counting involves more than distributed attention, that's the whole point of the puppet show... give the observer a task and he won't be able to function normally, then tell him he's got issues and your little program can help him.. we accept cash.

I don't know if fighter pilots are a good example (1)

PPalmgren (1009823) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237710)

The impression that I get after seeing training and hearing stories from vets who used to be in the profession & friends is that its more about planning than quick reaction time. "A reactive pilot dies, a proactive pilot lives." It doesn't matter if you need to turn immediately, your body can't take the G's that the jet exerts if you've already put yourself in that poor of a situation. On a side note, the job takes a serious toll on the body and is certainly not as glamorous as a lot of people make it out to be.

However, I can't think of any better examples of professions, so maybe they are on the money.

Re:I don't know if fighter pilots are a good examp (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238566)

That applies to tons of other situations for other reason. Motorcycle riding is a good example. Virtually all of the times when a rider ends up getting creamed it's in a situation that's known to go bad. Left turners being one of the more common. If you wait until you're about to be hit, it's too late, you often can't turn a motorcycle fast enough to avoid it if you're not already on it.

Re:I don't know if fighter pilots are a good examp (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34239158)

Driving in general is that way, whether professional or just out on the street (though it does go doubly so for bikes). Anyway, the way Sir Jackie Stewart explained it on Top Gear is you should think of a car's suspension like a skittish dog. If you approach it gently and predictably, it will behave well. If you do something sudden and rash, it'll bite you. Reflexes are almost useless in most driving situations, because the car will not react optimally every time you do something sudden and jerky instead of smooth and in control. Anticipation by reading other drivers and traffic and then taking preemptive action is always preferable to counting strictly on reflexes.

Re:I don't know if fighter pilots are a good examp (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34238752)

But then again with good visual attention you're more likely to spot that a situation is about to go bad sooner, thus permitting more room and planning planning to handle it. A 'gamer' might spot a dangerous situation 5 seconds before it happens, a nongamer might only spot it 4 seconds (or even less) before. That last second can depending on the situation be the difference between life and death.

Re:I don't know if fighter pilots are a good examp (1)

Kelbear (870538) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238870)

I can home in on things I'm looking for very quickly, but I think my attention to detail suffers as a result of always tackling large volumes of information breadth-first instead of depth-first.

For example if I'm scanning a page of information with a lot of critical information, I skim it and miss what I'm looking for, skim again and miss it again, and it takes awhile before I realize I'm never going to find what I'm looking for this way. Eventually I settle down and read it carefully from the top and find what I needed.

Yes, I'm using text as the situation while the article discusses visual information, but I feel that I use the same mental "search-mode" for both situations. I tune out the immediate situation slightly and bring everything into equal portions of general awareness. Then the mind does all the unconscious processing, and I snap directly to points of interest.

Being highly attuned to distraction is useful in games. Hearing the faint report of a footstep/gunshot in the distance is a clue that most people don't pick up on when there's a tornado of gunfire and explosions right next to them. I log all that information in and prepare for my second and third steps while others are completely consumed by their immediate situation.

But it's a big hindrance when I'm trying to parse a long complex concept from my books, and my attention snaps to a car trunk being closed 2 houses down. Or tracking a truck going down the highway. Or the ping of the metal flexing in the hot air vent. It takes me a long time to focus, and it's easy for me to lose that focus too.

I think having concentration and single-minded focus will take most people farther in life than a broad and light attention span. The economy is really geared to favor specialists who have to absorb large amounts of complex detail, be it from a book, or from a craft.

Re:I don't know if fighter pilots are a good examp (1)

foniksonik (573572) | more than 3 years ago | (#34239276)

Not true. You are ideally suited to managing fast paced processes. You just apparently haven't found the niche that pays off yet. I can do both. Probably not as good as some at either.

I believe at the moment that it is a left vs right brain activity.

Can we pair this with the study that... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34237720)

video games make children violent? Soon we'll start having visually attentive murderers...

No shit? This just in... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34237832)

Repeated, focused operation of a bodily function just might reduce the time between intent and achievement. Or, in other words, a muscle is a muscle.

Play more UrT (1)

jebblue (1160883) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237848)

Woot! Playing Urban Terror is good for me.

It's "Video" Game (1)

fatp (1171151) | more than 3 years ago | (#34237882)

It would be a failure if it replies on other forms of attentions.

And the reality is that vision is the most important perception.

Driving Skills? (1)

snowraver1 (1052510) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238050)

I'd like to see a study on gamers' driving records compared to non gamers. Are gamers better at driving? Worse?

Re:Driving Skills? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34238348)

I'd like to see a study on gamers' driving records compared to non gamers. Are gamers better at driving? Worse?

No.

Re:Driving Skills? (1)

Black Gold Alchemist (1747136) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238380)

No.

Yes.

Re:Driving Skills? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34239374)

Both.

With no middle ground, to speak of.

Re:Driving Skills? (1)

What the Frag (951841) | more than 3 years ago | (#34239926)

Better drivers? I don't know. However I'd call me a faster reacting driver. Due to FPS games my reaction time decreased significantly over the time.

i'm quite sure (1)

zlel (736107) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238052)

porn does quite the same thing

Contradicts what the military says (1)

dave562 (969951) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238130)

I was reading an article about a year ago that was comparing soliders from urban areas and rural areas. Video game use is obviously fairly universal among enlistment age males. The hypothesis that was stated was that the soliders who had played video games would be more alert and more effective on patrol. It turned out to be the exact opposite. The kids who played games were more of a liability because their attention was narrowly focused and they would have problems recognizing things that were out of place. On the other hand, the "rural" enlistees who hunted and spent time outside significantly out performed the urban "video game" kids when it came to noticing IEDs and other threats.

Re:Contradicts what the military says (1)

Shadow of Eternity (795165) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238300)

Link? I'm skeptical because any gamer that's got tunnel vision and is bad at spotting "out of place" things would be TERRIBLE at almost every FPS.

Re:Contradicts what the military says (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34238462)

Yes but most people ARE terrible at Quake-like FPSes. IME especially soldiers. With realistic shooters though, e.g. OFP and ARMA, they did a lot better. Not because they were great but because they knew when to work as a team.

Re:Contradicts what the military says (1)

Simon80 (874052) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238542)

That doesn't sound right to me. When playing something like Counterstrike, UT, or Quake, reaction time is key, and the environment is usually very familiar in multiplayer maps. There's little reason to be keeping an eye out for anything that's not a person, and if there's pickups, they're usually in static locations, so there's no need to visually search for those either.

Re:Contradicts what the military says (1)

Shadow of Eternity (795165) | more than 3 years ago | (#34249076)

Maybe in the old 99 games where maps may as well have been flat colored boxes of various sizes for all they mattered, but with games like Battlefield and especially Bad Company it's getting pretty important to be aware of things.

Re:Contradicts what the military says (1)

Simon80 (874052) | more than 3 years ago | (#34260658)

What "things" you're talking about other than people?

Re:Contradicts what the military says (1)

Shadow of Eternity (795165) | more than 3 years ago | (#34278846)

Well lets start with landmines, most people would consider one of those pretty important to notice.

Re:Contradicts what the military says (1)

Labcoat Samurai (1517479) | more than 3 years ago | (#34243184)

Maybe if you've hardly ever been outdoors, you'd be bad at *knowing* that something is out of place. I don't know, doesn't seem like a very damning indictment here. Video games could still improve your reaction time and attention to relevant detail while not being as useful for outdoor military patrols as hunting experience, which seems much more closely related to the task.

Re:Contradicts what the military says (1)

Shadow of Eternity (795165) | more than 3 years ago | (#34249058)

That sounds more like a training failure on the military's part tbh, unless of course hunters are out there looking for a 12 point IED.

Re:Contradicts what the military says (1)

Labcoat Samurai (1517479) | more than 3 years ago | (#34249752)

Heh :) Maybe looking for deer tracks or other signs of one's quarry is something that translates well... who knows?

Re:Contradicts what the military says (1)

Shadow of Eternity (795165) | more than 3 years ago | (#34250756)

And those 4 brown pixels might be more brown pixels or they might be a sniper 300 meters away. That little blip might just be some bloom or it might have been a tank firing at you from the horizon...

Not necessarily a contradiction (2)

justinlee37 (993373) | more than 3 years ago | (#34239536)

Just because hunting and being outside is more effective at developing military patrol skills than video games are, it doesn't necessarily follow that video games are not effective. They could simply be less effective. Plus, the example quoted in the summary was fighter jet pilots. That sort of task is highly visual in a very different way and I would imagine that at times, modern HUDs resemble video games. Not to mention that, as I have heard, there are several flight simulation games that actually require you to know how to operate all of the equipment in the cockpit for the plane you are flying. I'd like to see a study that specifically controlled for experience at THOSE types of games, not just "Halo" or something stupid. I don't know of any FPS, even amongst the more realistic ones than Halo, that require you to know how to actually operate an M-16, AK-47, Colt .45, or whatever else they put in the hands of the player.

Being in the Air Force and piloting an F-16 is a very different task than being in the Army and patrolling the latrines.

I realize that the Army doesn't just patrol the latrines but it rhymes so I couldn't help myself ;-)

Also don't forget that the skills mentioned in the summary aren't just useful in the military. Enhanced visual attention could be useful to someone who performed robotic open-heart surgery, or a designer who uses AutoCAD to engineer low-cost hydroponic farm equipment. The world doesn't ALWAYS have to be about war, death and destruction, you know ;-)

Re:Not necessarily a contradiction (1)

Carthain (86046) | more than 3 years ago | (#34241640)

Enhanced visual attention is also useful for your everyday person -- such as anyone who drives a car.

Even Better: No Sound (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34238180)

I played all my games without sound for years, relying solely on constant visual awareness, and it has definitely increased my ability to focus on my surroundings in day to day life. Playing major titles muted is definitely the way to go if you want to use them to train your eyes.

Re:Even Better: No Sound (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238600)

But, it's not just visual acuity that counts, it's the way that you integrate that with your other senses that makes for the best. Meaning that you're not generally going to rely upon just one of your senses when making a decision. For instance your sense of smell and taste are intimately related and hard to truly divide. Likewise ones vision tends to dim when one is concentrating on listening and vice versa.

If you really want to be overall perceptive, you have to work on balancing and interpreting all the sensory information simultaneously.

Woah a study that does not bash violent games (1)

youn (1516637) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238388)

the results must be wrong ;)

From the University of No Shit Sherlock (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34238394)

Ric Romero reports: frequently doing something that requires skill will improve your skill! Its called: practice.

Need more twitch games though (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34238454)

Back in the day when Quake1/2/3 was popular and I played a lot I noticed enhanced hand-eye coordination among other things. One was that I was able to grab flies out of the air with my hand with an almost 100% success rate. Pretty much while doing anything I could react faster and more accurately. Similar to this article, I had an enhanced sense of awareness, noticing even very small and/or fast moving objects.

Re:Need more twitch games though (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238586)

Yes, but can you do it with chopsticks?

Re:Need more twitch games though (1)

Cwix (1671282) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238798)

Only on my first try.

I need all the enhanced visual attention I can get (1)

Decollete (1637235) | more than 3 years ago | (#34238938)

since I am cramming everything that needs to be done thanks to video games. How I wish it can help keep myself awake in the office after playing till late nights though.

FPS game skills in Montreal traffic (1)

claq (727871) | more than 3 years ago | (#34239112)

I hadn't played FPS games for quite a few years but I credit the skills they developed for successfully navigating autoroute 40 in Montreal. Noticing relevant signs while dodging cars just a half meter away got my family through alive. No achievements awarded (except being alive and not trading paint), but autoroute 40 is definitely the expert level, compared to easy level aka autoroute 20. I'm an experienced Toronto driver, but things are different enough in Montreal to make you have to fall back to skill sets learned in twitch fests. No offense to Montreal drivers; I'm sure if one is familiar with the driving culture it all makes sense, but, damn, cut the folks with the Ontario plates some slack :)

America (1)

Swampash (1131503) | more than 3 years ago | (#34239660)

If it has a military application, it's good, and money will be thrown at it.

Film at 11 (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 3 years ago | (#34239884)

So doing $something a lot improves your skill in doing $something_similar?

Whodathunkit!?!?

Hats (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34240342)

All 1500 hours of Team Fortress 2 has brought me is a habit of looking at the top of a person's head first.

Hats (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#34240386)

all 1500 hours of Team Fortress 2 gave me was a habit of looking at the top of people's heads first

Peripheral vision, people. (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 3 years ago | (#34240776)

Waving your mouse around to simulate having a natural FOV doesn't train you to actually use your natural pheripheal vision, and it does sound logical that it might in fact cause it to decay.

How Call of Duty saved my life. (1)

NuKe_MoNgOoSe (1941452) | more than 3 years ago | (#34242016)

True story! I believe that my passion for FPS like Call of Duty are largely responsible for saving my life and that of my family. It was only because of quick reaction time (out of my peripheral) that I noticed a SUV about to sideswipe me coming off a side road and because I am so used to adjusting my vision quickly to scope into windows and whatnot off the left and right of the screen when im gaming (attention to my peripheral vision was always lacking)i was able to swerve to the opposite lane as the truck screeched to a halt. Had i not swerved the SUV would have taken my girlfriend or my 5 month old out and likely caused more damage as the vehical spun around from the impact. I really do believe that my adoration of Call of Duty improved my reflexes, and my ability to see out of my periphery(sp).

Great idea with real world application (1)

murph146 (1942566) | more than 3 years ago | (#34273258)

I think further development of this is a great idea. The fact that is has the possibilites for real world application should be a major factor in further continuing the research. With all the distractions out there in the world anything that can hone in on and help people focus on the relvant information immediately around them would be a big benefit. Thats just for the every day man or women. But, when applying it to very stressful jobs or ones with very technicals demands the positive outcomes could be far reaching. I hope to see this more of this in the future.
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