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Malaysian Indicted After Hacking Federal Reserve

kdawson posted more than 2 years ago | from the tip-of-the-proverbial dept.

Crime 132

wiredmikey sends along a security story that looks like it could be one to watch. Lin Mun Poo was arrested shortly after arriving at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport in late October, traveling to the US on business. The 32-year-old resident of Malaysia was observed by an undercover Secret Service agent selling stolen credit card data in a diner. After arresting him and seizing his laptop (which was "heavily encrypted"), authorities discovered evidence of far more serious security breaches. According to documents from the Department of Justice, Lin Mun Poo had hacked into the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland and stolen over 400,000 credit and debit card numbers. Also, according to authorities, Mr. Poo managed to hack into FedComp, a data processor for federal credit unions, enabling him to access the data of various federal credit unions. He also hacked into the computer system of a Department of Defense contractor that provides systems management for military transport and other military operations, potentially compromising highly sensitive military logistics information.

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This story... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34307212)

is a load of Poo.

Re:This story... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34307538)

Nah, it's just the minimum dose of crap.

Re:This story... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34307646)

You might say people are lining up for this minor load of poo

You might also say that these are neither puns, nor funny.

Re:This story... (5, Funny)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307724)

It would appear the Mr. Poo, is in some really deep shit now....

Re:This story... (1)

LifesABeach (234436) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308630)

A list of Credit Card numbers stolen from a Federal Reserve Bank? Really? Could I see a Credit Card Application from this bank? How about some enter prizing sole go and open a personal checking account there. Because that's what we use to ask every freshman finance major when I was going to college. I was told that walk BACK from the Fed. bank was an illuminating experience. Good times, good times...

Re:This story... (4, Insightful)

falsified (638041) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307716)

It kind of is. Can we stop putting things like this under "Your Rights Online"? The person was observed breaking the law in a restaurant, not online, and it sounds like subsequent searches were above the board and revealed some pretty egregious shit. He's also confessed to at least some of the charges.

Does Slashdot have a grouping named "People not yet convicted of breaking the law, but ehhhhhh, it really looks like they did"? Otherwise it looks like we're arguing that people should have a protection against being observed by the Secret Service when there's reasonable suspicion of illegality. This wasn't exactly warrantless wiretapping.

Re:This story... (1)

BBTaeKwonDo (1540945) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308658)

It's kdawson - what else did you expect? And why do I not have a filter on his/her posts?

Raiser tag?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34308714)

Maybe we need a Reiser tag for it?

grouping (1)

jDeepbeep (913892) | more than 2 years ago | (#34309344)

Does Slashdot have a grouping named "People not yet convicted of breaking the law, but ehhhhhh, it really looks like they did"?

A new grouping named 'Crime' would fit the bill imo.

END THE FED!!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34307214)

It's a bunch of usury and trickery. Onward!

Mr Poo? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34307216)

Serioulsy?

Re:Mr Poo? (0, Troll)

TrisexualPuppy (976893) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307236)

Serioulsy?

Well, for the record, there is an architect named I. M. Pei.

Re:Mr Poo? (1)

Coren22 (1625475) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308324)

I am pie, or am I mispronouncing the last word.

Re:Mr Poo? (1)

grub (11606) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307340)


He's a character in a potty-training book I used to read to my daughter.

Unlike the book, this Mr. Poo is going to the Grown Up potty where Mr. Bubba will enjoy Mr. Poo's company...

Re:Mr Poo? (1)

bughunter (10093) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307534)

Seriously.

I'd suggest that he seek asylum on the island nation of Fernando Poo [thefreedictionary.com] , but that might create an international crisis [everything2.com] that leads us to the brink of nuclear war.

Mr Lin (3, Informative)

donscarletti (569232) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308208)

Nope, they screwed it up. His family name is "Lin", his given name is "Mun Poo".

However, since he is Malaysian Chinese, things get weirder, Malaysian Chinese may write their name Chinese order "Lin Mun Poo", western order "Mun Poo Lin", without family name "Mun Poo", a single Arabic name e.g. "Muhammad", a single English name or an English name with a Chinese surname e.g. "David Lin". Any one of these might be what is written on this individual's birth certificate.

Re:Mr Poo? (1)

Hoi Polloi (522990) | more than 2 years ago | (#34309580)

It could be worse, there is a Whitehead Institute near me. Then there is Mr Lipschitz.

You can't trust Asians (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34307224)

I've said it for years - You can't trust a fellow if his skin is yellow.

Nobody listened to me, and look where we are now!

You can't trust the white man... (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34307394)

The native American did. And look where that got them...

Re:You can't trust the white man... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34308070)

What douche modded you up? And what do Chinese rail workers have to do with Native Americans?

Re:You can't trust the white man... (2, Insightful)

Lead Butthead (321013) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308164)

I think the point was, all races are equally (un)trustworthy.

The Eleventh Commandment (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34308722)

Thou shalt always read the title of a post before replying to it.

Re:You can't trust Asians (1, Insightful)

HungryHobo (1314109) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307530)

Did anyone else notice the lovely little bit of racism at the top of the article:
"'If a guy from Malaysia can get into networks like this, you can imagine what the Chinese and Russians ... are able to do' "

With the net someone from anywhere has just as much access to all the information you'd need to learn how to do this.
there's nothing special about the chinese, the russians or the americans, hackers come from everywhere.

Re:You can't trust Asians (0, Offtopic)

Bieeanda (961632) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307864)

I'm afraid that I didn't notice it for all of the racism in these comments.

Re:You can't trust Asians (4, Insightful)

mysidia (191772) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308198)

"'If a guy from Malaysia can get into networks like this, you can imagine what the Chinese and Russians ... are able to do' "

No racism there, except for extremely expansive gratuitously warped definitions of racism.

There are well-known large hacking rings in Russia and China. It is not difficult to imagine that many hackers working together are obviously a potentially larger threat than one hacker, assuming individuals of comparable skill and knowledge; the conclusions are obvious and have nothing to do with race.

There are some Malaysian hacking rings, but less well known to the public and the popular media.

Even if the more adept hackers happened to be in China, and it was stated, it wouldn't imply anything about race. As there are other factors involved, such as government being involved and promoting hacking, or there being stronger penalties for hackers in a country. The amount of technology available in a country, and the state of its economy and culture also effect such things.

In any event, Racism is defined as using power, for example, force, government authority, business decisions, or threat of violence/harm to promote the superiority of one race or to marginilize another.

Besides race there are a lot of differences between the culture and environment in Malaysia VS Chinese/Russian countries, ability to hide, and access to certain resources.

There is nothing in the article indicating the Malaysian race is somehow inferior, or evil, or that hackers of the Chinese/Russian race are superior, inferior, or more evil, ergo no racism.

Malaysian vs. Malay (1)

Abe Skray (944442) | more than 2 years ago | (#34309504)

I agree with the parent, but I want to make an important distinction in terminology.

There is nothing in the article indicating the Malaysian race is somehow inferior, or evil, or that hackers of the Chinese/Russian race are superior, inferior, or more evil, ergo no racism.

"Malaysian" is a term used to describe a citizen of Malaysia, a nation comprised of people from different ethnic groups. "Malay" is an ethnic term that can describe people from one of those groups. The expression "Malaysian race" is as meaningless as "American race" or "Canadian race."

Re:You can't trust Asians (3, Insightful)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308276)

I think the emphasis should be on the "some guy" aspect rather than the "Malaysia" aspect. The fact of the matter is, China and Russia aren't exactly hiding the fact that they have large populations of people who are basically dedicated to computer intrusion, espionage and intelligence gathering, many of whom receive partial or full government support, or are in fact government employees. While we have our own NSA, Russia and China seem to have lots of general citizens who are engaging in such activities for avowed nationalist purposes. I have a somewhat hard time believing that if I started hacking foreign governments and then went down the road here to share what information I may have gleaned that I'd be welcomed with open arms.

Malaysia isn't a country one generally hears about engaging in this type of activity. He could have been from Andora for all it matters, and the message would be the same: if one guy, no matter where he's from, without the support of his own government intelligence agencies, is able to obtain this type of information and access, then malicious state actors should have no trouble doing so. Also, the fact that his access to logistical information wasn't noticed until the course of what started out as a simple criminal investigation by the appropriate authorities (Secret Service being under the authority of the Treasury Department), that's kind of scary. It means that the Russians, Chinese, Iranians, or anyone else might also have had access to that same data and no one was apparently paying any attention, or there are unknown security flaws which were exploited and thus there were no IDS/IPS rules to catch the activity and raise any flags.

This dude is somewhat irrelevant compared to the wider implications of the non-credit-related activities, which are also pretty much straight up crime.

Re:You can't trust Asians (2, Insightful)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 2 years ago | (#34309022)

Clearly it means 'If one guy from a "friendly" country can do that, imagine what agents of the "unfriendly" countries can do with the backing provided by the state'.

Re:You can't trust Asians (1)

internettoughguy (1478741) | more than 2 years ago | (#34309778)

Did anyone else notice the lovely little bit of racism at the top of the article:
"'If a guy from Malaysia can get into networks like this, you can imagine what the Chinese and Russians ... are able to do' "

With the net someone from anywhere has just as much access to all the information you'd need to learn how to do this.
there's nothing special about the chinese, the russians or the americans, hackers come from everywhere.

The word you were looking for was probably "Xenophobia", not "racism".

Re:You can't trust Asians (1)

sjames (1099) | more than 2 years ago | (#34309840)

Not racism, just unclear. To translate, if an individual from a relatively neutral country can do this, imagine what the large group of state backed hackers from less friendly countries can do with their resources.

Stolen squared (5, Interesting)

hendrikboom (1001110) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307248)

He stole stolen credit card numbers? They ended up being twice stolen? And why was the Federal Reserve Bank harboring stolen numbers anyway?

Re:Stolen squared (2, Insightful)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307276)

For the same reason Comcast blocks bittorrents.
Because they are both private, corporate monopolies and
  there's nobody willing to stop them. (Look how the Audit the Fed bill died.)

Re:Stolen squared (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34307922)

You clearly missed the point in the grandparent's post. :)

He stole already-stolen credit card numbers from the Fed?

Re:Stolen squared (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34309220)

informative? parent didn't bother to actually read GP...

Re:Stolen squared (1)

Swanktastic (109747) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307554)

I believe the submitter misread the article. Everywhere else is saying that he hacked the Cleveland Reserve and separately stole the credit cards. The Fed banks have no reason to keep credit card numbers.

Re:Stolen squared (1)

durrr (1316311) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307774)

I don't know why but i read the same as op that the cleveland reserve credit cards he stole were stolen, but going back and rereading i find nothing wrong.
There's a brickwall in front of my window too suddenly, i think we need to reboot the reality servers.

Re:Stolen squared (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34307616)

TFS doesn't say he stole stolen credit card numbers. It says he stolen them. Subtle difference.

Re:Stolen squared (1)

Reservoir Penguin (611789) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307620)

How d How you think black-ops operations get financed?

Re:Stolen squared (1)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308288)

slush funds in off-shore accounts which are replenished via under-the-table arms and narcotics deals? Or is that too 1980s to be relevant anymore?

Re:Stolen squared (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34309370)

Drugs are patriotic! Support your local CIA operative!

Fed MasterCard (1)

droidsURlooking4 (1543007) | more than 2 years ago | (#34309984)

Use your Federal Reserve MasterCard/Visa and earn Bail Out Points to help you avoid bankruptcy. Pay zero % interest for the first election cycle on balances up to 2 Trillion!

One wonders why... (2, Funny)

digitaldc (879047) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307270)

...Lin Min was always so much more misbehaved than his brother, Hu Flung Poo?

Re:One wonders why... (2, Funny)

ilsaloving (1534307) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308216)

I heard that when he initially refused to give up his passwords, they threatened to throw him into a fan.

"Heavily encrypted" (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307284)

I'm guessing they used the standard government decryption algorithm HWBUO (Hit With Brick Until Open)?

Re:"Heavily encrypted" (5, Funny)

BruiserBlanton (133306) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307360)

You know that's not the plan.

Obligatory XKCD
http://xkcd.com/538/ [xkcd.com]

Re:"Heavily encrypted" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34307570)

best xkcd ever!

Re:"Heavily encrypted" (1)

FiloEleven (602040) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308300)

Okay, I have to ask.

The past three or four XKCD links I've seen have all had an AC replying with "best xkcd ever!"

Are you just one dude posting to all of these?
Is it a new stupid meme?
Or is it a bunch of people who are telling the truth but don't have nicks or are too lazy to sign in?

Genuinely curious,
f

Re:"Heavily encrypted" (1)

Apocryphos (1222870) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308932)

I think it's sarcasm. It used to be people would reply with how "XKCD is not 'obligatory'". I think this is just the next step of escalation. Take cover now.

Re:"Heavily encrypted" (1)

FiloEleven (602040) | more than 2 years ago | (#34309438)

So it's a new meme. Yay.

Re:"Heavily encrypted" (2, Funny)

Peeteriz (821290) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307454)

According to early data security research performed by KGB, thermorectal cryptoanalysis (involving a penetration test with soldering iron) can reveal encryption keys of any length within a couple of minutes.

Re:"Heavily encrypted" (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34307552)

Had his laptop been heavily encrypted, they wouldn't have gotten anywhere. This is an attempt at undermining cryptography.

Re:"Heavily encrypted" (2, Insightful)

Zed Pobre (160035) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308278)

Oh, I suspect that he might very well have been using full-disk encryption, which would meet the definition of 'heavily encrypted'. The lesson to take away here is that it doesn't matter how heavily you encrypt your data if you let your device get captured after you've logged in. From the motion for detention, he made a sale at a diner while being watched by Secret Service agents and got picked up 'shortly thereafter', whatever that means, and if he failed to completely power down his laptop between sale and arrest, it's game over. Lesson for the day: if you're carrying evidence that will destroy your life, remember that closing the lid on your laptop doesn't actually wipe its memory.

As an aside, I also suspect the motive for the phrasing is less 'undermining cryptography' as 'look how awesome we are'. Almost all documents by any law enforcement agency on a major bust puff up how devious and sophisticated the bad guy was, so they can imply that they were even better.

Re:"Heavily encrypted" (1)

bberens (965711) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308606)

Meh, he was clearly under surveillance. They likely just watched him type in his password and/or had previously installed a keylogger.

Re:"Heavily encrypted" (1)

Mongoose Disciple (722373) | more than 2 years ago | (#34309090)

Had his laptop been heavily encrypted, they wouldn't have gotten anywhere.

You know how they say you can root any system as long as you have physical access to the machine and enough time?

You can break any (practically useful) encryption, as long as you have physical access to a person who knows the key and are willing to attach a car battery to their gonads. The classic "Jack Bauer" style of crypto-hacking, if you will.

So much for security through obscurity... (2, Interesting)

aeroseth (228594) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307314)

Why are these things even connected to the internet if there is the danger of cracking them?

Re:So much for security through obscurity... (2, Insightful)

HungryHobo (1314109) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307452)

because someone in management thinks it would be cool to be able to access it all from his blackberry from home and a consultant assured him that the system their company was selling would let him do that securely (with of course an explicit clause in the contract which states that they do not guarantee that it will be secure and take no responsibility of any kind if it is not).

plus of course the banking system is civilian and the costs of running a completely seperate network are prohibative and anyone who wants to use that system has to be connected and if any of them are insecure then someone can get in anyway... etc.

Finally, security is hard. it was once summed up to me thusly by a lecturer: "if the other guy is a better programmer than you he'll probably get into any system you build eventually, there will always be someone who is a better programmer than you thus assume your system will be breached eventually and build in many many layers of security."

Re:So much for security through obscurity... (2, Insightful)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307508)

Don't forget that the taxpayers will backstop all losses... Privatize all gains and socialize all losses, thats the American Way (tm)

Re:So much for security through obscurity... (4, Insightful)

commodore64_love (1445365) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307598)

>>>Privatize all gains and socialize all losses, thats the [Corporatist] Way (tm)

fixed that for you.
And of course both parties are corporatist.
(whispers)
aka fascist

Re:So much for security through obscurity... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34309444)

>>>Privatize all gains and socialize all losses, thats the [Corporatist] Way (tm)

fixed that for you.
And of course both parties are corporatist.
(whispers)
aka fascist

Do you mean like the Wall Street bailout? Those *uckers should have been allowed to fail and then their executives charged and sentenced to death by hanging.

Re:So much for security through obscurity... (1)

mckinnsb (984522) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307470)

Likely because:
  1. The federal reserve bank may have been testing a new system which would allow financial institutions to access a list of stolen credit cards via a web or network interface for electronic transactions in order to safeguard them.
  2. FedComp is (likely) already a subscription service which is accessible via the internet for employees of said federal credit unions.

I don't think there's anything to see here. The guy stole "already stolen" credit cards and tried to sell them for a profit. He's a con artist, nothing more. There's been a lot of drum-up about US cyber security in the media lately (see: Stuxnet) and methinks its all just a lot of FUD in order to ply the citizenry into allowing "greater government oversight" of the internet and private networks.

Re:So much for security through obscurity... (1)

Dare nMc (468959) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308958)

> The guy stole "already stolen" credit cards
still sounds valuable, IE if a scammer buys a list of stolen cards, you wouldn't know how many people that was already sold to. IF you mask it with a current FBI... list, and get matches: what you have is likely worthless, or not worth making cards from. If however it comes back clean, you at least know the Feds are not yet "onto your list." And likely have some time to use them.
I would think (for this reason) the service would be to check your numbers, not to provide the entire list.

Re:So much for security through obscurity... (1)

Amorymeltzer (1213818) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307492)

...he allegedly tapped into the secure computers of a large Defense Department contractor that managed systems for military transport movements and other U.S. military operations?

...he had gotten the credit and bank card data by tapping into the computer networks of "several major international banks" and companies

In large part these are the networks of companies, which, while it makes sense for them to be online, doesn't make it easier to swallow.

To be honest, though, I think the worst part of the article is this:

"If a guy from Malaysia can get into networks like this, you can imagine what the Chinese and Russians, the people with real capabilities, are able to do," said one former senior U.S. intelligence official...

Training is everything. It doesn't matter whether you're from Russia or China or Malaysia or Sweden, what you know and how you know it is everything. It might be easier to be from one country or another, but once you get there nationality means nothing. This kind of ignorant and racist Cold War thinking is patently absurd, thank god it's a "former" official.

Re:So much for security through obscurity... (1)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307878)

Another way to look at this. He got caught. how good could he really be?

Re:So much for security through obscurity... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34307550)

Why are these things even connected to the internet if there is the danger of cracking them?

Because there's no other way for a modern financial system to operate. What, you want them to reconcile payments between branches using paper ledgers and couriers?

Re:So much for security through obscurity... (2, Interesting)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307580)

Why are these things even connected to the internet if there is the danger of cracking them?

For the same reason commercial power plants, including nuclear plants, are on the internet and running on stock Windows.

Because many of the people in charge of making these decisions are imbeciles.

Who did the Fed Reserve steal them from? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34307342)

"Lin Min Poo had hacked into the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland and stolen over 400,000 stolen credit and debit card numbers."

Sounds like he's in some deep poo. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34307400)

^_^

Is This Hack Part Of ( +1, Incendiary ) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34307430)

Bernanke's QE2 [zerohedge.com] ?

Hackers want to know.

Yours In Minsk,
K. Trout

Mr. Poo. (3, Funny)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307460)

I feel like it's an episode of South Park - hey there, Mr. Poo.

From TFA:

"To have the skills to break into highly sensitive systems like that is an impressive level of criminal activity," said Kurt Baumgartner, a senior security researcher for Kaspersky Lab, a computer security firm.

- yeah, I bet it takes impressive level of criminal activity consisting of some 'LOL Cat' or maybe a 'Hot Malaysian Massage' screen saver and off the shelf 'back-orifice' of some sort.

But anyway, what did this guy do that the Fed isn't doing anyway?

traveling to the US on business

- that right there is a punishable offense, well at the very least your 'junk' may have to be touched.

The 32 year-old resident of Malaysia was observed by an undercover Secret Service agent

- they are making it sound much dirtier than it was.

selling stolen credit card data in a diner

- stay classy Mr. Poo. At a diner?

Why can't you be more respectable and do it like the Fed does, they sell their junk bonds on the bond market, with bells and whistles.

After arresting him and seizing his laptop (which was "heavily encrypted")

- with ROT13

authorities discovered evidence

- as I said, with ROT13.

Lin Min Poo had hacked into the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland and stolen over 400,000 stolen credit and debit card numbers.

- BASTARD! How dare he steal the STOLEN credit card numbers? Fed was just going to sell them themselves at a diner.

Also, according to authorities, Mr. Poo managed to hack into FedComp, a data processor for federal credit unions, enabling him to access the data of various federal credit union.

- various 'credit union'. Yeah, that one credit union is extremely 'various' indeed.

He also hacked into computer system of a Department of Defense contractor that provides systems management for military transport and other military operations, potentially compromising highly sensitive military logistics information.

- well, in his defense, he was just going to sell that highly classified systems management information at a better restaurant, he has SOME standards.

"If a guy from Malaysia can get into networks like this, you can imagine what the Chinese and Russians, the people with real capabilities, are able to do

- OMG! Call the Pentagon, they need to check if the database of the stolen mortgage back securities papers hasn't been stolen!

In fact, the penetration of sensitive national security computers by overseas hackers — many of them believed to be state sponsored — is rapidly emerging as one of the country’s most alarming national security threats, officials said. And the threat is not just from foreign governments and for-profit hackers. Officials have also expressed worries that terrorist groups may be capable of the same sorts of sophisticated penetrations.

- clearly, more F35s are needed to stop these attacks. What was that about the Republicans voting to STOP pig, I mean pork spending?

HOW, just HOW will they STOP all that pork spending if there is clearly so much that needs to be done right now, to prevent the terrorists from winning by 'hacking' into the White House and stealing the toilet cleaning schedule?

Pentagon officials said Sunday they were unable to respond immediately to questions about whether Poo's hacking of the contractor's computers had compromised military troop movements. But spokesman Bryan Whitman said in an e-mailed statement to NBC News: "We are keenly aware that our networks are being probed everyday. That's precisely why we have a very robust and layered active defense to protect our networks and preserve our freedom of movement in this domain."

- but we will not give up our necessity to install hot Malaysian massage videos as screen savers!

So far, almost nothing is known about who Poo really is, what his motivations are, and who his accomplices might be. But Baumgartner said he believes "that there's a lot more to do this story that hasn't come out."

- I suggest they go over his junk once more, just to make sure.

Re:Mr. Poo. (1)

JamesP (688957) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307710)

Stop steering my storen stuff!!!!

Re:Mr. Poo. (1)

Yoshamano (1424781) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308112)

hahaha, I needed those lulz this morning, and your post delivered. Thanks.

Re:Mr. Ouchyy-Poo. (1)

noshellswill (598066) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308144)

Jam a hot poker up this Libertoonians *zzwhole ... then see if he wants to continue smarmy-chit-chat.

He forgot to wipe (2, Funny)

digitalPhant0m (1424687) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307466)

Mr. Poo forgot to 'Wipe' the data off hist laptop.

Re:He forgot to wipe (1)

RayMarron (657336) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307730)

Damn! Beat me to it! :)

Actual indictment (1)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307514)

For what its worth, his name Lin Mun Poo, not Lin Min Poo

POO lin Mun indictment [scribd.com]

Although I am curious to know if his name is being reported correctly. Is Poo his family name or is it Lin? Can anyone familiar with Malaysian names give an opinion?

Re:Actual indictment (2, Informative)

tangent3 (449222) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307802)

It's a Chinese name (there's a large community of Chinese in Malaysia)
Lin is the family name, Mun Poo is the given name.

Re:Actual indictment (1)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307856)

It's a Chinese name (there's a large community of Chinese in Malaysia) Lin is the family name, Mun Poo is the given name.

Thanks - That's what I thought, but even the indictment has POO in all caps rather than LIN

Re:Actual indictment (1)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307884)

Thanks - That's what I thought, but even the indictment has POO in all caps rather than LIN

Ooops .. I take that back. It is Scribd that has POO in all caps, the indictment has the complete name in caps.

Re:Actual indictment (1)

Viceice (462967) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307996)

Lin is his Family/surname. I initially wasn't sure, but then I found a local news report citing a police official using his given name as "Mun Poo".

Anyway, it's a chinese name and when written in mandarin, surnames come before given names. Confusion arises when the name is romanised (often times in a shoddy manner, so you can't tell just by reading it) and then the surname is moved to the back as is the formal english style. It gets worse in documents where the comma or uppercase seperating first and last names is omitted.

slip of mind? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34307546)

This guy is obviously talented, he must know a lot about security related things.
So after cracking all this high profile targets, he uses his bright mind to decide on a travel to the USA... And bring his laptop... With all evidence still on it...

Mr. Poo (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34307572)

Mr. Poo. tee hee hee...

I'll bet (1)

kimvette (919543) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307680)

I'll bet he will serve a far harsher sentence than rapists and child diddlers, because this involves the almighty dollar.

Re:I'll bet (2, Insightful)

Hinhule (811436) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307742)

Like being recruited by the NSA or the Cyber command.

I'll Bet you will... (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 2 years ago | (#34307748)

I'll bet he will serve a far harsher sentence than rapists and child diddlers, because this involves the almighty dollar.

After someone empties your bank account, let me know how you feel.

Re:I'll Bet you will... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34307876)

My thoughts exactly.

I was ready to drive down to Georgia and have a chat with the fuckers that did it (they were filling their tanks at a local gas station). I found out where they actually lived (their town, that is).

I got carried away, but hey, this is what happens when you find out you're 600 shorter over night.

Nevermind the hassle. Cancel your bank account, change all your passwords, paperwork, new cards.

just my $.02.

Re:I'll Bet you will... (1)

Noughmad (1044096) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308166)

After someone rapes you/your wife/daughter, let me know how you feel.

Re:I'll Bet you will... (1)

pspahn (1175617) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308798)

For those not keeping up, here are the options:

1) Have your money stolen from your bank account.

2) Have the female loved ones in your life raped.

If someone is coming around, snatching up money and people, instead of arguing over which is worse, you better just hide your money, hide your wife, hide your kids...

how could they... (1)

hesaigo999ca (786966) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308284)

How could those companies that were in charge of military intel have been so loose as to place the computers that are to contain the intel that is lcassified to access the internet so easily. That is 1) prob right there....secondly, the banks again should not have their main data available to the web as well, although seeing some of the banks today using everything web faced, I can not really blame them, they are all just sheeping along...but military should have known better.

This guy is a bad apple, but does not mean all of them will be the same, if this guy has access to all that info right at his finger tips, did he have a botnet working , did he have access to screenshots, and keyloggers, I would like to know more details, and also help push the banks to take further steps in securing their networks.

the real theives are the FED (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34308316)

The amount of money that that theif would have been able to steal with 400,000 credit card numbers is NOTHING compared to the amount of money that the Federal Reserve bank steals from Americans everyday via debt slavery and monetary debasement.

This is why (1)

shambalagoon (714768) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308334)

This is why we should just replace the internet with a big swimming pool that we can all enjoy. The most you'd possibly lose is your bathing suit, and that's generally fun for everybody.

Re:This is why (1)

HarvardAce (771954) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308826)

The most you'd possibly lose is your bathing suit, and that's generally fun for everybody.

Go to a public swimming pool, look at the people there, and let us know if you still stand by that statement.

Re:This is why (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34309744)

You naked racist, put your Klan hood and your titanium dioxide white sheets back on!

Is anyone (1)

jon42689 (1098973) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308464)

...wondering why the hell the federal reserve knows anything about our accounts? While I understand that the fact that this was, in fact a security breach, the problem isn't how the hacker got in, but why the data was there for him to steal in the first place! I saw somewhere (I think maybe even here on /.) that world governments apparently buy more digital storage every year and it had a figure for what percent of produced storage governments bought. Does anyone have any doubts about what they are storing? In addition, if we're going to indict some random malaysian hacker for stealing our data, let's go ahead and do the same for our own government, which seemingly saw fit to do the exact same thing by snooping on traffic at the telco level. How is that NOT stealing??

but the russians are doing all th hacking (1)

chronoss2010 (1825454) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308480)

so say the nsa story yesterday

Frank Zappa on Mr. Poo (1)

2na (675312) | more than 2 years ago | (#34308654)

"Watch out where those Huskies go and don't you eat that yellow snow" - FZ

Another example (1)

chicago_scott (458445) | more than 2 years ago | (#34309148)

Incidents like this demonstrate that when the Government says they'll keep your data secure and private (body scanner data, for example) that it's representatives are either intentionally lying or naive, or both.

But they still demand more "tools" (ie- power) and insist that they are competent custodians. No government should ever be trusted this much, no matter how just and righteous it is.

Why does the Fed have credit card numbers? (2, Insightful)

goodmanj (234846) | more than 2 years ago | (#34309494)

Seriously, why does the Federal Reserve have consumer credit card numbers? We're not talking about TJ Maxx here: unless I'm mistaken the Federal Reserve only does business with banks, they have nothing to do with ordinary consumers and their silly bits of plastic.

People putting their income tax payments on plastic, maybe? I'm stumped.

The numbers were stolen? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#34309540)

stolen over 400,000 credit and debit card numbers

So the owners of the cards opened their wallets and found no numbers left on their cards any more? Since the numbers were stolen.

A set up to determine agenda. (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 2 years ago | (#34309796)

So, the guy was smart enough to hack into a federal reserve and get 400 k card nos, smart enough to hack into a dod contractor and acquired sensitive budgeting and military information, but, he was stupid enough to come to usa to sell a number of credit card numbers at a FUCKING DINER.

excuse me, but that kind of bullshit can only make idiots believe itself. anyone who has the slightest understanding of tech world will know that the person at a caliber like the above will never leave deep, unreachable recesses of china, russia, or wherever country his is, and will never send any drones to conduct business with computers containing very critical information like the above. especially, not into a country that he has hacked.

im guessing that, this setup was arranged by the u.s. government to reinforce its hands in arguing for 'greater security measures' (locking in and censorship) for internet in the recent ridiculous statements it is making, trying to set up an agenda. and the federal reserve hack and dod contractor hack data was probably implanted by 'other sources' involved in the affair.

In other news (1)

Sean (422) | more than 2 years ago | (#34309822)

The Federal Reserve hacked into US Dollar savings and stole $4 trillion.

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